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Jewellery MAKING

GET INSPIRED!

The UK's best jewellery magazine

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PROJECTS & IDEAS

TECHNIQUES Comprehensive guide to silver clay for beginners Knitting with wire

Inside this issue Silver clay, wirework, polymer clay and much more... MJ109 Cover 01 SH.indd 1

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Create fantastic woven designs quickly!

CHA 2016 WINNER HOT PRODUCT AWARD

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Making Jewellery is published 13 times a year by GMC Publications Ltd, 86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XN makingjewellery.com thegmcgroup.com 01273 477374 EDITOR Sian Hamilton mjeditor@thegmcgroup.com SUB EDITOR Sarah Doughty EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Lauren Goodchild, Abby Costen DESIGNER Claire Stevens PRODUCTION MANAGER Jim Bulley jimb@thegmcgroup.com PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Amanda Hoag amanda.hoag@thegmc group.com PUBLISHER Jonathan Grogan PRINTER Precision Colour Printers DISTRIBUTION Seymour Distribution Ltd Tel: +44 (0) 20 7429 4000 ADVERTISING Russell Higgins Tel: 01273 402841 russellh@thegmcgroup.com MARKETING Anne Guillot SUBSCRIPTIONS Helen Johnston Tel: 01273 488 005 helenj@thegmcgroup.com Subscribe online at makingjewellery.com 12 issues (inc p&p) UK £71.88, Europe £89.85, Rest of World £100.63. Cheques made payable to GMC Publications Ltd. Send to The Subscription Department, 166 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU SEE PAGE 90 FOR MORE DETAILS Current subscribers will automatically receive a renewal notice (excludes direct debit subscribers)

Editor’s letter H

ello and welcome to our August issue! There are some issues of Making Jewellery that you would browse through and could be forgiven for not picking up what the theme was and then there are issues like this one where it’s pretty hard to miss the theme! Yes this issue has a strong theme – as it’s summertime and everyone loves the beach

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and sea we’ve gone with a nautical and beach theme. The jewellery in this issue is really drool worthy, yes that might sound a little strange but really any jewellery fan will understand that moment when you are so focused on a gorgeous piece of jewellery that you don’t notice a tiny bit of drool escaping down your chin! My favourites this month are the gorgeous pale, ocean-coloured polymer clay set that graces the cover by Lizzi Bucklow-Holt (p28). Also the wirework starfish set by Caroline Wiltshire (p8); these cute wire sea creatures can grace my neck any day.

Sian

FIND US ON Follow us on Twitter at @MAKINGJEWELLERY To become a fan of our Facebook page search for MAKING JEWELLERY Find us on Pinterest at pinterest.com/ makingjewellery Find us on Instagram at instagram.com/ makingjewellery

Views and comments expressed by individuals in Making Jewellery magazine (ISSN 1756-4069) do not necessarily represent those of the publishers and no legal responsibility can be accepted for the results of the use of readers of information or advice of whatever kind given in this publication, either in editorial or advertisements. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by anymmeans without the prior permission of Guild of Master Craft sman Publications Ltd.

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CONTENTS REGULARS 5

JEWELLERY TALK The latest news, reviews and information

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46 10 QUESTIONS Interview with jewellers Zeljka and Milica Ticeric

53 WHAT INSPIRES Find out what inspires Melanie Mcgready

64 COLOUR & STYLE Inspiration for the seaside

77 ON TREND Get ready for summer with these floral accessories

78 PRODUCT TEST Sian reviews the Poly-fast sanding tool

81 TOP 8 Designs with a nautical feel

82 PRODUCT REVIEW We review products that help give your designs a beachy look

92 IT’S A JEWELLER’S LIFE The latest installment of Anna Mcloughlin’s column

TECHNIQUES 14 SILVER METAL CLAY Make your own fine, solid silver jewellery with minimal tools

54 KNITTING WITH WIRE Master basic knitting stitches and fine wire in order to create fantastic-looking results

94 BASIC TECHNIQUES Beginners’ techniques to get you started

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ISSUE 109 • AUGUST 2017

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PROJECTS 8

STYLISH STARFISH Make gorgeous wirework accessories perfect for summer

23 NAUTICAL STAR Refine your metal clay skills with this stunning nautical themed project

28 DROP IN THE OCEAN Fabulous pieces inspired by the colours and textures of sea glass

34 BEACHY WRAPS Use easy peyote stitch to work beautiful spirals reminiscent of shells

39 SEA BREEZE Get in the mood for summer with these bright necklaces

44 REEF KNOT NECKLACE Create a beautiful necklace inspired by rower Helen Glover

48 FORGET ME KNOT Forge Sterling silver wire into knots for a simple yet stunning effect

60 KNITTED NECKLACES Capture the essence of summer with this easy-to-make collection

67 DEEP SEA CHARMS Make decorative sea creatures to adorn beach bags and key rings or, for jewellery

72 ROLLING WAVES Use polymer clay to create a set that reminds us of days on the seashore

84 FLEUR-DES-DUOS A lovely bracelet with RounDuo beads

88 PEARL EARRINGS If you make your own wedding jewellery, you’ll find these earrings are perfect for the bride

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Manufacturer, Distributor, Wholesaler

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Biggest selection of Czech Charlottes, Miyuki Delicas & Miyuki Seed Beads Cali® | Preciosa HillTM | Preciosa CandyTM | Preciosa TeeTM | Preciosa CornelianTM | SuperduosTM Preciosa PelletTM | Preciosa RippleTM | Preciosa ChilliTM | DIAMONDUOTM | Preciosa PipTM | TangoTM Tel: (416)757-3287 | Toll Free: 1(888)755-9055 | E-mail: sales@johnbead.com | www.johnbead.com

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Watch the video at www.youtube.com/user/ JohnBeadCorp

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NEWS

JEWELLERY TALK News, reviews and all the gossip ssip

NEW ETHICAL DRAGO DRAGON BEADS

PHOTOGRAPH: BOYKUNG/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Celtic Bead d Shop has add added a new dragon bead to its handmade ndmade Beard Bead range, using pure solid pewter. The pewter pe is lead free, naturally, and an alloy of (90%+) tin and copper with a little antimony to help the mixture harden. All are natural materials, the mining of which has almost no impact on the environment. For more information, visit celticbeadshop.com.

Birthstone of the Month

PERIDOT Peridot is the birthstone of August. This unique stone is a striking lime green and is one of the few gemstones that exist in only one colour. Peridot is the rare gem-quality variety of the common mineral olivine, which is formed deep inside the earth’s mantle and brought to the surface by volcanoes. The gemstone only measures 6.5 to 7 on the Mohs scale (testing mineral hardness), so while the raw crystal is prone to cracking during cutting, the fi nished gemstones are fairly robust and easy to wear. When presented as a gift, Peridot is said to bring the wearer magical powers and healing properties to protect against nightmares. It is also said to instil power and influence through the wearing of the gemstone.

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PRECIOSA ORNELA PRESENTS PLAYFUL PERFECTION Do you love beads as much as we do? Try using unique Czech beads and seed beads in conjunction with Playful Perfection, a book full of tutorials by the internationally renowned designer Kerrie Slade. Find your copy at preciosa-ornela.com.

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NEWS

FAVOURITE MAKE

FRIDAY

What’s on AUGUST – OCTOBER Find out what’s happening in the jewellery world near you

AUGUST 18-20 AUGUST – SCOTLAND ADVANCED ENAMELLING TECHNIQUES Design and make your own enamelled jewellery piece with simple fittings during this three-day workshop in Fife. £200, carolinefinlay.co.uk 30 AUGUST – SUSSEX JEWELLERY WORKSHOP WITH SARAH MACRAE This one-day course will help you develop your drawing designs for making jewellery, near Chichester. £111, westdean.org.uk

NINA MASON 50s’ Rose Set

KIMBERLEY NEWMAN Bracelet

ADVANCED ENAMELLING TECHNIQUES

14-17 SEPTEMBER – GEORGIA, USA 2017 OLD SOUTH BEAD RETREAT This excellent retreat gathers like-minded people to enjoy beaded jewellery making in the beautiful city of Savannah, USA. $625, socialbeadia.com

SEPTEMBER

23 SEPTEMBER – LONDON GLASS JEWELLERY Craft your own original fused glass pieces ready to be made into jewellery in Hackney. £45, rainbowglassstudios.co.uk

2 SEPTEMBER – COLCHESTER SILVER CLAY FOR BEGINNERS In this one-day workshop, you will learn the magic of silver clay, which once fired is pure silver. £85, curly-girly.co.uk

23 SEPTEMBER – YORKSHIRE WIREWORK JEWELLERY Design and make your own unique jewellery from copper wire in Ebberston. £130, ebberstonstudios.co.uk

9-10 SEPTEMBER – COTSWOLDS FABRIC & RESIN BANGLE WORKSHOP Enjoy this two-day course converting a strip of fabric into a resin bangle; you will also have the opportunity to make a matching pendant and pair of earrings. £139.95, resin8.co.uk

24 SEPTEMBER – SUFFOLK RING MAKING WORKSHOP On this one-day workshop, you will use a variety of equipment to make a range of stunning silver clay rings. £99, silverclayworkshop.co.uk

12 SEPTEMBER – HAMPSHIRE JEWELLERY WORKSHOP Discover how to make beaded bracelets, earrings and handbag charms during this one-day beginners’ workshop at Sandham Memorial Chapel. £15, nationaltrust.org.uk

6 OCTOBER – LONDON BEGINNERS’ WAX CARVING Learn the age-old technique of lost wax carving, a fascinating way of making silver and gold jewellery in South London. £132, londonjewelleryschool.co.uk

OCTOBER

14 OCTOBER – SURREY THE BIG BEAD SHOW Get the chance to explore an inspiring combination of retailers, artists, workshops and demonstrations at the UK’s biggest all bead show in Esher. Prices vary, thebigbeadshow.co.uk

JANINE LEARNER Herringbone Bracelet

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JEWELLERY WORKSHOP AT WEST DEAN COLLEGE

21 OCTOBER – HEREFORDSHIRE CASTING FOR JEWELLERS Use water to create beautiful organic silver forms during this one-day workshop at Oxford Barn. £110, melissahuntjewellery.co.uk

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NEWS

FIMO KITS AT BEADS DIRECT Form and Play Beads Direct has released a new range of soft clay kits – perfect for keeping the kids entertained this summer! Each kit comes with a modelling tool and easy to follow instructions. Create and Play Flower Jewellery Set Take their passion for clay even further with the Fimo Create and Play Flower Jewellery Set and learn how to make bright beads and charms into cute bracelets or a necklace. For more information,, visit beadsdirect.co.uk. informat

BEGINNERS’ RESIN WORKSHOP WITH RESIN8 £69.95 – 1 OCTOBER Join Clare John for this introduction to the craft of resin jewellery. You will learn how to make a range of resinfi lled silver-plated jewellery without using expensive or sophisticated equipment. For more information on how to o book, visit resin8.co.uk.

THE TURQUOISE COLLECTION FOR KERNOWCRAFT Cornwall-based jewellery supplies company Kernowcraft will be launching their new Turquoise Collection this September. Within the collection, Kernowcraft provides 100% natural turquoise, sourced from a husband and wife team, who mine, cut and polish the stones themselves in Colorado, USA. Most turquoise sold is stabilised and often coloured due to the decrease of high quality natural turquoise being found in mines across the world. So whether you’re after beads, cabochons, nuggets or something completely unique – make your jewellery stand out from the rest with Kernowcraft’s range of 100% natural and untreated turquoise. For more information, visit kernowcraft.com.

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PROJECT

STYLISH STARFISH CAROLINE WILTSHIRE

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ire weaving is a unique way to add depth and texture to your jewellery. These wirework starfish use an easy weaving technique and make great summer accessories. Create a casual boho look with copper wire, or dress them up with coloured wire and sparkly bicone crystals for the evening. The smaller versions can be used to create earrings or even make a charm to jazz up a summer bag. This is an ideal way to use up your sea glass stash (or a good excuse to collect some more!). Alternatively, there are stores on Etsy and eBay where you can purchase sea glass pieces. Or, you could create a similar look by wrapping a flat bead or gemstone at the centre of the starfi sh instead of sea glass.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CAROLINE WILTSHIRE

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HOW TO MAKE MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

0.4mm (26 gauge) silver-plated wire 0.8mm (20 gauge) silver-plated wire 1mm (18 gauge) silver-plated wire 0.8mm (20 gauge) copper wire 1mm (18 gauge) copper wire 0.315mm or 0.4mm (26 gauge) coloured wire Small sea glass pieces Gemstone chips 4mm bicone crystals Seashell beads Lava beads Seaside or nautical charms Chain, cord, tiger tail stringing material Crimp beads Clasps Jumprings Headpins and eye pins Earring hooks Keyring/bag charm and chain Wire cutters Chain nose pliers Nylon-jaw pliers Round nose or bail-making pliers Ball-pein or chasing hammer Steel block

Starfish pendant piece (left) 1. To make the large starfish pendant, cut a 30cm length of 1mm silver-plated wire and straighten using nylon-jaw pliers. Measure approx. 5cm from the end and bend the wire up slightly using chain nose pliers. This will form part of the bail of the pendant. 2. Measure approx. 2.2cm along from the bend and using chain nose pliers bend the wire outwards at an angle of about 90°. Measure a further 2.2cm along the wire and bend the wire down sharply with the chain nose pliers. Measure another 2.2cm and bend the wire upwards again at around 90°. You have now formed the first point. Repeat this step until you have four complete points. Don’t worry too much about the shape of the starfish at this stage. 3. When you reach the fifth point, measure 2.2cm and then bend the wire upwards slightly using the chain nose pliers. Measure 5cm from the bend and then trim the wire. This will form the second part of the bail – the end section should be the same length as the first section of wire that you measured. 4. Now manipulate the wires into a circular starfish shape by hand until you are happy with the shape – it doesn’t need to be exactly symmetrical. Use chain nose pliers to reshape

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the points if necessary. Now select a piece of sea glass that sits comfortably within the area at the centre of the starfish. Then using a hammer and steel block, gently hammer the tips of the four complete points to harden the wire and help keep the shape. (Note that you don’t need to hammer the point with the bail wires). 5. Cut a 100cm length of 0.4mm silver-plated wire and holding the base of the bail wires together, wrap the wire around these twice, from left to right, over the top and then behind the wires, to secure. Do not trim. 6. Next, weave the bail. Using the same piece of 0.4mm wire, wrap it around the right hand wire twice – start by exiting up through the middle of the two wires, passing over the top of the right wire and then behind the right wire, then repeat. Then wrap the wire around both wires twice – from the right side pass behind both wires, over the top from the left, then repeat. Then weave around the left wire twice – start at the left, pass over the left wire, down between the two wires and behind the left wire, then repeat. Repeat this process until you have woven approx. 1.5cm. Do not trim the remaining 0.4mm wire as you will use this later. Remember to straighten any kinks or bends in the 4mm wire as you work by smoothing gently with the nylon-jaw pliers. Keep the wires in the weave as tight and as close together as possible.

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7. Using bail-making or round nose pliers, gently hold the bail wires at the base of the woven section and carefully bend backwards and around. Using chain nose pliers, bend the 1mm wires upward slightly at the point where the weaving finishes, then push the two sections together, ensuring they meet fully. 8. Trim the remaining 1mm wires to a length of 1.5cm. Next, use the round nose pliers to form decorative spirals on either side, by coiling around the tip of the pliers. Then holding the coil carefully with chain nose or nylon-jaw pliers, bend around using a circular motion. To secure the bail, wrap the 4mm wire around the entire bail from back to front several times. 9. Weave the wire around the points of the starfish. Starting at the bail point, take the remaining 0.4mm wire and wrap around the right-hand 1mm wire twice near the top of the point. Start by exiting up through the middle of the two wires, passing over the top of the right wire and then behind the right wire, then repeat. Pass up through the middle of the wires, over the top of the left 1mm wire and then behind in a figure-of-eight motion. Wrap around the left wire twice, then exit up through the middle of the wires and wrap twice around the right-hand side again. Repeat until you have reached the base of the point. Finish by wrapping around one of the 1mm wires twice and then trim on the reverse of the pendant, pushing the wire end

flat carefully using chain nose pliers. Remember, as with the bail, use the nylon-jaw pliers to straighten any kinks or bends in the wire as you work. Keep the weave wires as tight and as close together as possible. 10. Cut a new piece of 0.4mm wire approx. 70cm long. Starting at the tip of next point of the starfish, wrap the 0.4mm wire around the left hand wire twice to secure, then pass up between the left and right wires. Then repeat Step 9. Continue until you have woven all the points of the starfish. As you weave each point, check that your piece of sea glass still fits within the centre space. If a larger space is required, weave slightly short of the base on some of the points. 11. Make a basket for the sea glass at the centre of the star. Cut a 50cm piece of 0.4mm wire and wrap twice in a corner between two of the points. Place your sea glass piece in the centre and holding it in place with one hand, wrap the wire back and forth in between the points on both sides, to secure the sea glass. Finish and trim the wire as previously. Copper pendant (right) 12. Make a large starfish using copper wire with green sea glass. Hang it from a long waxed cotton cord, knotted and strung at 5cm intervals with green Aventurine chips (in the same shade as the sea glass), or beads of your choice.

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PROJECT

Silver pendant (p8) 13. Make a large starfish with blue sea glass. Measure approx. 48cm of tiger tail wire and add a jumpring and crimp the bead at one end. String blue Aventurine chips or similar on the wire, with the starfish at the centre point. Embellish with other beads if you wish. Finish off with a crimp bead and a clasp of your choice. Blue pendant (p10) 14. Make up a large starfish in silver-plated wire and wrap it using 0.315mm (or 0.4mm) blue wire (I’ve used ‘supa blue’). Instead of the central sea glass piece, string 4mm blue bicone crystals on the centre wires. Hang from a long silver chain.

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Bag charm (p8) 15. To make the small starfi sh, cut a 20cm length of thinner, 0.8cm silver-plated wire. First, make a loop at one end of the wire using round nose pliers. Then repeat Step 2, measuring approx. 1.2cm along the wire between the bends of the points. To complete the fi fth point, measure 1.2cm along the wire and then wrap the remaining wire around the base of the hanging loop and trim the end. 16. Shape the star as in Step 4 and hammer the points. Cut 35cm of 0.4mm silver-plated wire and weave the points as in Steps 9 and 10. Cut 30cm of 0.4mm wire to create the centre basket as in Step 11 and use a small, flattish piece of sea glass, a gemstone chip or a bead for the centre. 17. For the bag charm, hang a length of chain from a clip or split ring and attach small starfish. Add lava beads, seashell beads and other fishy or nautical charms and beads as desired, using headpins, eye pins and jumprings. Silver earrings (p8) 18. Make up two small starfish as per Steps 15 and 16. I’ve used a small blue gemstone chip for the centre, to match the hanging cord on the large silver pendant. Attach earring hooks to the hanging loops. Blue earrings (p10) 19. Make up two small starfi sh as per Steps 15 and 16, using silver-plated wire, but weave with blue coloured wire. String 4mm blue bicone crystals on the centre wires, instead of using a focal sea glass piece. Attach earring hooks to the hanging loops.

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RESOURCES Wire: wires.co.uk Sea glass pieces, seashell beads, gemstone chips: etsy.com, ebay.co.uk Lava beads: bijouxbeads.co.uk Other materials are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT beaubellajewellery.co.uk BeauBellaJewellery.etsy.com beaubellajewellery@gmail.com

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

SILVER METAL CLAY JULIA RAI

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ilver metal clay is an accessible and easy-to-learn medium, which allows complete beginners to make fine, solid silver jewellery with minimal tools. This guide is ideal for a beginner working with silver metal clay in lump, paste and syringe form. Most people who enjoy arts and crafts have many of the tools already so starting to work with silver metal clay can be quite cheap. It can be fired with a cook’s butane torch, so no need for a kiln. The material itself is relatively expensive, but there is no waste and if you follow some simple rules, you can be designing and making your own silver jewellery in a few hours. There are two main brands of fine silver metal clay – PMC and Art Clay. Choose PMC3 or Art Clay Silver as these are the easiest to work with, can be torch fired and are very similar in consistency and handling.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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10g PMC3 or Art Clay Silver Plastic work mat Roller Playing cards Oil Plastic shot glass and sponge Textures Cutters Small drinking straws Small length of wire to fit smallest straw Cling fi lm Teflon sheet Emery board Sanding sponge Cocktail sticks Rubber block 1mm drill bit Pin vice 2-part silicone moulding compound Small shell Steel brush Steel burnisher Butane torch Countdown timer Firebrick Stainless steel mesh Tweezers

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PHOTOGRAPHER: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, JULIA RAI

TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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HOW TO MAKE 1. First assemble the tools you will need. A wipe-clean work mat makes a good work surface; plastic placemats are ideal. To ensure the clay doesn’t stick to the surface of your texture, use olive oil that has past its use-by date. Pour a little oil into a plastic shot glass with a small piece of kitchen sponge in it. This will control the amount of oil you use and also prevent messy spills. Playing cards make cheap spacers to ensure your rolled-out clay is a consistent thickness. To texture the back of your piece effortlessly, roll out the clay onto a subtle, shallow texture that is easy to lubricate. Leather or faux leather is perfect for this. A plastic or acrylic roller, or just a piece of plastic pipe, completes the basic tool kit. Cutters 2. Small cutters come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Cheaper cutters normally have one rolled edge and one cutting edge so can only be used in one orientation. More expensive cutters have two cutting edges, which is particularly useful for asymmetric shapes. This means you can flip the cutter to make a mirror image pair of earrings, for instance. Nesting shapes are also a useful addition to your cutters as they allow you to make matching earrings and slightly larger pendants. Embossing cutters are fun to use and combine cutting out shapes with texturing the surface of the clay. Plunger cutters often come in a set of different shapes or sizes. They allow you to easily expel the cut out clay by pushing the plunger down when you have cut the shape out.

Textures 3. When you start working with metal clay you begin to see textures everywhere. As a beginner the easiest textures to work with are shallow as this allows you to ensure everything you make is strong and has integrity. As you become more experienced, you can experiment with deeper textures, but you need to make your pieces proportionately thicker so they don’t have thin and weak spots. You can get textured wallpaper free from DIY shops, lace from old bras, hankies, napkins or bits of textured ribbon from your other crafting media. Punchinella is the waste from the sequin-making process and you can buy it from sequin suppliers online. Skeleton leaves also make lovely textures. Flat leaves from the garden can also be used but make sure they are clean and dry. 4. Before you open the packet of clay, make sure you have everything ready. The clay consists of fine silver particles, an organic binder and water. As soon as you open the package, the clay will begin to dry out so it’s crucial that you are fully ready to begin working with the clay before you get it out. Choose the texture and cutter you want to use and think about the size of hole you want to put in the piece for a jumpring or earwire. Small drinking straws are perfect to make jumpring holes, but you can also use a small cutter to make a feature hole instead of a plain round hole. Assemble your tools and have a piece of cling film ready so you can wrap up any excess clay immediately to keep it moist.

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5. Lay the leather on your work mat and add a stack of ten playing cards to each end of the leather. If you use ten red and ten blue cards, you can easily separate them later if they get mixed up. Make sure the cards are on top of the leather so your rolled-out clay will be the right depth. Press your finger onto the oily sponge and lubricate the surface of the leather. You need to use enough oil to prevent sticking, but not so much that the clay slides around. Oil your roller, cutter and texture, if it is made of plastic or metal. Later, I’ll show you how to lubricate porous textures like paper or lace. Also oil one end of the drinking straw you will use to make a jumpring hole. 6. Each brand comes in a variety of pack sizes and the internal packaging is slightly different. Beginners may fi nd it easier to start with a smaller sized package so choose 7g or 10g of Art Clay Silver or PMC3 for your first try. You can easily get three or four small pieces of jewellery from a 7g pack, more if you work small. Open the package and take out the wrapped clay. The picture shows the cellophane that Art Clay silver comes wrapped in. Quickly and with good pressure, roll the clay into a smooth ball in the palm of your hand. Avoid overhandling the clay as this can cause it to dry out more quickly, although some people’s hands are more drying than others. Put the ball of clay onto the oiled leather between the card stacks.

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7. Using the playing cards as a guide, roll the clay. Make sure the ends of the roller are always on the cards. Remove two cards from both sides and roll again. The clay is now eight cards thick. Check the size and shape of the clay against your cutter. The reason for rolling the clay taking two cards off at a time is so that you can control the size and shape of the rolled clay. If the clay is not wide enough for your cutter, turn the clay by 90˚ before taking two more cards off each side and rolling again. The clay is now six cards thick. Take two more cards off each side and roll again. The clay is four cards thick which is the thinnest you should go to make a flat, shallow textured piece. 8. If you are using a plastic texture, like punchinella, you will have oiled it during your preparation. If you’ve chosen wallpaper, lace or ribbon, it’s hard to oil these as they soak up the oil quickly. It’s easier to oil the rolled-out clay if you have a texture like this. Once your clay is four cards thick and the right size for your cutter, press your finger onto the oily sponge and put a thin slick of oil over the whole surface of the clay. Place your texture onto the clay and roll one time with good pressure, still resting the ends of your roller on the stack of four cards. If you roll back and forth, the texture can move slightly and prevent you getting a crisp imprint. 9. Place the oiled edge of the cutter on the clay, lined up with the part of the texture you want to use. Press fi rmly downwards so you

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get a clean cut. Remove the cutter. Wrap up the excess clay immediately in clingfi lm. If the shape is stuck inside the cutter, use the blunt end of a pencil or paint brush to gently press one edge of the clay away from the cutter and allow gravity to help it drop onto the leather. Don’t worry if the edges are not perfect or if the join in the cutter has made a mark; these will be dealt with when the clay is dry and easier to handle.

100°C. Be careful they don’t blow around in a fan oven! For small pieces I use a coffee mug warmer, which is cheap and available on eBay. A piece of steel mesh gives a flat surface above the hotplate and provides a gentle heat. Anywhere warm will speed up the drying and take you onto the next step more quickly. The piece must be totally dry before fi ring.

10. Use the small drinking straw to make a hole for the jumpring or earwire. Check to make sure the straw end is round as they are easily squashed. The hole should be around 3mm away from the edges of the shape. Press the oiled end of the straw into the clay and twist it gently to make a clean hole. Use a piece of wire – copper wire is cheaper than silver for this – and push out the plug of clay from the hole. This can be added to your other clay in the cling fi lm. Don’t worry if the hole isn’t perfect; this can be corrected in the dry stage.

12. In the dry stage, you can handle the clay without risking damaging the texture. It is brittle in this stage, however, so it needs to be handled gently and will not stand up to rough handling or being dropped. Any refining that needs to be done to edges or holes is much easier at this stage and should be done before firing. Hold the piece close to the area to be refined and using an emery board, file the straight edges so they are smooth and free of any marks left by the cutter. Curved edges are best refined using a sanding sponge. Use a cocktail stick like a file to refine the inside of the hole from the back and the front of the piece.

Drying

Firing

11. You can allow the clay to dry naturally if you are not in a hurry. A piece four cards thick will dry naturally in around an hour or you can leave it overnight. Dry pieces will keep forever so there is no urgency to getting them fired. You can speed up the drying by using a hairdryer, a dehydrator or a hotplate. You can even put them in your home oven at around

13. When firing by butane torch at home, the best place to do it is on the hob. It’s used to being hot and with a few low-cost items you can transform it into a firing station. Cheap ceramic floor tiles – especially ones which have been damaged as they are normally reduced in price – make a stable base. A firebrick raises up the piece and provides another level of

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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heat absorption. You can fire directly onto the firebrick, but a piece of stainless steel mess bent to form a bridge allows air to circulate around the piece and makes controlling the temperature easier. You will also need tweezers and a glass or ceramic bowl fi lled with cold water, plus a countdown timer. A pair of safety glasses is also recommended. 14. Make sure your hair is tied back and there are no trailing pieces of clothing before you start firing. To ensure you can see the colour of the piece while it fires, dim the lights and shut the curtains. It’s hard to judge the colour, and therefore the temperature, of the metal in normal light. Once the metal is at the right temperature, you will need to time the firing. Set your timer for three minutes and decide which hand you will hold the torch in, and then put the timer on the other side. Adjust the torch so you have a bushy, gentle flame rather than a pointy fierce flame, which is less controllable. Your pieces need to be no bigger than a 50p piece to be torch fired successfully. Any larger and it’s difficult to keep the whole piece uniformly hot. 15. Turn on the torch and aim the flame at the piece. The first thing you will see is the binder burning out, so expect the piece to ignite and burn. When this subsides, watch the colour of the piece carefully. You are looking for a peach/salmon coloured glow; this will tell you the temperature of the piece is correct. Start the 3-minute timing when the piece reaches

this colour. There is no need to move the torch around while firing. Move the torch slightly further away if the piece gets any redder than the peach/salmon colour. If it is not glowing, it is too cool so move closer. Getting the hang of torch control takes practice, so keep working at it. When the timer goes off, turn off the torch, pick up the piece with tweezers and drop it into the cold water. Melting 16. It is possible to melt your piece using a butane torch, although it is quite difficult to melt it into a puddle of silver. If the piece gets too hot normally the surface starts to melt. Often you will see a fl ash of silver go across the surface of the piece and this indicates that the surface has started to melt. Pull the torch back to cool the piece down but continue to fi re it for the full three minutes. Things with pointy elements, like stars, can lose the ends of the points as they melt up into the body of the piece. The lesson if you do melt the piece is to keep a very close eye on it during fi ring, never look away or lose concentration and keep the lights dim. Pieces once fi red are solid silver and not very easy to reclaim.

Rehydrating 18. The clay dries out during use but it can be rehydrated and turned back into usable clay. There are two methods for rehydrating the clay. One is to rehydrate slightly dry clay so you can immediately use it; the other is to rehydrate completely dry clay. While you are using the clay, you may start to see cracks appearing when you roll it out, especially around the edges. The best way to rehydrate it so you can carry on using it is to put it inside some cling film and squash it out to form a flat pancake. Dip your finger into some water and put a slick of water over the whole surface of the pancake. The large surface area allows the clay to absorb the water more quickly.

Polishing 17. If you have fired the piece correctly, it should be white, not silver. This is the natural

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surface of the silver. If you looked at it under a microscope, you would see lots of hills and valleys that dissipate light and gives it the matt white appearance. It now needs polishing to flatten the surface and allow light to bounce off it, producing the silvery shine. The easiest and cheapest way to polish it is by using a steel brush. Brush the surface all over and you will see the white transform into silver like magic. A steel burnisher used on the edges of the piece will compact the surface and give a high shine. You can also rub the burnisher over the high spots of your texture to add sparkle to the piece.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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19. Fold the pancake in half trapping the water inside; do this from outside the cling fi lm, avoiding handling the clay directly. Press the pancake through the cling fi lm and away from the fold so you form another flat pancake. If the clay is very dry you can add another slick of water over the surface at this point but otherwise, fold the pancake in half again and press it down to form another pancake. Repeat this folding and pressing about 6 or 7 times. This process forces the binder in the clay to quickly absorb the water, making it into useable clay again within a few minutes. If you have done this correctly, when you pick up the clay and roll it into a ball, there should be no wet clay on your hands. 20. Even clay that is totally dry can be rehydrated and returned to being usable clay again. If you have small pieces that are dry, chop them up with a craft knife or break them into smaller pieces with your fi ngers. Put them into a piece of cling fi lm and spray with a little water. Make sure all the pieces are wet, and then seal the cling fi lm into an airtight container or plastic bag and leave it to soak up the water. Squeeze it occasionally to see if it is soft all the way through. If it is too wet after it has soaked up all the water, leave it open to the air for a while, folding it occasionally to ensure it dries evenly. If it is still too dry, use the other rehydration method of wetting and folding to bring it to the right consistency.

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21. If you are doing a lot of metal clay work, you may have more pieces to rehydrate. In this case, a coffee grinder kept especially for the purpose is a good investment. Store dry pieces in the coffee grinder to keep them clean until you have enough to rehydrate. Whizz up the pieces until they are dust, tip this into a dish (through a tea strainer if you think there may be lumps in it), then add water slowly and mix until it clumps. Tip the mixture into a piece of cling fi lm and then roll it out through the cling fi lm, fold and roll again. This will force the water into the binder in the same way as the other rehydration process. Leave the clay to rest overnight before using it.

23. Make a flat piece, four cards thick and then dry it. Roll out more clay two or three cards thick and cut out a small element (like a star) to stick on. Make sure the element will fit onto the piece without overhanging the edge. Pieces that are two or three cards thick will be too weak if they stick out from the piece and may bend. Dampen the area on the dry piece with water to help the adhesion of the star. Put some paste on the back of the star, place it on the flat piece and press gently so the piece is firmly fixed. Clean up any excess paste with a damp paintbrush. If you have used the paste texture, any excess paste can be blended into the pattern. Once it has dried, refine all the edges of the piece as before.

Paste

Drilling

22. Both of the main brands produce a paste version of silver metal clay, but you can also make your own by mixing water with lump clay or filing dust. Paste is good for sticking things together – like adding a feature to a flat piece – and can also be used to create unique textures on the surface of a dry piece. You can stick wet pieces to wet pieces, wet pieces to dry pieces or dry pieces to dry pieces using paste. The paste texture is very easy to do and depending on the thickness of the paste, a variety of different effects can be achieved. Paint the paste onto the surface of a dried piece in small sections and swirl a pattern using a cocktail stick. Random swirls are lovely or you can put straight lines or cross-hatching for example to create a unique texture.

24. These O and K letters are too small to successfully make a hole with a drinking straw so holes are best drilled in the dry stage for your jumprings or earwires. Any shape with points, like stars, triangles or teardrops are better drilled than punched. Drilling allows you to make a hole that is neat and nearer the edge of the piece than you can get with a drinking straw. You can use a drill bit in your fingers to drill a hole, but it is more comfortable to use a pin vice. If the piece has dried completely flat, put the piece flat down on a rubber block and mark the area for the hole with a pencil. Use a 1mm drill bit, put the tip onto your pencil mark and begin to turn the drill. Don’t put any pressure on it; just allow the drill to do the work.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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25. Sometimes in the drying process, especially if the piece has been speed dried, you get a little warping of the piece. In this case, putting it flat down on the block to drill can result in the piece breaking. It is best to hold the piece to drill the hole, supporting the piece with your finger behind the area to drill. As you are not using any pressure to drill, you will not drill into your finger. As you turn the drill, you’ll see the dust falling from the hole. As it begins to come through you can feel a little blister begin to develop where your finger is supporting the drilling. Move your finger out of the way and carefully drill through. Syringe clay 26. The syringe type clay is formulated to extrude and maintain a round line so it is perfect for piping designs on the surface of dried pieces. It is also really good for filling small gaps with a level of precision that cannot be achieved with paste. The syringes come with a nozzle and you can also buy nozzles of different sizes, which give a range of different effects. Before you start, figure out how you will hold the syringe to allow the greatest control and comfort while working. I like to hold it in my fist and use my thumb to press down on the plunger to extrude an even line. Practise on your work mat until you get the hang of it. The clay line should drop from the nozzle so hold the end 1mm or 2mm above the surface. This allows for the most control and means the line is always round.

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27. Make a fl at piece four cards thick and allow it to dry. You can texture it if you like. When it’s dry, draw a design on the surface with pencil. This will burn out during firing. Dampen the surface where your pencil line is and then follow the line as you extrude the clay using even pressure and moving your hand at the same speed as the extrusion. If your line goes a bit off, use a damp, good quality paintbrush to gently nudge it back into place. Build up the design gradually and allow each section to dry before moving on so you don’t damage the lines already in place. If you go completely wrong, remove the syringe with a damp paintbrush and start again. Store the syringe nozzle down in water so it doesn’t dry out. Blot off the water before using the syringe.

29. Another easy way to work with lump clay is by using moulds. You can buy ready-made moulds or make your own using 2-part silicone moulding compound. Mix equal quantities of both parts together well so they are a consistent colour and put this down onto a flat surface in a smooth ball. Press the item to be moulded into the ball until you reach the widest part of the item. Do not allow the silicone to come up over the edge of the item or go further than the widest part or you will create an undercut, which will prevent your silver clay from popping out cleanly. Allow it to cure – normally around 10–15 minutes. You can simply fill the mould with smooth, well-hydrated silver clay up to the top and leave to dry in the mould or pop it out onto Teflon to dry.

28. You can combine techniques in the same piece by using paste to add a texture to the syringed piece. If your syringe is not as perfect as you’d like, paint thin paste over the dry syringe lines to give the piece a consistent finish and disguise any syringe mistakes. Using lump clay, paste and syringe, you can create an infinite number of designs, textures and patterns to create truly unique jewellery. As the medium is so easy to work with and requires simple tools, it is perfect for creating jewellery at home. Once you have mastered the basics, there are many resources available to help you learn more advanced techniques like bead or ring-making. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

30. There is no need to oil the mould unless it contains very fi ne detail. In this case it is best to use a paintbrush dipped in oil to lightlyy oil all the nooks and crannies in the mould. Another way to use the mould economically is to line it with clay rather than fi ll it. Using well-hydrated clay, form a fl at patty around 1.5mm thick, which just fits the mouth of the mould. Press this down into the mould and up the sides using your little fi nger so it just fits the space and doesn’t come up over the edges. You can texture the upper surface by gently rolling the moulded item onto the clay while it is in the mould. This creates a double sided, 3D piece. Allow it to dry in the mould for best results.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

TROUBLESHOOTING Breaks If a piece breaks cleanly, you can stick it back together. Put it down on a flat surface and add a little water to both surfaces of the break. Press the pieces together and hold steady for a minute or two. Allow it to dry without disturbing it. If you can still see the break, use the paste texturing process to cover up the break or stick an element over it to disguise it. Crumbly clay If the clay is crumbly and adding water doesn’t help, it normally indicates that the clay has soaked up too much oil. You can make this clay usable again by mixing it with an equal amount of fresh clay.

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CONTACT juliarai.co.uk csacj.co.uk info@csacj.co.uk

Inspirational pieces 1, 2, 3. Julia Rai juliarai.co.uk facebook.com/MetalClayAcademy 4. Gemma Illman lastingtouch.co.uk facebook.com/lastingtouchkeepsakes 5. Pat Wilson metalclayni.com facebook.com/MetalclayNI  Slieve_Croob_Silver  6. Sara Johnson facebook.com/Chillipepperdesigns 7. Jo Richards fayebenjamin.co.uk

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6/21/17 10:06 AM


PROJECT

NAUTICAL STAR TRACEY SPURGIN

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ere is a good starter project with a nautical theme to refine your metal clay skills.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

30g Art Clay Silver Work surface Roller Set of assorted spacers or playing cards Clingfi lm Badger Balm Needle tool Fine-pointed tweezers Water brush Sanding grit Files Polishing equipment Pin vice with 1mm drill bit Long ball headpin

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0.8mm (20 gauge) wire Large jumprings Silicone moulding compound Snake roller Screw eye Star cutter

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TRACEY SPURGIN

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE 1. Roll out a piece of clay 1mm thick on a well balmed surface. Using a star-shaped cake cutter, cut out the star shapes; two to make a pair of earrings and two to make the nautical star bead for the pendant pieces. Use a headpin to create an indent down the centre of two of the stars. Place these to dry. 2. Once these pieces have dried, use a little paste to adhere the two stars together, leaving the headpin in place to keep the channel open. Leave this to dry before using fi les to refine the piece once again. The further two stars will become earrings. 3. Roll out some clay 1.5mm thick and use a strip cutter to cut a piece of clay 0.5mm wide and place around a ring mandrel, wooden dowel or roller to create the ring. Cut and join

the ring to a neat seamless join. Allow to dry before sanding and cleaning the edges. 4. To make the larger outer half-wheel, roll out and cut a piece of clay 1.5mm thick x 0.5mm wide. Place this over something larger in diameter than the ring. Make sure the piece is straight and allow this to dry. Once dry, drill holes through the sides with a pin vise and drill bit. Draw pencil lines on the edges of the pieces if it helps. Make holes on opposite sides of the ring and one in the centre of the half-wheel piece. Make sure the pieces line up with a headpin. 5. To create the bail, roll out and cut a piece of clay 1mm thick and 10mm wide. Wrap this onto a straw and make a seamless join. Allow this to dry, then refi ne and sand the piece to be smooth and tidy.

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6. To make the spokes for the ship’s wheel, use a snake roller and place 2mm spacer bars underneath the roller. This will help control the thickness of the snake. Allow this to dry before using a craft knife to cut into equal size pieces. Through one of the spokes, use a 1mm drill and drill a hole through the length of the spoke. 7. Mark equal spacing for the spokes on the plaster dry pieces and begin to assemble the spokes into the inner and outer wheel sections. 8. Once all the spokes have been attached and dried, use two more to connect the bail to the outside rim of the wheel. The spots to create the points on the wheel spokes are a graduated set of small circles made with tube cutters. These are attached with a tiny amount of paste. Place this to dry.

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PROJECT

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over a straight-sided mug. This is a good shape and size for a bracelet or bangle. Once all the pieces are dry, fi re following the manufacturer’s instructions. A few jumprings have been soldered onto the end of the bangle and 0.8mm wire soldered to create the earwires for the earrings. 12. After polishing all the pieces, use a long single ball headpin threaded from the top through the star and to the lower edge of the wheel. Link on the twisted dangle using a wrapped loop. Finally, use a twisted cord to hang the pendant. 9. Using a snake roller, roll out a snake of clay about 2mm thick. Split this into three equal size pieces. Taper each end to a point, aiming to get these as equal in size as possible. Add a little water to place these together and add a little twist. Push in a little screw eye at the top. Place to dry before tidying this up. 10. The knotted pendant and bracelet have been created from a length of twisted cord from a haberdashery store. Using two part silicone moulding compound, mix equal amounts of compound together then roll it out using 2mm spacers into a large flat layer. Gently press in the twisted cord. Leave to cure. Once cured, roll out a snake of clay and push this into the mould. 11. Remove the clay from the mould and manipulate into the knotted design. To make the bracelet, lift the clay and let it dry

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RESOURCES metalclay.co.uk craftworx.co.uk

CONTACT tracey@craftworx.co.uk

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6/21/17 10:07 AM


PROJECT

DROP IN THE OCEAN LIZZI BUCKLOW-HOLT

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, LIZZI BUCKLOW-HOLT

PROJECT

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his project was inspired by the colours and textures of sea glass that wash up on the shoreline. The design has been created to mimic ocean waves, water drops and faux pearls. Blending together translucent clay with a little alcohol ink and some iridescent powder creates a faux sea-glass-effect clay that I have used to make this statement bangle, pendant and matching earrings. You will need to know how to create a 3-colour Skinner blend and turn it into blended stack, there are plenty of tutorials and videos showing both processes available online.

HOW TO MAKE

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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2 x 56g blocks of Premo! Sculpey white translucent clay 56g block of Premo! Sculpey white clay Alcohol inks in dark blue, mid green and white (optional) Iridescent mica powder Pasta machine Extruder and slot disc Rigid and flexible tissue blades Round bangle former Two round rivets Small round cutter Cocktail stick Large metal knitting needle tool Liquid polymer clay Stringing materials Jewellery findings

Bangle 1. Condition two blocks of white translucent clay. Divide into roughly three equal parts. To each part, add three or four drops of alcohol ink, one colour to each part. For this blend, I used dark blue, mid-green and white inks. Using the white ink is optional. Mix in the inks to make an even blended sheet of each colour. 2. Cut and arrange the colours as shown in the photo. Double up the layers if required. 3. Roll and fold the colours several times to achieve an evenly blended Skinner blend. 4. Fold and stack to create a blended stack (Skinner block) from which to work. 5. Cut the Skinner block into pieces about the size of a finger and roll into a log so the green is at one end and white at the other. 6. Insert the log into an extruder and choose a disk with a small rectangular slot hole. Extrude all the blended clay into long, flat strings.

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PROJECT

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7. Measure the circumference of your wrist and condition and roll out a sheet of white clay approx. 2mm thick, at least 40mm wide and as long as the wrist measurement. Place this on the side of your work surface as a guide for the next few steps. Take a length of extruded ‘string’ and cut a few strips approx. 30mm long from the white end. Stack them broad sides together. Secure the strips gently to the work surface and continue to add strips as shown. Add small balls of white clay ‘pearls’ in a random fashion between some of the strips. Pause at about a third of the length of the white clay sheet

in line with the straight strips and fi ll in the corners with offcuts and more pearls. Continue with straight strips and random pearls until the desired length is achieved. For more interest, cut out a couple of circles (save the cut outs to make earrings) and replace with a wrapped pearl motif.

8. To create the focal point of the bangle, create a slightly larger ‘pearl’ with some white clay then wrap it with a string of clay, starting with the green end. Continue wrapping around until it measures 30mm across. Place

11. Smear a thin layer of liquid polymer clay over the white sheet. Slide a blade under the design to loosen it from the work surface and very carefully move it onto the white clay sheet. Press gently to adhere.

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9. Neaten the edges and trim with a flexible blade to taper the ends of the bangle. 10. Press in a circular rivet into each end of the bangle and remove the clay from the centre.

12. Slide a blade under the white clay, then pick it all up and place onto your bangle former. Trim off any excess white clay, including inside the rivets. As the design has changed from a fl at to a curved surface, some of the straight strips will move to leave gaps. Use a tool to even out the gaps for a pleasing effect. Lightly dust the top of the design and especially the pearls with a little iridescent mica powder. Extrude a string of white clay and wrap around the design to create a border, making sure it is adhered well especially the edge meeting the backing sheet. Make some round and fl at beads with the remaining scraps of clay. Make holes with a cocktail stick. Bake everything at 130°C for 45 minutes.

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

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13. Allow the bangle to cool a little, then remove from the former while still flexible. Test the sizing on your wrist. Hold under cold water at the desired size until cold and rigid. Add a length of matching cord and beads to create a tie closure.

Create a bail by wrapping clay around a large metal knitting needle. Bake separately, trim to size and add to the back of the pendant with liquid clay. Bake everything together one last time to secure. Clip-on earrings

Rectangle pendant 14. Stack strips of extruded blend and dust with iridescent powder. Add a border of white extruded clay. Create a bail by wrapping clay around a large metal knitting needle and pressing gently to the top of the pendant. Add another decorative strip of clay for added security. Bake everything together then carefully remove the needle. String with complementary beads created from the same blends. Round pendant 15. Wrap a large white ‘pearl’ of clay with extruded strings until the desired size. Dust with iridescent mica powder. Finish with a border of white. Bake on a domed surface. Smear the back with liquid clay and add a layer of white clay, trim and smooth the edges to blend with the border. Texture if desired.

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16. Make two water-drop motifs by wrapping blended strings around a white ‘pearl’ ball of clay. Dust with iridescent powder and finish with a border of white. Bake for the first time, then add the clip on finding by embedding it in a layer of clay on the back, secured with liquid clay to the front. Trim and neaten up. Bake to cure everything together permanently.

Rectangle dangle earrings 18. Stack strips of extruded blend and dust with iridescent powder. Add a border of white extruded clay. Trim an eye pin to size and gently push into the edge of the rectangle so it reaches half way. Bake. Pull out the eye pin, add a matching clay beads, then dab the end with a little superglue and push back to secure. Add earring findings.

Round dangle earrings 17. Use the cut outs from the main project. Dust with iridescent powder and wrap with a white clay border. Trim an eye pin to size and gently push into the edge of the circles so it reaches at least half way. Bake. Pull out the eye pin, add a matching clay bead and seed bead, then dab the end with a little superglue and push back to secure. Add earring findings.

RESOURCES Resources for this project are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT bizzizizzi.co.uk facebook.com/bizzizizzi

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7/3/17 9:33 AM


PROJECT

BEACHY WRAPS CHLOE MENAGE

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE; DIAGRAMS: CHLOE MANAGE

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

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ellini spirals make the perfect nauticalinspired centrepiece for casual wrapstyle jewellery. These fun beaded beads use easy peyote stitch to work beautiful spirals reminiscent of shells. The Cellini spiral is created naturally, thanks to the different sizes of beads used. As you work you will see the spiral developing quite quickly, making it a fun stitch to work with! Choose sandy beach colours or vibrant nautical reds, blues and white strung on natural-looking faux suede. This casual jewellery will have you beach-ready in no time.

MATERIALS & TOOLS 1g x size 15 seed beads ● 1.5g x size 11 seed beads ● 1g x size 8 seed beads ● 100 x 3mm pearls ● 1m x faux suede ● Toning beading thread ● Synthetic wax ● Size 12 beading needle ● Scissors Note: Quantities are approximate and will vary depending on length ●

1. Cut a wingspan of thread and wax well. Leave a tail thread of approx. 6cm. Pick up two size 15s, two size 11s, two 3mm pearls, two size 8s, two 3mm pearls, two size 11s. Pass through all of the beads again and exit from the second size 15. 2. Pick up a size 15, pass through the second size 11. 3. Pick up a size 11, pass through the second 3mm pearl. 4. Pick up a 3mm pearl, pass through the second size 8. 5. Pick up a size 8, pass through the second 3mm pearl. 6. Pick up a 3mm pearl, pass through the second size 11.

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PROJECT

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7. Pick up a size 11, pass through the second size 15. Step up through the size 15 added at the beginning of this round (Step 3).

To finish your beaded bead, pass through the work, following the thread path. Once secure, trim your thread. Repeat with the tail thread.

8. Pick up a size 15, pass through the size 11 added in Step 3. Pick up a size 11 and pass through the 3mm pearl.

11. Thread the beaded bead on to the cord of your choice. For a lariat, cross the ends of the cord through the beaded bead, then add a charm to a jumpring and knot the end of the cord over the jumpring. Repeat to add a jumpring and charm to the other end of the cord. This can be worn as a necklace or wrapped around your wrist for an adjustable bracelet.

9. Pick up a 3mm, pass through the size 8. Pick up a size 8, pass through the 3mm pearl. 10. Pick up a 3mm pearl and pass through the size 11. Pick up a size 11, pass through the size 15 and the second size 15 to step up. Peyote around, repeating Steps 8–10, until your beaded bead is the desired length (mine are between 3cm and 5cm). Hint: the bead you exit from will always be the next bead you pick up. Always step up through the final two size 15s.

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12. Alternatively for a one-size bracelet, pass the cord through the bead three times, and create a knot either side. I did this by wrapping three times over the cord and passing the end through the loops before pulling tight. If there is enough space, feed the end into the beaded

bead. Repeat with the second end on the opposite side of the bead. Another option is to keep it casual and just thread the cord through once, then wrap it around your wrist and tie. This means that you can wear it as a lariat or bracelet as you desire.

RESOURCES 3mm pearls: stitchncraft.co.uk Faux suede: riversidebeads.co.uk Seed beads are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT pinkhot.co.uk info@pinkhot.co.uk

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

SEA BREEZE CLAIRE NIGEON

T

hese bright necklaces will get you into the mood for summer. Based around craft shells that have been painted and embedded with crystals, they will be a pretty addition to your summer wardrobe. This project is perfect for those who have a bit of experience with basic jewellery making techniques and those who would like to practise many techniques in one go, such as polymer clay, crystal clay, drilling, painting, sewing and threading.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ●

Craft shells Crystal clay, silver and turquoise Crystal chatons, crystal and turquoise mix

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Fimo polymer clay, red, yellow and lilac Acrylic paint, turquoise, coral Rub ‘n Buff silver metallic leaf Varnish 45cm x 5mm turquoise cord 45cm x 5mm navy cord 45cm x 3mm silver cord 45cm x 3mm blue and white cord Nylon monofilament 6mm x 4mm-link silver-plated chain 6mm x 3mm-link silver-plated chain 3mm x 2mm-link silver-plated chain 3 x 13mm silver-plated lobster clasps 5mm silver-plated jumprings 7mm silver-plated jumprings 2 x 12mm silver-plated jumprings 2 x 2mm cup silver-plated necklace ends Large silver-plated decorative clasp Silver-plated headpins Silver-plated eye pins 7mm silver-plated bead caps Silver colour 3-holed spacer bars Acrylic crystal sew-on stones

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10mm, 8mm and 6mm acrylic pearls 4mm silver acrylic beads 8mm x 3mm silver acrylic beads 8mm x 6mm turquoise glass beads Turquoise chip beads 12mm x 8mm light grey drop beads Seed beads in coral, silver, turquoise and red Mini glass jar Explorer 4-pack charms Hobby drill with fine drill bit Hobby vice Round nose pliers and cutters Cream cotton thread Sewing needle Paintbrush Seashell silicone mould

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CLAIRE NIGEON

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE Crystal, coral and pearl necklace (p39) 1. You will need five shells for this necklace; one large central shell, two slightly smaller for either side of the central shell and two smaller ones on the outside. Using a hobby (pin) vice and drill bit, drill a hole through the top of the shells except the central shell, which does not need a hole. 2. Paint the shells in a coral colour. You can do this with a readymade coral paint or use a mix of red and peach. Make sure the outsides of the shells are painted well; don’t worry about the insides as they will be fi lled with crystal clay. Use silver Rub ‘n Buff to bring out the texture of the shells. Varnish if required, although the silver Rub ‘n Buff does give a nice shine. 3. Place an eye pin through each of the four shell holes. Make up Crystal clay for each of the shells. As the Crystal clay comes in two components you will need to mix it together, each shell will need a pea-sized ball of each component. Mix together well and fill each shell to cover the eye pins. For the large central shell, lay an eye pin horizontally in the middle of the shell. Curve the pin before you do this so that when you fill the shell with clay you have more to cover, and so that the pin is not too near the top.

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4. Using the crystal chatons, embed these in a neat design to the crystal clay. Leave the Crystal clay to cure over night. When the Crystal clay is completely cured, cut down the eye pin so that about 10 mm remains. Make a loop with round nose pliers. Fix all of the shells together with 7mm jumprings. 5. Cut five pieces of 6 x 3 mm link chain: one 11 links, two 10 links and two 8 links long. You will be adding beads on headpins to the chain, which will be added to rest underneath the shells. The 11-link piece for the middle will need four 6 mm pearls and three clusters of three coral seed beads. These consist of three seed beads on a headpin and three headpins attached to a 5mm jumpring. So, attach a seed bead cluster to the central link, a pearl bead either side, seed bead clusters either side and pearl beads either side. Attach the chain to the 7mm jumprings either side of the central shell. Attach beads to the other pieces of chain as in the picture. Attach 10mm pearl beads on headpins and using decorative bead caps to the jump rings in between each shell. Cut two pieces of 6mm x 3mm chain to desired length to finish the necklace and finish with a lobster clasp and two 7mm jumprings.

Turquoise crystal shell necklace (p41, top right) 6. Make up nine shells with turquoise crystal clay and turquoise mix chatons as in Steps 1–4. Make up six more shells as in Steps 1–4 but don’t add crystal chatons. These shells will face the other way; I have used the clay to make the back look neat and to cover the eye pins. Lay out the shells together in a group and attach together with 7mm jumprings. Use 6mm x 3mm chain either side, jumprings and a lobster clasp. Multicoloured charm necklace (p41, top right) 7. Drill a hole in three shells and cover completely in the silver Rub ‘n Buff, inside and out as the shells may turn when worn to expose the backs. With a headpin on an 8mm bead pass through from inside the shell out and cut and make a loop. Using an attractive bead at the back as a stopper will make the shell look good if it turns when wearing. 8. Make some colourful Fimo nautical charms. I made three red-coloured shells using a silicone mould, one lilac and one yellow. Make a hole with a pointy tool before baking to the manufacturer’s instructions. When they are baked and cooled, apply some silver Rub ‘n Buff, which will bring out the texture of the shells well. Varnish if necessary.

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PROJECT

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9. Make a message in a bottle. Using a mini glass jar fi ll with yellow, silver and turquoise seed beads and a tiny rolled up piece of paper tied with a small piece of embroidery thread. Cut a piece of chain to the length you are happy with around your neck and lay out the silver nautical charms with the silver shells and message in a bottle spaced out until you are happy with the design and apply to the chain with jumprings. Add jumprings and a lobster clasp to the ends of the chain now. 10. Cut a long piece of 2mm x 3mm chain and attach this to one of the closure jumprings. Weave the chain in and out of the chain and charms so that it looks random. Finish with the chain at the other closure jumpring. Take the colourful Fimo charms and attach these spaced out in the design. Attach some beads where necessary in the same way, some on small pieces of 2mm x 3mm chain so that they dangle and some from the base of the necklace. Attach some acrylic stars in any gaps. If you wish, add in more chain randomly like before. Make a small Crystal clay starfish and press this onto a silver shell. You should be able to form a star shape by getting a small ball and pinching out five legs. Press in some colourful seed beads and chatons.

bottom hole. Thread on a large flat coral bead to the four pieces, then thread two pieces of nylon through the top hole of the next spacer bar. Thread the other two pieces from the coral bead through the middle hole in the spacer bar. Then with the last piece of nylon thread four seed beads, a 4mm silver bead, thread through a shell, an 8mm pearl bead, and back up through the shell, another 4mm silver bead, four seed beads and through the bottom hole of the next spacer bar. Next, on one of the two top pieces of nylon thread three 4mm silver beads and then about seven seed beads on the other piece. On one of the middle pieces of nylon thread on seven more seed beads. Thread on two long silver beads to the other piece. Attach the next shell to the bottom piece of nylon as before.

out your seven shells with the cord, and with jumprings tack them to the cord temporarily so you can work on the necklace while your shells are spaced correctly. 15. With cotton thread and a needle put a few stitches in the cord at the knot at the top. Around the outside edge of the cord sew turquoise beads starting with an 8mm x 6mm turquoise glass bead and followed by a turquoise chip. Carry on alternating these beads until you get to the first shell. Take out the jumpring that attaches the shell and sew on the shell at the headpin. In between each shell follow the pattern of glass bead, chip, glass bead. Carry on in this way until the end. Pendant (p41, bottom)

12. Pass the four top pieces of nylon through to the next spacer bar, two pieces to the top and middle holes. Thread through the next shall as before. Repeat this pattern until you have added three large coral beads. Finish with a spacer bar, an 8mm pearl bead, tie off the nylon, cut down and attach the necklace ends. With 7mm jumprings and 6mm x 3mm chain, fi nish off the necklace in the same way as the previous necklaces.

16. Make up a turquoise shell as in Step 6, but you can use an old bead as a stopper as this will be covered with Crystal clay. Make up some Crystal clay and embed multicoloured seed beads and chatons inside. Attach an 8mm pearl bead to a headpin, cut down and loop. Attach the shell and bead to a 7mm jumpring and this to a long piece of 6mm x 3mm link chain. Loop the chain together with an open link. You will not need a clasp as the necklace will be long.

Coral and shell necklace (p41, top left)

Plaited rope necklace (p41, bottom)

11. Drill holes in five shells, but only dab lightly with silver Rub ‘n Buff instead of covering completely. Make up the necklace. Cut five pieces of nylon monofi lament to about 50cm each. Tie all pieces together at one end and attach a necklace end with a dab of superglue now. Apply an 8mm pearl bead to all five pieces of nylon, then four pieces to the top hole of a 3-holed spacer bar and the last piece to the

13. Thread all pieces of cord through a 12mm jumpring and tie a knot to secure. Sticky tape the ends to a surface and plait together. Finish the ends in exactly the same way as the beginning. With 7mm jumprings, attach a decorative bar and ring clasp.

Craft shells and explorer charms: hobbycraft.co.uk Seashell silicone mould: amazon.co.uk All other materials are widely available

14. Make up seven shells as in Step 6 but paint them turquoise. Varnish if necessary. Lay

claire@nigeon.com

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RESOURCES

CONTACT

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Flux’n’Flame Jewellery School

At Flux n Flame we offer jewellery DQGVLOYHUVPLWKLQJFRXUVHVZRUNLQJ with sterling silver, gold and precious stones using traditional jewellery PDNLQJWHFKQLTXHV6PDOOJURXSV friendly, informal atmosphere with superb tuition from professional award winning jewellers $O -HVD0DUVKDOO 2XUJRUJHRXVZRUNVKRSLVIXOO\ HTXLSSHGDQGSXUSRVHEXLOWDQGLV situated in the heart of the beautiful Dorset countryVLGH ‘Humour, patience and creativity Jess and Al have in abundance. Nothing is too much trouble, and everyone is treated like family. One of the nicest places you could wish for to learn and express yourself, comforted in the knowledge that each piece will be made to their exacting standards. I can’t praise them highly enough.’ Susan, student

For a brochure contact us at Flux’n’Flame Milton Abbas, Dorset DT11 OBD Tel: 01258 881690 Mobile 07785 550771 (PDLOVPLOHDORW#ÀX[QÀDPHFRXN

ZZZÀX[QÀDPHFRXN

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6/21/17 10:19 AM


CELEBRITY STYLE

REEF KNOT NECKLACE TANSY WILSON

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CELEBRITY STYLE

STYLE

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have made this necklace for rower Helen Glover, not only to suit her nautical lifestyle and love of the water – but also because of ‘tying the knot’ to wildlife presenter Steve Backshall last year in beautiful Cornwall.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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350 x 10mm snowflake/ daisy spacers 50cm x 1mm (18 gauge) silver wire 2 x 12mm jumprings 2m of black studded suede ribbon 2 x 15mm ribbon clamps Toggle clasp and jumprings

HOW TO MAKE 1. Cut a 25cm length of 1mm silver wire and make a wrapped eye loop at one end (see page 94). Thread on 175 x 10mm snowfl ake/ daisy spacers. Ensure they all fit together snugly but not too tightly. Make another wrapped eye loop as close to the last spacer added as possible. Cut away any excess wire.

You want the spacers to be a little loose, as you will be bending the wire in the next step, which will force the spacers together. 2. Repeat Step 1 to make another identical column of spacers. Bend each one exactly in half. Slide one loop over the other loop tucking both ends of the spacers in so they form a knot as in this image. Pull both ends of each column so the knot tightens, ensuring you keep the ends level. 3. Link a large jumpring to both wrapped eye loops at each end to secure the two together. This jumpring is 12mm diameter x 1mm thickness so it is strong and won’t pull apart. 4. Now the knot is secure you can shape it using your hands. You want a nice curve that will sit around the base of your neck. 5. Cut the 2m of studded suede into four 50cm lengths. Hold two lengths together and fold

them both in half. Pass the two loops, which are formed at the halfway point, through the jumpring added in Step 3. Then take the four ends and pass them through the loops and pull. This will secure the suede onto the jumpring. Repeat this step to add the remaining two 50cm lengths of suede to the other jumpring. 6. Trim the ends to the right length you want your necklace. These ones are all at 14cm to make an overall 40cm necklace. Open up a 15mm ribbon clamp and trap the four ends in the jaws, securing them in place. Repeat for the other side and finally add a clasp of your choice using jumprings.

Helen Glover MBE is a British professional rower and a member of the Great Britain Rowing Team. She is ranked the number 1 female rower in the world since 2015, and is a two-time Olympic champion, triple World champion, quintuple World Cup champion and triple European champion.

RESOURCES All supplies are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT tansywilson@hotmail.com

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PHOTOGRAPH: FEATUREFLASH PHOTO AGENCY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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PHOTOGRAPH: COREPICS VOF/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

HELEN GLOVER

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PHOTOGRAPHS: ZELJKA AND MILICA TICERIC

FEATURE

10 QUESTIONS ZELJKA AND MILICA TICERIC When did your interest in jewellery first start? Zeljka: Our interest for jewellery started in 2011. I had just finished my degree in Fashion Design and I was searching for a job in the fashion industry. Looking for inspiration and going through some fashion magazines, I noticed a crochet chain necklace and decided to try to make something similar for myself. And what happened – all of my friends loved it! In a few days, I had ten necklaces ordered and I realised I needed help with buying supplies and making. So that is when I asked my sister Milica to join and that’s how it all started.

Do you have any formal training? If so, where did you train? Milica: No, we don’t. Zeljka had experience with Fashion Design, but not with Jewellery Design. We learned everything we know on the go and I would say that we are still learning. Where is your studio? Zeljka: Since Milica moved to the UK our studio is based at home in two cities, Birmingham, UK and Belgrade, Serbia. Where do you find inspiration and how do you decide what to make next? Milica: When we’re not together, we’re always online, talking to each other. We share the same interest in photography and travel and we fall in love with the same fashion styles that we find on Instagram or Pinterest. We both admire urban fashion style, inspired by elements of nature and traditional fashion elements from all over the world. Usually we first find materials that look inspiring and then decide what we’ll create. What is your preferred medium? Zeljka: We love natural stones, such as druzy agate and turquoise, vintage Swarovski rhinestones and cup chains, glass beads, Japanese pearls, handmade pompoms, even shrink plastic…

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Do you have a favourite tool? Milica: Maybe it sounds simplistic, but we can’t make quality pieces without a needle and a thread. Our jewellery is mostly made from fabric and rhinestones and beads, so without a needle, thread and quality industrial strength glue, we are not able to work. Which techniques do you enjoy using? Zeljka: Crochet is the technique that we first started with and we still use it where possible. It’s beautiful and it makes the process feel like some sort of therapy. Do you offer workshops or classes? Milica: No, but we’re dreaming of the day we have the opportunity to do this and work with other creative people. What are your goals? Zeljka: We would love to continue selling our products to fashion conscious girls from all parts of the world, from Japan to South America. Maybe we would love to sell a little bit more, but to remain a one of a kind jewellery brand. In next few years, we see ourselves representing our jewellery at jewellery fairs in Paris. If we don’t reach our goals, our jewellery will always remain part of our creative project. What’s your favourite thing that you’ve ever made? Is there one project that stands out above the others? Milica: Our favourite pieces are definitely bracelets and necklaces made with natural agate stones. Every piece of stone has a unique shape and that makes every piece one of a kind.

CONTACT etsy.com/uk/shop/JewelryLanChe instagram.com/lanchejewelry uk.pinterest.com/jewelrylanche facebook.com/jewelrylanche

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PROJECT

FORGET ME KNOT TANSY WILSON

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orge Sterling silver wire into knots for a simple but stunning effect. This collection is ideal for the beginner silversmith who wants to experience very basic forging techniques using wire to create simple yet impressive results. The fundamental skill is in annealing the metal regularly so it is soft enough to manipulate.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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30cm x 3mm (9 gauge) Sterling silver wire 20cm x 2mm (12 gauge) Sterling silver wire Roll of 1mm (18 gauge) silver-plated wire Side cutters Vice Piercing saw Nylon-ended hammer Fine needle file Bangle and ring mandrel Reverse tweezers Soldering torch Flux, solder and pickle Metal polish and silver cloth Pliers to assemble pieces

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PROJECT

HOW TO MAKE

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1. Cut a 30cm length of 3mm Sterling silver round wire and bend it in your fingers to create a loop in the middle of the wire. This process will have already work hardened the silver, making it too difficult to bend any further. This means you need to anneal it to soften the silver again. Do this by heating the silver wire until it glows a cherry red. Be careful not to overheat and melt the silver.

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2. You can quench the silver in water to cool it down or leave it to cool down naturally. Either way, once the silver has cooled, manipulate it with your fingers to form a knot. 3. This manipulation will have hardened the silver again, so place it onto your soldering area and anneal it.

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4. Manipulate the knot a little more ensuring it is forming at the centre of your wire. Repeat the annealing process and shaping the knot until you are happy with its size. End up with the wire either side of the knot being as straight as possible at this stage.

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5. Place the wire around your bangle mandrel at your wrist measurement and again with just your hands try and bend the wire around the former to start forming the shape of the bangle.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

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6. Keep bending the wire around so the two ends cross each other on the opposite side of the mandrel. Check to see if this is a good bangle size for you and if it is, clamp the two ends of wire into the jaws of your vice and using a piercing saw, cut through both ends at the same time. This will give you a perfect flush joint ready for soldering.

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7. Manipulate the two cut ends so they lay perfectly flush against each other and place onto your soldering block. Add some flux and a small square pallion of easy solder to the join. Heat gently so the flux bubbles and then increase the heat to melt the solder so it runs into the join. Pickle and rinse. 8. You can now put the bangle back onto the bangle mandrel and using a nylon-ended hammer, gently tap the bangle into shape. Again, this will harden the silver as well as making it the perfect shape. 7

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PROJECT

9. Use a fine needle fi le and fi le away any silver solder that has run around the join. Then polish the complete piece to a very high shine. You can also use metal polish and a silver cloth to remove polish residue. Ring 10. You can make a matching ring in exactly the same way following Steps 1–9, except this time using 2mm thick wire that is 10cm in length. 9

Necklace

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11. Alternatively, if you do not have soldering equipment you can use 1mm silver-plated wire to make this fine dainty choker. Cut 30cm of 1mm wire and form a loose figure-of-eight shape in the middle of the length. 12. Take the end and pass it through the right hand loop and start to pull both ends of the wire at the same time. Try to avoid kinking the wire and try to position the knot in the middle of the overall length.

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13. As you pull the ends the knot starts to tighten. However, before you pull too much, add two cylindrical objects of the same size into each knot loop. I have used marker pens. Then pull the wires again and they will tighten around the pens forming perfect loop shapes.

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14. Manipulate the two wires exiting the knot to look like the image here. Then approximately 4cm from one side of the knot, form a wrapped eye loop, cutting away any excess wire. Repeat for the other side.

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15. Cut two 20cm lengths of 1mm wire and start to form a wrapped eye loop at the very end of each piece. Before you completely wire wrap the eye loop, join each one onto the wrapped eye loops made in Step 14 and then finish the wrapping to secure them in place.

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16. Form wrapped eye loops at the end of these two pieces added to your central knot section. Finally, make a shepherd’s crook shape of wire and wire-wrap that onto one end to form a clasp. You can now manipulate the entire piece so it forms a nice choker shape.

RESOURCES Sterling silver and silver plated wire is widely available from advertisers in this magazine. 15

CONTACT

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tansywilson@hotmail.com

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PROJECT

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Caverswall Minerals MAKE YOUR OWN JEWELLERY

Set your own stones, ceramics, resins etc into our silver 925 mounts. We have a very large selection of silver settings and mounts including pendants, brooches, cufinks, rings, lockets, earrings, bracelets, stick pins ns and tie bars etc in many different styles from modern, classic and celtic ca allll polished and easy to set.

JEWELLERY TOOLS NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE

We supply a large range of semi precious cabochons Tel: 01782 393838

email: phil@caverswallminerals.com

www.caverswallminerals.com

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what inspires

MELANIE MCGREADY

Find out what inspires Melanie’s unique designs MY DESIGNS My designs are the result of combining my love of nature with two-dimensional shapes, which I fi nd intriguing. These shapes are sometimes geometric, like a simple house shape, or more organic shapes that are found in nature, such as butterfl ies and owls. I prefer jewellery that is relatively simple by design and I like to think that I have infused a little part of nature into each piece to create something that is both atmospheric and unique, with a delicate modern aesthetic.

MY INSPIRATION I live in a very beautiful, rural part of Northern Ireland so inspiration is everywhere. Nature has always held a peaceful clarity and had a calming influence on me. Maybe it has something to do with having four children, but I’m most inspired and get most of my ideas when I’m outside. There are many wonderful parks and gardens close by, but I would have to say that my biggest source of inspiration comes from my herb garden. I love gardening, so I often fi nd myself selecting varieties with th the intention of using them in my creations somewhere down the line.

stoneware is a firm favourite. I love seeing how its varying characteristics react with oxides and glazes fired at high temperatures. I make my own moulds from flora that is mostly collected from my garden, which I then use to create the images you see in a lot of my jewellery designs. I tend not to make too many pieces in one shape with the same mould because I get bored easily and find repetition a bit tedious. I use the same principle when it comes to glazing, as I enjoy making my own glazes and colour combinations, which I make in very small batches. I also have a large collection of Indian woodblock stamps that I like to use in my jewellery.

CONTACT Etsy shop: cherryhillstudioclay.etsy.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS: MELANIE MCGREADY

MY TECHNIQUES QUES I love to experiment, t, so I’m constantly tryingg out new clays, although gh

22/06/2017 12:13


TIPS & TECHNIQUES

KNITTING WITH WIRE TANSY WILSON

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PHOTOGRAPHER: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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HOW TO MAKE

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aster basic knitting stitches using fi ne wire to create a variety of necklaces and bracelets. You may have used a knitting dolly with wool as a small child, but using it in this technique with fi ne wire can create fantastic results. The following steps will show you a basic knit with 4-prong or 6-prong dollies. Also show you how to use beads inside the knit or actually having beads on the wire itself to make a series of individual bracelets. See page 60 for the project on knitted necklaces.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Rolls of 0.4mm (26 gauge) coloured wire Knitting dolly and hook Selection of beads Selection of end caps, clasps and jumprings Side cutters Flat nose pliers 2-part adhesive

1. Firstly let’s talk about the wire. Obviously wire comes in a vast variety of colours and thicknesses or ‘gauges’. Most of it is copper with a coloured coating and this is great to use as it is very soft. The thickness of wire that you knit with is your preference but I fi nd anything less that 0.3mm can snap during the knitting process and anything more than 0.6mm can become quite difficult to manipulate to achieve an even knit. All of the bracelets featured in this technique section are made with 0.4mm wire. Also try and always use wire that is already on a roll as it is less likely to kink during the working process and get tangled. 2. The next important thing is the actual knitting dolly. Again these come in a variety of shapes and sizes with a different number of prongs on each. The most common dollies are 4-prong or 6-prong. They should also come with a large hook tool, also sometimes called a needle. (You can also make your own dollies by hammering large nails into a wooden base to obtain bespoke sizes of knit, but this is more advanced and not covered in this technique.) 3. So what is the difference between using a 4-prong and 6-prong dolly? A 4-prong dolly will give you a length of knit that has a squarish exterior (see the gold wire). The stitches tend to be further apart and therefore this creates a more open knit. It also makes a thinner column of knit. The 6-prong dolly has more stitches per

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row so creates a visually tighter knit (see the green wire). The end result is very sturdy and round, making a fatter column of knit. Plain knit 4. Whatever dolly you choose to knit with, the stitch technique is exactly the same. It’s simply a case of wrapping wire around a different number of prongs depending upon what one you use. Always keep the wire on the roll so you don’t underestimate how much wire you will need to make a certain length of knit. Take one end of the wire and pass it through the central hole in the dolly. Bend the end of the wire up at the base of the dolly so you can hold this end when you hold the dolly in the same hand. 5. Hold the dolly whilst also holding the end of wire and use your other hand to wrap the wire around one prong on the dolly. I am righthanded so I hold the dolly in my left hand and use my right hand to wrap the wire clockwise around the first prong. 6. Still holding the dolly in my left hand and the wire in my right hand I move anticlockwise to the next prong along and again wrap the wire clockwise around that prong. I then go anticlockwise to the third prong along and wrap the wire clockwise around that prong. Finally, I go anticlockwise to the fourth and last prong left and wrap the wire clockwise around that one.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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7. Now continue to move anticlockwise to the prong you fi rst started wrapping the wire around in Step 5. Wrap the wire clockwise around this prong again. Make sure this new wrap of wire is above the first wrap of wire. Take the wire anticlockwise to the next prong along but do not wrap the wire, just hold it in your other hand as you hold the dolly.

and wrap that clockwise around that prong. Continue taking the wire anticlockwise to the next prong along and just hold it there.

8. Pick up the hook tool. Again as I’m righthanded, I hold it in my right hand. Stick the end of the tool under the first wrap of wire that was done around the first prong and pull the wire away from the prong. You do not have to pull it very far. The slack will come from the end you were holding in Step 4.

11. Stick the tool into the bottom wrap of wire on the next prong and again pull the tool away from the prong so you make a loop that you can lift over the upper wrap of wire. Continue to move in an anticlockwise direction to the next prong along and wrap the wire clockwise and then sticking the tool into the bottom wrap and pulling away from the prong and over the top wrap of wire. Keep repeating this process as you continually move around the dolly one prong at a time.

9. Twist the tool so you lift this loop of wire over the wrap of wire above it. Make sure the wrap of wire above it still stays on the prong. You do not need to pull the tool or the wire any more than that. Now hold the wire that was resting at the next prong along in Step 7

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10. This image shows the lifted loop left behind after Step 8. It is the form of the knit and although it might look messy and out of place at this stage, it does even out as your knit grows.

12. In essence, you always have one wrap of wire on a prong then you make two wraps on

one prong, lift the bottom one off leaving one wrap again on that prong and then move onto the next prong along. As you get five or six rows into the knit, it helps to tug at regular intervals on the wire that is poking out of the bottom of the dolly. This will not only pull the wire knit down through the dolly, but will also serve as the tension to the knit. You don’t have to tug at it hard; just maintain an even pull to keep the stitches the same size. 13. Once you have reached the desired length of knit you can cut away the single wire attached to the roll at the top of the dolly. Cut it leaving approx. 10cm to spare. 14. Take the cut end of wire and pass it under the wrap of wire that’s immediately linked to that length of wire. Do not go in between the prong walls as you will not be able to slide the knit off. Pull the wire so it moves to the next prong along.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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15. Take the end of the wire again through the loop of wire on that prong and pull. Repeat this process so you pass the cut end of wire through all the loops on the dolly avoiding the prong walls. 16. As you pull the cut end of wire, you should be able to lift the wrapped wires completely off the prongs. Keep pulling the wire and it will tighten around the final knitted stitches closing the column of knit. Do not cut away any excess wire yet as it can be useful to attach end caps, cones and clasps. 17. This image simply shows that a 6-prong dolly is used in exactly the same way with the wire wrapping around each prong. 18. Now you have a completed length of knit, you need to think of tidy ways to finish off the ends ready to join on a clasp. I find that using Kumihimo end caps and cones are an excellent way. They come in so many shapes, sizes and metal colours that you really can add an individual touch to your designs.

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19. To use an end cone, pass the excess wire that is left after knitting, through the hole of the cone. Thread on a jumpring and then thread the end of wire back down through the hole of the cone and pull. Add glue (a 2-part adhesive is perfect for this) to the interior of the cone so that it dries leaving a secure fitting cone. Cut away any excess wire.

21. You can then cast off the dolly in the usual way, pulling the wire and sealing the end of knit. Remember if you are adding end caps or cones it helps to have a few rows of stitches before the first bead and after the last bead added so you can manipulate the wire into the end cap and not get glue on the beads. Beads on wire

Beads inside knit 20. A very effective design is to add beads inside the column of knit. If you are using a 6-prong dolly, this can be achieved by knitting your column of wire fi rst; then as you remove it from the dolly do not pull the end wire to close the knit, but leave it open so you can simply insert smaller round beads inside. However, if you use a 4-prong dolly, it is easier to do a row of stitches then add a bead and do two rows of stiches before adding another bead. As you pull the knit through the dolly it snugly traps the beads inside the knit evenly spacing the beads.

22. Another stunning design is to actually have beads threaded onto the wire as you knit. Again I leave my wire on the roll but undo enough to thread on approx. 120 x size 6 Miyaki seed beads. Again, you can make your design really individual depending on the beads you use. 23. Do at least five rows of stitches in exactly the same way as for plain knit. Then as you go around again, slide one bead up before you wrap the wire around the next prong along so the bead lays on the wire spanning between the two prongs. Use the tool as you do for plain knit to hook the bottom wire wrap over and off the top wire wrap.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

Inspirational pieces 1 & 2 AlbaWirework albawirework.etsy.com, alba.wirejewellery@gmail.com These bracelets use Sterling silver or goldplated wire and clasps. Both bracelet designs were made using a wooden knitting dolly and capture approximately 100 Swarovski crystals in a range of colours. 3, 4, 5 & 6 Kerstin Kreations etsy.com/uk/shop/KerstinKreations, krichtercatling@btinternet.com These necklaces are made from colour enamelled silver-plated copper wire and were created using a wooden knitting dolly. Some incorporate seed beads.

24. Slide another bead up and make it rest on the wire spanning between the next prong along, then wrap the wire around the next prong. Again, knit exactly as you do for the plain knit just ensure you slide one bead at a time between the prongs as you work your way round.

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25. As you pull the bottom wire for tension it will also pull the beads down through the hole in the dolly and although it might look chaotic as you are knitting, the end result is really very pretty.

RESOURCES Wire, chain and findings are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT tansywilson@hotmail.com

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PROJECT

KNITTED NECKLACES TANSY WILSON

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

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his collection is ideal for the beginner who wants to experience wirework without the need for many tools or high precision! There are more detailed instructions on using a knitting dolly on page 54. The results are quick and with wire being available in so many colours, the combinations are endless.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

3 x rolls of 0.4mm (26 gauge) coloured wire 1mm (18 gauge) wire 8mm Stardust beads 10 and 12mm end caps Jumprings Chain Clasp Knitting Dolly (4-prong or 6-prong) and hook Side cutters Flat nose pliers 2-part adhesive

1. Make a 30cm length of knit in silver 0.4mm wire using a 6-prong dolly and secure the ends. (See Techniques on page 55 for details). 2. Cut a 20cm length of 1mm wire and push the end of the wire through the very end of the knit. Thread on one 8mm gold stardust bead and then curl the knit half way around the bead. Continue to push the wire through the knit the other side of the bead trapping it in between a ‘U’ shape of knit. 3. Thread another 8mm gold stardust bead onto the wire and now wrap the knit half way around that bead. Continue to push the wire through the knit securing that bead in place. Keep repeating this procedure so you start forming a wiggle of knit around the gold beads until you have used up your entire length of knit.

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4. Once you have come to the end of the knit, wrap the 1mm wire around both ends of the knit to hold it all together. Cut away any excess wire. Remember the design will look better if you have symmetry to the wiggle and each end has the knit facing up. 5. Mix up a small quantity of 2-part adhesive and glue a 10mm end cap onto each end and leave to dry completely. 6. Once both caps are dry you can manipulate the knit with your hands to form a nice curve. This is why the symmetry to the wiggle is important and with each end of the knit facing up makes it much easier to join on your chain.

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7. I have used a large link chain as a feature but you can have any chain you like. Simply join each end of the chain to the end caps using a jumpring. Finally, add a clasp of your choice using jumprings too.

RESOURCES

11. Mix up another small quantity of 2-part adhesive and glue a 12mm end cap onto this end and leave to completely dry. Once dry you can add a clasp of your choice using jumprings.

Wire, chain and findings are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

Looped necklace

tansywilson@hotmail.com

CONTACT

Plaited necklace 8. An alternative design is to knit three separate lengths of knit using a 4-prong dolly. Make each one in a dierent coloured wire. I have knitted these ones all at 50cm in length. Hold the ends of each length and pinch together wrapping a piece of wire to secure them all in place. 9. Mix up a small quantity of 2-part adhesive and glue a 12mm end cap onto this end and leave to dry completely.

12. Another alternative design is to again knit three separate lengths of knit using a 4-prong dolly. Make each one in a dierent coloured wire and each one a dierent length. I have knitted one at 40cm, one at 45cm and one at 50cm. Hold all three knits at one end and bind together using wire. Glue on an end cap. Then arrange the three lengths so they are staggered with the shortest at the top. Bind the other ends together to hold in place. Glue the other end cap and add a clasp using jumprings.

10. Plait all three knits together to form a loose, even plait. Then again pinch the other three ends of knit together and wrap a piece of wire around them to secure the plait in place.

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PROJECT

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COLOUR & STYLE

NAUTICAL STYLE This issue we take inspiration from the classic nautical trend, with styles that look great at the seaside. By Rachelle Bell DINNER WITH THE CAPTAIN A formal invitation to dine with the captain calls for an elegant ensemble. A vintageinspired tea dress in tones of blue accessorised with silver heels and a sophisticated shawl will evoke a memory of a bygone era. Alternatively, simple separates will add versatility to your capsule cruise wardrobe. A crisp A-line skirt teamed with a dainty blouse will look put-together and pretty. You can always dress them down with a plain T-shirt or denim shorts to get more wear out of them while away. To add extra luxury, a pair of pearl earrings or mother-of-pearl necklace seems appropriate for the occasion.

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Ruffle Ruff Ru ffle e TTop £22.99, Stripe A-line Skirt £34.99, both bonprix.co.uk Crossed Wires Scarf £18, oliverbonas.com Mae Tea Dress £169, prettyeccentric.co.uk Skagen Rose Gold Pearl Earrings £109, littlewoods.com

SAILOR CHIC This look is inspired by the allAmerican navy girl. Originally the pin-up was used in propaganda posters to make joining the navy an attractive idea. During the war, it boosted morale and reminded the troops of their sweethearts waiting for them back home. Present day, this look is a flirty, retro style, perfect for beachside fun. A high waist pair of denim shorts is a summer essential; choose white or navy blue for a classic look. Team with a oneshoulder top with a cute ruffle detail. A high waist bikini creates the iconic pin-up shape and flatters all body shapes. Add a kitsch brooch to your beach bag or headscarf to salute the trend. Charm bracelets or necklaces work well with this look. Ma Make M ke sure to include anchors, hors, sshells hell he l s and mermaids to with o stayy fittting tingg w ith the it sailor chic style. stt yle.

S i O Stripe One Sh Shoulder ld Top TTo op £30, White Shorts £25, both wallis.co.uk Ahoy Sailor’s Brooch £23, daisypark.co.uk Nautical Stripe Bikini Top £8, bottoms £6, both matalan.co.uk Breton Stripe Dress £65, cathkidston.com

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COLOUR & STYLE

SEA-READY SWIMWEAR Whether you are sunning yourself on a private yacht, lounging on the beach or even taking a dip at your local swimming baths, fabulous swimwear will make you feel and look fantastic. This season, deep blues and other sea hues have inspired the designers. Organic, artistic patterns and prints are everywhere, taking inspiration from the wild waves. A printed sarong will be your towel, beach mat, dress and shawl, so adaptable for many situations. A bandeau swimsuit will ensure that you don’t suffer any pesky tan lines while topping up your tan. A pair of espadrilles is a great footwear choice, more supportive than flip flops yet lighter and more stylish than trainers. These are ideal for long llo on ngg walks wal a lk kss along a lo longg the t h beach.

Casablanca Crossover C Swimsuit £76, Casablanca a Pareo £50, both seasprayswimwear.com Castaway Stripe Bandeau u £119, figleaves.com Shoreline Tote £25, shop.nationaltrust.org.uk Guest Espadrilles £70, dunelondon.com

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LOVELY LINEN For this nautical trend, we take inspiration from the canvas of ship’s sails – in the form of linen. Linen is a durable fabric has been a fashion favourite for centuries. Linen is a sustainable, natural fabric that is light and breezy, perfect for hot summer days. As always, stripes are the favourite; this season vertical stripes are more prevalent on the catwalk. Team a striped maxi dress with a straw hat, canvas sneakers and a denim backpack for an easy, casual look that’s perfect for exploring the coastline. Jewellery is inspired by the ropes and knots found on a traditional sailboat. Organic materials such as hemp and jute mimic the texture of rope. Add sea glass, blue beads or shells to embellish the knots.

Autograph Dress £59, M&S collection, Hat £19.50, both marksandspencer.com Stripe Maxi Dress £49.99, bonprix.co.uk Stripe Trousers £45, monsoon.co.uk Necklace £12.50, next.co.uk

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PROJECT

DEEP SEA CHARMS LISA FLOYD

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ake decorative, sea creatures to adorn beach bags and key rings or, turn the pieces into a necklace and bracelet set. This is an introductory project for using a piercing saw and designs can be adapted to include more detail and suit individual skill levels. Using aluminium is a costeffective alternative to precious metals.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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Tracing paper, paper and pencil Glue stick Low tack tape Cutting knife and mat Craft knife Semiprecious stone pendants Small semiprecious beads 0.8mm (20g) aluminium sheet metal Jumprings, assorted sizes (5mm-12mm) Headpins Ball chain and connectors Doming hammer and block Piercing saw frame and blades Bench peg/clamp Drill/small drill bit Half round fi le and assorted needle fi les Sanding sticks Flat nose pliers x 2 pairs Round nose pliers Flush cutters

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, LISA FLOYD

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE 1. For the large, sea creatures, choose a pendant shape suitable for the centre of your design. A front to back, top drilled stone works best but a bead with a central hole can be placed on a headpin if necessary (see Step 14). Draw an outline around the stone and a line directly down the centre. Draw one half of each design as a simple outline. 2. Use tracing paper to copy the outline. Fold the paper in half (or turn it over, matching the edges) and trace the section again to complete a whole design. 3. Secure traced image to a cutting board and use a craft knife to carefully cut away the inside section and around the outline, to create a template. Note: Always follow health and safety guidelines for using knives. Use a cutting mat and angle the blade at 45°. Change the blade immediately if any dragging on the paper occurs. Take care removing and replacing blades and dispose of sharps safely.

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4. Use a doming hammer and steel block to place pattern onto the surface of an aluminium sheet. Cover a section large enough to allow placement of the template. Hammering will cause the metal sheet to curl and distort slightly; to counteract this, turn the sheet over and hammer the reverse with a nylon-headed hammer or wooden mallet. Aluminium is quite soft and will take marks easily, to avoid unwanted damage, keep the protective plastic cover on the metal or place new sheets of tracing paper each side during the hammering process. Note: Always wear protective glasses and gloves, when hammering, drilling or cutting metal in order to avoid injury. 5. On the reverse of the sheet, stick the template to the metal using a glue stick. Cut the inside of the template to create a central gap. To do this, drill a small hole close to the edge of the template. Insert the saw blade through the hole before attaching to the saw frame (See Step 6 for more details). Use a firmly fi xed bench peg

to rest the metal on during sawing and hold the saw frame vertically whilst cutting. The central cut-out pieces are used for making the charms in Step 11 and a smooth edge will mean less fi ling and shaping later. 6. Guide for setting up the saw: Place the saw frame with the handle towards you, against your midriff and rest the other end against the bench; look to check the teeth of the blade are facing up and the teeth are running towards you. Insert the far end of the blade into the pads at the top of the frame, then tighten the screw to secure. Carefully add the sheet metal so the blade is threaded through the drilled hole and place it up close to the frame, to avoid breaking the blade. Push the saw with your body to give it tension. Insert the opposite end of the blade into the bottom of the frame and tighten the screw; once secured, the blade should be taut.

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

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7. Loosen the bottom of the saw frame; separate the blade from the metal before re-fitting blade ready to cut around the outer edge. Aim for a neat cut as close to the template shape as possible. To alter the direction during sawing, gently turn the metal while still carefully moving the saw up and down. If this is a brand-new skill and proves difficult, simply cut sections separately, removing and repositioning the saw each time.

sticks are useful for this task. Check the stones sit neatly in the gaps. The metal is pliable and can easily be tweaked to add shape, if required. Steps 1–10 describe making the large sized mermaid’s tail, fish and turtle designs.

8. The central cutouts already have the hammered pattern and can be used for making the smaller, sea creature charms.

12. As described in Step 7, saw around the outline shape. The sawing skills needed here are a little more challenging due to the small size. Extra care should be taken to avoid injury to fingers when cutting. Follow Steps 9 and 10 to finish the edges. Any residue glue or dirt can be removed with warm soapy water and polish with a soft cloth.

9. Use a selection of files and needle fi les to smooth the inside cut and outer edges. Remember the metal is soft and marks easily. Gently fi le the edges flat before slightly tilting a fine needle fi le to round the edges. Swap the fi les to use the profi le best suited to the area needing smoothing. 10. Any sharp edges, including tails and fins should be fi led and sanded to a smooth and rounded edge for safety. Half round sanding

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11. For the small charms, trace the outlines of the cutout sections before drawing small animal designs inside the shapes, using Steps 2 and 3 as a guide.

13. On the larger shapes, drill two small holes at the top of the design. One hole will allow for a jumpring to attach the pendant and the other for a jumpring and chain. On the small charms, only one hole is needed.

14. The bead used for the large turtle design is placed on a large headpin, which is looped, ready to attach to the metal shape. The same principle is used to turn small beads into charms to be added to the small key rings. Use round nose pliers to grip the top of the headpin and turn the pliers away from you to form the loop. 15. Place jumprings on the top drilled pendants and attach to the metal shapes. Add jumprings to the small metal, and bead charms. Thread through a short length of ball chain and connector to finish. Repeat for each design. If jumprings prove unsuitable for the stones, a triangle bail can be made with wire and flat nose pliers.

RESOURCES alchemyandice.com cooksongold.com the-beadshop.co.uk

CONTACT lisafloydprops@gmail.com www.chilichic.co.uk

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PROJECT

ROLLING WAVES ALISON GALLANT

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his project uses polymer clay to create a set that reminds us of days on the seashore. A wide ripple blade is one of the most useful tools a polymer clay artist

can own. Here it is used for two extremely different and versatile techniques, with seaside colours of blues to turquoise for the waves and pearly white for the surf.

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PROJECT

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, PAUL GALLANT

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Premo! Sculpey quarter block Ultramarine (5562) Premo! Sculpey quarter block Cobalt Blue (5063) Premo! Sculpey half block White (5001) Premo! Sculpey half block Peacock Pearl Accents (5038) Premo! Sculpey one-and-a-half blocks Pearl Accents (5101) Spare block, any colour Pasta machine Tile or glass Paper Tissue blade Wide ripple blade 30mm circle cutter Roller Texture sponge Square ring bezel Square pendant bezel 6-oval bracelet finding 2 domed shapes for baking Wet and dry sandpaper (400 and 800 grits) Coarse cloth for buffing Wide channel bangle 2 oval shapes for earrings Silver necklet 4 earwires 3 x 6mm jumprings 2-part epoxy glue

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HOW TO MAKE 1. Mix a quarter block each of Ultramarine, Cobalt Blue and Pearl (blue), a half block of Peacock Pearl and a quarter block of Pearl (turquoise), then one block of Pearl and half a block of white. Divide each colour mix in two and set aside one piece of each. 2. Roll the blue and turquoise mixes on No.4 on the pasta machine and the white on No.5. Cut the white in half. Stack the sheets, blue, white, turquoise and white. Roll over the top to exclude air and pop any surface bubbles. Cut in half, stack and repeat once more.

5. Choose a slice for the pendant, cover it with paper and press gently with your roller, or rub with your fingers to make sure there are no gaps caused by the ripple blade. Stamp out a 30mm circle and place it on paper or a tile.

3. Using a wide ripple blade, cut down through all of the layers across the top of the block and press back together. Repeat from one corner to the other and press together again.

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4. Hold a sharp blade between both forefi ngers and thumbs and take thin slices from across the block. If it’s easier, stand the block on its side and slice down. Interesting variations can be seen if you use a ripple blade, then press or roll the slices thin, as shown on the right of the picture.

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6. Roll a small piece of blue on No.1 and again with a texture sponge. If you don’t have a suitable sized cutter, press the square bezel onto the blue, remove and cut along the lines. Press the clay into the bezel and make a few cuts in the centre of the square to make sure there won’t be any air bubbles after baking. 7. Stamp out two 30mm circles from patterned sheets for earrings. Make a small hole near the top of each one and place on domed shapes. Next, stamp out six 2cm x 1.5cm ovals for the bracelet. Place them on paper or a tile. 8. Bake all pieces according to the clay manufacturer’s instructions. Sand the fronts of the pendant circle and bracelet pieces, and the fronts and backs of the earrings with 400 and 800 grit wet and dry sandpaper. Mix 2-part epoxy glue and stick the pendant circle onto the blue base and the bracelet ovals onto the finding. Keep a wet wipe handy in case any glue seeps out. 9. Set up two double-layer (thickest setting) offset Skinner blends 8cm x 6cm in blue to white and turquoise to white. Roll each one

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through the pasta machine approx. 20 times, folding from the bottom to the top, at the thickest setting. Place an unopened block of clay to fi ll the gap along the rollers and stop the blend spreading. 10. Keeping the same orientation, reduce to No.2, then No.3. Cut slices approx. 5mm deep across both blends with a ripple blade. Insert into a wide channel bangle. One slice should be sufficient for four lines. Alternate the colours and sponge to join lines when fi lled. 11. Roll a small piece of turquoise on No.2. Press the ring bezel into the clay and cut out the shape. Insert into the bezel. Cut a strip of turquoise to white, with one edge straight and the other rippled. Place in the bezel as for the bangle. Add a final line of turquoise with one edge straight. Sponge to join all of the lines. 12. Roll a small piece of blue on No.4 and stamp out two 2cm x 3cm. Cut off a short length of blue to white and reduce it to No 4. Cut four strips, starting two of them with one straight edge and one rippled. Place strips onto both

pieces of blue, trimming the edges as you progress. Sponge both pieces to join edges and stamp out again to retain shape. Bake with the bangle and ring. 13. Lightly sand the edges and backs of the earring pieces. Roll blue on No.4 and then with a texture sponge. Stamp out two 2cm x 3cm oblongs. Smear liquid clay on the backs of the baked pieces and sandwich silver ovals between the two layers using the sponge. Bake patterned-side down on a sponge. 14. Add jumprings and earwires to the round earrings and earwires to the oblongs. Add a jumpring to the pendant and your choice of necklet, chain, or cord. Buff the round earrings and bracelet ovals on a coarse cloth or denim.

RESOURCES All supplies are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT alisongallant@yahoo.co.uk info@millefioristudio.com

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PROJECT

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The free leading event for students on a precious metal related course. Goldsmiths’ Hall, London Tuesday 31 October – Wednesday 1 November 2017

– – – – – – –

Free hallmark registration package* Celebrity guest speakers Careers expertise Hallmarking guidance Demos and offers Services, suppliers and organisations Make Your Mark Awards

*Terms and conditions apply

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6/21/17 10:32 AM


SHOPPING

ON TREND

Get ready for summer with these floral accessories, by Lauren Goodchild 1

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1. Necklace £15 – simplybe.co.uk 2. Slip Ons £48 – office.co.uk 3. Scarf £12 – mandco.com 4. Socks £6 – cathkidston.com 5. Clutch £19.99 – zara.com 6. Necklace £69 – bimbaylola.com 7. Rucksack £20 – oasis-stores.com 8. Shoes £95 – dunelondon.com

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POLY-FAST SANDING TOOL This month Sian tests the Poly-fast sanding tool to make sanding any baked polymer clay or other similiar material a breeze! THE PRODUCT

WHAT ELSE WILL YOU NEED?

The Poly-fast system is a battery operated sanding tool that allows you to sand faster and more precisely. This makes sanding your polymer clay projects quick and incredibly easy.

Immediately you will need two AA batteries. The kit will work with rechargable batteries but doesn’t come with them. If you find your grip isn’t great then you might want to consider getting gloves to help you hold onto the piece being sanded.

WHAT DOES IT DO? This tool uses a vibrating head with detachable sanding pads to sand the surface of any material that can be sanded. Developed for polymer clay it would also work on other materials, like wood, plastics and fired metal clay.

WHAT IS INCLUDED? The basic kit contains the tool, one head without sponge backing and eight different grit sanding discs 80, 150, 320, 500, 600, 800, 1000 and 1500.

HOW GOOD ARE THE INSTRUCTIONS? There are brief pictural instructions on the back of the package. These are ok, alternatively just go to the website, where you’ll find a wealth of instructional videos on how to use it. YouTube also has more videos by a range of independent reviewers.

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CAN IT BE ADDED TO? You can buy packs of sanding discs separately to replenish your stock and a few extra fi ner grits as well. If you want the sponge backed head, you can buy them in a set of three, each one having a different colour of plastic to help you keep track of what grit is on the head. There is also a pack of three standard (without sponge backing) heads available too, if you want more.

IS IT VALUE FOR MONEY? This kit is a bit of an investment but personally I think the time and energy it saves you with sanding makes it value for money.

IS IT EASY TO USE? It is very easy to use. There is a knack to using it as there is a shock absorber just below the

head and you need to make sure your hand is below that. When holding the tool correctly you feel no vibration and it sands very quickly and easily.

OVERALL SCORE I loved this tool! I’ve always found sanding baked polymer clay a real slog so when Polyfast asked me to try this I was intrigued from the start. It has proven to be a tool I will use very regularly as it at the very least halves my time spent sanding. I haven’t tried it with my fi red metal clay yet but I think that it would work just as well for getting a good fi ne fi nish on that surface too.

SCORE

COST €49.90 (for the basic kit)

RESOURCES poly-fast.com hello@poly-fast.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS: SIAN HAMILTON

PRODUCT TEST

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1. The kit with some of the extra sanding disc and extra head packs. 2. The sanding grit is written on the box 3. There are two different head types, one with sponge and one without 4. It’s a good idea to write the sandpaper grit number on the back of the sanding discs 5. Tool 6. Sanding

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DISCOVER A WHOLE RANGE OF JEWELLERY MAKING SUPPLIES

BEADHOUSE.CO.UK G E T 2 5 % O F F YO U R F I R S T O R D E R USE PROMO CODE

GIVEME25

BEADHOUSEUK W: www.beadhouse.co.uk E: sales@beadhouse.co.uk T: +44(0)1484 485111 Bead House, Quarmby Mills, Tanyard Road, Oakes, HuddersямБeld, West Yorkshire, England HD3 4YP

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SHOPPING

Making Jewellery

TOP 8 ALL AT SEA This month’s must-have items for your jewellery kit. By Sue Mason-Burns

Beachcomber Necklace Kit, £5.50 spellbound.co.uk

Metal Charms Silver Ships Wheel Charms, 26p each bigbeadlittlebead.com

Rose Gold Plated Zamak Anchor Charm, £1.97 per pack of 2 beadsdirect.co.uk

8/0 Miyuki Seed Beads – Sea Foam Greet, £5.60 per 22g tube spoiltrottenbeads.co.uk

Handmade Seaside Heart Bead, £20 josephinewadmandesigns.com

Best Flexible Moulds by Penni Jo – Conical Sea Shells, £12.95 metalclay.co.uk

Multi-coloured Striped Resin Saucer Beads, £4.99 per pack of 5 beadsdirect.co.uk

Superduo – Nebula Ivory Matte, $7.49 per 14g tube potomacbeads.com

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PRODUCT REVIEW

BESIDE THE SEASIDE This month we bring you an array of products to help you get that nautical feel holidays. By Sue Mason-Burns to your jewellery pieces for those beach hol

SHE SELLS SEA SHELLS These gorgeous beads look like the most exotic periwinkle shells, but they are in fact handmade from polymer clay. They measure 17mm x 14mm and come in an array of colours, including green and white, which also has natural brown hues, and the mostly white with swirls of pinks and purples. They also have a very generous 2mm drill hole which opens up a world of design opportunities. These are unique artisan beads made by the very talented Silvana Bates and are available from Big Bead Little Bead for £2.40. bigbeadlittlebead.co.uk

NAUTICAL CLAY

FRESHWATER CULTURED PEARLS Is there anything more seaside than pearls? And these are some truly gorgeous examples. They are multicoloured potato pearls, available in an array of colours and sizes. The darker strand are 6–7mm in size and a 45cm strand, which will give you in excess of 70 genuine freshwater pearls, costs £8.88. The more pastel strand, which includes white, peach, lavender and silver grey, measure approximately 7–7.5mm and a 40cm strand will cost £32.57. If you want a more even colour in your pearls, then the lavender/pink might be for you. They measure 6–6.5mm and a 40cm strand will cost you £27.32. cooksongold.com

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If you’re planning to make some nautical themed pieces with your polymer clay, then you’re going to need the staple red, white and blue. Beads Direct stock a wonderful range of Fimo colours in both the Soft and Effect range. The Soft will give you a rich opaque colour and the Effect gives you a sparkle to add an extra element to your jewellery designs. Blocks of Fimo (56g) are priced at £1.99, so why not check out the whole range? beadsdirect.co.uk

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PRODUCT REVIEW

MERMAID SCALES This range of resin cabochons feature iridescent scales, which shimmer in the light just like the tail of a mermaid. They are also AB coated to maximise the iridescence. The ovals measure 18mm x 13mm and come in a pack of 10 for £1.99. The pretty hearts measure approximately 12mm and are sold in a pack of 15 for £1.99. For a variation of colour, the orange round cabs also measure 12mm and a pack of 15 will cost you £1.99. For a limited time, if you use coupon code ETSY10, you will receive a 10% discount on these beautiful cabochons, as well as all the other quirky items in the shop. etsy.com/uk/shop/decodenUKsupplies

DREAMY TURQUOISE What gemstone do you think of when you think of summer days on the beach? My thoughts immediately turn to turquoise. It conjures up those summer skies and leisurely walks along the beach. The Curious Gem have a beautiful range of turquoise on offer. These faceted round Sleeping Beauty Turquoise cabochons, are ready to set into your jewellery pieces. They are completely natural, not dyed or treated in any way, and measure 6mm, perfect for rings. One of these truly stunning cabochons will cost you £16.25. Or what about some beautiful AA grade microfaceted rondelles? This 21.5cm strand of 4–6.5mm diameter stunning quality Turquoise will cost you £37.15. Or if freeform cabochons are your thing, then why not check out this stunning example. Measuring 13.5mm x 11mm, this untreated beauty will set you back £14.60. thecuriousgem.co.uk

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PROJECT

FLEUR-DES-DUOS BRACELET GIANNA ZIMMERMAN

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ake a lovely bracelet with RounDuo beads and a selection of other pieces. This design has been created by Gianna Zimmerman, a Dutch self taught beader who started in 2000. She has a YouTube channel with a range of videos all about seed beading and is writing her first book with designs from the Art Deco era.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 x Cup button 12 x RounDuo beads 11 x Rose Montees SS20 Size 15, size 11 and size 8 Miyuki seed beads 0.006 Wildfire thread 2 x size 12 beading needles Scissors

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PHOTOGRAPHS/ILLUSTRATIONS: © POTOMAC BEADS

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE 1. Thread two needles onto a 5ft length of beading thread (one needle on each end). Add (1) 15/0, (1) 11/0, (1) 15/0 and drop them down to the middle of the thread. Add (1) Cup Button (CB) with the bowl side down (one needle goes through the left hole and the other through the right hole). Add (3) 15/0`s on each needle and drop them down next to the CB. Add (1) 11/0 on one needle. With the other needle, go through the same 11/0 in the opposite direction. Pull the thread. Note: At this point you should have an equal length of thread on both sides. Take one of the needles back through the (3) 15/0`s, the CB, the seed beads, the CB, the (3) 15/0`s and the 11/0. 2. Add (3) 15/0`s on each needle. Add (1) RounDuo (RD) on one needle. With the other needle, go through the same hole of the RD in the opposite direction. Pull the thread. Add (1) 15/0 on each needle and go through the second hole of the RD. 3. Add (1) 15/0 on each needle. Add (1) Rose Montee (one needle goes through the fi rst hole and the other through the second hole). Add (1) 15/0 on each needle. Add (1) RD on one needle and with the other one go through the

same hole in the opposite direction. Add (11) 15/0`s on the both needles and go through the second hole of the fi rst RD (the hole closest to the Rose Montee). 4. In this step you will use the peyote stitch. With one needle, go through the first 15/0. Add (1) 11/0, skip the second 15/0 and go through the third 15/0. Continue adding 11/0`s. Once you add the last fifth 11/0, go through the 15/0 as well as the RD. Pull the thread. Repeat the pattern with the other needle. 5. With both needles do the same. To add the next row of the peyote stitch, go through the 15/0 that is closest to the RD as well as the 11/0. Add (1) 8/0 and go through the next 11/0. Once you add the last fourth 8/0, pass through the 11/0, the 15/0 and the RD. 6. With both needles do the same. To do the last row of the peyote stitch, go through the first 15/0, the 11/0 and the 8/0. Add (2) 15/0`s between each 8/0. Once you add the last (2) 15/0`s, go through the 8/0, the 11/0, the 15/0 and the RD. Add (1) 15/0 on each needle and go through the second hole of the RD. Repeat the steps 3 - 6 to your desired length of the bracelet.

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7. At the end of the design, add (3) 15/0`s on both needles. Add (1) 11/0 on one needle. With the other needle, go through the same 11/0 in the opposite direction. With one needle, pick up (27) 11/0`s and sew back through the first 11/0 to make a loop. Test the Cup Button. With the other needle, go through the first 11/0 and add the 8/0`s with the peyote stitch. Once you add the last 8/0, sew back through the next (3) 11/0`s and the 8/0. Add (2) 15/0`s between each 8/0. Weave the needles through your work until the threads meet. Tie a square knot and burn down the thread ends.

RESOURCES: Potomac Bead Company has some of the world’s largest bead stores in the USA, they sell thousands of bead weaving products and have a comprehensive website with international shipping options. potomacbeads.com

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6/21/17 10:39 AM


NEXT

ON SALE 17 AUGUST

MONTH

70

PROJECTS & IDEAS

IN THIS ISSUE...

An introduction to Powertex, beaded butterflies, textured gold rings, faux ceramic polymer clay, plus much more

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03/07/2017 12:16


PROJECT

PEARL EARRINGS SIAN HAMILTON

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BOOK DETAILS

f you make your own wedding jewellery, you’ll find these pearl earrings are perfect for the bride. They are at their most elegant when they are very long. If you prefer a shorter drop, they can be made to any length and still look stunning.

Extract from Wedding Jewelry: 30 inspirational designs to make by Sian Hamilton, first published in 2017 by GMC, ISBN 9781784943301, £14.99. Available from gmcbooks.com

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

12 x 4mm white and cream glass pearls 12 x 6mm white and cream glass pearls 8 x 8mm white and cream glass pearls 2 x 10mm white and cream glass pearls 10g x size 8 or size 9 clear AB seed beads 34 x 25mm silver coloured headpins 2 x 50mm fine belcher chains 2 x silver coloured earwires Beading mat Chain nose pliers Round nose pliers Side cutters

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22/06/2017 12:44


PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, SIAN HAMILTON

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE 1. Using the pearls and seed beads, make up 34 beaded headpins following the technique (see opposite). Use one pearl and one seed bead per pin. You will have four different sizes of beaded headpins. 2. Take the chain and add an earwire to one end. When opening a loop on the earwire or on the beaded headpins, grasp the loop by the open end and twist. Don’t pull it outwards as that will distort the shape. Twist it to open the loop and twist it back to close. Add a 4mm beaded headpin to the end link on the earring. 3. Add a 4mm beaded headpin to the next link in the chain. Skip a link and add another 4mm beaded headpin.

HOW TO MAKE BEADED HEADPINS

4. Skip a link and add a 6mm beaded pin to the next one. Then add a 4mm beaded headpin to the next link along. Skip a link and add another 6mm beaded headpin to the next one up. Miss a link and add another 6mm beaded headpin to the next one up. 5. Add a 4mm beaded headpin next then skip a link and add three more 6mm beaded headpins, each with one empty link between them. Add a 4mm beaded headpin, just above the last 6mm beaded headpin. 6. Above the last 4mm beaded headpin add the four 8mm headpins, spaced out with one link between each one. Finally, attach the 10mm beaded pin at the top by the earwire. Repeat all the steps to make a matching pair.

1. Place all the seed beads, pearls and headpins that the earrings require (see materials list) on a beading mat. Pick up a headpin and place a seed bead and then a pearl on the pin. Repeat to add one seed bead and one pearl to each headpin. Pick up one pin and hold it at the very end with round nose pliers. 2. Roll the pin around the plier jaw until it hits the other jaw, then loosen your grip so you can rotate the pin and coil it some more. 3. Keep coiling the pin right up to the pearl. Now repeat Steps 1 to 3 for all the headpins on the beading mat.

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4. Pick up the side cutters and a coiled beaded headpin. Place the cutters where the fi rst coil on the pin crosses over with the piece coming out of the pearl. You need the flat side of the cutters facing the loop you are keeping so that you get the flattest possible cut on the end. 5. You should end up with a ‘P’ shape. Repeat Step 4 for all the beaded headpins you need. 6. Using the chain nose pliers, grasp the pin as close as possible to the end that’s coming out of the pearl and tweak the wire back so that the loop is sitting more centrally above the pearl. It doesn’t need to be the exact centre. Repeat this step on all the beaded headpins.

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CLASSIFIEDS

Write for Us Writing books about Crafts Have you ever thought of writing, or have you written, a book about your passion for crafts? Do you long to ďŹ ll the gaps of your existing library? Then why not contact us with your original idea or fresh approach to your specialist subject? New and inexperienced writers will be given expert advice and guidance by our friendly and professional team.

100

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WEDDING JEWELRY

'HFRUDWLYH3DSHU&UDIW      

30 inspirational designs to make

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Little Activities

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VVanessa anessa Mooncie Mooncie

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91 7/5/17 11:53 AM


IT’S A JEWELLER’S LIFE We share life behind the scenes with blogger Anna Mcloughlin, who is a gold and silversmith with a passion for using environmentally friendly and ethically sourced materials in her designs.

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or this month’s blog, I’ve chosen to follow the nautical/beach theme (ahem, well, I do mention holidays a couple of times) and talk about the pros and cons of self-employment. I’ve been working as a designer/goldsmith for the last 11 years but before that I spent 5 years working full time as a secondary school teacher, so have had plenty of time to experience the ups and downs of both employment and self-employment. Here’s some of what I have learned…

STARTING WITH THE GOOD STUFF: The freedom to work around family life This was not really something I’d thought about until I became a mum. Then it became probably the single most important reason for becoming my own boss. When my first child was born, I was teaching full time and had the salary to match. I thought that there

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was just no way we would be able to manage without my income and so the possibility of ‘not’ returning to my job just wasn’t something I’d thought about. I had a mortgage to pay and now, another mouth to feed too! So when my daughter was just 5 months old, she started attending a private nursery to be looked after by someone else, while I went back to teaching other people’s children. I loved teaching, but that first year back at work was really hard and my heart just wasn’t in the job as quite understandably, I just wanted to be spending as much time as possible with my own child. I dropped a couple of days teaching, but as any teacher will probably tell you, it’s not really a job that works very well as a part-time one, as you still end up going in to school on your days off or staff meetings or working on planning and marking at home. So I left… kind of… and became a self-employed jewellery designer/ maker/supply teacher.

Holidays whenever you want Obviously within reason, as if you’re always on holiday, then you won’t be earning any money, but if you work for yourself, you don’t have to plan months in advance and check if anyone else in the company has booked the same weeks, then wait to get permission from the HR department. Holidays also come under cons too though, as I’ll explain later. Be your own boss I think this is a bit of a funny saying as you are never really ‘your own boss’, especially if you are making something to sell to other people; your clients are! What you do become though is the decision maker, so if you choose to change the design of something, or you want to have a morning off to go and see your child pick up a certificate in assembly, you don’t have to jump through hoops getting permission, you just do it!

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BLOG

Making a ring: work in progress

No commuting This is true in my case anyway, as my daily commute is now just a few steps out of the back door to my ‘posh shed’ as we like to call it. Meeting lots of different people Being a designer, whatever medium you work in, is always going to involve working with other people and I guess this could fit onto either side of the pro/con fence depending on whether this is something you enjoy or not. It’s exciting! I think this is probably the second most important reason for being self-employed – that it’s fun! Let’s face it, life is pretty short, and you only get one chance at it, so if you have an idea that you feel passionate about, you should go for it. The average person spends about a third (according to a quick bit of Google research) of their entire life at work. That’s a fair old chunk of your lifetime, and I know so many people that hate their jobs and spend their whole week waiting for the weekend to arrive. I guess we all do that to a certain extent, but in my opinion, if you have to spend a whole load of time, week in, week out doing something that is making you miserable, you really should at least try to change something.

Powered by honey, lemon and ginger when you have a cold!

THE NOT SO GOOD STUFF: Lack of employment security If you’re going to run your own business, there’s no getting away from the fact that you have to be a ‘risk taker’. Not having to answer to anyone else and being able to make all the decisions about when, where and how you work, being liberated from the traditional 9–5 grind is all amazing, but if it all goes wrong, then everything falls onto you. There are obviously ways of safeguarding against this by making sure you always do your research about both what you sell and where you intend to sell it, but if everyone suddenly decides to stop buying what you make tomorrow, your income stops too! When I first became self-employed, I continued to teach on a supply basis and also offered workshops to schools. This meant that I could always work and earn money, even if it wasn’t quite what I wanted to do. Actually, I guess that’s true for any business, as a selfemployed person has so many transferrable skills. So maybe job security in ‘your own’ business is fairly low, but hey, if it does all go wrong, there are always jobs going out there doing something! No holiday/sick pay This reason is partly what inspired this month’s blog, as I currently have a rotten cold, but also two commissions that need to be fi nished and posted this week as well as writing my MJ blog. When you’re a self-

employed sole trader and you have a deadline, you just have to meet it. There’s nobody else to do things for you, especially as a designer when your clients are paying for ‘you’ to do a job. I have a wonderful helpful (also selfemployed) partner that will happily take my fi nished items to the Post Office for me later on today, but when it comes to the actual making and writing bits, I just have to get the job done myself. It doesn’t matter how poorly I feel, if I let one client down, and they speak to someone else that speaks to some else – then I could end up with a reputation for being unreliable, which could result in my clients taking their money (and my wages) elsewhere. The same goes for holidays. Yes, you can go whenever you want and for as long as you like, but the work doesn’t go away, it’s all still waiting for your when you get back!

Finally to sum up, in my opinion anyway, being self-employed is very hard work and you have to be incredibly disciplined at times, (especially when you have to force yourself to work when you’re ill!) but it’s also loads of fun and to be perfectly honest, I wouldn’t ever want to go back to having a ‘proper job’!

Find out more about Anna’s jewellery at annafinejewellery.co.uk

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Work/life balance? This again, is something that can fit onto either side. I know people that have left high-paid, stressful jobs in order to get some ‘work/life balance’ back and I know people who are selfemployed who really struggle to fi nd time to do anything but work. My workload varies a little with the seasons, so at the moment, I’m really busy; but I think having a family forces me into having a pretty good work/life balance. It just means that I have to be super-organised!

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

BASIC TECHNIQUES HOW TO MAKE A WRAPPED LOOP

1. Thread a bead onto a head or eye pin. Grip the wire with round nose pliers next to the bead.

2. Bend the wire above the plier jaw to a right angle. You will need about 2mm of wire above the bead before the bend.

3. Move the plier jaws to sit at the top of the bend.

4. With your thumb push the wire back around the pliers, keeping it tight to the jaw.

5. Keep pushing the wire around the jaw until you meet the bead.

6. Move the pliers around the loop and continue to bend the wire around until it is facing out at a right angle and you have a complete loop.

7. If attaching the loop to a chain this is the stage to do that. Use a pair of chain nose pliers to hold across the loop firmly.

8. Wrap the wire around the neck of the loop until it meets the bead. Snip off any excess wire and push the end against the coil to finish.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SIAN HAMILTON

MAKING A SIMPLE LOOP

1. Thread the bead onto a head or eye pin and cut the pin about 1cm above the bead. Bend the wire to a right angle above the bead.

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2. Using round nose pliers, grasp the wire at the very end and curl it around the plier jaws.

3. Roll the wire around to meet the bead. If it does sit centrally move the plier jaws around the loop to sit by the bead away from the open end. Bend the loop back to sit directly above the bead.

4. Use chain nose pliers to tighten the loop by twisting it from side to side. Do not pull it outwards as that will distort the shape.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

USING JUMPRINGS

CRIMPING A BEAD

ADDING A COVER

MAKING AN EYE PIN

Always make sure you follow this guide and don’t pull jumprings apart as they can easily distort.

To show this process clearly it is being shown without using thread; the thread or wire should be inside the bead.

Crimp covers make your finished jewellery look more professional and clean.

Make your own eye pins using 0.8mm (or 0.7mm) wire. You can use 1mm if you need strong pins.

Take a jumpring in two pairs of pliers with the opening centred at the top.

Hold the crimp bead in the pliers with the bead sat in the hole that has a round side opposite a ‘W’ shape.

Take a crimp cover and place it over the crimped bead, making sure the bead is completely inside the cover.

Take the very end of the wire in round nose pliers. If the wire is quite hard it may slip out of the pliers, so start the loop about 2mm in and snip off the straight piece as you make the first curve.

Hold the jumpring either as shown in the step above or this step.

Before closing the pliers, check that the bead is sat straight. When you close the pliers the thread should fall either side of the bend.

Take a pair of chain or flat nose pliers and carefully grasp the cover. Gently press the cover closed.

The shape you want to create is a P. The advantage to making your own eyepins is that you can make the loop any size you need.

Whichever way you hold the jumpring, the opening motion is the same. Twist one hand towards you and the other hand away; never pull apart. Reverse the action to close.

Move the ‘U’ shape crimp to the other hole with two round sides. Turn the crimp so the ‘U’ faces sideways, press the pliers closed tightly.

The finished bead should be closed into a perfect bead shape. Nylon nose pliers do this job very well as they won’t mark the cover.

To finish the pin so the loop sits centrally on the wire, take the round nose pliers and place them where the round P shape meets the wire. Press the wire back against the pliers until the loop is centred.

makingjeweller y.com

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

BASIC TOOLS TYPES OF PLIERS

ROUND NOSE These are a must-have for a basic kit. When making jewellery, being able to create loops and rings is essential.

NYLON NOSE Another similar style to flat nose, these pliers have jaws that are covered in nylon to stop them marking the metal.

CRIMPING These pliers are used with crimp beads. If you want to have a nice finish to your crimping then these pliers are a good investment.

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CHAIN NOSE (SNIPE) Also called half round, these are the most versatile. They are used for many jewellery applications, so are another must-have for the basic kit.

FLAT NOSE Similar to chain nose, these pliers have a wider jaw that is completely fl at. Good for holding jumprings/findings as the wide jaw grasps a large area.

BENT NOSE

BAIL MAKING

Used for getting into small tricky spaces where a straight nose pair cannot reach.

These pliers have fixed sized jaws, with each jaw being a different size, usually with a 2mm difference (such as 3mm and 5mm). They come in a wide variety of sizes and are great if making a lot of the same size jumprings or coils.

CUTTERS/SNIPS

MEMORY CUTTERS

These pliers are also called side cutters. They come in a vast range of prices and styles. Be careful what you cut as they can blunt easily if used with hard or large dimension wire.

Used exclusively for cutting memory wire. If you are going to use memory wire you must invest in these; the wire will damage standard cutters.

makingjeweller y.com

22/06/2017 12:51


Introducing: CzechMates® 2-Hole Cabochon CzechMates® 3-Hole Beam

Crossroads Cuff by Starman TrendSetter Melinda Barta. Pattern available from your local bead store.

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PRECIOSA Pip

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Making jewellery august 2017  
Making jewellery august 2017  
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