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Jewellery MAKING

The UK's best jewellery magazine

70 PROJECTS & IDEAS

Beginners' technique for anodising aluminium Guide to successfully selling online

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Making Jewellery is published 13 times a year by GMC Publications Ltd, 86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XN makingjewellery.com thegmcgroup.com 01273 477374 EDITOR Sian Hamilton mjeditor@thegmcgroup.com SUB EDITOR Sarah Doughty EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Lauren Goodchild, Abby Costen DESIGNER Claire Stevens PRODUCTION MANAGER Jim Bulley jimb@thegmcgroup.com PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Amanda Hoag amanda.hoag@thegmc group.com PUBLISHER Jonathan Grogan PRINTER Precision Colour Printers DISTRIBUTION Seymour Distribution Ltd Tel: +44 (0) 20 7429 4000 ADVERTISING Russell Higgins Tel: 01273 402841 russellh@thegmcgroup.com MARKETING Anne Guillot SUBSCRIPTIONS Helen Johnston Tel: 01273 488 005 helenj@thegmcgroup.com Subscribe online at makingjewellery.com 12 issues (inc p&p) UK £71.88, Europe £89.85, Rest of World £100.63. Cheques made payable to GMC Publications Ltd. Send to The Subscription Department, 166 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU SEE PAGE 90 FOR MORE DETAILS Current subscribers will automatically receive a renewal notice (excludes direct debit subscribers)

Editor’s Letter 23

FIND US ON Follow us on Twitter at @MAKINGJEWELLERY To become a fan of our Facebook page search for MAKING JEWELLERY Find us on Pinterest at pinterest.com/ makingjewellery Find us on Instagram at instagram.com/ makingjewellery

Views and comments expressed by individuals in Making Jewellery magazine (ISSN 1756-4069) do not necessarily represent those of the publishers and no legal responsibility can be accepted for the results of the use of readers of information or advice of whatever kind given in this publication, either in editorial or advertisements. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by anymmeans without the prior permission of Guild of Master Craft sman Publications Ltd.

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t’s Christmas (well nearly!). This issue always comes with a little rush of excitement for me tempered with the knowledge that I’m asking designers to make Christmas themed jewellery in July! Still that doesn’t put me off as I can do Christmas anytime of year; I just love it. I can never bring myself to theme the December issue any other way than to call it Christmas and have everyone do a festive themed set. Sorry (but I’m not sorry really!) if you don’t like Christmas, but you’ll still find lots of interesting designs in this issue that you

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can theme another way, so no panicking, it’s not all holly, berries and Christmas trees (just a little bit). This issue I absolutely love Rajitha’s holly necklace (Berries & Baubles, p23). The way she has made the connector so the hook goes through the holly leaf is genius! It’s gorgeous to look at and really easy to wear. Yes, I could be found modelling it around the office when it first arrived. Well, all that is left to say is Merry Christmas, here at MJ HQ we wish you the happiest of festive season.

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CONTENTS REGULARS 5

JEWELLERY TALK The latest news, reviews and information

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20 COLOUR & STYLE Inspiration for this seasons style

40 10 QUESTIONS Interview with jeweller Melody Grossman

43 BUSINESS MATTERS How to successfully sell online

60 PRODUCT TEST Zoe tests a traditional necklace kit

63 WHAT INSPIRES Find out what inspires Nicola Foster

83 TOP 8 A selection of festive buys

92 PRODUCT REVIEW We review handy tools of the trade

94 IT’S A JEWELLER’S LIFE The latest installment of Anna Mcloughlin’s column

TECHNIQUES 14 ANODISED ALUMINIUM How to work with this wonderful material

96 BASIC TECHNIQUES Beginners’ techniques to get you started

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ISSUE 113 • DECEMBER 2017 PROJECTS 8

TOTAL ECLIPSE Stitch beaded rings in varying designs - perfect for statement party jewellery

23 BERRIES & BAUBLES Wirework holly statement necklace and accompanying set

30 SEASONAL PATTERNS Patterned polymer clay sets in pink and turquoise

34 FESTIVE DAZZLE Swarvoski crystal earrings

38 ROUND THE CRYSTAL MAZE Are you ready to enter the crystal dome?

44 WINTER BEAD APPLIQUE Lentil bead earrings and a pendant in silver clay

49 CHRISTMAS CANDLE A candle with festive sparkle

50 CHRISTMAS STARS

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Stylish pieces in silver, adding stars for more glamour

54 CHRISTMAS ALUMINIUM A coloured aluminium jewellery set

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64 ANGEL WINGS Modern angel wings in peyote stitch

71 COLOURS OF THE SEASON Flower petals using red, gold and turquoise polymer clay

77 PATTERN PERFECT Silver clay textured jewellery set

84 ICICLES & SNOWFLAKES A unique winter jewellery set using Powertex - enhanced by glitter and crystals

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NEWS

JEWELLERY TALK News, reviews and all the gossip ONLINE JEWELLERY COURSES AT CRAFTWORX.CO.UK

PHOTOGRAPH: MARTIN NOVAK/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Craftworx now offers online courses via private on Facebook groups. The F courses are aimed at those who can’t travel or find a convenient date for one of their workshops. Students will have access to pre-recorded video tutorials and notes as well as a group chat for a three-month period. For more information, visit craftworx.co.uk.

Birthstone of the Month TANTALISING TURQUOISE Turquoise, admired for its distinct colour since ancient times, is the brilliant birthstone of December. Dating back to the 13th century, turquoise was originally coined by the French to describe the stone brought to Europe from Turkey by Venetian traders. Turquoises vary from powdery blue to greenish robin’s egg blue, the most desired colour of turquoise being the intense sky blue. Copper pper is what gives the turquoise its blue hues, while iron and chrome add hints of green. Turquoise has been used to adorn items for thousands of years including jewellery, ceremonial ial masks, bridles and even weapons. Legend says turquoise grants power and protection. Some also believe when given as a gift, the gemstone symbolises a pledge of true affections.

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METALLIC PIGMENTS FROM RESIN8 Resin8 has released a new range of shimmering polyester pigments. These metallic dyes can be added to clearr resin to create stunning effects. For more information, resin8.co.uk. nformation, visit isit resin8.co.uk k. k

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NEWS

FAVOURITE MAKE

FRIDAY

What’s on DECEMBER, JANUARY & FEBRUARY Find out what’s happening in the jewellery world near you

DECEMBER 9 DECEMBER – MANCHESTER DECOUPAGE JEWELLERY Master the French art of decoupage and make ‘paper perfect’ jewellery at Fred Aldous. £27.50, ministryofcraft.co.uk 17 DECEMBER – LONDON PERFECT PEARLS Create your own string of pearls using the traditional knotting technique on silk in Camberwell. £120, fluxjewelleryschool.com

IZA MALCZYK Ring and earrings

JANUARY 2018 3 JANUARY – YORKSHIRE SILVER JEWELLERY MAKING Join Diane Lee to learn the traditional methods of silversmithing plus create your own unique piece of jewellery in Beverley. £95, myjewellerydesigner.co.uk 6 JANUARY – LEICESTERSHIRE SILVERSMITHING DAY CLASS Pick up the basic techniques of silversmithing including soldering with a blowtorch, polishing and finishing in Market Harborough. £80, leicestershirecraftcentre.co.uk

ANGELA BONNAR Ring

CLASSES WITH THE EDITOR

18–21 JANUARY – SUSSEX NON-TRADITIONAL STONE SETTING FOR JEWELLERS Join Penny Hill to learn contemporary stone-setting techniques including flush, channel and tension setting near Chichester. £353, westdean.org.uk

27–28 JANUARY – DORSET TRADITIONAL JEWELLERY MAKING Learn new techniques or simply brush up on existing skills in Milton Abbas. £225, fluxnflame.co.uk 27 JANUARY & 3 FEBRUARY – MANCHESTER MIX & MOULD: MODERN RESIN JEWELLERY Preserve your tiny keepsakes and shiny trinkets in handcrafted pieces of resin jewellery at Fred Aldous. £55, ministryofcraft.co.uk

FEBRUARY 3 FEBRUARY – CORNWALL SEAGLASS WIREWRAPPING JEWELLERY WORKSHOP Spend the day making a Sterling silver and seaglass or pebble piece in St Austell. £30, cornwall.ac.uk 3-4 FEBRUARY – LONDON JEWELLERY: COLOURING & DECORATING ALUMINIUM Create your own unique piece of jewellery in colourful anodised aluminium in Lambeth. £80, morleycollege.ac.uk 6 FEBRUARY – SUSSEX JEWELLERY WORKSHOP Develop your individual designs for jewellery making in Chichester. £114, westdean.org.uk

CHRISTMAS SILVER CLAY CHARMS

17 FEBRUARY – LONDON GLASS JEWELLERY Make your own unique fused glass pieces ready to be made into jewellery in Stoke Newington. £135, rainbowglassstudios.co.uk

7 & 14 DECEMBER - SURREY Make lovely presents for friends and family at this two and a half hour evening class being run by MJ Editor Sian Hamilton, 7-9.30pm on Thursdays in December. £52 (including 10g of silver clay) hamiltonjewellery.com

22-25 FEBRUARY – OXFORDSHIRE RESIDENTIAL JEWELLERY MAKING COURSE Learn traditional jewellery techniques such as saw piercing, soldering and polishing at Denman College. £545, denman.org.uk

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GLASS JEWELLERY

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NEWS

MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS MEMORABLE WITH POWERTEX Eleanor also designs, makes and sells colourful jewellery. This commissioned pendant was inspired by cold Finnish winters, the Northern Lights and a Buick car.

COLOURFUL COURSES AT RAINBOW GLASS STUDIOS Jeweller Eleanor Watson from Eleanor Designs offers creative day and weekend courses at Rainbow Glass Studios in Stoke Newington, London. These courses include enamelling on copper and fused glass jewellery for beginners. For those with more experience there are advanced classes in enamelling on silver, fused glass and cloisonné. Eleanor aims to help people re-discover their creativity. She says: ‘You’d be surprised at how many people believe they aren’t creative or artistic; I set out to rebuild their confidence and show them otherwise!’ For more details, gift vouchers or to book Eleanor’s courses visit jewelleryboat.com or rainbowglassstudios.co.uk.

NEW SWAROVSKI INNOVATIONS AT BEADS DIRECT The latest crystal innovations from Swarovski Create Your Style are now available at Beads Direct. These new arrivals offer colourful retro inspiration alongside subtle, vintage concepts. The range includes Shimmer Effect in beads, fancy stones and flat back crystals. To explore the collection, visit beadsdirect.co.uk.

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Turn old trinkets into wonderful handmade gifts for friends and family with Powertex fabric and textile hardener. This dynamic water-based liquid sculpting medium can be used to make sculptures, paintings, decorative objects and jewellery. For more information, visit powertex.co.uk

CARVE A WAX RING AT LONDON JEWELLERY SCHOOL Learn how to make a simple wax carved ring at London Jewellery School. An experienced tutor will guide you through the processes of sizing, shaping and carving the wax using hand tools and heat, adding a texture to your ring if you like. By the end of the class you will have created your unique wax carved ring which will then be cast into your choice of metal (silver, copper or bronze) polished and finished, ready for you to wear! Your ring is posted out to you within three weeks of the class or you can collect it from the School. For more information or to book a place, visit londonjewelleryschool.co.uk.

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PROJECT

TOTAL ECLIPSE CHLOE MENAGE

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n this project you can stitch beaded rings in varying designs – perfect for statement party jewellery. I wanted to create interchangeable rings that could be used together or separately, but with a dash of glamour to make them perfect for this season. This project is suitable for intermediate-advanced beaders. It combines simple bead embroidery with three-dimensional peyote doughnuts. When working the peyote rings it is important to work with a tight tension. Waxing your thread well before you start will help create a stiff and sturdy finish.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, DIAGRAMS: CHLOE MENAGE

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE 1. To make the necklace: Start with the bead embroidered rings. Use a bead tube or other cylindrical object of the correct size to draw a circle on your beading foundation fabric measuring 40mm in diameter. (I found that 100g bead tubes were the perfect size.) Find the centre and draw a smaller circle measuring approx. 24mm. (A bobbin of beading thread should do the job perfectly!) Cut around the outside of the circle, then carefully cut out the centre too; set this aside as you can use this offcut for earrings. Cut three of these rings. 2. Make a knot in the end of a length of coordinating beading thread. Wax it and thread on a needle. Pass up through the fabric roughly in the middle of the ring band. Pick up one size 8 seed bead and one size 15 seed bead. Pass down through the size 8 and down into the fabric at the point where you exited. Pull snug. Add nine of these equally spaced around the ring (approx. 7mm apart). 3. Exit up halfway between two of the beads, pick up a size 11 and pass down into the fabric close to where you exited. Repeat around to add nine of these, one between each size 8.

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4. To finish the detail, exit just above one of the size 8 beads – at 10 o’clock. Pick up four size 15 beads, hold the thread taut and then pass down into the fabric directly in front of the fi nal bead. To keep these in place, exit up between the second and third bead, and pass through beads three and four. Pass down into the fabric and repeat for the other eight size 8s. 5. Cut matching sized rings from the Ultrasuede backing fabric. Lightly glue to the back of the embroidered rings. Exit up through the work close to the outer edge. Pick up two size 15 seed beads. Pass through both layers of fabric and then back up through the second bead added. Pick up one size 15 and pass down through both layers of fabric and back up through the bead. Continue working around using this modified brick stitch adding one bead at a time until you reach the beginning. Work into the first bead to finish. 6. Pass the needle through to the centre of the ring between the layers of fabrics, being careful not to pierce through the fabric of either side. Exit up through the foundation near the centre and repeat Step 5 for the middle of the ring. Once complete, work through the beads in the centre until the thread is secure, then trim. Repeat to make three decorated rings in total.

MATERIALS & TOOLS Statement necklace ● Beading foundation (Misan’s Wonder or Nichole’s) ● Ultrasuede bead backing ● Toning beading thread (Miyuiki, One-G or KO) ● Approx. 6g x Toho Size 15 seed beads in bronze ● Approx. 6g x Toho size 11 seed beads in bronze ● Approx. 2g x Miyuki or Toho size 11 seed beads in contrasting colour – hot pink and eggplant ● Approx. 5g x Toho size 8 seed beads in bronze ● 122 x 2mm Czech glass pearls ● Chain ● Jumprings ● Clasp of your choice Single doughnut ● Approx. 1–2g x Toho Size 15 seed beads in bronze ● Approx. 1–2g x Toho size 11 seed beads in bronze ● Approx. 1–2g x Miyuki or Toho size 11 seed beads in contrasting colour – hot pink and eggplant ● Approx. 1g x Toho size 8 seed beads in bronze ● 20 x 2mm Czech glass pearls

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PROJECT

7. To make the beaded doughnut rings, begin with a long length of waxed thread. We will be working with peyote in the round. Pick up 40 size 11 seed beads. Important: remember to pass the needle through the two rings you are planning to join before creating the loop of beads! Make sure the rings are facing the correct way. Tie the ends of the thread in a knot to secure the ring while you work. 7

8. Work around the ring in peyote stitch to create the third row in size 11 beads. Next add three rows of size 15 beads in peyote stitch. Keep a tight tension as you work.

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9. Stitch three rows of size 11 seed beads. Next work one row of size 8s, then one row of size 11s (these size 11s could be in a contrasting colour). 10. Peyote one row using the 2mm pearls, then one row of size 11s (again contrasting) and finally one row of size 8s.

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11. Zip the size 8s to the first row of size 11s. Keep a tight tension and reinforce if needed. If you find some sections of the doughnut have caved in then reinforce these areas by working through them again, this should fi x it. Once your ring is reinforced you can trim your threads. Repeat Steps 7 to 11 to create one more doughnut ring that joins the second and third embroidered rings and then create two standalone doughnut rings.

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12. To join the standalone doughnut rings to the end embroidered rings you will create a slender ring band. On a length of waxed thread, pick up one 2mm pearl, one size 11 seed bead, 16 times. Pass through the embroidered ring and one of the standalone rings. Pass through the first few beads to join in a ring (do not knot, as the knots can break the pearls).

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13. Exit from a pearl, pick up one size 11 and pass into the next pearl. Repeat along to peyote a size 11 between each.

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14. Exit from a size 11, pick up two size 15s. Pass into the next size 11. Repeat along then work into a size 11 on the opposite side of the ring and repeat. Reinforce the edges of the rings to give a sturdy finish to the ring. Be aware that the pearls may become quite full of thread and can be fragile, so avoid reinforcing through these. Repeat Steps 12 to 14 to join the second standalone doughnut ring to the final embroidered ring.

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

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15. Create two small spacers; wax a shorter length of thread and pick up one 2mm pearl and one size 11, five times. Join into a loop by passing through the beads again. Exit from a size 11. * Pick up three size 15s and pass into the next size 11. Repeat around. 16. Exit from the third size 15 in a trio and pass directly into the next size 15 and the two after. Pass directly into the next trio and repeat around keeping a good tension. 17. Exit from a size 11, repeat from * in Step 15 and Step 16 to create a matching strip of 15s to sit on the opposite side of the pearl. Reinforce then create a half hitch knot. You should have a sturdy ring band. Work in your thread and trim.

and finished with a sliding knot or bead, or hung on chain by adding a bail using the band created in Steps 12 to 14. You can easily modify these bands to make them larger or smaller to suit by using more or fewer beads in Step 15. To adapt the size of the doughnut rings simply pick up fewer beads in Step 7; 36 seed beads works well instead of 40 for a smaller ring. 20. Make earrings to match the statement necklace by using the inner cut-offs to create tiny embroidered rings. Stitch a loop of beads to the top and attach to fishhooks. Or, use a beaded ring (Steps 13 to 15) and hang them simply with two small simple rings of beaded loops; just be sure to reinforce these loops well.

18. Measure out enough chain to fit, and then double the quantity. Cut in half. Take one half and pass one end through the last beaded ring, then thread both ends through a small beaded spacer. Push the spacer down to meet the beaded ring. Join the ends of the chain to a clasp of your choice. Repeat with the second length for the other side.

Toho seed beads, 2mm pearls and beading foundation: jencel.co.uk Galvanised seed beads and 2mm pearls: stitchncraft.co.uk

19. You can make simple pendants by creating standalone doughnut rings using Steps 7 to 11. These can be threaded directly onto faux suede

pinkhot.co.uk info@pinkhot.co.uk

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RESOURCES

CONTACT

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®

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Create fantastic woven designs quickly!

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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ightweight, bright and durable, anodised aluminium is a wonderful material that’s both affordable and easy to work with. Jane Adam was the first person to begin experimenting with it for jewellery in the late 1970s and she is responsible for pioneering most of the techniques in use today, including the ones we’ll look at here. If you want to learn more about Jane, then check out the inspirational images at the end of this article where you will find her web address along with those of other wonderful anodised aluminium artists.

ANODISED ALUMINIUM KAREN CAINE

MATERIALS & TOOLS 0.5mm thick anodised aluminium sheet or blanks ● Latex gloves ● Ziplock bag and acid-free paper ● Steamer (or pan) If you are using aluminium sheet ● Jeweller’s coping saw or metal shears ● Ruler and pencil ● Protection for work area and clothes ● Paper towels ● Stands (or other means of keeping pieces upright) Optional, depending on technique ● Paintbrush ● Pipette or 1ml syringe with a blunt needle ● Mini ink blending tool ● Rubber or acrylic stamps ● Fancy hole punch ● Sellotape ● Masking tape ● Sticky-back plastic ● Acetone ● Glue removal products – rubbing alcohol, white spirits or cooking oil ● Wax crayon ● PVA glue ● Sizzix Big Shot and embossing folder ● Peen hammer (or other hammer for texturing) ● Swarfega (to clean dyed skin) May be required ● Water-based dye ● Alcohol-based liquid ink ● Alcohol-based markers ● Alcohol-based, solvent inkpad (StazOn) ● Waterproof dye inkpad (Memento) ● StazOn Cleaner ●

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RESOURCES Anodised aluminium and speciality water-based dyes: aluminium-jewellery-supplies.co.uk Liquid ink, ink pads and mini ink blending tools: craftie-charlie.co.uk and amazon.co.uk 1ml syringe and blunt needle: amazon.co.uk Stamps: amazon.co.uk and hobbycraft.co.uk Fancy hole punch and sticky-back plastic: hobbycraft.co.uk All other items: ebay.co.uk

CONTACT facebook.com/thecraftydwarf

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, KAREN CAINE

TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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HOW TO MAKE

1. Anodised aluminium is ordinary aluminium that has been chemically treated to give it a porous surface called the anodic fi lm. These pores can be fi lled with dyes and then sealed by steaming the metal. The seal that forms is very thin, so you can still see the locked-in colour. Care is needed, though: until the anodised aluminium has been sealed you need to ensure that the pores are kept free of grease and other contaminants that might stop it accepting colours. For this reason, you should always store it in acid-free tissue paper inside a Ziplock bag and you must wear latex gloves when you handle it to avoid transferring oils from your skin. You can buy anodised aluminium blanks or cut a large sheet to the size you need. To do this, mark your cutting lines in pencil and then use shears or a saw to make the cut. Water-based soluble dyes 2. You can use a wide range of water-based dyes to colour anodised aluminium: food colourants, fabric dye, water-based drawing and calligraphy inks or specialised powder dyes like those we have here. Regardless of the type you use, it’s a good idea to take precautions to avoid accidentally dyeing your clothes, work area and

skin. A large, shallow plastic box lined with paper towels is ideal as it will contain any spills. Old jam jars make convenient storage jars for mixed dyes, but it’s easier to pour the contents into a shallow plastic tub for the dyeing process as you can more easily retrieve small pieces and accommodate larger pieces like cuffs. Ideally, you also need a way to stand your pieces to allow them to dry. The metal stands here (usually used for enamel work) are one option. Plastic tweezers are also helpful as they allow you to see your work more clearly when you retrieve it from the dye – just remember to wipe them with kitchen towels after each use to avoid accidentally transferring the dye to other areas of your metal. You should also protect your hands: two layers of latex gloves are good (it’s easy to tear small holes in a single layer and fi nd that you have been wearing a pool of dye at the end of your fi nger!). If you do dye your skin, you can use Swarfega to remove the worst of it. Finally, use an apron or wear clothes that you don’t mind staining. 3. Once you have set up everything, it’s time to start dyeing. The simplest method is to lower the entire piece into your tub of dye and leave it there for as long as required. These specialist

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dyes only take a couple of minutes to achieve their full colour potential, but you will need to experiment to discover the best time for your chosen dye. 4. Once you’re happy with the colour, push the edge of the metal against a paper towel to remove the excess dye so that it doesn’t pool at the bottom and distort the colour. Place it in the stand or lean it against an upright edge to dry. And that’s it: you have successfully completed the dyeing phase. If you just want a single colour, you can now steam the metal to seal the colour (see Step 24). Multiple dyes 5. You’re not limited to a single dye, though. One way of adding multiple colours is to partially dip your metal into the dye, then blot and dry it as you did in Step 4. Then making sure that the second end is dry... 6. ...flip it over and dip the other end. This will create a line between the two colours. The amount of bleed you have depends on how much you allow the second dye to flow over (or over-dye) the first. For a hard, straight line use some type of resist, such as Sellotape (see Step 21), rather than relying on double dipping.

Storage and handling

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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7. If you prefer, you can over-dye your entire piece. Start as you did in the previous step by dyeing the metal with your fi rst colour. Let it dry and then dunk the whole thing in a second colour. This will create a blend of the two colours. If you only dye part of the piece in the fi rst stage, you will end up with two bands of colours. 8. You can also combine dyes with a paintbrush. Paint one colour at one end, another at the other and then blend them in the middle by continuing to paint about halfway into the opposing area – fi rst down from the top, then up from the bottom, keep repeating until you have a smooth graduated blend. If you want to deepen the colours, simply repeat the process as many times as required. Alcohol-based inks

10. Alcohol ink pens are perhaps the most straightforward way of getting a solid colour with alcohol inks: just colour straight across the surface. Or use two colours to create bands.

13. There are plenty of ways of other ways of applying and manipulating liquid inks. Here we’ve blotted and blended the colour on with a mini ink blending tool, but you can also swirl the ink on the metal, paint it with a brush, or blow it with a straw and so on. Experiment to see what methods you can find.

11. You can also blend those bands together by overlapping them or by using a blending pen, which adds more alcohol. In either case, you can then smudge the colours together using a foam pad or a latex-gloved finger to get a graduated blend. Using the blending pen thins the colour slightly in places, giving more interest.

14. As well as pens and liquid inks, you can also add colour with an alcohol-based solvent ink pad, such as StazOn. Do make sure that you clean the stamp immediately afterwards with StazOn Cleaner, though – alcohol will dry out rubber or acrylic stamps if it’s left on too long.

Alcohol-based inks and pads

Mix it up

12. Another approach is to drip different coloured alcohol-based liquid inks on to the surface. The droplets spread and meet forming unique patterns. The Ranger inks on the left spread more easily, while the Jaquard ones have tendency to pool. One way around this is to thin the ink using 70 per cent rubbing alcohol. You can add this directly to the metal using a pipette or a syringe with a blunt needle to get a mottled effect or you can mix the ink and alcohol in a container before applying it.

15. You may be wondering why you need two different ways of adding colour to your aluminium, but in fact, it’s incredibly useful because once it’s dry, alcohol-based ink can not be diluted or smudged by water-based dye and vice-versa. This means, for example, that you can create a design with alcohol ink markers (the blue and purple areas here), then dye it with a water-based dye to provide a background (red). Because the blue and purple areas are both alcohol-based, they blend together in places, but the red has a sharply defi ned edge and this maybe useful for some designs.

9. Another option for adding colour comes in the form of alcohol and solvent inks. These come in a multitude of forms, including marker pens, liquids and ink pads. As with the water-based dyes, a plastic tub lined with kitchen towel makes a useful work area for containing spills. You should also protect your skin and clothes as discussed in Step 2.

Alcohol-based markers

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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16. Another way of combining the two mediums is to use water-based dye to paint over a stamped image created with an alcohol-based ink pad. 17. Once the flowers are dry, you can over-dye them with another colour; in this case we used the graduated blending technique discussed in Step 8. 18. You can reverse this idea by stamping with a water-based ink, such as the popular Distress Ink range, then colouring over with an alcohol ink. Water-based inks are only permanent when used on porous surfaces, so while the ink that enters the pores in the anodic layer will stay in place, you need to carefully blot away any excess ink lying on the surface before colouring over it with an alcohol-based ink. If not, the stamped pattern can be smudged. Waterproof dye inks 19. If you need a third layer in your design, you can use a waterproof dye ink, such as Memento. Like the Distress Inks, you need to carefully blot away excess ink sitting on the surface of the metal (rather than in its pores). Once dry, waterproof dye ink isn’t affected by either alcohol or water-based inks, so you

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can colour over it with either or both of them. In this example, the snowflake pattern was stamped on with Memento ink, then red lines were drawn on with an alcohol-ink marker and finally the whole thing was dipped in a purple water-based dye. Resists 20. Some alcohol and solvent-based metallic and opaque inks will dry on the surface of the anodised aluminium, but aren’t sealed within the pores during the steaming phase of the process (see Step 24). This means you can wipe them off with acetone afterwards to reveal whatever lies beneath. In other words, you can use them as a ‘resist’ to protect the covered area from later dyes or inks. One such resist is StazOn Opaque ink. Try stamping this on to a piece of anodised aluminium with a rubber stamp, letting it dry and then dyeing the metal in a water-based dye. The ink isn’t affected by the dye, but it does stop it reaching the bare metal beneath it. Once the metal has been sealed, remove the ink with acetone to reveal the negative impression left by the stamp. You can also stamp on to a dried waterbased dye and then over-dye the exposed area (see Step 7) to get a coloured rather than bare metal design.

21. You can also create resists with sticky paper and tapes. You can use Sellotape (top left) to stop the dye coming into contact with the aluminium, or dye the metal first, then add the Sellotape on top. Here we dyed our sample yellow, added three strips, then dyed it red and added wider strips on top of the first strips, then dyed it purple. We did the same type of thing with the piece on the top right, but in this case we used torn strips of masking tape to create feathered edges. For the bottom piece we used a fancy hole punch on sticky-back plastic, then stuck the resulting snowflake stickers on to the bare aluminium before dyeing the whole thing purple. In all cases, you leave the sticky paper and tape in place until you have finished sealing the aluminium (see Step 24). You can then clean off the sticky residue with rubbing alcohol, acetone, white spirits or cooking oil (each glue is different, so you’ll need to experiment to find out what works for you). To see how these three pieces looked once they were cleaned up check row three, page 17. 22. Essentially, you can create resists with anything that prevents the dye reaching the layer below. Here, the one on the left has a wax crayon resist, which was drawn directly on to the aluminium before it was dyed in a water-based dye. The second piece had PVA

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glue piped on with a syringe and blunt needle. The glue was left until it was hard and then the piece was dipped in the same dye. As above, you should leave these resists in place while you seal the metal, then remove them with one of the products listed in Step 20. Other resists that you might like to try include nail polish, Tippex and grease-based make-up. Texturing and forming

Claire Gent, folksy.com/shops/clairegentdesign

Meghan O’Rourke, meghanorourkejewellery.com Jane Adam, janeadam.com

PHOTOGRAPH: JOEL GEGEN

23. Although, it’s easy to form hairline cracks in the anodic layer by twisting or bending anodised aluminium, it can be strangely forgiving of certain distortions. If you have access to a papercraft embossing machine or rolling mill, you can try using it to add texture to the aluminium (we used a purpose-made papercraft embossing folder for ours). You can also hammer textures into the metal, either before or after you dye it. You may start to see silver peeking out where the anodic layer has been broken, but you can use these as part of your design. Another option would be to cover them over with Gilder’s Paste or a paint-on patina, like the Vintaj range. Sealing

Jane Adam, janeadam.com

PHOTOGRAPH: JOEL GEGEN

Robin Aronson, jinglersjewelry.com

PHOTOGRAPH: LARRY SANDERS

24. The final stage of the process involves sealing the anodic layer in the aluminium, which traps the colours inside. You will need a dedicated steamer for this (you can’t use it for food afterwards). It doesn’t matter which sort it is: traditional steamers that go on the hob or electric ones work equally well. Make sure that your metal is standing on its end so that any dye-tinged condensation can roll down and away – again, enamel-work stands are great for this. You should also make sure that pieces with different colours don’t touch and transfer their dyes. If you don’t have a steamer, you can use a pan of boiling water and drop your aluminium in there, but make sure that it is boiling before you add your pieces and expect to lose some vibrancy as the water will dilute the dye before it is sealed. (Again, the pan cannot be used for food afterwards.)

Robin Aronson, jinglersjewelry.com

Robin Aronson, jinglersjewelry.com

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PHOTOGRAPH: LARRY SANDERS

On the right is the inspiration gallery of work by a variety of aluminium artists.

PHOTOGRAPH: LARRY SANDERS

Sealing time varies according to the metal you buy, but is usually between 30 and 45 minutes. The aluminium is sealed once it no longer accepts water. You can test this by touching a damp sponge against the cooled metal. If the water is absorbed, you need to continue steaming. Once the metal is sealed and has cooled down, wipe it over with acetone to remove any dye or ink that remains on the surface, then rinse and dry it. You can now use it in your projects. To find out more about forming jewellery with dyed aluminium see page 54.

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COLOUR & STYLE

CHRISTMAS PARTY We have lots of festive fashion ideas to make your winter wardrobe sparkle. By Rachelle Bell STARRY NIGHT KITSCH Whilst star print has been a CHRISTMAS strong autumn trend, now is the time for it to really shine! Eveningwear is where the stars can be seen. Deep navy satins and silks provide the perfect night-sky background. Metallic appliqué details and net overlay add texture and volume. Oneshoulder dresses are the key silhouette for occasionwear. Team with a pair of heeled ankle boots and a statement pair of chandelier earrings to accentuate the dress dre shape. A glitzy camisole looks gr great dressed up with pencil skirt and a heels for a last minutecocktail cockt date. How about styling it with a chunky cardi, jeans and boots for carol singing! Dress £55, Boots £45, both wallis.co.uk Firework Camisole £28, evans.co.uk Star Jumper £32, mandco.co.uk Jacquard Star One Shoulder Dress £55, very.co.uk Sho Mood Necklace £18,, debenhams.com

Nothing says Christmas like a novelty jumper. Now you can let your Nan put her knitting needles away as the high street has plenty of fun sweater options. Bright, bold and sparkly are usually the top criteria and if it has a pun on the front that is even better! Plus ‘Christmas Jumper Day’ is now officially a thing, so wear your jumper on Friday 15 December to help a good cause and get into the spirit of Christmas. Silly hair accessories and printed socks are ideal for any kids’ parties or for those who are still young at heart, plus they make great stocking fi llers or secret Santa gifts. If you really can’t get onboard the kitschy train, a classic shift dress with a fun pattern is a prim and proper alternative. Jolly Holly Jumper £16, direct.asda.com/george Gingerbread Sequin Jumper £36, Robin Socks £5, both topshop.com Festive Scrunchie chi hie e £5, £5, 5 paperchase.co.uk o.uk o. uk Jewel Dress £199, 199, 19 9, hobbs.co.uk hobb ho bbs. s.co co.u .ukk

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COLOUR & STYLE YLE

GOLD LD GREETINGS ETINGS

MERRY BERRY Red ev Red eevokes ok o kes holly h l berries, mulled wine and, of course, Father Christmas himself! It is truly a festive shade and is a must have for seasonal outfits. Take inspiration from Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz and go for a pair air ir of ruby slippers, or if you’re feeling ng particularly festive a statement sparkling red dress will really bring the cheer to any gathering! For those days when December iss freezing, a red beret will keep you u warm and chic. Ribbon details aree favoured at this time of year, from m tied waist belts to wrap-on heels; be inspired by your Christmas presents and put a bow on it! A pair of tacky holiday earrings always goes down a treat in the he workplace on Christmas Eve but but u if you want something a little less ‘tinselly’, try a sophisticated ed d bauble-esque style that you can n wear over and over again. One Shoulder Sequin Dress £55, 55 5 5, Gold Slingback Shoes £27, both dorothyperkins.com Red Heart Jumper £55, whitestuff.com Ribbon Red Heels £39.50, marksandspencer.com Red Beret £12, Thread Wrapped ed d Earrings £10, both monsoon.com om

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Is there a more luxurious ious tone than gold? This season the catwalk was fi lled with dazzling shades of the shimmering metal. From plush gold velvets to dainty sparkling satins, it is an easy shade to wear to amp up the glamour. A jumpsuit is another favourite shape for eveningwear. Pair with some wooden heels and a longer length necklace to accentuate a v-neckline. A delicate pair of gold earrings will add a subtle festive detail to any outfit. A pair of metallic ankle boots will perk up your winter wardrobe, whether they are worn with jeans and a faux leather jacket for the Christmas light switch on or with your favourite little black dress. They are certainly a statement piece, but they are also very versatile. A little mini-bag is ideal for carrying around just the essentials and won’t weigh you down on your works night out or last minute Christmas shopping! Velvet Jumpsuit £55, riverisland.com Star Earrings £16, oliverbonas.com Buba Metallic Shirt Dress £89, esss £ 89,, 89 houseoffraser.com Gold Pointed Boots £29.99, newlook.com Metallic Mini-Bag £35, monsoon.co.uk nsoon.co.uk

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PROJECT

BERRIES & BAUBLES RAJITHA NANDAKISHOR

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A

Very Berry Christmas to everyone! In this special issue for Christmas, I have designed a wirework project incorporating a few of the classic festive ingredients like ivy leaves, berries and baubles. This project would be perfect for an intermediate level wirework artist.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

0.8mm (20 gauge) bronze-plated or coloured wire 0.4mm (26 gauge) bronze-plated or coloured wire 0.8mm (20 gauge) silver-plated or coloured wire 0.4mm (26 gauge) silver-plated or coloured wire

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3mm bronze-coloured metal round beads/ spacers 3mm silver-plated or coloured metal round beads/spacers 4mm multi-coloured metal beads Bronze-plated or coloured headpins Silver-plated jumprings 4mm and 10mm red dyed coral round gemstones Green quartzite gemstones (assorted) Chain nose pliers Flat nose pliers Bail-making pliers Round nose pliers Flush cutters

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, RAJITHA NANDAKISHOR

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE Weaving pattern

Ivy-berry pendant and clasp

1. I have used only one weaving pattern throughout the project. Take three lengths of 50–60cm long 0.8mm bronze-coloured wire (these act as our structural or base wires: wire 1, wire 2 and wire 3). Take approx. 1m of bronze-coloured 0.4mm weaving wire. Pick one of the base wires. Start to weave using 0.4mm wire at the centre of wire 1 by wrapping it over twice. For the third wrap, pick the second structural wire (wire 2) in the centre, holding it parallel to wire 1 and wrapping over both the wires together and bring the weaving wire up from bottom (between wire 1 and wire 2). Wrap the wire over wire 2 once more and for the third wrap, bring the weaving wire over wire 2 and wire 3 together, holding all wires parallel to each other. Bring up the weaving wire through wire 2 and wire 3. Wrap twice again on wire 3 and bring the wire up from the bottom of all three wires, as shown in the picture. You have now finished one column of the simplest 3-by-3 weave on three base wires. The same weaving technique could be extended for any number of base wires.

2. Repeat Step 1 until you have done 20–25 columns of the weave (this length also defi nes the radius of the pendant bail and clasp connector you are trying to make). Adjust it according to your project size or requirement. Now add a metal bead to wire 1 and repeat the weave in Step 1. Add the next bead to wire 1. Ensure that the weaving wire is right underneath wire 1 to start the next weave.

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3. Prepare six lengths of 6–7cm long 0.8mm bronze-coloured wire (decorative wire). Grab the weaving wire and follow Step 1 to weave a column until you get to the top of wire 3. At this point, hold one of the decorative wires parallel to wire 3. Continue doing the same weave as before for four base wires this time (the fourth wire being the recently added short decorative wire). Repeat the steps to add a metal bead to wire 1 and following Step 1 to finish three more columns on four base wires. Now, when you add your next metal bead to wire 1, only weave the bottom three base wires and ignore the fourth one.

4. This step is to prepare for a bend. Continue adding another column of the weave (without a metal bead). Bring the weaving wire up through wire 1 and wire 2. Use the chain nose pliers to make an inward bend in wire 1. 5. Using the weaving wire lying under wire 2, weave wire 2 and wire 3 together once or twice depending on where you want to bring the bend on wire 2, using the same weave (on the two base wires only this time). Make a soft bend on wire 2 following the bend on wire 1 underneath. Wrap around wire 2 throughout the bend. Make a final bend on wire 3 right above the bend on wire 2. Use flat nose pliers to squeeze the wires to make the bend pointy. Make sure that all three bends are in line. 6. Do a reverse of Step 4 by combining wire 2 and wire 3 using two base wire weave, followed by a 3-base wire weave and fi nally to add the fourth wire to the weave (the fourth one being the decorative short wire prepared in the beginning of Step 3). Follow Steps 3 to 5 to fi nish the second side of the hexagonal ivy leaf shape. Follow the same steps as above to

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PROJECT

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fi nish weaving the third side also using metal beads and decorative short wires, except that by the end of weaving the third side, do not reduce it from a three-base to two-base wire weave. Also, note that there are no bends. 7. Use bail-making pliers to form a bail on the wire strip woven in Step 2. 8. The next step is to finish the second half of the leaf, which will be a mirror image of the other side. Follow Steps 2 to 6 to finish weaving the second side of the leaf, as shown in the picture. You don’t have to be strict about the exact number of weaved columns and metal beads added. Slight variation is acceptable as long as the leaf shape is maintained. 9. Bring both ends of the leaf together, ensuring all six wires lie parallel to each other. In order to ensure that both the sides lay at the same level, you may use a small length (15cm) of 0.4mm wire to tightly wrap around the bail 8–12 times to close the loop of the bail, bringing the three base woven strips closer on either sides. Once the six wires are on the same level and parallel, slightly bend the outer two wires on each side outwards. This leaves behind the middle four wires. Use the same weave on

this four base wire five to six times. Now reduce the number of wires further down to two wires by slightly bending outwards each of the wires on the outer sides. Using the technique we have been using throughout the project, weave the remaining two base wires for a length of approx. 1–1.5cm, depending on the size of the clasp connector and hook. Use the picture to follow the reduction in weaving pattern. 10. Snip and tuck in neatly the 0.4 wire to avoid sharp edges. Bend the middle two wires together using bail-making pliers to form a hook. Snip the wires leaving 1.5cm from the bend of the hook using flush cutters. Using the round nose pliers, make a small loop at the end of the hook, as shown in the picture. Neatly snip rest of the loose wires leaving a 1cm edge. Use the round nose pliers to make a decorative coil on all of the wire ends to finish the piece. The finished ivy leaf pendant component would look like the leafy component of the clasp in picture 13. Thread the pendant through matching torque necklace or chain. Embellish the pendant component by adding red coral gemstones using headpins or wire.

12. The total number of times you would weave further depends upon the bend of the hook you are designing for the clasp. 10–12 times is a good count for the weave. Add the 10mm gemstones to all three wires. Snip the wires leaving just enough length (approx. 2.5cm) for making a flat coils as stopper for the gemstones. Use round nose and flat nose pliers to make neat coils. To finish the other end of the hook, snip the three wires leaving 1cm to make the connector. Out of the three base wires, make a flat coil using the middle one, the remaining two would need to be closed as a loop to be able to get used as a connector for the clasp hook.

11. To make the second part of the clasp (the berry hook), take three lengths (approx. 15cm

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each) of 0.8mm bronze wire and start the 3-by-3 weave on three base wires as described in Step 1. Add three metal beads to the woven strip (one on each base wire) and continue weaving on the base wires by fanning the base wires out, as shown in the picture. This is to accommodate two 10mm gemstones at the end of the weave.

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PROJECT

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13. Bend the flat structure from Step 12 using the bail-making pliers to finish the second part of the clasp – the berry hook; the first part of the clasp is the finished piece from Step 10 – the ivy leaf. Finish the necklace by adding one end of a gemstone chain to the connector of ivy pendant clasp and the other end to the Berry hook connector. Berry earrings 14. Take three lengths of 0.8mm bronze wires, each 15cm long. Follow Step 11 to make the fl at weave. Thread the weaving wire through two 4mm red gemstones. (Please note the difference: for berry clasp hook, the gemstones where added to the 0.8mm base wires.) Continue the weave once more as before ensuring that the gemstones lay between the gaps of the base wires as shown in the picture. Wrap weaving wire on one of the base wires three to four times and snip neatly, ensuring no sharp edges. 15. Now add three metal beads, one to each of the base wires and make wrapped loops at the end as shown in the picture. Snip the excess wire off. On the other side of the woven strip, the middle wire acts as an inbuilt earring hook.

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Add couple of decorative beads spaced by simple wire-wrapping on the middle wire. 16. Use bail-making pliers to make a decorative bulge to the earring component if you like, or leave it flat. Use the round nose pliers to bend the middle wire to form the earhook. Snip the excess wire away and use flat nose pliers to give a slight kink to the earwire end. Neatly coil the remaining two wires on both sides to make a decorative loop. Hang your desired gemstones through the three wrapped loops to embellish the earring. Once you are happy with the earring, finish it by making a matching pair following the same steps. Berry ring 17. Take slightly longer lengths of three 0.8mm wires (approx. 20-25cm) and follow Step 14 to make the basic structure for an earring component. Add three metal beads to each of the base wires as done in Step 15. Instead of making a wrapped loop on the base wires and snipping the wires off, continue by adding three coral beads to the base wires. These beads form the centre pattern of the ring. From this point onwards, you need to weave a mirror image of what you did so far in this step. This means add

the three metal beads and reverse the actions of Step 14 by attaching a new 0.4mm length of wire to one of the base wires, adding two gemstones to the weaving wire and weaving further back until you end up with a 1cm long weave of three base wires. Finish the wire ends by adding coils at both the ends of the woven strip. Use a ring mandrel to form the flat woven structure into a ring of desired size. Silver bauble decoration (p23) 18. This design has only a slight variation to the ivy leaf. The only difference is a 4-by-4 weave (weaving wire wrapped four times on base wires) with coloured metal beads being added throughout the inner circumference wire of the circle (wire 1) in a circular fashion. Hence, there are no bends like the ivy leaf. Take three lengths (approx. 30cm) of 0.8mm silver-plated wires. Also prepare six short decorative wires (approx. 5–6cm length) using 0.8mm wire. Snip a long length of 0.4mm silver-plated weaving wire. Start the weave by following Step 1 to make a 4-by-4 weave pattern on four base wires (the fourth wire being the shorter wire on the outside of the circular piece). Add a metal bead and continue with the weave. Repeat the weave on four base wires, three times in total. On the fourth turn, skip wire 4.

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

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19. Whilst doing the weave, gently curve the parallel wires using your thumb to form a circular shape. Repeat Step 18 until you have used all six decorative wire pieces and the woven piece has formed like a circular piece. 20. Using the round nose pliers, make loops on the decorative wire ends on the outer circle. Bring all six wires together parallel to each other as done in Step 9. Use the same weave to cover the three base wires just before they meet. Split the wires into three groups (two base wires in each) as shown in the picture. You might need to work with two or three new pieces of 0.4mm weaving wire to continue the weave further. Use 4-by-4 weave on all three pairs for a length of approx. 10cm. 21. Form the pair of woven wires on the left and right side in a circular shape (like a ribbon bow) crossing each other right below the middle one. 22. Bend the middle strip of woven wires on top of the crossing-over from the front and taking it to the back to secure the bow as shown in the picture. Follow Step 10 to make a hook using the middle strip. This acts as a hook to hang on a Christmas tree or act as a bail for a pendant or connector. Use round nose pliers to ďŹ nish all raw ends into decorative coil or loop. Finish the bauble by using some festive coloured gemstones as embellishments.

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Silver bauble pendant (p23) 23. Take three lengths of 30cm 0.8mm silverplated wires. Make a small U-bend on the middle of outer wire (wire 3). This bend acts as a bail for the pendant. Follow Step 22 to form a circular pendant wire woven structure using silver metal beads. Start the weave either from the centre of the wires to the sides; or from the side towards the centre (as per your ease of weaving), as shown in the picture. Once both ends of the circle get to meet, bring all six wires together and parallel. 24. Follow Step 9 to reduce weaving pattern from six to two base wires. Finish all six wire ends as decorative loops, as shown in the picture. Embellish the pendant by attaching gemstones to the loops using wrapped loop technique. Attach the bail to a silver chain or torque necklace using jumprings.

RESOURCES Widely available from advertisers in this magazine

CONTACT facebook.com/HandmadeByRaji

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PROJECT

SEASONAL PATTERNS NADĂˆGE HONEY

I

like marking polymer clay with patterns – and I think this technique opens a whole new world of possibilities. You can work with shop-bought texture sheets, but you can easily mark the clay with your own tools, so the end result becomes much more personal. I have used gold paint to inject a bit of glamour for the festive season, but any colour will work. This project is perfect for beginners or more experienced clay workers alike.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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½ pack (42g) Fimo Professional White pea size amount of Fimo Professional Red ½ pack (42g) Fimo Professional Turquoise Pasta machine Flexible tissue blade Gold acrylic paint Talcum powder 2 paintbrushes Texture sheets of your choice 10mm, 15mm, 20mm, 30mm and 40mm disc cutters 400, 800 and 1,200 grit wet and dry sandpaper Tile or glass to work/bake on Small dome shape Drill/hand drill Flat endpins or silver wire Jumprings (mixture of silver and copper colour ones) Earring loops, gold-faceted beads, glass beads and seed beads Nylon-coated wire and clasp for necklace Baby wipes

HOW TO MAKE 1. Make the pink clay (White clay mixed with a smidgen of Red clay rolled on the thickest setting on your pasta machine) and gather the gold paint, the brushes, the talcum powder, the texture sheet and the cutters. 2. Lightly brush talcum powder all over the texture sheet to avoid it sticking to the clay. Then place the texture sheet down onto the clay and gently press with your fi nger over the whole surface. Make sure you press enough to mark the clay, but not so much that your clay becomes too thin. 3. Once you have made the impressions in the clay, you need to get rid of the excess talcum powder to be able to apply the paint. To do so, use a brush and gently clear away all the talcum powder.

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4. Using a clean paintbrush, paint the entire sheet of clay with the gold acrylic paint. Make sure it is evenly spread and covers all the crevasses. You need to work as fast as possible so the paint doesn’t dry too quickly. Once you have finished, use a baby wipe to clean off the paint on the raised area, leaving it only in the crevasses. The neater you work at this stage, the easier it will become later. 5. Cut out ten 20mm discs and one 30mm disc. Lift them off the tile with the help of the tissue blade. 6. Place the bigger disc as well as eight of the small discs on a tile and two on the dome. Bake the discs according to manufacturer’s instructions.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, NADÈGE HONEY

PROJECT

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PROJECT

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7. Once the discs are baked and have cooled down, you can sand them in a bowl of cold water, using the different grades of sandpaper. Always start with the coarser one and work your way towards the finest grade. This step will be made a lot easier if you have removed the paint evenly at Step 5. Assembling your jewellery sets 8. Place the baked pieces as you would like to assemble them, adding the glass beads, seed beads or faceted beads you have chosen to complement the gold paint. Drill the discs where they will need to be fi xed to the nyloncoated wire with jumprings. 9. To assemble the earrings, use the jumprings and earring hooks as shown to put your earrings together. With the round nose pliers,

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make a loop to attach the gold faceted bead on the bottom of the clay disc. Cut the excess wire with the cutter. 10. For the second set, the principle is the same as for making the necklace before, except you are now using a different texture sheet and a different clay colour, Turquoise. I have also used different size cutters for the earrings (10mm, 15mm and 20mm) and 40mm for the pendant. 11. The pendant also needs to be thicker, so place two layers of clay on top of each other before marking the clay. Repeat the instructions from Step 2. For the earrings, cut out various sizes of discs and place some on the domed metal shape. 12. Once baked, sanded and drilled, proceed to assemble the pieces for the earrings and

pendant. Use jumprings to link the discs and to attach to the earring hooks. (I used two different hooks; the ones on the right are shop-bought ones, whereas the pair on the left are made using Sterling silver wire.) Thread a gold-faceted glass bead onto a flat end pin and with the round nose pliers make a loop to fi x it to the bottom part of the pendant. Place a jumpring on the top of the pendant to fi x it to the ball chain.

RESOURCES Widely are available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT nadegehoney.com Facebook and Instagram: @nadegehoneydesign

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

FESTIVE DAZZLE TANSY WILSON

U

se Swarovski crystals to get that ultimate Christmas dazzle! This collection is ideal for any level jewellery maker and quickly achieves really classy professional results! The crystals come in a vast array of colours so you can tailor your designs to complete your Christmas party outďŹ t.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

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2 x pendant cups for 12mm Swarovski 4470 2 x 12mm Swarovski 4470 Graphite 2 x pendant cups for 12mm Swarovski 1122 2 x 12mm Swarovski 1122 Meridian Blue 2 x pendant cups for 10mm Swarovski 1122 2 x 10mm Swarovski 1122 Rainbow Dark Pair of safety hooks for 14mm Swarovski 1122 2 x 14mm Swarovski 1122 Crystal Volcano Pair of 8mm pull-through studs 2 x 8mm Swarovski 1088 SS39 Crystal 0.8mm (20 gauge) silver wire 0.4mm (26 gauge) silver wire Kidney wires 2.5mm crystal bicone beads Selection of glass beads 2 x crimp tubes Side cutters Round nose pliers 2 x pairs of flat nose pliers Jewellery glue

1. My Crystal Idea supplies lots of different Sterling silver or silver plated ‘cups’ that are the exact size and shape to take corresponding sized Swarovski crystals. The combinations are endless and using these gives such a professional looking fi nished design. My first design looks at the pendant style cups with one loop at the top. 2. Select your ideal shapes and sizes of pendant cup and matching shaped crystals and using the recommended jewellery glue. Simply squeeze a tiny drop into the surface of the cup and stick in the corresponding crystal and leave to dry. 3. Cut a 15cm length of 0.8mm Sterling silver wire. (You can use silver-plated wire too.) Using round nose pliers, create a small eye loop at the very end of the wire.

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4. Manipulate the remaining length of wire with your fingers to create a unique shaped earring hook. You can use pliers as well if it helps. You may also need to cut any excess length of wire away depending upon your style of hook. Repeat Steps 3 and 4 to make a matching earring hook. 5. Cut a 25cm length of 0.4mm Sterling silver wire (or silver-plated) and wrap the very end four times around the 0.8mm earring hook right at next to the eye loop. 6. Add a 2.5mm bicone crystal to the 0.4mm wire and then wrap the wire completely around the 0.8mm wire and back up. Add another 2.5mm bicone crystal to the 0.4mm wire and again wrap this wire completely around the 0.8mm wire and up.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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PROJECT

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7. Repeat Step 6 and keep adding a 2.5mm bicone crystal to the 0.4mm wire and wrap once around the 0.8mm wire and then adding another bead, until you come to the top of your earring hook. Now wrap the 0.4mm wire four times around the 0.8mm wire to finish off. Cut away any excess 0.4mm wire. Repeat Steps 6 and 7 to add crystals to the other earring hook.

and then use round nose pliers to squeeze the loop on the kidney wire closed, securing the pendant cup in place.

8. Open the eye loop on your earring hook created in Step 3 and join onto it the loop from the top of your pendant cup. Close the eye loop securing the pendant cup in place. Repeat for the other earring.

11. Once happy with your design, slide a crimp tube onto the kidney wire. Manipulate it so it is resting against the last bead added and squash it onto the wire, securing the beads in place. Repeat Steps 9 to 11 to make a matching earring.

Kidney wire style

12. These alternative designs utilise cups that are already pre-joined onto an earring hook or stud. These are earring threads where you simply glue the crystal into the cup at the end. Or these cute ‘safety hook’ earrings make a really stylish statement.

9. If you are not confident in making the earring hooks yourself, you can buy large ‘kidney shaped’ earwires. Add a pendant cup to the loop at the bottom of the kidney wire

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RESOURCES All materials: mycrystalidea.com

CONTACT 10. You can then thread any combination of glass or crystal beads directly onto the kidney wire. Obviously check the hole in the bead is large enough to slide onto the wire.

tansywilson@hotmail.com

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The Bead Store is the largest stockist of TierraCast in the UK. We also stock a vast range of Czech glass beads, TOHO seed beads, Swarovski crystals and top quality metal components made here in the UK.

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Fast and friendly service LOW PRICES Regular promos

You can now visit our shop every working day (Monday-Friday) from 9am to 12.30pm

Use coupon code JMM20 or book a weekend appointment by calling us on 07496757611. to claim 20% off your next order! Unit 4, West Calder Business Centre, 6 Dickson Street, West Calder, EH55 8DZ, West Lothian, UK

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13/10/2017 10:48


CELEBRITY STYLE

ROUND THE CRYSTAL MAZE TANSY WILSON

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he Crystal Maze game show has made a successful resurgence on our British TV screens this year and I particularly like the new host Richard Ayoade and the fabulous Jessica Hynes as ‘The Knight’. This bracelet is made for her character as the crystals sit nicely within the circles just like the tokens. Are you ready to enter the crystal dome?

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CELEBRITY STYLE

STYLE

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PHOTOGRAPH: FEATUREFLASH PHOTO AGENCY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

JESSICA HYNES

HOW TO MAKE

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22 x 12mm jumprings 28 x 6mm jumprings 25cm length of 0.8mm (20 gauge) wire 10 x 10mm crystal beads Large lobster clasp

1. Take 20 of your 12mm jumprings and manipulate them so they are all closed perfectly. Take two 6mm jumprings and link four 12mm jumprings onto them and close. Splay out two of the 12mm jumprings so you have a pair of 6mm jumprings in between two pairs of 12mm jumprings.

the next pair of 12mm jumprings and add another bead. Then continue to push this 0.8mm piece of wire in between the other end of the 12mm jumprings and then in between the next pair of 6mm jumprings. Keep repeating this adding a bead in essence inside each pair of 12mm jumprings.

2. Add another two 6mm jumprings to one of the 12mm pairs of jumprings and before closing add another two 12mm jumprings. Keep repeating this formation so you end up with ten pairs of 12mm jumprings all joined with pairs of 6mm jumprings. Finally add a pair of 6mm jumprings to each end pair of 12mm jumprings.

5. After threading your ten beads, you need to create an eye loop in the 0.8mm piece of wire at one end so that it sits in line with the last pair of 6mm jumprings added in Step 2. Take an open 12mm jumpring and link it through the fi rst 6mm jumpring, then the eye loop you just made and then through the other 6mm jumpring and close. Repeat this step making an eye loop in between the pair of 6mm jumprings at the other end and linking on the last 12mm jumpring.

3. Take your length of 0.8mm wire and straighten it as much as possible. Place the end of the wire in between the end pair of 6mm jumprings and in between each 12mm jumpring.

RESOURCES All materials can be sourced from advertisers listed throughout this magazine

CONTACT tansywilson@hotmail.com

4. Add your 10mm bead to the wire. Then continue to push this 0.8mm piece of wire in between the other end of the 12mm jumprings and then in between the next pair of 6mm jumprings. Keep pushing it though so it just pokes in between

6. Join another pair of 6mm jumprings to the single 12mm jumpring at one end and add to the eye loop on a large lobster clasp. Finally, link the last pair of 6mm jumprings to the single 12mm jumpring the other end and use as the lobster clasp’s catch. Close the bracelet and bend into an oval shape so the entire bracelet fits the wrist nicely.

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Jessica Hynes is a British actress who has written and starred in many hit TV shows and films over the last two decades. The Royle Family, Dr Who, Shaun of the Dead and the Bridget Jones trilogy to name just a few. She has won a BAFTA and several comedy awards and is an Ambassador for the charity Action for Children.

PHOTOGRAPH: NATALIYA KUZNETSOVA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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FEATURE

10 QUESTIONS MELODY GROSSMAN

When did your interest in jewellery first start? I’ve always had a personal love for jewellery and fashion design; wearing bright and creative jewellery was always a way for me to express my personal style and love for print and colour. Over the last few years in particular, I’ve found myself attracted to vibrant costume jewellery and beautifully bold fashion accessories. However, it’s only been in the last year that I decided to combine my passions of art and fashion to create my own pieces as ‘wearable artwork’.

Where is your studio? My studio is based at my home in North London.

Do you have any formal training? If so, where did you train? I don’t have any formal training in jewellery making; I actually studied as a fine artist at Winchester School of Art, specialising in painting. I am predominantly a self-taught jeweller, with the advice and help of a few friends along the way!

What is your preferred medium? I love working with paint to create my colour designs, but there’s also a huge satisfaction in working with acrylic and wood for the physical pieces. I love the way the designs come out completely different on these two materials, and how the depth of the acrylic brings out the vibrancy in the designs.

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Where do you find inspiration and how do you decide what to make next? I find inspiration everywhere. Recently I’ve been creating print designs for my jewellery based on my own paintings, which are generally inspired by colour combinations and texture. The geometric elements in my jewellery are often inspired by current fashion trends.

Do you have a favourite tool? It’s probably a very obvious answer, but I wouldn’t be anywhere without my pliers! Which techniques do you enjoy using? Recently I’ve been creating a lot of print designs using my palette knife and oil paints, then digitising them through Photoshop. I love the textures the palette knife creates; it adds something really unique to a design. After editing the images in Photoshop, it can be hard to tell how it was created – which is something I really enjoy about the fi nal prints. Do you offer workshops or classes? I don’t offer workshops at the moment, but I’ve been thinking about it! What are your goals? Ultimately, I’m dying to expand my business

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PHOTOGRAPHS: MELODY GROSSMAN AND ELICEA ANDREWS

and create a ton of extra ambitious jewellery collections, which usually require tools or materials that I don’t have access to just yet. I’m also planning to branch into other fashion accessories such as printed clutch bags, cardholders, and other fun pieces. The dream is to one day appear at London Fashion Week! What’s your favourite thing that you’ve ever made? Is there one project that stands out above the others? My rose gold collection has been a personal favourite. I had so much fun creating the pieces and following the rose gold trend via fashion forecasting and fashion weeks. They’ve been my bestsellers to date.

CONTACT melody-g.com Instagram: @melodygdesign

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12/10/2017 10:14


Caverswall Minerals MAKE YOUR OWN JEWELLERY

Set your own stones, ceramics, resins etc into our silver 925 mounts. We have a very large selection of silver settings and mounts including pendants, brooches, cufinks, rings, lockets, earrings, bracelets, stick pins and tie bars etc in many different styles from modern, classic and celtic all polished and easy to set.

We supply a large range of semi precious cabochons Tel: 01782 393838

email: phil@caverswallminerals.com

www.caverswallminerals.com

Give the gift of jewellery makingb Vouchers and e-vouchers available For more information visit http://www.londonjewelleryschool.co.uk/our-services/gift-vouchers/ or give us a call on 0203 176 0546

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13/10/2017 10:49


BUSINESS

BUSINESS MATTERS How do you successfully sell online? We look at the best ways of advertising and selling your jewellery on the web. Karen Young offers some advice BE ACTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

PHOTOGRAPHS

You need to let people know you exist; it’s not enough to expect sales to come from just being on Etsy or a similar site. However, you don’t necessarily have to post on social media every day. I’ve found that just having regular, good quality content works well. Do your research and make sure you are on the platforms that your customers use. If your customers are on Instagram, then focus on that. Don’t waste time trying to be everywhere!

Alongside your description, your photos are extremely important. Ensure your pieces are well lit, crisp and clear. Photograph your piece from different angles, including the back and clasp. Show the scale, so if it’s a ring, photograph it on the hand. Lifestyle shots are important, so style the piece using props in a way that will appeal to your customer. It’s always a good idea to have at least one photograph on a white background as that helps to show the piece without distractions, but I find that it is the lifestyle shots that sell the pieces. I also like to include a photo of my packaging, which also helps people decide whether they want to buy, especially if it is for a gift.

THINK ABOUT OTHER ADVERTISING

Karen Young is a jeweller and founder of Karen Young Jewellery. She also teaches at the London Jewellery School. Karen sells her jewellery on Etsy and from her own website and shares some top tips for successfully selling online.

You don’t necessarily need to consider traditional newspaper or magazine advertising, especially at fi rst, but there are other ways of promoting your work. You can join local business networking groups – whether online or with face-to-face meetings. I make a good number of sales each year from interaction with local business groups and Facebook groups.

KNOW WHO YOU’RE SELLING TO Once you have a range of jewellery and are ready to sell, it is important to make sure you spend the time honing down who your customers are; their likes, dislikes and where they shop. This will help you choose where to sell online to make the most impact.

DESIGNING A COLLECTION Design your jewellery with the ideal customer in mind. You need to consider your customer’s income levels and what they are willing to spend their money on and focus your collections on that. I find that my bestsellers are those that are part of a themed collection rather than oneof-a-kind pieces. I use that to my advantage to batch produce pieces I know will sell well, which helps optimise my time and the cost of my goods sold. It is good to offer a wide variety of pieces to choose from and I find if people can’t afford a statement piece, they can buy a simpler piece from the range.

PRICING It can be scary to look at pricing when you see imported jewellery being sold very cheaply. However, you need to find a price that is right for you and your work. Be confident in your work, and use your branding and descriptions to explain why it is worth the money. Also, have work at different price points to entice customers – they might buy a more expensive piece next time!

DESCRIPTIONS When you’re selling online, it is crucial that you are not just describing the size of the piece and what it is made of. You must ensure you have answered any issues that your customers may have. You need to explain why they should buy it; better still make it tug on their heartstrings! Is it perfect for a gift? Is it designed for bridal jewellery? Use the description to encourage people to buy.

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GET YOUR PROCESSES RIGHT Be quick to answer any questions the customer may have and have multiple ways to do that such as have a contact form, FAQ and a T&Cs page. Make sure your email address is readily available in multiple, easy to find places. It helps to give potential customers confidence that you are a real person and are responsive to their needs. Make a note of questions you are asked by customers. You may be able to tweak your terms and conditions or product descriptions to ensure they are answered before they’re asked again in the future. I always like to test the checkout process myself to ensure that it is working well, and that I am not going to lose customers somewhere in the process.

LISTINGS Drip feed your listings on your site – don’t put them all on at once. The more recently a shop has updated a listing on Etsy, the higher they are when someone searches on Etsy, for example, for a silver ring. I renew products regularly, around two or three a day. Renew a bestseller before it expires as this will put it back up the top of a search again. On Etsy it costs 20 cents to do that and I see it as an advertising cost.

CONTACT karenyoungjewellery.co.uk info@karenyoungjewellery.co.uk etsy.com/uk/shop/KarenYoungJewellery

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PROJECT

WINTER BEAD APPLIQUÉ JULIA RAI

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orking with metal clay in the dry stage provides a whole lot more options for jewellers. Planning is everything when working with dry components and thinking through the sequence of construction is crucial to a positive result. But remember, the wonderful thing about metal clay is that if something goes wrong along the way, you can just crush up the dry clay, rehydrate it and start again. The best way to learn dry construction is to make hollow beads. They are more forgiving than going straight into making open boxes as you can make the insides of hollow forms as messy as you like. Here we’ll make some lentil bead earrings and a pendant with a Christmas theme plus a simple box bead, also with Christmas motifs. We will also explore using paper type clay to make the appliqué motifs.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

30g Art Clay Silver or PMC Fine silver syringe type clay Art Clay Paper type Fine silver paste Circle cutters Teflon sheet Paper punches – Christmas theme Sterling silver chain Earwires 1mm and 2mm-3mm drill 400-600 grit sandpaper Sanding sponges Tissue blade Paintbrushes Collapsible eye needle Firing tools Vermiculite or fibre blanket Polishing tools

RESOURCES Widely available from advertisers in this magazine Art Clay Silver, silver clay syringe, Art Clay Paper Type, silver clay paste: metalclay.co.uk Chain and earwires: cooksongold.com

CONTACT juliarai.co.uk csacj.co.uk info@csacj.co.uk

HOW TO MAKE 1. Paper type silver clay is great for adding appliqué designs to the surface of these hollow beads. I’ve chosen Christmas themed punches – snowflakes, holly and a Christmas tree. The pendant and earring set will have snowflakes on both sides of the beads so I’ve chosen two snowflake punches, one smaller than the other. Choose a round cutter a bit larger than the size of the punch. You can also use textures on the surface of the beads or add a paste and cocktail stick texture when the bead is fully constructed. 2. To make a domed form, find something round and domed like a measuring spoon. Ping-pong balls, marbles or old-fashioned light bulbs also make good forms for making domed shapes. Oil the outside of the measuring spoon. Roll out some clay four cards thick and cut out a circle for the pendant. Carefully transfer the circle to the measuring spoon. Gently press the edges down onto the spoon but don’t squash them. They need to make good contact with the spoon all round. Leave to dry. 3. Put a piece of sandpaper flat down on the table. File the open edge of the dry domes until you have a flat platform all round. As you file, move your fingers around the outside of the dome so you put equal pressure on all parts of the dome as you file. Keep a close eye on how much you are filing off. The more you file, the shallower and

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smaller the dome gets. This can cause problems when you come to stick the two halves together if you file one more than the other. 4. Check the fit of the two halves, turning them around individually to see which way they fit best. Put a pencil mark across the join on both halves when you find the best fit; this will help you to put them together correctly when they are sticky with paste. Dampen the flat platform on both halves and then put a line of syringe around the platform on one half. Stick them together, ensuring the pencil line matches on both halves. Press the edges firmly so the syringe clay squeezes out, but don’t clean this up yet. Leave the assembled bead to dry. 5. When the bead is dry, gently sand off any lumps of dry syringe in the join, fi ll any gaps with syringe and smooth with a damp paintbrush. Allow to dry. Check for any more gaps and fi ll if necessary. Use sanding pads to smooth the surface of the bead and the joins so you have a completely clean and smooth bead. You can also use this step to correct any misshapen areas of the bead or edge by sanding it and fi lling as necessary. 6. Art Clay Paper type is dry out of the pack and quite rigid so is perfect for using with paper punches. Turn the punch over so you can see

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, JULIA RAI

PROJECT

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PROJECT

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the cutting aperture. Slide the Paper Type sheet into the slot and line it up as close to the edges of the sheet as you can. This will help to make using punches with paper type as economical as possible. Punch out the snowfl ake. Line the sheet up again in the punch and cut another. Handle these with care as they will break if you bend them. Avoid getting them wet as this can cause them to disintegrate. 7. Paint a layer of thin paste onto one side of the bead and immediately stick the snowfl ake onto the surface pressing down fi rmly from the centre outwards, to ensure good contact with the surface. Allow this to dry. Paint thin paste all over the surface covering the snowfl ake and the surface to ensure it is well stuck down. Make sure you don’t have any thick areas of paste around the edges of the snowfl ake. When this side is dry, do the same on the other side.

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8. When the bead is completely dry, mark the points on each side where you will drill holes for the chain. Create a notch on these marks using a small fi le. Use a 1mm drill to drill a pilot hole into the notch. Make sure you drill in the direction of the other hole rather than at a 90° angle to the edge of the bead. This will make threading the chain through much easier. Do the same with the other hole. Use a small round fi le to open the holes out further until you have a hole large enough for your chain and remember to account for shrinkage. 9. Put the bead to one side and make the earrings. With the larger bead we domed the two halves on the outside of the measuring spoon but with the smaller earring elements it’s easier to dome them on the inside. Oil the inside of four spoons. Cut out circles from clay rolled out four cards thick. It’s safer to do these one at a time so the circles remain moist while

you put them into the spoons. Place each circle into the spoon and press down gently in the centre so the circle makes good contact with the surface of the spoon. Leave all four to dry. 10. File the flat platform into all four sides and stick the beads together as before. Fill the joins, refine and sand the surfaces. Punch out four snowflakes using the smaller paper punch and stick these onto the beads following the same process as for the larger bead. Once the beads are dry, use a 1mm drill to drill a pilot hole in the centre of the snowflake on each side. Open this hole out using a 2mm or 3mm drill bit. Clean the hole up if necessary with a small fi le. You can also embellish a central hole by making small donuts and sticking these onto the finished beads. Put the earrings to one side. 11. To make the box bead, choose a circle cutter to make the central core and then choose a

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PROJECT

larger circle cutter around 8mm to 10mm larger in diameter. This will form the two sides of the bead. Cut a piece of Teflon to the depth of the smaller cutter, wrap it around the cutter and stick with tape. Roll out a long length of clay four cards thick so it is around 1cm longer than you need to wrap around the cutter. Cut it with a tissue blade a bit wider than the depth of the bead core you want. Wrap this around the cutter overlapping the end, cut down through the overlapping clay, remove the excess and use thick paste to stick the ends together. Leave to dry. 12. Cut the larger circles for the sides of the box bead using rolled out clay four cards thick. Leave these to dry. Slide the core element off the cutter, fi ll and refine the outside of the join if necessary with syringe and then sand it smooth. Use sandpaper flat on the table to fi le each end of the core flat and even. Dampen the surface of one of the side elements and one end of the core and then use syringe to stick the core to the side. Allow this to dry and then refine the join on the outside so it is smooth. Use the same process to stick the second side onto the core. Allow the whole bead to dry. 13. File the edges of the side elements so they are even and smooth. Add a texture to the core using paste and a cocktail stick. Smooth the surface of both sides using a sanding pad. Cut a Christmas tree and holly from the Paper Type sheet using paper punches and stick these to the sides using the same process as the pendant and earrings. Drill pilot holes in the core of the bead then widen these out with a 2mm or 3mm drill bit to create a large hole in each side of the bead. 14. To fire the beads, use vermiculite in a stainless steel container and nestle the beads so they are supported. You can also use fibre blanket to cushion the beads if you don’t have any vermiculite. Kiln-fire at 900°C for two hours or torch fire. When they are fired and cool, polish with a brass brush and/or polishing papers. You can tumble polish hollow beads, but you need to plug the holes otherwise they will fi ll up with shot. Use metallic pipe cleaners or thick copper wire through the holes to plug them during tumbling. 15. Thread chain through the holes in the pendant beads. A collapsible eye needle can help with this. Cut one side of the eye about halfway down to create a hook and then thread the needle through both holes, hook the end of the chain through the eye and pull it through. You can also use a pinch bail to hang pendant beads if you put a hole from front to back rather than in the sides of the bead. Cut two lengths of chain around 4cm long, thread them through the hole in the earring and attach to an ear wire. Alternatively, you can use 0.8mm wire to create your own earwires, which go through the centre holes front to back.

Similar designs have been made here with the same lentil shape. The pendant features a texture made with paste and a fireable stone. The earrings have a carved linear texture and fireable stones as a feature around the holes.

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Flux’n’Flame Jewellery School

At Flux n Flame we offer jewellery DQGVLOYHUVPLWKLQJFRXUVHVZRUNLQJ with sterling silver, gold and precious stones using traditional jewellery PDNLQJWHFKQLTXHV6PDOOJURXSV friendly, informal atmosphere with superb tuition from professional award winning jewellers $O -HVD0DUVKDOO 2XUJRUJHRXVZRUNVKRSLVIXOO\ HTXLSSHGDQGSXUSRVHEXLOWDQGLV situated in the heart of the beautiful Dorset countryVLGH ‘Humour, patience and creativity Jess and Al have in abundance. Nothing is too much trouble, and everyone is treated like family. One of the nicest places you could wish for to learn and express yourself, comforted in the knowledge that each piece will be made to their exacting standards. I can’t praise them highly enough.’ Susan, student

For a brochure contact us at Flux’n’Flame Milton Abbas, Dorset DT11 OBD Tel: 01258 881690 Mobile 07785 550771 (PDLOVPLOHDORW#ÀX[QÀDPHFRXN

ZZZÀX[QÀDPHFRXN

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17/10/2017 16:05


CHRISTMAS CANDLE JAROSLAVA RŮŽIČKOVA

HOW TO MAKE

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he glass seed beads from the PRECIOSA Traditional Czech Beads range are mainly designed for stringing or embroidery. This simple tutorial shows an alternative way to decorate a candle.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ●

PRECIOSA Traditional Czech Bead mix Double-sided adhesive tape Scissors Smooth candle

Stick the double-sided tape onto the smooth candle in one or more lines. If you want to create wide lines put the first layer of tape on and remove the cover before laying the second strip down. Remove the cover on the tape one strip at a time and sprinkle on the bead mix. This will help stop the tape from getting dirty or picking up dust. Press the beads onto the tape and fill in any gaps to cover the tape completely.

CONTACT PRECIOSA Traditional Czech Bead range preciosa.com

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PROJECT

CHRISTMAS STARS TANSY WILSON

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reate these stylish pieces in silver, adding stars for more glamour. This collection is ideal for the beginner silversmith as you experience very simple forging techniques as well as basic soldering skills. However, the end results are sophisticated and stylish for the party season.

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1.5mm (16 gauge) Sterling silver wire 1mm (18 gauge) Sterling silver wire 0.8mm (20 gauge) Sterling silver wire 5 x 10mm star charms 2 x earring hooks Silver chain Round bangle mandrel Jumpring mandrel Side cutters Nylon-end hammer

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Ball and flat-head hammer Punch Piercing saw Needle fi les Drill and 1.2mm drill bit Reverse tweezers Soldering torch Flux, solder and pickle Emery paper Silver polish and cloth Pliers to assemble pieces

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

2. Slide the wire off the mandrel and then cut the wire using side cutters. You need to cut it so you have four perfect circles. Then cut each circle in half. This picture shows just one circle cut in half for clarity. 3. Pick up one of the halves of wire and place it flat onto a steel bed. Using the flat end of a hammer, strike the very tip of the wire to flatten and splay out the very end. It must splay out to at least 3mm in width. Do this to the other end of the wire too!

4. Take a ‘punch’ and create a dent where you need to drill a hole. This will be in the centre of the flattened silver ends you created in Step 3. 5. Place a 1.2mm drill bit into the jaws of your drill and now drill a hole where you made the dents in Step 4. Remove any burrs created from the drilling with a needle fi le. 6. Repeat Steps 3 to 5 to create four semicircles of silver wire that are flattened at each end and each drilled with a 1.2mm hole. Polish each piece to a high shine. 7. Wrap a 10cm length of 1mm Sterling silver wire three times around the 10mm diameter on a jumpring mandrel and slide off. Then wrap a 10cm length of 0.8mm Sterling silver wire three times around the 5mm diameter section on

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the mandrel. You could use drill bits or similar cylindrical objects if you don’t have a mandrel. 8. Using a piercing saw, cut each jumpring away from the coil so you are left with two 10mm jumprings and two 5mm jumprings. Place one of the 5mm jumprings through your star charm. 9. Manipulate the jumpring that’s linked to the star charm so the ends of the jumpring align perfectly. Place onto your soldering block protecting the star from direct heat and add a drop of flux and a tiny square (pallion) of easy solder to the join on the jumpring. Heat this gently so the flux bubbles and sticks the solder in place, then increase the heat so the solder melts and runs into the join. Pickle and rinse. Repeat this step to solder the other 5mm jumpring through the other star charm.

1. Wrap your 1.5mm Sterling silver wire around a round bangle mandrel at your wrist measurement. Wrap it four-and-a-half times around, gently tapping it with a nylon-head hammer so you don’t dent the surface of the wire.

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10. Take one of the 10mm jumprings and slide it through one of the holes drilled in one of the 1.5mm wire halves. Pick up another half and also add it to this jumpring. Now add the 5mm jumpring with the star attached. Finally, add another two halves and close the jumpring so the ends align perfectly. 11. Repeat Step 10 so you add the remaining 10mm jumpring and star charm to the other side. Place the entire bangle onto your soldering block and add a drop of flux and pallion of solder to each join on each 10mm jumpring. Solder the jumprings closed. Pick and rinse. Polish the entire bangle back to a high shine. Earrings 12. An alternative design using the star charms are to make these lovely circle earrings. Repeat Step 7 to make two 5mm jumprings and two

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10mm jumprings. Then repeat Step 9 to solder a 5mm jumpring through a star charm. Then add this 5mm jumpring to a 10mm jumpring and solder this 10mm jumpring closed. Pickle and rinse. Repeat to make another circle and star charm. 13. Polish both circles and star charms to a high shine. Then open the bottom loop on an earring hook and add the 10mm circle. Close the eye loop. Repeat to make the other earring. Pendant 14. Using another length of 1.5mm wire, bend it into a star shape using flat nose pliers. It doesn’t have to be mathematically accurate in shape, as you will be texturing it. My overall star size is approx. 20mm diameter.

Now use the ball-end of a hammer and strike the star creating a dimpled texture all across the surface. I have also textured a star charm in the same way. 16. Use the hole punch and dent a mark so you can drill a 1mm hole in the top and bottom parts of your wire star. Link a jumpring through the star charm and the bottom hole of the wire star and solder closed. Finally, add a jumpring to the top hole and solder closed. This jumpring can be larger so you can fit a chain through it to make a perfect pendant.

RESOURCES All materials: cooksongold.com

CONTACT 15. Solder the join on the star. Pickle and rinse.

tansywilson@hotmail.com

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PROJECT

CHRISTMAS ALUMINIUM KAREN CAINE

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here are lots of ways of adding beautiful colours and patterns to anodised aluminium as you can see from the techniques on page 14, but adding sticky-back plastic shapes to coloured aluminium is a great option if you’re looking for a simple Christmas project. What’s more, you can skip some parts if you don’t have the time or equipment. For instance, if you don’t want to get involved with the dyeing process, you can buy ready-dyed sheet or if you want to skip the metal working aspects, you can buy ready-prepared shapes (blanks) that you can colour yourself. Better still, once Christmas is over, you can peel off the stickers, clean up the glue residue with acetone and then redecorate your jewellery ready for the new season! After all, jewellery this colourful shouldn’t just be for Christmas...

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, KAREN CAINE

PROJECT

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MATERIALS & TOOLS 0.5mm anodised aluminium sheet (raw or pre-prepared) ● Sticky-back plastic ● UV-resistant acrylic spray varnish ● 0.3mm aluminium sheet (or card stock) ● 0.7mm (22 gauge) and 1mm (18 gauge) wire ● Open link chain ● Findings: clasps, jumprings, calottes, crimp beads, bead caps ● Beads: 8mm faceted, 8mm diamanté rondelles, 45mm x 2mm curved tube noodle spacers, tiny seed beads, bead frames for 8mm beads, star charm, hoop connector ● Clear nail polish ● Stick-on chatons ● Glitter ● E6000 glue ● Pencil, eraser and ruler ● Craft knife or scalpel ● Cutting mat ● Pinking shears (for Christmas jumper bangle) ● Steel block ● Centre punch and hammer ● Drill and drilling surface (or metal punch) ● Flush cutters ● Pliers: chain nose, needle nose, bail-making or round nose ● Bracelet mandrel (or similar) ● Scribe (or nail) Optional ● Equipment for dyeing aluminium (see p 14) ● Metal shears or coping saw ● Sandpaper and fi les ● Fancy hole punches or metal dies and cutting machine ● Disc cutter

HOW TO MAKE

1. You can buy coloured aluminium if you wish or you can cut and dye your own. To do the latter, begin by familiarising yourself with the basic technique on page 14, then cut a 15cm x 15cm sheet of anodised aluminium and use a brush to paint alcohol ink across its surface. Don’t worry, if it seems a bit streaky – this is largely due to excess ink on the metal’s surface that will be removed later. Steam the metal to seal the pores in the anodic fi lm, then clean away any ink left on the surface with paper towels soaked with acetone. Keep wiping the surface until the ink stops staining the paper towel.

4. Peel off the backing and lightly stick the snowflakes to the aluminium. Allow some of the snowflakes to overlap the edge of the metal as this adds interest to the finished piece. Once you’re happy with the placement of the stickers, press them down hard, making sure that there are no air bubbles.

Snowflake bangle (p57) 5. Turn the aluminium over and place it on a cutting mat, then slice away the overhanging sections using a sharp craft knife or scalpel. 6. Curve your strip of aluminium around a bracelet mandrel or similar oval or round object, such as a rounders bat or water-fi lled plastic bottle. Anodised aluminium is quite resistant and tries to spring back to its original shape, so gradually squeeze it until the two ends of the cuff touch. When they spring away from each other they should leave a 2.5cm gap, which is ideal for a cuff. Go slowly when curving the metal to avoid breaking the anodic fi lm and creating a crease. Once the bangle is formed, take it into a well-ventilated space and spray it with a UV-resistant acrylic varnish. This will protect the colour and help prevent the stickers from lifting.

2. Once you have your coloured sheet, mark out the size of your bangle with a pencil and ruler. A strip that’s 2.5cm wide will make a standard cuff, but you can vary that for a wider or narrower style. Once the bangle is marked out, cut it using metal shears or a jeweller’s coping saw. (Aluminium is a very soft metal, so you may wish to use a saw blade with larger teeth than you would ordinarily use for copper or silver.) Put on a dust mask and sand the edges and corners until they are smooth to the touch. If you want to remove a lot of metal, you can use a coarse metal fi le, but you will need to clean the teeth out regularly with a wire brush to prevent it clogging up. If you prefer to avoid metal work, you can buy anodised aluminium cuff blanks that you can dye yourself.

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3. Take some white sticky-back plastic and cut out snowflake patterns using fancy paper punches or metal dies with cutting machines like the Sizzix Big Shot or Xcut Xpress. Alternatively, you can buy ready-made stickers, which you’ll find in the paper craft section of your local hobby store.

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Christmas jumper bangle (opposite page) 7. Create a strip of metal for your bangle as you did in Step 2. Cut across a 15cm wide piece of sticky-back plastic using pinking shears to get the zigzag pattern. Make sure that you bring the blades down cleanly and that you don’t allow them to catch on the sticky interior of the plasticised paper when you move the scissors along. Once you have the zigzag, cut on either side of it with a blade and ruler to create the white zigzag blocks for the top and bottom of the bangle. Cut out the pieces that will make up your central motif as you did in Step 3 (we’ve chosen Christmas trees). Measure them and then mark where they should go on the bangle to be centrally aligned across its height. For instance, if your bangle is 2.5cm and your motif stickers are 1cm tall, their bases should be 0.75cm from the bottom of the strip. Similarly, you can mark where each sticker should be placed along the central axis. Start by marking the middle (7.5cm along a 15cm bangle), then measure out from there towards each side. For instance, if your stickers are 1cm wide, you can place the next ones at 6cm from the left and 9cm from the left (1.5cm away from the middle sticker). This will give a 0.5cm gap between each sticker.

cutting mat, then run a blade along the edge of the bangle to remove the excess plastic. Finally, curve and varnish the bangle as you did in the previous step. Necklace (p59) 8. Photocopy the necklace template and tape it on top of some sticky-back plastic on a cutting mat, making sure that everything is lying completely flat. Carefully slice around the lines of the template to cut out the same shapes in the sticky-back plastic. 9. Stick the cut-out stick-back plastic shapes to the aluminium sheet and draw around them with pencil. Remove the stickers and cut out the shapes in the aluminium sheet. It’s easiest to do this if you start by roughly cutting out the block containing all three shapes and then carefully cut around each of the pieces in turn. Sand the edges, then rub out any pencil lines and use acetone on a paper towel to remove

residue left by the sticky-back plastic. Rinse with water and dry. 10. Mark where you want the holes to go on the front of the shapes (around 3mm from the edges) with a pencil. Put the shapes on a steel block, then use a centre punch and hammer to create divots on the pencil marks. This will stop the drill from skittering across the metal. Move the shape to a surface into which you can drill (a block of spare wood or rubber is ideal) and drill into the divots with a lubricated 1.6mm drill bit. You can use a hand or electric drill, but try to keep it perpendicular to the metal. (If you don’t have a drill you can use 1.6cm metal punch pliers instead.) Once the holes are made, lightly sand away any burrs on the back then add stickers and varnish the pieces just as you did with the bangle in Steps 3 to 5. 11. Create two pretty connecting pieces by cutting 10cm of 0.7mm wire. Make a wrapped loop at one end (see p96), then pass the wire

TEMPLATE Printed actual size

Once you have marked the position of the stickers, rub out all the lines apart from the marks that will be covered and stick down the stickers. Now add the zigzag blocks that you created earlier, to the top and bottom of the bangle. Flip the aluminium and place it on a

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through an 8mm bead and a suitably sized bead frame. Use needle nose pliers to bend the wire close to the exit hole of the bead frame and then form a second wrapped loop, making sure it is on the same axis as the first.

15. Crimp the bead and close the calotte over it and the tiny seed bead. Next slide on a bead cap, an 8mm bead, a rondelle and a noodle tube spacer as shown. Cut the doubled-over tail where it exits the fi rst bead.

12. Connect the aluminium pieces together with jumprings and then add chains to link the connected pieces to the framed beads you created in the previous step. The lower chains should be slightly longer than the upper ones to give a nice draping effect. Finally, use more jumprings to add chain and a ready-made clasp to complete the necklace.

16. Now add the rest of the beads, rondelles and spacers as shown. Once all thee beads are in place add another bead cap, then en another calotte, crimp bead and tiny seed bead. Double the tiger tail back through the crimp mp bead, bead cap and final bead as you did d before. Pull everything tight and crimp the bead ad and close the calotte. Cut the excess tiger tail. ail. Loop the ends of the calottes and add jumprings rings and a clasp to finish the necklace. Use bailailmaking pliers and 1mm wire to make the S-links by pulling the wires around the two jaws in a figure-offeight then cutting in the middle with flush cutters. (If you don’t have ave bail-making pliers use a narrow and a fat part of your round nose pliers instead.) Open your S-links as you would jumprings and attach the pendant to the middle of the necklace. klace.

Rectangular pendant necklace (p59) 13. Using the techniques already covered, cut and sand a 3cm x 5cm rectangular piece of coloured anodised aluminium, drill holes in the top corners and add snowflake stickers, leaving a blank section at the bottom. Cut a piece of sticky-back plastic 4cm wide and cut a wavy line across it with a blade. Stick this on the bottom of the pendant to represent accumulated snow. Flip the aluminium over and trim the excess plastic as you did with the zigzag sections of the Christmas jumper bangle in Step 7. Add a coat of spray varnish. 14. Cut a 60cm length of tiger tail and slide it through a tiny seed bead, a crimp bead and calotte at one end. Take a tail of a few centimetres and run it back through the crimp bead and calotte. Tighten the doubled length of tiger tail, so the seed and crimp beads are tight against one another.

18. Once it’s set, add a stick-on chaton then take a ready-made hoop that’s slightly larger than your disc and use an S-link to join it to the pendant.

Circular pendant necklace (p54) 17. To make this sparkly pendant, start by cutting a disc in your dyed aluminium nium sheet with a disc cutter and sanding ng the edge smooth (or you can buy a readyadyprepared circular blank if you prefer). fer). Drill a hole at the top as you did in Step p 10. Cut out a shape in your sticky-back plastic astic and stick it in the middle of the disc. Now paint

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over the surface with clear nail polish and before it’s dry, sprinkle on some glitter strands. Try not to let the glitter clump. (If you do, you can easily try again by removing everything with an acetone-soaked paper towel.) Once you’re happy with everything, leave the pendant to one side while the nail varnish sets.

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19. Create a smaller version of the necklace you made for the rectangular pendant (Steps 14 to 16), then finish by adding a chain and a clasp using jumprings.

middle using a scribe (or nail) and ruler and punch a hole through the what will become the top-inside corner of the back of the card once the metal is folded.

Christmas card charm bracelet (below)

22. Fold the Christmas card by holding a ruler down against the scored line and pulling the front half of the card upwards. Scratch the back of the coloured square and the front of the card so that there is a key for the glue. Use some E6000 glue to fi x the coloured square to the front of the card, carefully wiping excess glue away with a cotton bud soaked in acetone.

20. For the final piece you need small pieces of coloured aluminium. This can be a good way of using up scrap pieces from other projects or you can prepare a multicoloured strip using alcoholbased marker pens. Once your aluminium is ready, mark 1cm x 1cm squares in pencil and cut them out using metal shears. Sand the edges and corners, then set aside. 21. Next prepare the cards themselves. You can use ordinary, non-anodised 0.3mm aluminium as shown here or a heavyweight cardstock covered with Modge Podge or Paverpol, if you prefer. Whichever material you use, cut a series of 3cm x 1.6cm rectangles, sanding the edges if you’re using metal. Score a line down the

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RESOURCES Anodised aluminium sheet and blanks: aluminium-jewellery-supplies.co.uk Pre-coloured aluminium sheets: cooksongold.com 0.3mm aluminium sheet: modelshop.co.uk Sticky-back plastic, fancy paper punches, metal dyes: hobbycraft.co.uk Wire: wires.co.uk All other items: ebay.co.uk

CONTACT craftydwarftutorials.com

23. Once the glue is set, add different stickers to the coloured squares to fi nish the mini Christmas card charms. 24. Take a 17cm length of chain with large open links and add the charms with jumprings. You can also add a metal star charm as an end dangle for the bracelet. Finally, attach a readymade clasp to finish the bracelet.

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PRODUCT TEST

TRADITIONAL NECKLACE KIT This month Zoë tests a necklace kit by Nunn Design, to create jewellery perfect for the festive season. By Zoë Lynham THE PRODUCT This kit is designed to create a long-line necklace from epoxy clay and crystal chatons. With its sparkle, it would be perfect to wear for a special occasion or ideal as a Christmas gift for someone wanting to try a new medium.

WHAT DOES IT DO? This kit guides you through the mixing of the two-part epoxy clay, how to shape it in the bezel and adding the crystal chatons. It also takes you through the assembly of the components to create the necklace.

WHAT IS INCLUDED? The kit contains the circular bezel connector, crystal chatons, black epoxy clay and hardener, a toggle clasp, chain, jumprings, a headpin, a small glass pearl, latex gloves and a beeswax toothpick.

HOW GOOD ARE THE INSTRUCTIONS? The kit comes with very detailed instructions that are easy to follow. They consist of thirty photographs, with ten written steps that are linked to the images. Also included are some useful tips, such as how to successfully embed the chatons in the clay and working with the textured jumprings.

adhesive that bonds to most materials, I would also recommend protecting your work surface with a non-stick surface such as a Teflon baking sheet. I purchased mine from the kitchen section of a discount store.

CAN IT BE ADDED TO? I had sufficient epoxy clay to make a pair of earrings with some earring bezels I had in my stash. Nunn Design also make similar kits for earrings, a bracelet and a ring, if you would prefer another piece of jewellery or would like to make a jewellery suite. The necklace and earrings can be purchased from Beads Direct, and come in either a silver or gold-plated finish. There is nothing to stop you adding tassels or beads to the connector to change the design. A small glass pearl and head pin is supplied to add to one end of the pendant connector.

IS IT VALUE FOR MONEY? I think this kit is good value for money; it is well thought out, containing not only all the components required to make the necklace, but the beeswax tool to pick up the chatons and the gloves to mix the clay at the start. It is also well priced for trying out a new medium or as a gift for a family member or friend. The quantity of chatons and epoxy clay is also generous.

WHAT ELSE YOU WILL NEED?

HOW EASY IS IT TO USE?

You will need some wet wipes or a wet paper towel and two pairs of pliers for assembling the necklace. As epoxy clay is essentially an

This kit was very easy to use. One part of the epoxy clay was harder to condition initially, but instructions were also given on how to soften

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the clay in this case, making it easy to work with. You have a working time of two and a half hours once the two parts are mixed, so there is plenty of time to plan your design and embed the chatons. It is important to ensure that the chatons are properly embedded in the clay, but if any fall out after the clay has cured, it gives you a handy tip for fi xing the problem.

OVERALL SCORE I have never worked with epoxy clay before, but after trying this kit, I was hooked. I was delighted at how easy it was to mix and shape the clay, and embed the chatons. The finished result looks very professional and the pendant connector could be used in many different ways in a design. I liked the detail on the connector, which has a lovely pattern on the back, and the jumprings are also textured, adding extra detail to the overall design. It has been a really good stepping stone in to a new medium.

SCORE

COST £21.97 (inc VAT)

RESOURCES beadsdirect.co.uk service@beadsdirect.co.uk

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PHOTOGRAPHS: ZOË LYNHAM

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1. The kit. 2. Black epoxy clay and hardener. 3. Black clay in bezel. 4. With crystal chatons. 5. Toggle clasp and chain. 6. Adding the glass pearl. 7. Attaching the chain. 8. The finished necklace (with additional earrings).

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FEATURE

WHAT INSPIRES

Nichola Foster MY DESIGNS

My designs are varied and depend on my mood! I like trying different colour combinations and get easily bored making multiples of the same design. Consequently, they can vary quite significantly. I like to make ‘orphan’ beads and challenge myself to make them into something wearable using the different colours to make one whole piece. I recently melted a whole lot of dichroic glass shards together along with a base and clear cap, and cut the finished piece into pendants. Every single one was different – it was very rewarding and sums up my style!

MY INSPIRATION Colour draws my interest in lots of different ways and inspires me more than anything else. For example, I enjoy seeing two popping colours working together to make a pretty visual – or even lots of muted colours to create an overall effect. I like the challenge of attempting to create the same effect in glass. It could be anything; a flower, an item of clothing, a painting; literally anything! But it’s usually the colours and combinations that draw my attention fi rst and foremost.

MY TECHNIQUES I was taught glass-fusing techniques by a glassworker friend and then went on to do a short course in lampworking. I love both techniques and they each have their own rewards. I love glass fusing because you’re laying pieces of cold glass and kiln-firing them, meaning that you never know quite what you’re going to get until you open the kiln. Lampworking allows the freedom of forming your designs instantaneously because you’re working with the glass whilst molten.

CONTACT

PHOTOGRAPHS: NICHOLA FOSTER, KATY PARKER

nicholafosterdesigns.co.uk facebook.com/nichola.foster.designs etsy.com/shop/nicholafosterdesigns

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PROJECT

ANGEL WINGS CAROLINE WILTSHIRE

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love the delicate, modern appearance of these angel wings, created in peyote stitch using two colours of Delica seed beads. They look stunning made up in silver and gold tones. To create a minimal look, hang a small wing on a simple chain or ear hook. Alternatively, combine large and small wings with crystals and beads to create a statement piece for your Christmas party outďŹ t. Although I’ve designed them with Christmas in mind, they could easily be worn at any time of the year. Knowing odd count peyote stitch and decreasing in peyote stitch would be useful, as turning around and decreasing can seem complicated initially.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CAROLINE WILTSHIRE

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HOW TO MAKE

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Size 11 Delica seed bead colour A for outer edge and centre of wing (e.g. silver, gold) Size 11 Delica seed beads colour B for remainder of wing (e.g. white) 4mm bicone crystals 10mm bicone crystals 6mm round crystals Size 11 Miyuki or Toho seed beads Size 8 Miyuki or Toho seed beads Stop bead or large bead 5cm eye pins Earring hooks Jumprings Chain Clasps Fireline beading thread Size 10 or 11 beading needle Small sharp scissors Round and chain nose pliers

RESOURCES 10mm bicone crystals: crystals.co.uk, totallybeads.co.uk Other resources are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT BeauBellaJewellery.etsy.com beaubellajewellery.co.uk beaubellajewellery@gmail.com

Large wings 1. Cut a long but manageable length of beading thread and thread a needle. Add a stop bead (a temporary bead in a different size, shape or colour), passing through the bead twice to secure and leaving a tail approx. 40cm long. Pick up 11 Delica beads in the following colours and order: one colour A, two colour B, five colour A, two colour B, one colour A. 2. The rest of the wing is created using odd count peyote stitch. Pick up one colour A and pass through the second bead on the first row of beads added, so that the bead sits side by side with the last bead in that first row. Continue along the row, picking up a bead, skipping a bead and passing through the next, in the following order: one A, one A, one A, one A, one A (you should have added six beads in the second row). Try to keep the tension tight as you work. When you pick up the last bead at the end of the row, pass through the end bead on the previous row directly beneath the bead just strung, so that the bead sits side by side with the bead below. 3. Pass through two more beads (the second and third) on the row below, then turn around by passing through the second ‘up’ bead on the row you’ve just added, then down through the second and first beads on the previous row (exiting through the first bead). You now have three rows. Note: check that the fi rst row has

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not twisted around and become the third row, or your pattern may not work out correctly. 4. To start the next row, pass through the end bead on the second row and pick up a bead and pass through the next ‘up’ bead in the row. Continue along the row, fi lling in the gaps. Add the beads in the following order: one B, three A, one B (five beads in total). 5. For the fifth row, string one bead and pass through the next ‘up’ bead (second bead in the previous row). Continue along the row, fi lling in the gaps. Add the beads in the following order: one A, one B, two A, one B, one A (six beads in total). When you’ve added the last bead, turn around, passing through the end bead in the previous row. Pass through the next ‘down’ bead towards the middle, then step up and turn back through the directly above (second from the edge) and down through the first bead in the row below. Turn and pass through the end bead on the row you just added, ready to start the next row. 6. Continue adding beads for the next rows as follows, turning around as per Steps 3–5 when required: Row 6: 1 x B, 3 x A, 1 x B. Row 7: 1 x A, 1 x B, 2 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 8: 2 x B, 1 x A, 2 x B. Row 9: 1 x A, 1 x B, 2 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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PROJECT

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8. For row 11, pick up 4 x B. Row 12: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 13: 4 x B. Row 14: 1 x A, 3 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 15: 1 x A, 2 x B, 1 x A, decrease as in Step 7. Row 16: 3 x B. Row 17: 1 x A, 2 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 18: 3 x B. Row 19: 1 x A, 2 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 20: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, decrease. Row 21: 2 x B. Row 22: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 23: 2 x B. Row 24: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 25: 2 x A, decrease. Row 26: 1 x B.

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Row 27: 2 x A, turn around. Row 28: 1 x B. Row 29: 2 x A, turn around. Row 30: 1 x A, work around to exit through the bead you’ve just added. Note: It’s important to keep the tension tight whilst decreasing.

(depending on the thickness of the hanging chain or cord you will be losing), keeping the tension tight, until you have a strip. If the strip is loose, work back through the beads to reinforce it. Bend round to form a loop and pass through the central bead a few times to secure. Cast off.

9. For the end of the wing, pick up one A, pass through the previous (central) bead and then back through the bead you have just added. Pick up another one A and repeat. Work back through the rows to reinforce. Cast off.

Small wings

10. Next complete the top section of the wing. Remove the stopper bead and thread a needle on the tail of thread that you left earlier. Work the thread around so that it exits on the inside of the first bead in the top row. Pick up: Row 1: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, decrease. Row 2: 1 x A, 2 x B 1 x A, decrease. Row 3: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, decrease. Row 4: 1 x A, 1 x A decrease. Row 5: 1 x A. 11. Next form the hanging loop. Work around so that you exit through the central bead at the top. Pick up one A, pass back through the central bead, then back through the bead you have just added. Repeat four or five times

12. To make the smaller wings, follow the above instructions Steps 1–9, but adjust the rows as follows: Row 1: 1 x A, 2 x B, 1 x A, 2 x B, 1 x A. Row 2: 4 x A, turn around. Row 3: 1 x B, 1 x A, 1 x B. Row 4: 4 x A, turn around. Row 5: 1 x B, 1 x A, 1 x B. Row 6: 1 x A, 2 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 7: 3 x A, decrease. Row 8: 2 x B. Row 9: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 10: 2 x B. Row 11: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A, turn around. Row 12: 2 x A, decrease. Row 13: 1 x B. Row 14: 2 x A, turn around. Row 15: 1 x B. Row 16: 2 x A, turn around. Row 17: 1 x A. Cast off.

7. Next we will start to decrease. For row 10, pick up one A, one B, one A, one B, one A. When you reach the end of the row, turn around and pass through the last bead in the previous row. Step up into the bead next to it (the second bead in) and down into the third bead in. Turn and work round in a circle by passing through the bead directly above, step down into the second bead from the edge. Turn around and exit from the second bead in the last row you added (in the direction you will be adding the next row).

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13. Finish off the top section as in Step 10, but adjust as follows: Row 1: 1 x A, 1 x B, 1 x A decrease. Row 2: 2 x A, decrease. Row 3: 1 x A for the central bead. Add a further 4 or 5 x A to form the hanging loop. Cast off.

14. For the earrings, attach jumprings through the loops at the top of either large or small angel wings and hang from earring hooks.

crystals and size 8 seed beads in the following order: one size 8 seed bead, a 10mm bicone, size 8 seed bead, 10mm bicone, size 8 seed bead. Then make a loop at the end using round nose pliers. I’ve made the third pin to a slightly shorter length (size 8 seed bead, 10mm bicone, size 8 seed bead), to use at the bottom of the necklace. Join all three pins to a central jumpring. Attach a large angel wing to the eye at the end of the shorter pin using a jumpring. Attach chain (to your desired length) to the remaining two eye pins to finish the necklace.

Bracelet (right)

Small necklace (right)

15. To make the bracelet, make up two small angel wings. Add a hanging loop at the bottom of each wing instead of the top, following the same steps as previously and using four A beads to form the loop. Omit the loop at the top of the wing, but join the two wings together through the top central beads instead. Attach a jumpring to the loops at either end and attach two small lengths of chain (measure your wrist size to determine the length) and add a clasp of your choice.

17. Thread a small Angel Wing on a chain of your choice.

Earrings (p67)

Long necklace (p67) 16. To make the long necklace you will need three 5cm eye pins. Thread the pins with crystals and beads – I’ve used 10mm bicone

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Bar necklace (p64) 18. Thread the following on a 5cm eye pin: size 11 seed bead, 4mm bicone crystal, size 11 seed bead, small angel wing, size 11 seed bead, 6mm round crystal, size 11 seed bead, size 8 seed bead, large angel wing, size 8 seed bead, size 11 seed bead, 6mm round crystal, size 11 seed bead, small angel wing, size 11 seed bead, 4mm bicone crystal, size 11 seed bead. Form a loop at the end of the pin using round nose pliers. Attach a jumpring at either end of the eye pin and attach a chain and clasp of your choice.

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PROJECT

COLOURS OF THE SEASON ALISON GALLANT

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hree of my favourite polymer clay colours are red, gold and turquoise, perfect for a Christmas project! Using them in a Skinner blend produces so many more and they give extra interest when layered with lighter coloured sheets of clay and rolled into a spiral cane. Cut, manipulate and combine in different patterns and you have flower petals that can be used in many ways.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, PAUL GALLANT

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

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½ block (28g) Premo! Sculpey White (5001) ½ block (28g) Premo! Sculpey Peacock Pearl Accents (5038) ½ block (28g) Premo! Sculpey Pomegranate (5026) ½ block (28g) Premo! Sculpey 18kt Gold Accents (5055) ½ block (28g) Premo! Sculpey Pearl Accents (5101) 1¾ blocks (98g) Premo! Sculpey White Translucent Accents (5527) ¼ block (14g) scrap clay Pasta machine Tile or glass Paper Tissue blade 1cm and 3cmm circle cutter 4cm and 2.5cm square cutters Texture sponge Thin texture Needle tool 400 and 800 grits wet and dry sandpaper Coarse cloth for buffing 6mm and 4mm gold-coloured jumprings 4 x gold-coloured earwires Gold-coloured chains 2-part epoxy glue

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1. Mix ½ block of Pomegranate and ¼ block of White Translucent and repeat with the same amounts of 18kt Gold and White Translucent and Peacock Pearl and White Translucent. The translucent adds depth to the colours. Roll each mix through the pasta machine at the thickest setting. From each sheet, cut a piece measuring 6cm x 12cm and put the rest aside. 2. Overlap the rectangles in the order of Red, Gold and Peacock to fi ll the width of the pasta machine, and press together. Roll through at the thickest setting, fold from the bottom to the top and repeat until the sheet is blended. This may take up to 20 times. Trim the sheet to 14.5cm high. 3. Cut in half across the blend and stack. Turn 90° and roll through the pasta machine, Red first, at the thickest setting. Trim the ends to neaten. Mix ½ block each of White and Pearl and roll it alongside one block of White Translucent, both at No.3 on the pasta machine. Form into sheets as wide and 2cm longer than the coloured blend.

White showing each end. Trim 3cm from the Translucent and lay on the blend, leaving some showing either end. Chamfer the ends of the blend and Translucent, fold the White over the two layers one end and roll up tightly. 5. Slice off a 2cm length of the cane and reduce it to a diameter of 2.5cm. Cut down from the top into four equal pieces. Slightly flatten each one, pushing the White up towards the colour to form petal shapes. Make sure the thin, coloured sides have sharp, straight edges. Reduce them to 4cm, press four together and cut in half lengthways. Recombine the eight petals into a semicircle, cut in half again and form into a circle. Using a needle tool, press down on the White to defi ne the indentations between each petal. 6. Roll a small piece of Red through the pasta machine at the thickest setting, and then again with a texture sponge. Stamp out a 30cm circle. Take a thin slice of the cane, put it face down on paper, place a jumpring as shown, and add the red disc to trap it between the two layers. Press with the sponge to give a good bond.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

4. Place the White clay mix on paper. This makes it easier to handle, as it may stick to a tile. Lay the blend on top, leaving 1cm of

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7. Slice off a 2.5cm length of spiral cane and reduce it to 1.5cm. Cut down into four pieces and flatten, as in Step 5. Recombine eight petals only. Take nine slices for a bracelet and two for earrings. Pierce the bracelet pieces either side and the earrings at the top. Place all of the pieces on paper, ready to bake. 8. Roll approx. ¼ block’s worth of Red at the thickest setting and then again with a texture sponge on one side and a thin texture on the other. Cut two pieces approx. 3cm x 4cm. Take two slices of four petals and press each one on the thin textured sides of the Red. Trim the Red rectangles to 2cm x 3cm. Reduce the remainder of the Red by running through at No.2 with the sponge, cut one straight edge and butt up to the petals. Press the Red again with the sponge to make sure the layers are fully together. Trim again, turn over and press jumprings into the clay at the top. 9. Roll another ¼ block’s worth of Red at the thickest setting and texture as in Step 8. Stamp out two 4cm squares and one 2.5cm square

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from the centre of one of them. Cut a slice from the eight-petal cane and place it in the centre of the whole square, thin textured side up. Place on sponge and bake. When cool, smear a little liquid clay around the rim of the square, and press on the cut out square with the sponge to make a clean join. Pierce two holes in the centre of the top of the frame to hold a bail after baking.

12. Lightly sand the patterned pieces with 400 and 800 grit wet and dry sandpaper. Add jumprings to both sides of the bracelet pieces and join the sections together with a smaller ring. Finish with a clasp. Add jumprings and earwires to the smaller earrings, and earwires to the larger pair. Add bails to the pendants from Steps 9 and 10 and attach the three pendants to the chains with jumprings.

10. Roll a ball of scrap clay, 2.5cm diameter. Take slices from the two different sized eightpetal canes and place them around the ball. Roll in your hands until you can no longer see the seams. Make two holes in the top as in Step 9. 11. Bake all of the pieces on paper, except for the earrings from Step 8 and the pendant from Step 9, which should be placed face up on a texture sponge. Bake according to clay manufacturer’s instructions. When they are cool, stamp out two 1cm circles in textured Red, smear a tiny amount of liquid clay on the flat side and press onto the backs of the earrings to cover the base halves of the jumprings. Bake again.

RESOURCES Supplies are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT alisongallant@yahoo.co.uk info@millefioristudio.com

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PROJECT

PATTERN PERFECT JANE KHARADE

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Silver clay Badger balm (or olive oil) Stock card Clear decorative stamp swirls Teflon mat Rolling pin Spacers Straw Spoon Scalpel Blunt knife Wire brush Paintbrush Washing-up liquid Epoxy resin Soldering block Blowtorch Needle files, emery papers Solder paste Pickle 15mm round cutter Ring blank Brooch back Cord ends 2mm black leather cord Butterfly earring backs Chain 11mm lobster clasp 2 x headpins 2 x earring plates 2 x earring hooks 2 x 4mm, 2 x 5mm, 6mm, 7mm jumprings 2 x small pearls Flat nose, round nose and cutting pliers

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, JANE KHARADE

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

Printed actual size

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2. Using an acrylic rolling pin and spacers, roll a piece of PMC on a Teflon mat, use the template for the small pendant. Roll the stencil into the clay to create an impression of the pendant in the clay. Lightly coat anything that comes into contact with PMC with Badger balm or olive oil to prevent the clay from sticking. 3. Stamp into the clay, bottom left-hand side with a small decorative stamp. Make sure the stamp is also lightly oiled to prevent sticking.

TEMPLATES

Pendant (large)

1. Transfer the templates provided to light card and cut out all of the stencils needed for the six different pieces, as shown.

Pendant (small)

Brooch

Earring

4. Use a blunt knife or similar tool to create radiating lines top right of the pendant. 5. Use a sharp scalpel to create clean crisp lines when cutting out the pendant. Add a hole at the top for hanging and wrap the excess PMC up immediately to keep so it can be reused. Repeat Steps 2, 3, 4 and 5 to create the brooch in exactly the same way. 6. Use the template provided for the ring and cut out the stencil. Roll the stencil into the PMC to create the impression in the clay.

Use 15mm cutter for earring

C

reate this chic jewellery set that uses pattern as its focal point and different textures that add interest and contrast. These pieces are made from PMC (brand of silver clay) using card to mask off the different areas. These pieces can be adapted to suit you – use any small stamps you may already have – whilst Liver of Sulphur enhances the recessed areas. I love that these pieces can be dressed up or dressed down, and would look great on any age person. They would also make wonderful Christmas presents!

Ring

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PROJECT

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7. Stamp into the PMC with the decorative stamp and add the line detail to finish. 8. Cut out the ring with the scalpel, and gently curve the square by laying it in a spoon that has cling fi lm over it. Don’t forget to lightly oil the cling fi lm to release the PMC. Repeat Steps 6, 7 and 8 to make the large pendant and pearl drop earrings. Add holes in the earrings and use a straw to add a hole in the large pendant. When making the earrings, flip the template over so that the earrings mirror each other. 9. Make the round earrings by rolling out a piece of PMC thinly. Stamp into the PMC using a stamp and cut out with a 15mm round cutter. Add a hole at the bottom for hanging the pearls and leave all the PMC pieces to dry out overnight. 10. Fire all of the PMC on a soldering block with a handheld blowtorch. Each piece has to be

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timed for three minutes from when it starts to glow a dull orange colour. Quench immediately in cold water and brush clean with a wire brush and washing-up liquid.

the brooch, the pendant and the radiating lines on the ring with a texturing attachment for a handheld power tool. Polish all the stamped areas with a metal burnisher.

11. Solder the earring posts to the back of the round earrings, and the ring band to the ring with solder paste. When soldering the brooch back on, be careful the brooch fittings don’t get too hot. Quench and pickle the three pieces brush clean with a wire brush and liquid.

14. Add findings to the pieces. Attach a 6mm jumpring to the small pendant and suspend from a silver ball chain. Thread a pair of earring hooks to the pearl drop earring; finish off the round earrings by threading two small pearls onto headpins. Make a neat wrapped loop on each and hang from the earrings via two 4mm jumprings. Finish off the large pendant by gluing on the cord ends. Add a 5mm jumpring to each end and a lobster clasp to one end. Hang the pendant from the cord via a 7mm jumpring.

12. Wearing rubber gloves and a mask, mix up the Liver of Sulphur in a well-ventilated room according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Apply the solution to the jewellery with a paintbrush and dunk in cold water to halt the reaction. 13. Polish off the Liver of Sulphur with fine grade emery paper. Texture the central band on

RESOURCES All materials: cooksongold.com Friskars clear mini decorative stamp: princesscrafty.co.uk

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SHOPPING

Making Jewellery

TOP 8 CHRISTMAS TREATS A selection of festive buys. By Zoë Lynham

Aluminium Blank, Fir Tree, 46 x 40mm, 65p metalclay.co.uk

Premo! Sculpey ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ Polymer Clay, 57g, £1.99 metalclay.co.uk

‘Snowflake’ round seed bead mix, 10g, £1.19 beadsdirect.co.uk

Swarovski Becharmed Pave Shooting Star Charm Bead, ‘Crystal Golden Shadow’, 14mm, £9.61 cooksongold.com

Kheops Par Puca Beads, ‘Crystal Sliperit’, 10g, £3.50 spoiltrottenbeads.co.uk

Gold Glitter Braiding Cord, 1mm thick, 2m, £3.29 beadsdirect.co.uk

Snowflake Charm, silver-plated, 8mm, £1.66 beadhouse.co.uk

ImpressArt Xmas Tree Design Stamp, 6mm, £6.24 cooksongold.com

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PROJECT

ICICLES & SNOWFLAKES FIONA POTTER

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love the magic of ice and snow where nature displays its beauty in glistening icicles, frost and snowflakes. This project uses Powertex – a liquid based sculpting medium – enhanced with a little snow glitter and crystals to create some unique winter jewellery.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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Powertex Fabric Hardener – white, blue and transparent Powercolor Pigments – turquoise and white Powertex Easy Varnish Powertex Stone Art Powertex Texture Balls in small Powertex Paintbrushes, approx. 2.5cm and 2cm, and round Natural fabrics such as T-shirt fabric, knitted scrim AB flatback crystals in shades of blue Manmade snow glitter Compressed cotton balls Cocktail sticks Oasis or old clay (to stand cocktail sticks in) Kitchen paper Plastic table covering Apron to protect clothing Vinyl gloves Disposable bowl or deep plate for Powertex liquid Texture mats Polymer clay roller (not a pasta machine) Polymer clay blade Ceramic or glass tile Sponge backed sandpaper, medium grit Sanding sticks Necklace cord and fi ndings Earwires Drying rack (optional) Basic jewellery tool kit

HOW TO MAKE 1. Cover your working area with plastic; a bin liner works well. Gather together white and blue Powertex fabric hardener, stir stick, vinyl gloves, Stone Art, texture mat and cutter. Wearing your gloves, pour white Powertex into a recycled plastic container. Add a little blue Powertex and stir until the colours are evenly mixed. 2. Add Stone Art to the Powertex and mix in well. Add more Stone Art and mix thoroughly each time until the mixture is firm, rather like unworked bread dough texture. Work well to make sure that the Stone Art fibres are well mixed and the Stone Art clay is fairly smooth and not sticking to your gloves. 3. Once mixed, you can either roll out with a Perspex clay roller or press out with your fingers until it is around 8mm thick and fairly even. Next use a texture mat and press firmly into the clay until the surface is textured. Use a clay blade to cut triangular icicle shapes, up to around 10cm x 1.5cm. I cut eight triangle pairs in three sizes (two pairs of the smallest) and one centre connector for a bracelet. The bracelet connector was placed over a glass jar to give a gently rounded shape. 4. Place four triangles on the plastic covered tile and lay a plastic drinking straw over the top. Pop a little Powertex onto the back then roll

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the top of the triangle over the straw and gently press into the wet Powertex; this will help with an even bond. Try to neaten the edges as much as you can, as this will reduce the amount of sanding and smoothing needed later. If you have any clay left, roll up and make a cylindrical dropper to create a daywear pendant. Carefully push a hole through from side to side to thread a cord through. Leave all pieces to dry until hard. 5. To make some contrasting beads, use compressed cotton balls. These are only drilled part-way through, so from the opposite end carefully push an awl through and work the hole all the way through. Cover some cocktail sticks with cling fi lm so the Powertex doesn’t stick and thread one cotton ball on each. Mix together a similar colour mix as Step 1 only a small amount is needed – and using a flat brush, brush Powertex on to the beads. Leave some plain and some can be rolled in to small Powertex Art balls for added texture. I use a block of oasis to push the sticks into while the balls dried. 6. Once the Stone Art pieces are fully dry, check them over and sand away any rough edges so nothing catches the skin or clothes. The ones on the right of the picture have been sanded but some texture is still left. Do this on all pieces including the bracelet centre and the dropper.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, FIONA POTTER

PROJECT

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PROJECT

7. Using a flat brush, Powercolor turquoise and Easy Varnish, mix a very small amount of the turquoise pigment. Wipe the excess off on some kitchen paper and then using the flat of your brush, swipe gently across the surface of each piece (I do front, back and sides). Next add a tiny speck of white Powercolour and some more Easy Varnish to the mix and repeat the brushing. Catch only the most raised areas, which will bring out even more texture. You might want to do a third dry brush layer with just white. 8. Using transparent Powertex (it looks white but dries clear) and a round brush, lightly brush over some of the raised areas then over a piece of paper, sprinkle snow glitter over the piece, tapping off the excess. Using the tip of the brush, dot some more transparent Powertex on each piece and then pop on some blue or AB flatback crystals. Do this for all the pieces and leave to dry for a few hours or overnight. Once thoroughly dry, brush off any loose snow glitter.

7

9. Lay out all of your designs with their findings and any additional beads. I incorporated some Swarowski Crystal Elements with AB coating and a mix of threads to enhance the ice theme. I used basic techniques including ribbon cord endings. Have fun with the materials; the design opportunities with this medium are endless.

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RESOURCES Powertex products: powertex.co.uk Flatback crystals: ebay.co.uk/bhp/flat-back-crystals Compressed cotton balls: hobbycraft.co.uk Snow glitter: glittermagic.co.uk

CONTACT Web: fionapotter.uk Email: workshops@fionapotter.uk Blog: fionapotterqd.blogspot.co.uk Instagram: instagram.com/fipotter Pintrest: uk.pinterest.com/FionaPotterUK Facebook: Fiona Potter Artist and Jewellery Maker

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PRODUCT REVIEW

IT’S…CHRISTMAS! This month we focus on a few festive treats to get us into the Christmas spirit! Whether you are wishing to add a little sparkle to your jewellery, or find the perfect packaging g g for your handmade handma gifts, look ok no ffurther. By Zoë Lynham CHARMS AND BEADS CH Kee the kids entertained during the festive Keep season with these wonderful enamel and seas rhinestone themed charms. Ranging in price rhin from 45p to 80p, these charms can be used to make earrings, pendant necklaces and charm bracelets. There are different designs available, bracel including a bell, candy cane, Christmas wreath includ poinsettia. and po charm measures 20x17mm and The Santa S costs 80p 80 whilst the stocking charm measures 18x16mm and costs 45p. You can also purchase Christmas charm bracelet kit for £3.95, which a Christm includes a silver plated rolo charm bracelet, plated jumprings and six different silver plat Christmas charms. (The charms may vary in Christm design). This kit would be perfect for a stocking fi ller, to keep the kids engaged whilst the Christmas dinner is being prepared! If you are looking to add a little sparkle to your jewellery, than this Emerald crystal snowflake charm/pendant would make the perfect addition to a necklace or bracelet. Priced at just £1.50 for a 20x18mm pendant, this makes a wonderful addition to your stash. Made in the Czech Republic, Preciosa have a range of fi re-polished beads that would add a beautiful shimmer to your hand-made jewellery. These 4mm Metallic Cranberry beads are just £3.15 for a pack of 100 beads. spoiltrottenbeads.co.uk

PACKAGING PA W When it comes to wrapping up your gifts this Christmas, good quality wrapping or packaging can add to the whole experience of unwrapping the gift. These pillow boxes are a brilliant way ca to package your hand-made gifts or store your jewellery in your workspace. These boxes are supplied flat, which makes them perfect to store until you need them, as they do not take up much su space and they are less likely to be damaged. The folded box measures 70x70x25mm when closed. sp They can be fi lled with materials such as tissue paper, to protect your jewellery and enhance the Th T experience of unwrapping the gift. These gold pillow boxes come in a silk fi nish and cost £3.13 for eex pack of 10. Other colours are available: black, silver, white, red and polka dot. ap If you would like to add a finishing touch to your pillow boxes, look no further than this beautiful satin ribbon. This 10mm wide, double-faced black satin ribbon, is ideal for wrapping be b around your pillow boxes and other medium to large jewellery boxes. Priced at just £2.58 for a aaro ccontinuous 25 metre roll, this will go a long way. Made from 100% polyester, it has a lovely sheen on both sides of the ribbon and is available in a range of widths and colours. o ccooksongold.com An alternative type of packaging for your handmade jewellery, are these lovely, gold organza A bags. A perfect colour for Christmas, measuring approx. 13x16cm (5x6.5in), they are b ccompetitively priced at just £1.94 for five bags. beadsdirect.co.uk b

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PRODUCT REVIEW

KITS AND TUTORIALS

POLYMER CLAY Beads Direct have this fantastic Christmas Fimo Clay kit available that is perfect for creating both jewellery and home décor for this festive season. This would be a fabulous medium to introduce your family to in the run up to Christmas, or, if like me, you are fascinated the possibilities of polymer clay, then it is a perfect starter kit for yourself or as a Christmas gift for a family member or friend. Included in this kit are seven different colours of Fimo Clay, a gloss varnish, a Christmas mould, a pack of four moulding tools, an acrylic roller, an acrylic water brush tool and a pack of fridge magnets, all in a handy storage box. As an experienced polymer clay artist myself, I think this is a great value kit and suitable for all year round. There are a range of moulds produced by Fimo, the hearts and jewellery mould also available on this website for £7.79 and £4.97 respectively, as well as an extensive range of Fimo polymer clay colours for around £1.99 a pack, you could add to your stash. Also available in limited quantity is the Staedtler Fimo metallic powder in silver. This powder is applied to the Fimo before it is hardened in the oven, to add a shiny, metallic finish to your pieces. Use the varnish in the kit above to seal the powder in place. Priced at £3.97 for a 3g pot, this powder will go a long way. beadsdirect.co.uk Adding colour to clay is not limited to traditional traditio metallic colours. This kit of ‘Golden Winter’ Cosmic Shimmer Mica Po Powders, offers you a choice of six beautiful colours, a mix of vibrant, bold metallics and subtle intereference meta shades, all perfect for the festive season. It comes with a pump spray bottle co and brush and can be used in different ways. These mica powders can be used on uncure uncured polymer clay, or mixed into the clay itself. They look amazing over black cl clay, but could also be used with clay to create natural themed jewellery, such as a berries and leaves, as well as themed Christmas jewellery. As they have a resin re added, it helps them stick well to the clay after baking, but a layer of var varnish will also enhance the colours and make them more vibrant. (As the powders are very finely milled, it also means they can be mixed with water aand spritzed over card or paper – perfect for those of you who like to make cards or create scrapbooks and ca journals.) At £12.45 for the whole kit, this is a great addition to your collection. It is available in other collec colour combinations and free postage and packaging is offered when yyou spend over £25. ejrbeads.co.uk ejrbeads.co.

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Beads Direct have a number of CDROMs in their ‘Complete Guide to Jewellery Making’ series. CD-ROM 12 is a Festive Beading edition, which contains 20 projects in PDF form, to help you prepare for Christmas. It will guide you through a range of designs, from simple to more detailed, covering home décor, accessories for your outfits and special touches for your gift wrapping. Examples of projects include novelty earrings, statement necklaces, wire Christmas trees and decorations for your Christmas tree. Priced at just £14.99, this CD-ROM is both Windows and MAC compatible. beadsdirect.co.uk

Spoilt Rotten Beads offer a range of downloadable patterns and this particular one really grabbed my eye. Whilst it is described as a Christmas decoration, I think those of you who are keen beaders could adapt it to jewellery. This is a fully illustrated Tila bead snowflake pattern by Chloe Menage. It combines size 11/0 Miyuki seed beads with the Tila beads and costs just £2.75. spoiltrottenbeads.co.uk If you would like to try a kit, these cute little robin earrings may be just what you are lookingg for. This kit comes with fully instructions as illustrated, step-by-step ste well as all al the beads, thread and a needle needl required to complete the earrings. The only additional ear requirements are a pair of re flat-nose pliers and a pair of scissors. This kit is priced at s £6.95 and is given a difficulty £ rating by SpellBound Beads, r of o 6 out of 10. spellboundbead.co.uk sp

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BLOG

IT’S A JEWELLER’S LIFE We share life behind the scenes with blogger Anna Mcloughlin, who is a gold and silversmith with a passion for using environmentally friendly and ethically sourced materials in her designs. This month (and next month, as this has turned out to be a bit too long to fit into a single issue!), my blog is inspired by an email that I received a couple of weeks ago from Worcestershire Chamber of Commerce. It was from a lady that works in the Department for International Trade. She had found me via my Etsy shop and asked if I would like to meet with her to discuss how they might be able to help my business. I explained that although I do get the occasional overseas order that I wasn’t really looking to sell internationally, but that I’d be happy to meet and have a chat anyway as I knew that earlier this year they had helped (as in ‘paid for’) a fellow Malvern-based crafts person to exhibit at the British Craft Trade Fair. Also, it was an excuse for an hour out of my workshop and a nice coffee in town! She offered me a couple of opportunities that I guess that most people would have bitten her arm off for; to pay all my expenses to travel to either the US or Sweden to exhibit my jewellery

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at a big trade fair! The thing is though, I really don’t need or want to travel all that way to make a living out of selling my jewellery. I run an ethical business and do my very best to live a ‘green’ lifestyle. I know it’s not perfect and there is probably more I could do, but one thing I do feel very strongly about is unnecessary flying. I also respect others’ choices so I’m not going to use this a place to try and preach eco-living, but the facts are out there if you want to look them up, but basically, I turned down her offer. It got me thinking though, about the places in which I do choose to sell my work and thought you all might find it useful if I write about my experiences with the various places I’ve tried. I’ll start with online selling as, let’s face it, everyone expects you to be on the web in one form or another these days. If you’re just starting out, then probably the easiest place to start promoting and selling whatever you make is on social media. I’m a bit old school and really like Twitter as that was my first social media

account, probably about 10 years ago now! Then I remember Facebook coming along and thinking, nah, it’ll never take off (guess I was a tad wrong with my prediction)! So anyway, I decided eventually that I’d better get myself a Facebook account and set up a business page. Then, the whole social media frenzy began and now, if I’m honest (and I bet I’m not alone in this), I’m feeling a little like I’m struggling to keep up with the many different options. Social media accounts are easy enough to set up, but they unfortunately don’t run themselves. I’m now also ‘on’ Instagram and Pinterest and am currently trying to get up to speed with exactly how they operate on a business level, but maybe that’s a whole other blog! So, next up is an actual ‘www’ website. I’ve been through a few versions over the years and have also experimented with full a blown e-commerce store. Having chatted with lots of my fellow artisans over the past 10 years, building a website seems to be something

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My website

that quite a lot of people think they can’t do themselves and that they have to pay a specific ‘web designer’ £1000s to set up and run for them. Well, I’m a bit more stubborn than that (or maybe just a cheapskate!) and remember thinking, if I can draw and write with a pencil on a piece of paper, then how hard can it be? I haven’t really ventured into coding a whole site from scratch, but you don’t need to. There are hundreds of template-style websites that will provide you with a really professional looking website completely free, as long as you don’t mind having an advert for the website company on there too. I do now pay an annual fee for my template-based website with Squarespace, but it’s a fraction of what it would cost to employ a web designer. My other, and actually the main reason for choosing a template site is that I

My Etsy site

want to be able to update it at a time that suits me, which is quite often 11 o’clock at night! The next online place I’m going to talk about is Etsy. I first discovered Etsy many years ago when it first started. Back then, it was mainly American sellers but there were a handful of UK on there, and at 20 cents to list an item for sale, I thought it was worth a shot. What Etsy don’t tell you though, is that if you want to have any hope of people actually being able to see your wares after the first 10 minutes of putting them there, you’re going to have to ‘re-list’ and pay that 20 cents again, regularly, probably a couple of times a week, at least until your shop gains a bit of traction and people start clicking. So, Etsy isn’t really as cheap as they first make out, as you also have to pay a percentage fee when an item is sold. However, I’ve persevered,

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TOP FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Some pictures of my jewellery, recently posted on social media

and over the last two or three years, my Etsy shop seems to have really taken off and I’m now getting a lot of views, with people ‘favouriting’ my work and most importantly sales! Etsy has also recently released a separate feature where you can pay a monthly fee of around £15 for a standalone website that doesn’t have the Etsy branding all over it. I’ve got this set up as a link on my main website now, so that it looks like I have a separate e-commerce store. Etsy gives you all the viewing stats and although it’s not ranking as highly as Etsy itself, the views and sales are slowly creeping up. More on selling in actual real life places next month. Find out more about Anna’s jewellery at annafinejewellery.co.uk

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

BASIC TECHNIQUES HOW TO MAKE A WRAPPED LOOP

1. Thread a bead onto a head or eye pin. Grip the wire with round nose pliers next to the bead.

2. Bend the wire above the plier jaw to a right angle. You will need about 2mm of wire above the bead before the bend.

3. Move the plier jaws to sit at the top of the bend.

4. With your thumb push the wire back around the pliers, keeping it tight to the jaw.

5. Keep pushing the wire around the jaw until you meet the bead.

6. Move the pliers around the loop and continue to bend the wire around until it is facing out at a right angle and you have a complete loop.

7. If attaching the loop to a chain this is the stage to do that. Use a pair of chain nose pliers to hold across the loop firmly.

8. Wrap the wire around the neck of the loop until it meets the bead. Snip off any excess wire and push the end against the coil to finish.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SIAN HAMILTON

MAKING A SIMPLE LOOP

1. Thread the bead onto a head or eye pin and cut the pin about 1cm above the bead. Bend the wire to a right angle above the bead.

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2. Using round nose pliers, grasp the wire at the very end and curl it around the plier jaws.

3. Roll the wire around to meet the bead. If it does sit centrally move the plier jaws around the loop to sit by the bead away from the open end. Bend the loop back to sit directly above the bead.

4. Use chain nose pliers to tighten the loop by twisting it from side to side. Do not pull it outwards as that will distort the shape.

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‘Tropical Palms’ Bracelet by Starman TrendSetter Diane Fitzgerald.

77057JT

77063JT

79086JT

77062JT

ASK YOUR LOCAL BEAD STORE FOR CZECHMATES® OR ORDER FROM: Creative Beadcraft Ltd www.CreativeBeadCraft.co.uk Fru Parla www.FruParla.se Gyöngysziget www.Gyongysziget.hu Hobby Perline www.HobbyPerline.com

I-Beads www.I-Beads.eu Kadoro www.Kadoro.pl Natascha Kralen www.NataschaKralen.nl Old Bicycle Shop www.OldBicycleShop.co.uk

Perlenexpress.de www.PerlenExpress.de Perles & Co www.PerlesAndCo.com Robin’s Beads www.Robins-Beads.co.uk The Southampton Bead Shop www.TheSouthamptonBeadShop.co.uk

Tanzee Designs www.TanzeeDesigns.co.uk WirWar Kralen www.WirWarKralen.nl AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTOR

EUROPE: Koralex Wholesale: +420 483 360 288 · www.CzechBeads.eu · Sales@SeedBeads.eu US, ASIA: Starman Wholesale: +1 888 683 2323 · www.StarmanInc.com · Sales@StarmanInc.com IBC_MAJ_113.indd 1

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PRECIOSA Bugles D E S I G N BY P R E C I O SA O R N E L A

DISTRIBUTORS OF PRECIOSA Traditional Czech BeadsTM Beads Direct Ltd. | 01509 218028 | www.beadsdirect.co.uk The Spellbound Bead Co. | 01543 417650 | www.spellboundbead.co.uk Creative Beadcraft Ltd. | 01494 778818 | www.creativebeadcraft.co.uk Beads Unlimited | 01273 740777 | www.beadsunlimited.co.uk Spoilt Rotten Beads | 01353 749853 | www.spoiltrottenbeads.co.uk The Bead Shop (Nottingham) Ltd. | 0115 958 8899 | www.mailorder-beads.co.uk Beadworks UK Ltd. | 0118 932 3701 | www.beadworks.co.uk

PRECIOSA Bugles ART No.: 351 12 001 SIZE: 8,9“

PRECIOSA Traditional Czech BeadsTM PRECIOSA ORNELA, a.s. | Zásada 317, 468 25 Czech Republic P +420 488 117 711, F +420 483 312 292, E beads@preciosa.com preciosa-ornela.com

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What’s for Dinner? MALAYSIAN SPICED SEA BASS WITH BROWN RICE

MOROCCAN LAMB CUTLETS WITH ROASTED PEPPER COUSCOUS SALAD

PREP + COOK TIME 20 MINUTES SERVES 2

Lj 1 garlic clove

PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

Lj 2cm piece ginger Lj 6 shallots, 2 chopped into quarters

Lj 80ml (⅓ cup) extra virgin olive oil

and 4 sliced into rings

Lj 2 teaspoons ras el hanout,

Lj 3 teaspoons oil Lj 2 sea bass fillets Lj 200g rainbow chard, sliced

Lj

Lj 1 red chilli, sliced (more or less,

Lj

RECIPE FROM: WWW.UKSHALLOT.COM

to suit your taste) Lj 1 tablespoon soy sauce Lj 1 lime Lj 1 250g pack ready-steamed brown rice

1 Put the ginger, garlic, 2 chopped shallots and 1 teaspoon of oil into a small blender/herb chopper and whiz to a paste. Score the fish skins and rub the shallot paste into both sides of the fish. Marinate in the fridge for 30 mins or longer. 2 Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan with a lid. When the oil is sizzling, scrape most of the marinade from the skin side then lay the fish in, skin side down, cook for 1-2 minutes until the skin is crisp but the fish isn’t cooked through. 3 Gently lift out the fish and set aside on a warm plate. Toss the chard, remaining shallots and chilli in the pan, reduce the heat to medium then tip in the soy sauce and the juice of half the lime. Toss until the veg is well coated. 4 Lay the fish back on top and put the lid on to steam for 3-4 minutes until the greens are wilted and a little toasty, and the fish is cooked through. 5 Lift the fish onto warm plates and tip the rice into the frying pan with the greens. Toss together for 2 minutes and taste to check seasoning. Dish up the rice and add an extra squeeze of lime to serve.

WWW.FOODTOLOVEMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Lj Lj Lj

CHINESE PORK & NOODLE SOUP PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj

Lj 1.5 litres (6 cups) chicken stock Lj 500ml (2 cups) water Lj 8 slices dried shiitake mushrooms

Lj

plus extra for sprinkling 12 french-trimmed lamb cutlets 1 medium green pepper (200g) 1 medium yellow pepper (200g) 1 medium red pepper (200g) 1 teaspoon sea salt flakes 500ml (2 cups) water 30g butter 400g (2 cups) couscous 200g houmous 1½ tablespoons finely chopped preserved lemon rind 3.75g (¼ cup) torn fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

Lj 4cm piece fresh ginger (20g),

cut into matchsticks Lj 270g dried ramen noodles Lj 500g baby pak choi, separated Lj 60ml (¼ cup) soy sauce Lj 80ml (⅓ cup) mirin Lj 400g chinese barbecued pork,

sliced thinly Lj 4 spring onions, sliced thinly Lj 1 fresh long red chilli, sliced thinly Lj 9g (⅓ cup) coarsely chopped

fresh coriander

1 Place stock, the water, mushrooms and ginger in a large saucepan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer 10 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, cook noodles in a large saucepan of boiling water until tender; drain. 3 Return stock mixture to the boil; add pak choi, simmer until wilted. Stir in sauce and mirin. 4 Divide noodles among serving bowls; top with pork, onion, chilli and coriander. Pour over hot stock mixture.

1 Preheat grill. 2 Combine half the oil, spice and lamb in a large bowl; turn lamb to coat in mixture. 3 Quarter peppers; discard seeds and membranes. Place, skin-side up, on a lined oven tray, drizzle with remaining oil; sprinkle with salt. Roast under a hot grill about 15 minutes or until skin blisters and blackens. Cover pepper with cling film or paper for 5 minutes; peel away skin, then slice thinly. 4 Bring water and butter to the boil in a medium saucepan. Stir in couscous; cover, stand 5 minutes, fluffing with a fork occasionally. 5 Spoon houmous into a bowl; sprinkle with extra ras el hanout. 6 Combine couscous, pepper, lemon and parsley in a large bowl. 7 Cook lamb on a heated oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue) about 4 minutes each side or until cooked. 8 Serve lamb with couscous and spiced houmous.

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What’s for Dinner? TOP TIPS This classic French salad has its origins in Provence. Now that it has become a global favourite, there are many versions. However, the traditional star ingredient is tuna.

30 MINUTES NIÇOISE SALAD RECIPE ON PAGE 105

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What’s for Dinner? TOP TIPS Our good old standby has had a little makeover. Mixed veggie chips add extra elements of flavour to a family favourite.

30 MINUTES

STEAK & CHIPS WITH A MODERN TWIST RECIPE ON PAGE 105

WWW.FOODTOLOVEMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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What’s for Dinner? TOP TIPS You can use 350g raw peeled tiger prawns instead of the chicken – just add them with the noodles and ensure they are pink and cooked through before serving.

SPICY & WARMING CHICKEN & TURMERIC VERMICELLI SOUP RECIPE OPPOSITE

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What’s for Dinner? CHICKEN & TURMERIC VERMICELLI SOUP

NIÇOISE SALAD PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

PREP + COOK TIME 50 MINUTES SERVES 4–6

STEAK & CHIPS WITH A MODERN TWIST PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

Lj 4 eggs Lj 150g vermicelli rice noodles

Lj 155g green beans

Lj 1 small potato (120g)

Lj 7.5cm piece of fresh root ginger,

Lj 4 x 250g tuna steaks

Lj 1 small sweet potato (250g)

Lj 1 small red onion (100g),

Lj 2 small parsnips (240g),

peeled and cut into 3-4 slices Lj 7.5cm piece of fresh turmeric,

Lj

RECIPE FROM: FEASTS BY SABRINA GHAYOUR, £20 WWW.OCTOPUSBOOKS.CO.UK, IMAGES KRIS KIRKHAM IMAGERY CREDIT: KIRK KIRKHAM

Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj

Lj Lj Lj

halved lengthways (or 1 teaspoon ground turmeric) 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tablespoon chilli flakes (optional) 2.25 litres cold water (or use fresh vegetable or chicken stock) 300g shredded cooked chicken 2 carrots, peeled, halved lengthways and sliced 3–4 handfuls of chopped kale, tough stalks discarded 4 spring onions, thinly sliced from root to tip 1 small bunch (about 30g) of mint, leaves stripped, rolled up tightly and sliced into ribbons 1 small bunch (about 30g) of fresh coriander, roughly chopped maldon sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

1 Rinse rice vermicelli under cold water, put it into a heatproof bowl and pour over enough boiling water to cover the noodles. Soak 10 minutes, then drain and rinse under cold running cold water. Set aside. 2 Put the ginger, turmeric, garlic and chilli, if using, into a large saucepan over a medium heat and pour in water or stock. Season well and stir, then add chicken. Bring to a simmer, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for 30 minutes. 3 Remove and discard fresh turmeric, then add the noodles, carrots and kale and cook for a further 5 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Check and adjust the seasoning. Remove the pan from the heat, stir in the spring onions, mint and coriander. Serve immediately.

WWW.FOODTOLOVEMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Lj Lj Lj Lj

cut into thin wedges 2 small vine-ripened tomatoes (180g), cut into wedges 160g (1 cup) caperberries 90g (½ cup) seeded black olives 90g baby rocket leaves

quartered lengthways Lj vegetable oil, for shallow-frying Lj 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Lj 4 x 200g porterhouse steaks Lj 200g thinly sliced chestnut

mushrooms Lj 300ml single cream

LEMON DRESSING Lj 2 tablespoons finely grated lemon rind Lj 1 tablespoon lemon juice Lj 60ml (¼ cup) extra virgin olive oil

1 Place eggs in a small saucepan, cover with water; bring to the boil, simmer 5 minutes. Drain; cool, then peel. Cut into quarters. 2 Meanwhile, boil, steam or microwave beans until just tender, refresh under cold water. Cool. 3 Make lemon dressing. 4 Cook tuna on a heated oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue) for 2 minutes each side or until cooked as desired. 5 Arrange eggs and beans between serving plates with onion, tomato, caperberries and olives. Top with tuna and rocket; drizzle with dressing. LEMON DRESSING

Combine ingredients in a screw-top jar; shake well.

Lj 60g baby spinach leaves

1 Using a mandoline or sharp knife, cut potato and sweet potato into 2mm thick slices. 2 Heat enough vegetable oil in a large frying pan to come 2cm up the side of the pan; shallow-fry potato, sweet potato and parsnip, over medium heat, in batches, about 4 minutes or until golden and crisp. Drain on absorbent paper; season to taste. 3 Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat; cook beef about 5 minutes each side or until cooked as desired. Remove from pan; cover to keep warm. 4 Meanwhile, heat remaining olive oil in same pan; cook mushrooms over medium heat, stirring, about 4 minutes or until tender. Add cream, bring to the boil; simmer 3 minutes or until thickened and reduced slightly. Add spinach leaves; stir until just wilted. 5 Serve steaks topped with mushroom sauce and chips.

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New year’s eve party

y p p Ha New ! r a e Y If you’re planning a party on new year’s eve, we’ve got it covered, from finger food and drinks to stunning bakes.

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New year’s eve party TOP TIP

PARTY PIECE GINGERBREAD CAKE WITH MAPLE BUTTERCREAM RECIPE OPPOSITE

WWW.FOODTOLOVEMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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RECIPE FROM: BENJAMINA EBUEHI FOR WWW.BACOFOIL.CO.UK

Once the sponge is baked, wrap the layer cakes in cling film and pop in the fridge for 30 minutes. This makes it easier to cut the cake in two and keeps the surface of the sponge really smooth, stopping crumbs getting in the way during icing!


New year’s eve party 30 MINUTES

TOP TIP Make well ahead of time to allow a couple of hours for cooling.

CRANBERRY MOJITO RECIPE OPPOSITE

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New year’s eve party

PREP + COOLING TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

40 mint leaves juice of 4 limes 12 tablespoons (60ml) cranberry syrup 12 tablespoons (60ml) rum ice soda water

CRANBERRY SYRUP

RECIPE FROM: WWW.BERRYWORLD.COM

500g cranberries 300g (1⅖ cups) sugar 250ml (1 cup) water

1 To make the syrup, put the cranberries, sugar and water into a saucepan and bring to a simmer and allow to bubble for 10 minutes until the sugar has dissolved and the berries burst. 2 Leave to cool, allowing the cranberries to steep for a few hours or overnight. Strain the mixture into a jug, pushing it through the sieve with the back of a spoon. 3 To make a mojito put mint leaves in a jug with the lime juice, mix and crush together with the handle of a wooden spoon. Add syrup, rum and ice and stir well or shake in a cocktail mixer. Divide between four glasses, top up with soda water and add a sprig of mint and a few cranberries.

COOK’S

NOTES CRANBERRY MOJITO Use white rum for a classic mojito flavour or spiced rum for a richer more Christmassy taste.

WWW.FOODTOLOVEMAGAZINE.CO.UK

GINGERBREAD CAKE WITH MAPLE BUTTERCREAM PREP + COOK TIME 1.5 HOURS SERVES 16-20

SPONGE 225g unsalted butter 60g treacle 150g golden syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 150g brown sugar 300ml full−fat milk 2 eggs 350g (2⅕ cups) plain flour 2 teaspoons bicarbonate soda ½ teaspoon baking powder 50g stem ginger, finely chopped plus syrup ½ teaspoon salt 4½ teaspoons ground ginger 3 teaspoons ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon allspice 50ml stem ginger syrup 3 tablespoons water

MAPLE BUTTERCREAM 250g (1 cup) unsalted butter, softened 180g (1⅕ cups) icing sugar 50ml maple syrup

OPTIONAL DECORATIONS desiccated coconut gold leaf sugared cranberries

1 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. 2 Heat the butter, treacle, golden syrup and vanilla in a saucepan until melted. Whisk in the brown sugar and set aside to cool. 3 In a jug, whisk together the milk and eggs. Pour this into the butter and sugar mixture and whisk until fully combined. 4 In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder, ginger, salt and spices. Make a well in the centre and pour the wet ingredients into

the dry. Stir until there are no large lumps visible. 5 Divide the batter evenly between two tins and bake for 40−45 minutes. 6 While the cakes bake, heat the stem ginger syrup with 3 tablespoons of water. Let it come to the boil before removing from the heat. 7 Once the cakes are fully cooked, poke the surface with a skewer and pour over the hot syrup allowing it to soak through. Let the cakes cool before removing them from their tins and placing on a wire rack. 8 When the layers are completely cool, wrap them in cling film and place in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to an hour to firm up. Once chilled, unwrap the cakes and use a sharp serrated knife to cut each layer into two so you have four layers in total. Set aside while you make the buttercream. 9 To make the buttercream, beat softened butter for 3−4 minutes until pale and creamy. Add in icing sugar and beat for another 5−6 minutes 10 Pour in the maple syrup and beat until fully incorporated. 11 Assemble the cake by sandwiching each layer with some buttercream. When you get to the last layer place it cut side up, giving you a completely flat top. Cover the whole cake with a thin layer of buttercream for a semi− naked effect. Swirl some extra buttercream on the top of the cake before decorating with desiccated coconut, gold leaf and sugared cranberries.

PHOTO: DOMINIK PABIS/ISTOCK

CRANBERRY MOJITO

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New year’s eve party TOP TIP The goat’s cheese can be replaced with blue cheese. To freeze, place uncooked parcels on a tray and open freeze before carefully covering in foil. Cook from frozen for a few minutes more

HERBY GOLDEN TURKEY & CRANBERRY SAUSAGE ROLLS PREP + COOK TIME 40 MINUTES MAKES 10 LARGE OR 20 SMALL SAUSAGE ROLLS

RECIPE FROM: WWW.BERRYWORLD.CO.UK

375g pack of ready rolled puff pastry 30g butter 1 small onion, peeled and diced 300g leftover golden turkey meat, cut into 1cm dices 200g sausage meat or stuffing 8 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped 75g cranberry sauce (drained) ⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 medium egg, lightly beaten

CRANBERRY & GOAT’S CHEESE FILO PARCELS PREP + COOK TIME 45 MINUTES MAKES 20

These golden, tasty crispy parcels are perfect for parties, plus they can be made and frozen ahead of time and simply cooked on the day. 250g fresh cranberries 100g (1⅕ cups) caster sugar juice and grated zest of half an orange filo pastry (10 x 30 x 26cm sheets approx 220g packet) 200g goat’s cheese 8 tablespoons olive oil rocket leaves

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1 Place cranberries in a saucepan with the sugar and add the orange zest and juice. Bring to a simmer and cook gently for 8−10 minutes until the cranberries have softened. Cool. 2 Pre−heat oven to 200°C/180°C fan. Place a sheet of pastry on work surface, brush with olive oil, place another sheet on top, brush evenly with more oil. Cut into four squares. Repeat until you have 20 squares. 3 Place a 10g chunk of goat’s cheese in the middle of each square and top with a small teaspoonful of cranberry sauce, fold pastry around filling and scrunch the top together, brush with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Reserve remaining sauce. 4 Bake for approximately 10−12 minutes until golden and crisp. Serve warm with sauce, garnish with rocket.

1 Preheat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. 2 Unroll pastry, place on a floured work surface, cut in half lengthways. 3 Melt butter in a frying pan; add onion and fry until soft. Cool slightly. 4 Place turkey and sausage meat (or stuffing) in a bowl. Add cooled onion, sage, cranberry sauce, nutmeg, a pinch of salt and a good grinding of black pepper. Mix until well combined. 5 Shape the mixture into two long sausages the same length as the sheets of pastry. Lay one sausage down the centre of each piece of pastry. Brush edges with beaten egg then fold pastry over the filling and press edges together firmly. Mark edge of pastry with a fork to make sure rolls are well sealed. Neatly cut into even−sized portions 5cm long for larger rolls or 2.5cm for smaller rolls. 6 Place the sausage rolls on trays and brush with the remaining beaten egg. Bake for 15 minutes until puffed up and browned. 7 Allow to cool for a few minutes. Serve immediately.

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


New year’s eve party SERVE WARM HERBY GOLDEN TURKEY & CRANBERRY SAUSAGE ROLLS

RECIPE FROM: RACHEL GREEN FOR WWW.GOLDENTURKEYS.CO.UK IMAGE MICHAEL POWELL

RECIPE OPPOSITE

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New year’s eve party TOP TIP Wrap these pretty cookies up for Christmas presents and hang them with lengths of coloured ribbon on the tree for decorations. Increase the amount of ginger if you would like them extra spicy. Bake any leftover cookie shapes in the oven for 4–6 minutes, until firm.

112

GREAT GIFTS GINGER & CINNAMON STAINED-GLASS WINDOW COOKIES RECIPE OPPOSITE

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


New year’s eve party GINGER & CINNAMON STAINED-GLASS WINDOW COOKIES PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES MAKES 25

1 Preheat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan. Line 2 large baking sheets with baking parchment. 2 Put the butter, sugar, golden syrup, treacle and spices into a pan over a gentle heat. Cook for 3–4 minutes, allowing the butter and sugar to melt and dissolve, stirring from time to time. Then remove from the heat and stir in the bicarbonate of soda and flour in batches, stirring well between each addition, until you have a smooth, fairly stiff dough. Allow the dough to cool down for a few minutes, so it is easy to roll out. 3 Roll out the dough in between two large sheets of baking parchment to the thickness of 3mm, and then use a 9cm star or snowflake cutter to stamp out the large shapes. Scrunch up and re−roll the dough a few times to get 20–25 cookies. 4 Put the large cookies onto a baking sheet as you go. With a 4cm star or snowflake−shaped cookie cutter, stamp out the centre of the large shapes. You can put these small shapes onto a plate or another lined baking sheet to cook off later. Or you could create a little floating star or snowflake in the centre of your

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RECIPE FROM: TERESA BOVEY FOR SEASONAL SPUDS

RECIPE FROM: BAKE BY LORRAINE PASCALE IS OUT NOW, PUBLISHED BY BLUEBIRD (£20). IMAGE CREDITS: MYLES NEW

100g (⅖ cup) butter 100g (⅔ cup) soft light brown sugar 2 tablespoons golden syrup 1 teaspoon treacle 1 tablespoon ground ginger 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon large pinch of ground cloves pinch of chilli powder (optional) ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda 250g plain flour 5 plain boiled sweets (in different colours), roughly chopped

cookies by stamping small shapes from the cut−out centres using a 2cm cutter. Place these little shapes (if using) inside the large cookie shapes. 5 Using a separate colour for each cookie, sprinkle a little of the chopped boiled sweets into the centre of each large star or snowflake or around the outside of the little shapes, if using. Using the tip of a wooden skewer, make a hole at the top of each shape. 6 Bake the cookies in the oven for 6–8 minutes, until going firm and beginning to darken, and the boiled sweet has melted to fill the hole. Remove them from the oven and, before they set, use the wooden skewer again to widen the ribbon hole a little more. Leave them to cool completely and then serve.

BOMBAY SQUEAK CAKES PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 2-3

15g butter 77g pancetta or chopped smoked bacon pieces 3−4 shallots, chopped 1 garlic clove, crushed ½ red chilli, finely chopped 1 teaspoon garam masala 350g cooked mashed potato 15 cooked brussels sprouts, chopped Chopped coriander to garnish

1 Pre−heat oven to 180°C/160°C fan. 2 Fry pancetta or bacon and shallots in butter for 2−3 minutes, add the garlic and chilli and cook for a further 30 seconds. 3 Place into a bowl, stir in the mash and sprouts. Mix well and season and divide the mixture between 6 well−greased yorkshire pudding tins. Bake for 15−20 minutes. 4 These can be made in advance and refrigerated prior to cooking. Serve with cold meats and tomato or onion chutney.

113


New year’s eve party EGGNOG PREP + COOK TIME 30 MINUTES MAKES 8 SMALL GLASSES

RECIPE FROM: WWW.BRITISHASPARAGUS.COM

4 eggs 120g (½ cup) sugar, plus 1 teaspoon extra 450ml (1⅔ cups) milk 1 cinnamon stick 3 cloves 250ml (1 cup) single cream ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg ¼ teaspoon allspice powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 tablespoons dark rum 2 tablespoons whiskey a little ground cinnamon for garnish

ASPARAGUS CIGARS PREP + COOK TIME 35 MINUTES SERVES 16

2 bundles of asparagus 4 sheets of ready−made filo pastry 50g (⅕ cup) butter melted 2 handfuls of finely grated parmesan

1 Pre−heat the oven to 190°C/ 170°C fan. 2 Cook the asparagus in well−salted water for just 1−2 minutes once it has come back to the boil. 3 Drain and cool asparagus in cold water then drain again, drying thoroughly with a tea towel. 4 Cut the asparagus two−thirds of the way down, either discarding the

114

lower stem or saving it for a soup. Take one sheet of filo pastry and brush it lightly but thoroughly all over with butter. Cut each piece into four. Place each asparagus spear along the bottom of your filo piece and roll snugly but not over tightly. 5 Picking it up with your fingers brush the outside with butter again, then scatter the grated parmesan over the top of each cigar. Lay them down on a tray lined with greaseproof paper with the outside edge of the filo facing down on the paper to stop them unravelling when they cook. Grind over lots of black pepper. Bake for 15−18 minutes until deep golden and crispy.

1 Separate the eggs. Whisk the egg yolks to a light, foamy mass in a mixing bowl. Add the sugar and continue whisking until fluffy. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg whites and 1 teaspoon sugar until stiff. Set aside. 2 Gently heat the milk, cinnamon and cloves in a saucepan, but do not boil. Stir half the milk into the egg yolk mixture to even out their temperatures, then return the egg and milk mixture to the saucepan. Reheat over low to medium heat until the mixture thickens, stirring continuously with a wooden spoon. Do not allow to boil! Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the cream. Remove the cinnamon stick and cloves and leave the eggnog to cool. 3 Season with nutmeg, allspice and vanilla extract to taste and add the rum and whiskey. Gently fold in the whisked egg whites and refrigerate the eggnog for at least 1 hour. Transfer to glasses and serve garnished with whipped cream and ground cinnamon.  

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


New year’s eve party TOP TIP

RECIPE FROM: NEW YORK CHRISTMAS BY LARS WENTRUP AND LISA NIESCHLAG (MURDOCH BOOKS, £20). PHOTOGRAPHY BY LISA NIESCHLAG AND JULIA CAWLEY

For a dairy−free eggnog, try using soy, almond, rice or coconut milk.

CREAMY LUXURY EGGNOG RECIPE OPPOSITE

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115


Book Extract

BOOK COVER

SLOWCOOKER COMFORT FOOD by The Australian Woman’s Weekly Published in 2017 by Bounty Books based on materials licensed to it by Bauer Media Books, Australia, £17.99 www.octopusbooks.co.uk

This book is available to Food to Love readers at £3.50 each, plus free UK P&P. To order, please call 01903 828503 quoting, BO005. Ofer subject to availability, please allow 7 days for delivery.

BOOK EXTRACT What we choose to fuel our bodies with not only affects our weight, but our whole wellbeing. A good diet, full of colour and variety, can be transformative. Each colour group contains a unique set of healthy benefits, so we have some top treats to unlock the potential of eating well, and what that can do for your life... 116

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


Book Extract PERFECT WITH CHEESE CHUNKY QUINCE, ROSÉ & VANILLA PRESERVE RECIPE ON PAGE 119

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117


Book Extract

DELICIOUS COMBO

MULLED WINE PORK WITH RED CABBAGE RECIPE OPPOSITE

118

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


Book Extract MULLED WINE PORK WITH RED CABBAGE PREP + COOK TIME 8 HOURS 30 MINUTES SERVES 6

Lj 3 star anise Lj 2 cinnamon sticks Lj 2 teaspoons caraway seeds Lj 6 whole cloves Lj 2 sprigs fresh rosemary,

chopped coarsely Lj 2 sprigs fresh tarragon,

chopped coarsely Lj 2 cloves garlic, quartered Lj 2 medium red onions (340g),

cut into thick wedges Lj 1.4kg piece boneless pork shoulder, Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj

rind removed 250ml (1 cup) dry red wine 250ml (1 cup) chicken stock 2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ½ small red cabbage (600g), cut into 6 thick slices 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon leaves, extra sweet potato mash 2 medium orange sweet potatoes (800g), chopped coarsely 1 large potato (300g), chopped coarsely 60g butter

1 Tie spices, herbs and garlic in a muslin bag; secure with kitchen string. Place onion in a 4.5-litre (18-cup) slow cooker. Top with muslin bag and pork. Pour combined wine, stock, sauce, sugar and vinegar over pork. Cook, covered, on low, for 7 hours 30 minutes. Add cabbage; cook, covered, on low for a further 30 minutes. Discard muslin bag; season to taste. 2 Make sweet potato mash. 3 Remove pork from cooker; break into large chunks. Serve with mash and cabbage and onion mixture; drizzled with cooking liquid. Top with extra tarragon.

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COOK’S

NOTES

CHUNKY QUINCE, ROSÉ & VANILLA PRESERVE PREP + COOK TIME 8 HOURS MAKES 2.5KG

Lj 2kg quince Lj 500ml (2 cups) rosé wine

SWEET POTATO MASH Boil, steam or microwave sweet potato and potato until tender; drain. Mash vegetables with butter in a medium bowl until smooth; season to taste.

SERVING SUGGESTION Accompany with baby spinach and crusty bread to mop up the juices.

SERVING SUGGESTION Accompany with a sharp cheese and crackers.

Lj 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways,

seeds scraped Lj 1 cinnamon stick Lj 1.3kg (6 cups) white (granulated)

sugar, approximately Lj 125ml (½ cup) lemon juice

1 Peel, quarter and core quinces; reserve cores. Tie reserved cores in muslin. Chop quince coarsely. 2 Combine quince, muslin bag, wine, vanilla pod and seeds, and cinnamon in a 4.5-litre (18-cup) slow cooker; stir to combine. Cook, covered, on high, for 6 hours, stirring occasionally for even cooking, or until quince is tender and ruby-coloured. Discard muslin bag, vanilla pod and cinnamon. 3 Measure fruit mixture, allow 225g (1 cup) sugar for each 370g (1 cup) of fruit mixture. Return quince mixture and sugar to cooker; add juice. Increase heat to reduce setting on high; boil, stirring frequently, for 1 hour or until mixture gels when tested. 4 Pour hot quince mixture into hot sterilised jars, seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold.

119


Book Extract TOMATO SOUP WITH BASIL DUMPLINGS PREP + COOK TIME 9 HOURS SERVES 4

Lj 1kg over-ripe roma (egg)

tomatoes, cored Lj 400g canned whole tomatoes Lj 3 cloves garlic, peeled Lj 2 medium brown onions (300g),

quartered Lj 1 fresh long red chilli, chopped

coarsely Lj 1 stalk celery (150g), trimmed,

chopped coarsely Lj 200g (1 cup) drained roasted red

peppers, chopped coarsely Lj 3.75g (¼ cup) loosely packed fresh

small basil leaves or micro basil BASIL DUMPLINGS Lj 150g (1 cup) self-raising flour Lj 60g cold butter, chopped Lj 1 egg, beaten lightly Lj 2 tablespoons basil pesto Lj 2 tablespoons milk, approximately

APPLE BUTTER PREP + COOK TIME 7 HOURS MAKES 1.1KG

Lj 1kg apples, peeled, cored, Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj Lj

sliced thinly 55g (¼ cup) caster sugar 1 teaspoon ground ginger ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon cooking (kosher) salt 250ml (1 cup) apple juice 4 whole cloves 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways

1 Combine apples, sugar, ginger, cinnamon, salt, juice and cloves in a 4.5-litre (18-cup) slow cooker. Cook, covered, on high, for 6 hours. 2 Uncover, add vanilla pod. Increase heat to reduce setting on medium; boil, uncovered, for 20 minutes, stirring, until thick and browned. Discard cloves. 3 Pour hot apple butter into hot sterilised jars, seal immediately. Label and date jars when cold.

120

COOK’S

NOTES BASIL DUMPLINGS Place lour in a medium bowl; using your ingertips, rub in butter. Stir in egg, pesto and enough of the milk to make a soft, sticky dough.

SERVING SUGGESTION Top with halved mixed baby tomatoes. Suitable to freeze at the end of step 2.

1 Place tomatoes, garlic, onion, chilli, celery and pepper in a 4.5-litre slow cooker. Cook, covered, on low, for 7 hours. 2 Cool soup for 10 minutes. Using a stick blender, blend soup until smooth. Season to taste. 3 Make basil dumpling mixture. 4 Carefully drop level tablespoons of the basil dumpling mixture, about 2cm apart, on top of soup. Cook, covered, on low, for 1 hour or until dumplings are firm to touch and cooked through. 5 Serve soup with dumplings and sprinkled with basil.

SERVING SUGGESTION Serve on porridge sprinkled with sunlower seeds, pumpkin seeds, cinnamon and honey.

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


Book Extract

WINTER WARMER

TOMATO SOUP WITH BASIL DUMPLINGS RECIPE OPPOSITE

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121


JAN

BREAD WINNING Seeded pumpkin bread sticks

A TOUCH OF TENDERNESS Lamb shank & bean casserole

SPOTLIGHT ON GINGER Pear & ginger upside-down cake

GRAINS OF GOODNESS

SLOW & SUCCULENT

NO MEAT MONDAY

Mushroom brown rice risotto

Sticky balsamic roast chicken

Courgette & tofu noodles


S till hungry?

Head to www.foodtolo magazine.co.uve k to find out more!

EDITOR Clare Kelly ART EDITOR Emily Reynolds PRODUCTION EDITOR Debbie Oliver WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO: Sheena Horton, Darren Burge, Danny Stammers

H BAUER PUBLISHING

LOW-FAT FAMILY MEALS Spiced lamb cutlets with tomato & herb salad

THE TEAM

ACADEMIC HOUSE, 24-28 OVAL ROAD, LONDON NW1 7DT

HEAD OF CIRCULATION Suzannah Hedley NEWSTRADE MARKETING MANAGER Gavin Hyde MARKETING MANAGER Emma Randall SUBSCRIPTIONS MARKETING MANAGER Nikola Mossop

MARKETING & CIRCULATION

PUBLISHED BY H BAUER PUBLISHING Academic House, 24-28 Oval Road, London, NW1 7DT. The trade mark The Australian Women’s Weekly Food is also the property of Bauer Consumer Media Pty Limited and used under licence. © 2017 All rights reserved. Printed by William Gibbons, West Midlands, WV13 3XT.

BAUER MEDIA GROUP

Distributed by Frontline.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Paul Keenan GROUP MANAGING DIRECTOR Rob Munro-Hall MANAGING DIRECTOR - FOOD Nicola Bates

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Brandy snaps

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The recipe for the perfect winter garden...

You

Having fun whatever the weather ( The perfect garden! )

On sale now www.moderngardensmagazine.co.uk


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125


COOK’S NOTES

OVEN ROASTING NUTS RELEASES THEIR

BA K ING We use metric measures. See Conversion Chart for more information.

ALL FRUIT and vegetables are considered peeled, unless otherwise indicated. All nuts are shelled.

AROMATIC OILS: PLACE NUTS IN A SINGLE LAYER ON AN OVEN TRAY IN A 180°C/160°C FAN OVEN. STIR NUTS EVERY FEW MINUTES UNTIL THEY ARE GOLDEN. WATCH CAREFULLY AS THEY CAN OVER-BROWN VERY QUICKLY. REMOVE IMMEDIATELY FROM THE TRAY TO PREVENT BURNING.

126

Roasting NUTS To dry-roast spices, seeds or nuts, heat them in a dry pan, stirring continuously over medium-high heat until fragrant and just starting to colour (seeds will begin to pop). Be careful not to burn as this makes them bitter. Remove immediately from the pan to cool, then use according to the recipe.

FORGOT TO TAKE THE EGGS OUT OF THE FRIDGE? Simply place eggs in a bowl of warm, not hot, water for 5-10 minutes to bring them to room temperature.

Measuring cake pans

BOWLS Non-reactive bowls are made from ceramic, stainless steel and glass. These types of bowls should be used when marinating ingredients that contain acid, such as lemon, vinegar and tomato.

TO MELT CHOCOLATE, PLACE CHOPPED CHOCOLATE IN A HEATPROOF BOWL OVER A PAN OF BARELY SIMMERING WATER. THE WATER MUSTN’T TOUCH THE BASE OF THE BOWL. STIR CHOCOLATE UNTIL SMOOTH, N AS FROM THE PA AND REMOVE SOON A S IT’S M ELTED.

Cake pans are measured across the top, from one inside edge to the other.

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017

PHOTOGRAPHER JOHN PAUL URIZAR + STYLIST JUSTINE POOLE

WE USE LARGE EGGS IN OUR RECIPES THAT HAVE AN AVERAGE WEIGHT OF 60G, UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.


Recipe Index

What’s

ON THE MENU

RECIPE INDEX

CHRISTMAS BREAKFAST Almond, banana & blueberry pancakes Baked ricotta with truss tomatoes, bacon & rocket Citrus hazlenut twist Courgette, carrot & sweetcorn fritters Ginger ale & citrus punch Goat's cheese & chive tarts Peach & vanilla yoghurt fools Shakshuka

51 51 55 52 56 56 52 51

CHRISTMAS MAINS & SIDES Apricot & mustard glaze Double orange glaze Baby carrots & brussels sprouts Cranberry & goat's cheese filo parcels Edible vegetarian Christmas crackers Glazed ham

63 63 68 110 64 63

Herby golden turkey & cranberry sausage rolls Honey ginger glaze Lemon−roasted potatoes Quince glaze Quorn pieces festive roll Roast chicken with almond stuffing & spiced cherries Roast turkey with almond stuffing & spiced cherries Tenderstem with Christmas butter

110 63 68 63 67 60 60 64

CHRISTMAS DESSERTS Champagne & orange French macaron trifle Cheat's tiramisu naked cake Cheesecake with cranberry glaze Chocolate mousse cake with pomegranate syrup Cranberry meringue roulade & cointreau orange cream Panettone toast with peaches & blueberries Raspberry & almond trifle Rosewater & pistachio cheesecake cups Steamed Christmas pudding Winter fruit poached in mulled wine topped with granita

76 75 79 17 79 94 70 13 75 76

CHRISTMAS BAKING Christmas fruit cake Chocolate mud cake with white chocolate ganache Fig mince pies Ginger & cinnamon stained−glass window cookies

128

83 87 39 113

FOOD TO LOVE • CHRISTMAS 2017


Recipe Index

tart you subscription rn o on page 26 w

YOUR GUIDE TO THE RECIPES IN THIS ISSUE. TIME TO MAKE YOURSELF HUNGRY AGAIN... Gingerbread cake with maple buttercream Pfeffernüssen Rum & raisin shortbread Snowball cupcakes Speculaas Walnut, orange & cardamom Christmas cakes

Never miss an issue! S

109 83 83 8ç 87 88

CHRISTMAS TREATS Almond caramel bars Bonbons Candy cane pinwheels Coffee wreaths Gingerbread house cookies Sugar−coated peanuts Sugared almonds

ç0 35 ç0 36 35 36 39

Brown fried rice with carrot, cabbage & red onion 22 Malaysian spiced sea bass with brown rice 101 Moroccan lamb cutlets with roasted pepper couscous salad 101 Mulled wine pork with red cabbage 119 Steak & chips with a modern twist 105

Crumbed courgette & slaw wraps Golden turkey & kale colcannon with fried eggs Ham, mustard & parsley terrine Italian white bean & cabbage soup Mini vietnamese−style pork rolls Niçoise salad Triple−decker turkey club Tomato soup with basil dumplings Turkey & mozzarella Christmas sandwich loaf Quinoa salad with halloumi & pomegranate

SALADS, SOUPS & LIGHT MEALS

SAUCES, PRESERVES & DRINKS

MIDWEEK MAINS

Asparagus cigars Bombay squeak cakes Breakfast egg & ham pizza Chicken, bulgur & pomegranate salad Chicken schnitzel buns with apple slaw Chicken & turmeric vermicelli soup Chinese pork & noodle soup

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11ç 113 93 1ç 22 105 101

Apple butter Bloody mary Chunky quince, rosé & vanilla preserve Cranberry mojito Cranberry sauce Date & rose pomegranate mollasses Eggnog

2ç 9ç 97 21 97 105 93 120 93 13

120 55 119 109 67 10 11ç

129


ONLY £5.99

STARTERS MAINS SIDES & SAUCES DESSERTS DRINKS ENTERTAINING GIFTS


2OZ

100ML

3 FLUID OZ

90G

3OZ

125ML

4 FLUID OZ

125G

4OZ (¼LB)

150ML

5 FLUID OZ

155G

5OZ

190ML

6 FLUID OZ

185G

6OZ

250ML

8 FLUID OZ

220G

7OZ

300ML

10 FLUID OZ

250G

8OZ (½LB)

500ML

16 FLUID OZ

280G

9OZ

600ML

20 FLUID OZ

315G

10OZ

345G

11OZ

375G

12OZ (¾LB)

410G

13OZ

15OZ

500G

16OZ (1LB)

750G

24OZ (1½LB)

1KG

32OZ (2LB)

OVEN TEMPERATURES The oven temperatures in this book are for conventional ovens; if you have a fan-forced oven, decrease the temperature by 10-20 degrees.

LENGTH MEASURES METRIC 3MM

⅛IN

6MM

¼IN

1CM

½IN

2CM

¾IN

2.5CM

1IN

5CM

2IN

6CM

2½IN

8CM

3IN

10CM

4IN

°F (FAHRENHEIT)

13CM

5IN

VERY SLOW

120

250

15CM

6IN

SLOW

150

300

18CM

7IN

MODERATELY SLOW

160

325

20CM

8IN

MODERATE

180

350

22CM

9IN

MODERATELY HOT

200

400

25CM

10IN

HOT

220

425

28CM

11IN

VERY HOT

240

475

30CM

12IN (1FT)

2

°C (CELSIUS)

22 15

25 CM

IMPERIAL

12

470G

10 INCH

11

14OZ

1000ML (1 LITRE) 1¾ PINTS

10

440G

21

60G

20

2 FLUID OZ

19

60ML

18

1OZ

17

30G

16

1 FLUID OZ

14

30ML

13

½OZ

9

We use large eggs with an average weight of 60g.

15G

8

The imperial measurements used in these recipes are approximate only. Measurements for cake pans are approximate only. Using sameshaped cake pans of a similar size should not affect the outcome of your baking. We measure the inside top of the cake pan to determine sizes.

IMPERIAL

7

All cup and spoon measurements are level. The most accurate way of measuring dry ingredients is to weigh them. When measuring liquids, use a clear glass or plastic jug with the metric markings.

METRIC

{ actual size }

6

One Australian metric measuring cup holds approximately 250ml; one Australian metric tablespoon holds 20ml; one Australian metric teaspoon holds 5ml.

IMPERIAL

Metric ruler

5

METRIC

The difference between one country’s measuring cups and another’s is within a two- or three-teaspoon variance, and will not affect your cooking results. The United Kingdom, North America and New Zealand and use a 15ml tablespoon.

LIQUID MEASURES

4

DRY MEASURES

3

MEASURES

23

24

25

Conversion Chart

15g = 1 cup loosely packed 55g = 1 cup firmly packed 30g = 1 cup coarsely chopped 60g = 1 cup finely chopped Alternatively, use a 250ml teacup and follow the recipe guidelines.

1 INCH 2.5 CM

1

WEIGHING HERBS

Making jewellery december 2017  
Making jewellery december 2017  
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