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Jewellery MAKING

POLYMER TECHNIQUE

The UK's best jewellery magazine

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PROJECTS & IDEAS Beginners' guide to polymer clay

Inside... • Brick stitch flamingos • 50s style silver clay • Reticulation technique • and much more... MJ119 Cover.indd 1

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Making Jewellery is published 13 times a year by GMC Publications Ltd, 86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XN makingjewellery.com thegmcgroup.com 01273 477374 EDITOR Sian Hamilton mjeditor@thegmcgroup.com SUB EDITOR Sarah Doughty EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Lauren Goodchild, Abby Costen DESIGNER Claire Stevens PRODUCTION MANAGER Jim Bulley jimb@thegmcgroup.com PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Amanda Hoag amanda.hoag@thegmc group.com PUBLISHER Jonathan Grogan PRINTER Precision Colour Printers DISTRIBUTION Seymour Distribution Ltd Tel: +44 (0) 20 7429 4000 ADVERTISING Russell Higgins Tel: 01273 402841 russellh@thegmcgroup.com MARKETING Anne Guillot SUBSCRIPTIONS Helen Johnston Tel: 01273 488 005 helenj@thegmcgroup.com Subscribe online at makingjewellery.com 12 issues (inc p&p) UK £71.88, Europe £89.85, Rest of World £100.63. Cheques made payable to GMC Publications Ltd. Send to The Subscription Department, 166 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU SEE PAGE 74 FOR MORE DETAILS Current subscribers will automatically receive a renewal notice (excludes direct debit subscribers)

Editor’s Letter T

here are times when I supply a theme for an issue of Making Jewellery and what comes in surprises me. Often it reminds me that we all look at the world in a different way and what one person thinks a certain word means could be very different to the person sitting right next to them. This is very clear from the theme of this issue – Vintage! OK, so to some of you vintage means old lace, Victoriana etc. but to others it’s the 1960s – and in reality you could argue the point either way. For me it’s simply an interesting fact and for the magazine means we get a wide range of styles in our projects! And that can only be a good thing. This issue also includes a wide range of techniques from a beginner’s guide to polymer clay (p26) by a very well known MJ contributor and polymer clay artist Alison Gallant to reticulation (p44) by Tansy Wilson and a final look at what EFColor (p63) can achieve created by Karen Caine. If you don’t find something there to catch your eye then you may fall in love with Chloe’s flamingos (p40), just like I have done.

FIND US ON Follow us on Twitter at @MAKINGJEWELLERY To become a fan of our Facebook page search for MAKING JEWELLERY Find us on Pinterest at pinterest.com/ makingjewellery Find us on Instagram at instagram.com/ makingjewellery

Views and comments expressed by individuals in Making Jewellery magazine (ISSN 1756-4069) do not necessarily represent those of the publishers and no legal responsibility can be accepted for the results of the use of readers of information or advice of whatever kind given in this publication, either in editorial or advertisements. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by anymmeans without the prior permission of Guild of Master Craft sman Publications Ltd.

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CONTENTS REGULARS 5

JEWELLERY TALK The latest news, reviews and information

24 10 QUESTIONS Interview with jeweller Angela Richardson

39 BUSINESS MATTERS Starting up a business

51 TOP 8 Classic charm

70 PRODUCT TEST Zoe Lynham tests shape cutters from Debbie Bulford Designs

73 WHAT INSPIRES Find out what inspires Becky Everett

84 PRODUCT REVIEW Add a vintage feel to your designs

88 BE INSPIRED BY... This month: pearls, glue, gardens and hammers

92 IT’S A JEWELLER’S LIFE The latest installment of Anna Mcloughlin’s column

TECHNIQUES 26 POLYMER CLAY A complete beginners’ guide

44 RETICULATION Create a unique surface on silver sheet

63 EFCOLOR ENAMELLING Inspired by the pioneering work of Fiona Jones

94 BASIC TECHNIQUES Beginners’ techniques to get you started

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ISSUE 119 • JUNE 2018 PROJECTS 9

DELIGHTFUL DECO Gorgeous suite made using just one component to create a variety of looks

14 DRESSING UP Create pattern and texture on metal clay with Art Clay Paper

19 LOVELY LACE Make one-of-a-kind designs using actual pieces of lace

32 MONDRIAN-STYLE IN POLYMER CLAY Set inspired by the Mondrian-based fashion of the 1960s

36 BRIDAL LACE EFFECT Bracelet designed for Meghan Markle

40 AMERICANA TROPICANA For a retro look, replicate kitsch 1950s acrylic jewellery designs

52 SILVER TEXTURES

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Make lovely silver jewellery using the reticulation technique

56 VINTAGE OPULENCE Mix rhinestones, crystals, gemstones and pearls with polymer clay

75 SIXTIES STYLE Build up layers of colours to create groovy designs

80 LACY HEARTS Make textured silver clay pendants and earrings using vintage lace tablecloth

86 NOT-YOURGRANDMOTHER’S CAMEOS Shrink plastic necklaces that are both sweet and fun

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Be your own kind of Beautiful

Made with MultiPliers™ and Rose Gold Color German Style Wire.

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NEWS

JEWELLERY TALK PHOTOGRAPH: OKSANKASH/SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTOGRAPH OKSANKASH/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM COM

News, reviews and all the gossip

Our Favourite Gemstones AMETHYST Defined by its violet-purple colours, there are few gemstones that can claim the fame that amethyst can. Its colouration is a result of its iron and aluminium impurities. Yet some say the stone comes from the Greek god of grape harvest and more, Dionysus, pouring his wine onto a clear glass. The most valuable shade of amethyst is the deeper shade of purple, with flares of blue and red. Commonly named ‘green amethyst’ is formed using heat treatment, but is not accepted as a true amethyst. Typically worn as pendants, necklaces and earrings, amethyst looks finest in daylight and is fitting for each and every type of jewellery design as it’s strong and sturdy. This crystal promotes calm, balance and peace and is believed to improve cerebral and intellectual thought. Here are six splendid options for your collection.

Necklace £25, sforsparkle.com

Ring £34, TheAladdinsCave on etsy.com

Necklace £12, VFJewellery on etsy.com

Ring £42, LavantaBay on etsy.com

Pendant £109, PolyannaDesignsUK on etsy.com

Ring £109, PolyannaDesignsUK on etsy.com

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NEWS

FAVOURITE MAKE

What’s on in JUNE & JULY

FRIDAY

JUNE

JULY

2 JUNE – TOWCESTER BEJEWELS Create your own snazzy pendant out of beads with the experts of the trade at The Bead Scene. £40, thebeadscene.com

1 JULY – LINCOLNSHIRE DREAM CATCHER PENDANT WORKSHOP Make your own dream catcher pendant with the team at Riverside Beads in Market Deeping. £12.50, riversidebeads.co.uk

Find out what’s happening in the jewellery world near you

6 JUNE – LONDON MAKE A COPPER BRACELET Over three weeks learn all the skills you need to create your own copper jewellery. £78, craven-college.ac.uk 6 JUNE – LONDON INTRODUCTION TO GEMSTONES Get a hands-on introduction to the magnificent world of gemstones and learn to identify them for your makes. £56, londonjewelleryschool.co.uk ANGELA FINCH Necklace

7 JUNE – EXMOOR SEA GLASS JEWELLERY MAKING WORKSHOP Head to the coast to comb for your own seaglass before learning how to fashion it into your own piece of jewellery. £15, exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk 8–10 JUNE – WOLVERHAMPTON ART CLAY SILVER DIPLOMA COURSE Aimed at advanced beginners, Lori Ridgeway hosts a weekend making six projects using silver clay techniques. £500, craftcourses.com

MIA HOUGHTON Necklace

CATHERINE TEMALURU Necklace and earrings

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25 JUNE – BIRMINGHAM JEWELLERY WORKSHOP This weekly workshop is perfect for all abilities and includes vitreous enamelling, granulation and casting techniques using wax. £128, macbirmingham.co.uk

CASTING TECHNIQUES

2–3 JULY – LONDON CASTING TECHNIQUES FOR JEWELLERY Learn a range of home-studio casting techniques to create jewellery including cuttlefish casting, delft sand casting and more. £195, fluxjewelleryschool.com 14 JULY – BRISTOL LAMPWORK BEADMAKING 3-HOUR TASTER This taster workshop introduces the art of making your own glass beads, suitable for beginners. £70, creativeglassguild.co.uk 16–20 JULY – CUMBRIA TORCH-FIRED ENAMEL BEADS Head to Higham Hall in Cumbria to learn about torch-fired beads and have fun making your own piece of jewellery. Prices vary, highamhall.com 20 JULY – LONDON SILVER METAL CLAY TASTER CLASS Before you sign up for the longer running courses, you can take a taster session with the London Jewellery School. £56, londonjewelleryschool.co.uk 28 JULY – HEREFORDSHIRE BEADED FLOWER PENDANT/ BROOCH Create a posy stitched into fabric using glass flower and leaf beads with this class on the Welsh border. sallyboehme.co.uk

TORCH-FIRED ENAMEL BEADS

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NEWS

claire maunsell

ONLINE CLASSES WITH CRAFTCAST TUTORS

LINKS COLLECTION INSPIRED BY SPACE

NEW KITS FOR AUSTEN FANS

TierraCast has released a fresh collection of links that it believes will lead a new direction in jewellery designs. Intermix is a range of interconnecting rings in varying arrangements and sizes. TierraCast’s Katie Hill says: ‘The texture pattern and organic round shapes of the links are reminiscent of the surface of the moon. The true magic happens when you begin to intermix these links to create your designs.’ Intermix comes in four finishes – Antiqued Silver and Antiqued Gold to achieve a rustic feel, or Bright Rhodium and Bright Gold for a more contemporary look. To find out more, visit tierracast.com.

Chloe Menage of Pinkhot Jewellery has been working in conjuction with the Hampshire Cultural Trust to produce a brandnew Jane Austen Pendant kit. Suitable for those of all beading expertise, the kit includes bespoke, hand-made cabochons plus all the beads and the other materials you will need to complete the project. The centre features one of Austen’s many penned poems called ‘I Have Pain in my Head’, of which designer Chloe says; ‘I loved that the poem was penned by Jane herself, and set out to create a unique piece that captured her prose. I turned a copy of the manuscript into handmade glass cabochons, which can be stitched around with tiny beads. It was an honour to be involved in this project and it’s wonderful that others can now enjoy creating their own Jane Austen-inspired beaded jewellery!’ The kit can be purchased from pinkhot.co.uk or from the gift shops at Jane Austen House Museum in Chawton, The Wills Museum in Basingstoke and Winchester City Museum for £23.

Craftcast’s online jewellery making classes explore a variety of mediums and can be watched live or at your leisure from any device. Each class comes with helpful documents to provide an overview of the projects as well as a list of materials and resources. POLYMER CLAY WITH CLAIRE MAUNSELL Learn how to make a strong and light bangle form plus a range of colouring and texturing skills.

katharine wood

JEWELLERY MAKERS BUSINESS PLANNER FROM CRAFT SCHMOOZE

ENAMELLING WITH KATHARINE WOOD Pick up a variety of techniques to create a one-of-a-kind, colourful enamelled bangle.

This summer Craft Schmooze is launching a beautiful jewellery makers business planner. Each hardcover A5 book is packed with over 200 useful pages to help you cost your products accurately and plan the marketing for your jewellery shop. Available in a range stunning designs, these undated sulie girardi of stunn hardcover planners can METAL CLAY WITH be started at any time of SULIE GIRARDI year. If you would like to Master Sulie’s foolproof method find out more about the to make a metal clay pendant set planner or their extensive with a stunning cabochon stone, range of jewellery display r no soldering required! products to complement p yyour branding, visit ccraftschmooze on etsy.com.

SPECIAL OFFER ON BRYNMORGEN PRESS DVDS This month you can get your hands on two of Brynmorgen Press’s jewellery mastery DVDs – Patina Basics and PMC Basics – for a special price of £15 per title (including postage and packaging), down from their typical retail price of £25, while stocks last. In Patina Basics, covers how you can achieve rich coloured effects on metals, with explanations of all the materials and procedures you need with downloadable recipes and instructions included. PMC Basics boasts 30 clips covering different aspects of working with precious metal clay, presented with full navigational options for you to make your own path through the DVD. These DVDs will be available for a short time from craftworx.com.

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pam east PHOTOGRAPHY WITH PAM EAST Learn a formula for shooting crisp dramatic images of your jewellery every time. Join Craftcast for all the fun online learning at craftcast.com.

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READ ANYWHERE!

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DELIGHTFUL DECO SAMMI FLETCHER

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reate this gorgeous suite of Decoinspired jewellery using just one component to make a variety of looks, from simple to decadent.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, SAMMI FLETCHER

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HOW TO MAKE

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1mm (18 gauge) copper wire 0.4mm (26 gauge) copper wire 24mm Antique copper patterned rings 3mm faceted garnets 2mm seed pearls 13-14mm ivory coin pearls 9-10mm peach pearls 7mm ruby drop 7mm tube garnets (or substitute) 2mm copper beads 5mm copper jumprings 4mm copper jumprings 7mm copper jumprings Fine copper chain Set square (optional) Chain nose pliers Cutters 6-step bailing pliers

Large section necklace (p13) 1. Cut two 7.5cm lengths and two 6cm lengths of bare copper wire. Measure halfway along the length of each of the wires. Make a loop at each end of the 7.5cm lengths using the second smallest bail on your bailing pliers (approx. 3mm mandrel). Make a loop on each end of the 6cm lengths using the smallest bail on your bailing pliers (approx. 2mm mandrel). Bend each of the wires 90° at the centre point with a set square to help (if using). 2. Attach a 0.4mm piece of wire to one of the 7.5cm wires at the base of the loop. Wrap around this base wire until you reach the top of the loop. Attach a 5mm jumpring to the base wire by taking your weaving wire through it, wrapping both elements together twice. Continue wrapping the base wire four or five times. Attach a 6cm wire to the base wire by wrapping both wires together twice. The loops of both wires should sit next to each other. 3. Wrap the base (7.5cm) wire six times, then both wires together twice. Keep wrapping in this pattern (base wire six times, both twice, base six times) until 5mm from the bend, which is halfway along the base wire. Attach a 5mm jumpring by weaving it to the base wire twice. Take your weaving wire once more around the base wire. Weave both wires together around

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the top of the bend, around the base wire once then back through the jumpring twice, on the other side of the bend. 4. Wrap down the other side as before, attaching another 5mm jumpring to the loop at the bottom, mirroring the other side. Wrap the base wire until you reach the bottom of the loop. Pick up the other 7.5cm base wire and join both loops together twice. Now wrap around the new 7.5cm base wire until the edge of the loop, then weave the 5mm jumpring to the frame as before. Continue this half of the frame as before, then weave close and trim. 5. Attach a 0.4mm wire to one of the 5mm jumprings attached near the loops. Slide a 3mm garnet on and secure to the jumpring with one wrap, then take your 24mm ring and attach it to the jumpring, wrapping three times. Now slide on a 13–14mm coin pearl so it sits in the middle of your large ring and attach your large ring to the 5mm jumpring opposite. Attach a garnet as before. Secure and trim. 6. Attach a weaving wire to one of the remaining jumprings and secure the garnet to it, then attach the jumpring to the large central ring three times, secure the weaving wire back around the 5mm jumpring and trim. Repeat for the last jumpring. Finally, secure 2mm seed pearls to the four small loops. Make five more sections.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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7. Cut a 7cm length of 0.6mm copper wire and make a wrapped loop (see p94) at one end using the smallest section on your bailing pliers. Slide on a 2mm copper bead, a tube garnet then another 2mm copper bead. Finish with a wrapped loop at the other end. Make ten of these in total. Using 4mm copper jumprings join these in between each section. Finish at the back using 4mm copper jumprings linked to 8mm jumprings. Continue this until the desired length is reached. Finish with a clasp. Large single pendant (opposite page) 8. Create a section as above, substituting two 3mm garnets and a 10mm peach pearl for the central coin pearl. Omit the four decorative seed pearls. Attach a top drilled ruby drop between two loops at one end. Put one 7mm jumpring through each loop at the other end and thread a chain through these to suspend the pendant.

pieces down. Use a 9–10 mm peach pearl for the centrepiece, surrounded by a 14mm patterned central ring. Attach a small ruby drop to the base of one segment. Attach it to the other two segments using 5mm jumprings. Finally weave a 10mm jumpring between the top two segments to stabilise the design and attach jumprings to the top for a chain. Double drop (opposite page) 10. Create a small section as in Step 9, omitting all stones and attaching a top-drilled diamondshaped stone to one end. Create a medium size segment using the same method by cutting 6.5cm and 5cm lengths of copper wire, using a plain 16mm jumpring for the centre. Dangle the small section off this one with 5mm jumprings. Attach to a chain using 7mm jumprings through the top loops.

lengths of fine copper chain. Attach a 0.4mm piece of copper wire to the bottom of the 10mm jumpring and weave the chain to the jumpring to secure. Trim and suspend from a chain using two 7mm jumprings at the top. Small chain drop earrings (p10) 12. Create two sections the same way as Step 11. Once you have finished both, attach 5mm jumprings to the top of each section and use these to attach to suitable earring findings. Rose gold-plated Sterling silver findings were used here. Add in stones or beads if you choose, keeping in mind the weight of each earring.

Small chain drop pendant (p10)

RESOURCES Trio pendant (p9) 9. Using the method for the large sections, create three smaller segments with 6cm lengths of wire and 4.5cm sections of wire to scale the

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11. Create a small section as above, using 6cm and 4.5cm wire lengths. Don’t add in any gemstones; just use the 14mm patterned ring as the central focal point. Weave a 10mm jumpring to the loops at one end. Cut four 4cm

Widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT sammifletcher.com

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PROJECT

DRESSING UP FIONA INGRAM

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sing Art Clay Paper to create pattern and texture on metal clay is a favourite technique of mine and can be used in so many different ways. In this project I am using it to dress up some 1950s-style frocks and handbags – two different dress and dangly earring sets and a bag pendant with matching studs. The possibilities are endless and designs can be as individual as the fabrics they are inspired by. This is a beginner to intermediate level project. For those with a little more experience, this technique is great used with flexible base metals, which can be rolled out thinly and cut and punched in the same way.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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Art Clay Silver (around 30g for all the pieces) Art Clay Paper Art Clay Paste (or clay mixed with water) Spacers or rolling frames Roller Water spray Shallow textures A pin tool or scalpel Nail scissors or small sharp scissors Craft scissors with a decorative edge (optional) A variety of small paper punches Sanding sponges Small fi les Paintbrush Kiln or blowtorch for firing Brass brush Polishing cloth UV resin, colourant and lamp (optional) Findings: earwires, earposts (optional), jumprings and necklaces

HOW TO MAKE 1. Draw a simple dress shape onto graph paper with a black pen. The shape of 1950s dresses is very flared at the bottom and square at the top. The top section is around a third of the overall length of the dress. This design is 4.5cm long with an extra centimetre added to the arms at the top, which will be folded over later, so 5.5cm in total. The design can of course be adapted to any size. If you prefer, you can trace a photo of a dress you like and size accordingly. 2. Add transparent sticky tape to your graph paper template on both sides. This keeps your template strong and flexible so that it can be reused. It also stops it from sticking to the clay. Cut out the template with sharp scissors. 3. Roll out around 10g of clay to four cards thick or 1mm. The clay will need to be a long rectangle for the dress design, so starting off with a basic rectangle shape is helpful. Oil a shallow texture and place this underneath the clay. Take your cards or spacers down to three cards or 0.75mm and using the same texture as on the bottom,

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roll firmly from the bottom to the top. A shallow texture will provide a good base for applying paper clay shapes; this would be much more awkward if you used a deep texture. 4. Place the template onto the clay and cut around with a needle tool. Keeping the tool as upright as possible helps to get a neat cut with minimal pulling or dragging. 5. Once the dress has been cut out, turn the piece over. The extra length on the arm straps is going to create a double bail for a chain or necklace to go through. Using a cocktail stick or miniature straw as a spacer, fold the arm lengths down and stick them to the back of the dress with a little paste and water. You could also cross the straps over at the back as some dress designs do. I have crossed the arm straps on my dress with a punched flower decoration. 6. Now turn your piece over so that the weight of the pendant helps the arms to stick down. Set aside to dry.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, FIONA INGRAM

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7. Create matching earring templates by reducing your dress template on a printer or photocopier, in this case at 66%. Once you are happy with the size, add sticky tape to your template as before and cut out. With the earring design, I have rounded off the top of the dress design in a halter neck style. This allows a hole for an earwire to be part of the design. 8. Texture and cut out two earrings using your template and add a hole for the earwire with a tube cutter or straw before setting aside to dry. When your pieces are dry, refi ne both pendant and earrings with sanding sponges or fi les. Take particular care of the folded over arm straps when refining as these are delicate. 9. Now for some decoration! Cutting shapes from Art Clay Paper is such fun. Three of the best ways are by using papercraft punches, cutting with sharp nail scissors or using craft scissors. I really like using a small leather punch, which creates tiny circles. This is a great way of using up any tiny offcuts of paper clay that you may have. Decorative paper punches work well too. Craft scissors often used in

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children’s crafts are brilliant for interesting borders and decorative hems and a pair of nail scissors literally cuts any shape that you want! 10. I like to create a selection of cut and punched shapes in advance so that I can play around with design. Note that paper doesn’t like to get too wet. It is worth wetting a tiny bit of paper clay to see what happens, you will see that it turns to sludge. This can be saved as paste but should be kept separately as the binder in Art Clay Paper is different to that in ordinary paste. To apply the shapes, you need a tiny amount of water. I find the best method is to use a paintbrush dipped in a little water, then remove the excess water by brushing onto your hand. Wet slightly where you want to apply the paper clay and press gently into place. 11. I added polka dots to the first dress and earring set along with a belt and bow. The bow has been made from two petals cut from a flower punch with a little rectangle placed on top. 12. For the handbag and studs set, the template was created in a similar way. My

handbag pendant is a trapezium shape with the base a little longer than the top. I reduced the template to 50% of the original and then decided to try 40%. I felt that this would be too small when shrinkage was taken into account so I went with 50% for the studs. Again, the size can be adapted as you wish. 13. For the decoration on my little bags bag, I used bows and polka dots and then after firing added a tiny drop of red coloured UV resin to create a raised effect. I cured the resin for two minutes twice under a UV light. Before adding the resin I added an earring post with solder. You could also add an earwire to these if you do not want to solder as they have a useful hole in the design where the handle is. 14. For the second dress and earrings set I added punched flower decoration and used the children’s craft scissors to create a scalloped edge for the hem. I then fi led along this pattern with a small fi le to follow the line of the pattern. It is worth keeping the ‘outer’ from your punched shapes as this can be decorative in its own right and used in another project.

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PROJECT

15. Once you have applied your decoration and refined your pieces they are ready to fire. It is helpful to place a small piece of kiln blanket into the arm strap to support your bail as it fires. Fire your pieces at 800°C for 30 minutes in a kiln or according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Small paper clay pieces are fine to torch fire but care must be taken as it is thin and can melt easily. When fired, remove the kiln blanket, brush with a brass brush and polish as required. Add fi ndings such as necklaces and earwires and you are all ready to dress up!

RESOURCES Silver Clay, tools and resin: metalclay.co.uk All other materials widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT fionaingramjewellery.co.uk fiona@fionaingramjewellery.co.uk Facebook: fionaingramjewellery

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LOVELY LACE TANSY WILSON

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reate unique designs using actual pieces of lace. This collection is ideal for any level of maker as you can be as wildly creative as you like – with different shaped beads and connectors and the style of lace you choose. Once you start the ideas are endless.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ●

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Various lace pieces White glue (PVA or Modge Podge) Assortment of beads and connectors Chain Clasps Earring hooks Jumprings Nylon-coated wire Crimp tubes and crimp covers

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Eye pins Headpins Embroidery thread Ribbon clamp Bead cups Paintbrush Scissors Pliers to assemble pieces Crimping pliers

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HOW TO MAKE Floral lace necklace (p19) 1. Paint your lace with a thin layer of white glue, making sure it’s the type that dries clear. Also ensure you leave the good side of the lace facing upwards when you leave it to dry. Once dry, you can use a very stiff paintbrush to pierce the glue out from the lace to open up the holes.

again have mixed the colours using the same colour palette as the lace. 5. Add as many beads to the nylon-coated wire as desired. I have kept mine to a short style necklace. The important thing is you need all the beads to end at the same point. 6. Slide a crimp tube onto each wire and then thread each wire through the corresponding loop on a fourholed connector. Thread each wire back through its own crimp tube and make sure the beads are all snug on each wire before crimping the tube closed. Again, you can thread the wire back through the beads before cutting away any excess.

3. Now you can thread on the pearl beads. I have picked out colours that are featured in the lace. You can have all one colour or use contrasting colours to suit your style. I didn’t cut the excess nylon wire; instead I have threaded it back through the pearl beads.

7. Add crimp covers over each squashed crimp tube for a more professional and neater look. Finally, add a clasp using jumprings to the topside of the lace.

2. The first method of attaching beads to lace is to join nylon-coated wire to the lace using a jumpring. Simply push the jumpring through the lace. You can use a needle or compass point to make a hole if necessary. Link on a closed jumpring and close. Thread the nylon-coated wire through a crimp tube, then through the closed jumpring and back through the crimp tube. Crimp the tube as close to the closed jumpring as possible, then add a crimp cover.

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4. Repeat Step 2 to add another three strands of nylon-coated wire using jumprings to the lace panel. Add more pearl beads. I have used increasingly larger pearls on each wire and

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

PROJECT

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Grey lace necklace (p21) 8. This method uses eye pins threaded through beads to join to connectors to make up the chain. Thread an eye pin through a bead and create another eye loop using round nose pliers as close to the other side of the bead as possible (see p94). Repeat this for all the beads you will need. 9. Use jumprings to link the eye loop on the bead to a shaped connector. I have used pairs of jumprings as a feature. Again, repeat this step to make your desired length of chain.

Paint with white glue and leave to dry. As with the grey lace necklace, use eye pins through beads to create links and a headpin through a teardrop bead to make a droplet at the bottom of your butterfly. 12. Use lengths of chain between the beads instead of connectors to create a more delicate looking necklace. Join this to the tips of the wings of your butterfly using jumprings and add a clasp at your desired length of chain. Red tassel necklace (opposite page)

Pendant-style necklace (p21)

13. This design again has painted white glue lace panels used either side almost like a collar. Make a tassel by wrapping embroidery thread around three fingers, then slide them off your hand and tie them together in a bundle near the top.

11. You can purchase lovely lace shapes for use as a pendant like this gorgeous butterfly.

14. Use scissors to cut through the loops at the bottom and then splay out to create a semicircular

10. Join your chain to the lace (again prepainted with white glue) using jumprings. You can use the natural holes in the lace or make a hole with a needle or compass point.

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fringe. You can literally comb the threads to do this. Cut away the embroidery threads above the tied section and flatten out as much as you can. Add glue to this ‘stub’ of threads. 15. Place the glued section done in Step 14 into a semicircular ribbon clamp. Use pliers with nylon-covered jaws to squash the ribbon clamp as flat as you can. Once dry, you can re-comb the tassel and trim the ends into a perfect curved shape using scissors. 16. Join the tassel to the two sections of lace by using jumprings and a crescent-shaped connector. The jumprings easily loop through the natural holes in the lace. 17. Now you can add a length of chain to the top of each lace panel either side. I have again threaded an eye pin through a red bead making an eye loop the other side of the bead to link in between the chain to make another eyecatching feature.

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PROJECT

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Earrings (p21) 18. Some lace ribbons have lace tassels on and I have cut ten lace tassels from the ribbon using scissors. I did not coat these with white glue, but left them flexible for a different look. 19. Group five lace tassels and tie them together at the top using a length of embroidery thread. Wrap the ends of the thread around the knot to form a lump that will fit snugly inside a bead cup. 20. Add glue inside the bead cup and squash the lump of wrapped thread into it and leave to dry. I have put an eye pin through a small pearl bead to again make a nice detail before adding it to an earring hook. Painted lace earrings 21. You can cut shapes out of pieces of lace to get a smaller pattern and shape. Cut out two matching pieces and paint with the white glue and leave to dry. Once dry you can also paint or spray the lace. I have used gold spray on the top part, graduating down to leave a white section at the bottom. 22. I had these lovely gold floral studs that I joined to the lace to using a jumpring. However you could easily use an earring hook instead.

RESOURCES All materials are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT tansywilson@hotmail.com

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FEATURE

10 QUESTIONS ANGELA RICHARDSON

Do you have any formal training? If so, where did you train? The short answer is no! Since this all started from the one original idea I have sought to develop new ideas and a series of unique techniques, which I am continually working on as my skill levels improve. Where is your studio? My whole flat is my studio. I do a lot of my work on the sofa and for the more complicated Sterling silver work I use my dining table. My kitchen is transformed into a photographic studio for a few hours everyday. I haven’t found a use for the bathroom yet, but I’m sure I will!

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Where do you find inspiration and how do you decide what to make next? I hand pick a lot of stones and a stone will often inspire the design, especially if I manage to find an exceptional crystal. I will only use a stone if it works for the whole design. I have had some stones sitting around for years waiting for when I find a new technique that will show off their beauty. I tend to get ideas for new designs very late at night and have been known to be up at 3am making a mock-up of a design as I’m worried I will have forgotten the details by the next day. What is your preferred medium? I love working with really raw, rustic stones and using copper wire to frame them as I really think it spotlights the crystal. Do you have a favourite tool? I am extremely low tech; I enjoy using very basic techniques so I have to say pliers, though my ring mantel is essential too. Which techniques do you enjoy using? My favourite technique is wire-wrapping as I enjoy creating new items of jewellery using only wire and stones.

Do you offer workshops or classes? No, I do not offer them as I am a one-woman business and simply do not have the time. What are your goals? My brother is a web designer and created my website. I am very interested in working with him to combine his computer design skills with my more basic jewellery making techniques to create more intricate, elaborate and original designs. What’s your favourite thing that you’ve ever made? Is there one project that stands out above the others? This year I created a new line of Sterling silver wire-wrap rings. It took months of experimentation in the making to create a ring that was adjustable, durable and beautiful. I am really pleased with the results and my customers seem to really like them too.

PHOTOGRAPHS ANGELA RICHARDSON

When did your interest in jewellery first start? I have always had an interest in rare stones and crystals. I was inspired to start creating following a dream I had years ago – where I saw a long crystal wrapped with silver. At fi rst I looked everywhere for this piece of jewellery and when I couldn’t fi nd it I started researching how to make it myself. Things developed from there to the point where I could leave my job as a Biochemist and make jewellery full time.

CONTACT empoweredcrystals.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS: ANGELA RICHARDSON

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

COMPLETE BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO

POLYMER CLAY ALISON GALLANT

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olymer clay is an extremely versatile modelling material that lends itself perfectly to making items of jewellery. It is produced in a wide range of colours that can be mixed to create a huge palette. There are endless applications and techniques for using polymer clay including texturing, carving, adding surface effects and manipulating the clay into millefiori patterned canes. What will you make with it?

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

What is polymer clay?

Conditioning

Tools

Polymer clay is manmade from particles of PVC (polyvinylchloride), plasticiser and pigment. It has undergone rigorous testing and been certified as non-toxic. Polymer clay remains malleable until cured/baked in an oven. Many brands are available and they have slightly different characteristics, baking temperatures and times. The brands can be mixed, but this isn’t recommended because pieces would have to be baked at the higher temperature, risking scorching. The most popular and widely available brands used by artists and hobbyists alike for making jewellery are Premo! and Soufflé from Sculpey, Fimo Professional, Cernit, Pardo Art Clay and Kato polyclay. Other lines are made, but most of them are too soft for jewellery use. Experiment with different brands to fi nd the one you’re happiest with. Until the clay is baked there is no wastage because trimmings, also known as scrap clay, can be used for bead cores and fi lling domed pendants among other things. Polymer clay is also produced in liquid form by Sculpey, Kato and Fimo. They can all be tinted with paint, alcohol inks and pearly powders and the fi rst two have their own selections of colours as well as Clear Transparent or Clear. Some uses of liquid clay are as a glaze, transferring images from coloured or black and white images, fi lling carved pieces and using as a glue between baked and unbaked clay.

Polymer clay must be conditioned before use to soften it and make it more pliable and easier to work with. The ideal method for conditioning polymer clay is by using a pasta machine however, it can be done by hand, using only an acrylic roller, but this will put extra pressure on your wrists and take a lot longer. Cut off a slice from a block, approx. 5mm thick, and roll it flatter with your acrylic roller. Pass it through your pasta machine at the thickest setting. Repeat with a second slice, then put the two together, roll through, fold in half, put the folded edge on the rollers and repeat. Continue adding more clay until you have conditioned enough of that colour for your project. A test of when the clay is sufficiently conditioned is when it doesn’t crack when folded. Depending on temperature of the clay, it may take five passes or twenty! Reduce through the thicknesses to 3 or 4 and use very soon after conditioning or you will have to do it again!

You don’t need a large number of tools to start making polymer clay jewellery, and may fi nd you already use some of them for other crafts. The most useful tools are a pasta machine, smooth board or tile, acrylic roller, a tissue blade or craft knife, needle tool and metal or plastic cutters. My pasta machine can roll sheets of clay in nine different thicknesses and is a great time saver, whilst making your fi nished pieces neater. If you liberate the pasta machine from your kitchen, it can’t be used for food after rolling polymer clay through it. Other items to add over time are texture sheets and stamps, an extruder and discs, silk screens, inks, paints, pearly powders and a pin vice. Of course there are many more to acquire as your interest increases.

Either term is correct. Curing occurs when polymer clay is baked and hardened in an oven. You can use your home electric oven, but if/when you become ‘hooked’, it is recommended to buy a polymer clay dedicated small convection oven. A thermometer to monitor the entire baking time and a timer are essential, whichever size of oven you choose. I always heat my oven to the temperature recommended by the clay company before placing my pieces in, because ovens can ‘spike’ as they heat up. Place your items in a tin, foil container or glass tray and cover them for added protection. Do not use a microwave oven! Always bake for at least the amount of time advised by the clay companies, or the results may crack. You won’t damage anything by extending the baking time. After baking has ended, your pieces will remain pliable until they have cooled completely. This may take 20 to 30 minutes depending on the thickness. Try not to pick them up during this time!

The Skinner blend is probably the most useful technique to learn and it can be used for many projects. It produces a smoothly blended gradient sheet of clay from two or more colours, using a pasta machine. The blend is named after Judith Skinner, a former NASA software programmer. In 1996 she developed the technique when she wanted to blend two colours in a single sheet without having to cut and mix different quantities of each colour. She showed her idea to others and it quickly spread throughout the polymer clay world. Other artists had developed their own methods of achieving the smooth transition of colour, but Judith’s is the most popular.

Curing/baking

Basic techniques

Finishing When the items have cooled, they will need to be sanded smooth unless they have been textured. Use wet and dry sandpaper, starting with 400 grit, move on to 800 and go higher if desired. Polymer clay doesn’t need to be varnished and can be buffed to a light sheen by rubbing with a coarse cloth, such as denim. If you prefer to varnish your pieces, be careful to choose one that is compatible with polymer clay, either shiny or matte. If you don’t, the varnish will remain sticky and is very difficult to remove. Some resins also work well with polymer clay and liquid clay is excellent.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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HOW TO MAKE The Skinner technique 1. Condition ½ block each of two colours. Roll through the pasta machine at the thickest setting and form into two rectangles, approx. 12.5cm x 8cm. 2. Cut diagonally across both rectangles. Flip the pieces and make a double thickness of both colours. Smooth with your acrylic roller to ensure no air is trapped between the layers. 3. Press the two sets together and slightly offset them. This is a variation on Judith’s original idea, popular with many artists, which produces a small amount of pure colour either end, which can be useful for many projects.

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4. Roll through the pasta machine at the thickest setting. Fold the elongated sheet from the bottom to the top, keeping the same orientation of each colour on the left and right. Do not turn it! Press the fold to exclude air. 5. Roll through again, placing the fold on the rollers. After about 10 passes, the sheet will look like this. 6. Repeat until you have a blended sheet. This may take 20 or more passes through the pasta machine. 7. Now you have your Skinner blended sheet, you need to decide what to make with it. One of the applications is to elongate it to exaggerate

the blend, then roll it up into a bullseye cane. I made six different coloured bullseye canes blended to white to make this project (see picture). Offsetting the blends at the start gives a wider contrast. The outside layer of each one is a very thin strip of black for definition. See the following steps to make this cane. Bullseye cane 8. Turn the blended sheet 90° and pass it through the pasta machine three times, reducing the width of the rollers each time. At this stage it helps to lay the sheet on paper on a tile as it is easier to manage when it is much thinner.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

9. Trim both ends straight and roll up, starting with the colour. The clay should be soft enough to ensure that the centre is tight, without any gaps. Smooth the seam with your finger then rock the cane backwards and forwards until the seam disappears. 10. Condition a ¼ block of Premo! Sculpey Black and roll through the pasta machine at No.4. Lay half of the cane on the sheet and trim three sides.

11. Roll up until the two ends just meet and a crease is made in the longer end. Roll back and cut along the crease, then back again to close the gap. This gives a neat join and avoids a thick overlap.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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12. Another fi nish to bullseye canes is to wrap them in stripes, as used for this bracelet (see picture). Stripes 13. Condition ¼ block each of two colours and roll through the pasta machine at No.2. Form into rectangles 7.5cm x 5.5cm. 14. Stack one colour on the other and roll gently with your acrylic roller to exclude air. Cut in half, stack and roll again. Repeat once more. Cut a slice from the stack, approx. 3mm thick, hold it quite firmly at the top end to keep the stripes straight and pass it through the pasta machine at No.2. 15. Place the slice around a bullseye cane, with the stripes going from top to bottom, and trim. Add more slices to fit and roll the bullseye on a tile or board to heal the seams. Mica and pearl shift If you look at metallic and pearl polymer clays, you’ll notice that the top is shiny and, if you

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cut a slice, the side is dull. This is due to mica particles that can be manipulated to look dimensional, and the easiest technique is a twisted rope or beehive. An early polymer clay jewellery pioneer called Mike Buessler developed the ‘Beehive’ style of bead using the first Premo! metallic clays in the late 1990s. He also made other items of jewellery showcasing the properties of this range and the pearl clays. Continuing the Skinner blend theme, I illustrate two easy ways to use this technique. Beehive beads 16. Condition ½ block each of two metallic colours. I’ve used Premo! Sculpey Accents Peacock Pearl and Gold. Roll the colours through the pasta machine at the thickest setting, fold and repeat about 10 times, using the same orientation to align the mica particles. Set up an offset Skinner blend as described above and produce a blended sheet. 17. Trim the top of the sheet straight and cut strips across the blend as wide as they are deep. Using the trimmings, roll two round beads approx. 1cm in circumference.

18. Carefully pick up a strip of the blend and lightly press one end on a bead. Hold that down with one finger and, with the other hand, twist the strip and press it on to the bead, turning it as you progress. Add more strips as required, joining them with diagonal cuts. 19. Gently press the twists to flatten slightly on one bead and leave the other raised. The lines will show up the light and dark of the mica shift properties of the clays. I hope these simple techniques will encourage you to explore the exciting world of polymer clay. Start by experimenting with cutting and manipulating these ideas. You will soon be creating your own seemingly complex canes and other techniques that are described each month in this magazine. Happy claying!

RESOURCES Supplies are widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT alisongallant@yahoo.co.uk info@millefioristudio.com

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Inspirational pieces Making Jewellery issue 56, Nina Fletcher Making Jewellery issue 76, Sian Hamilton

Making Jewellery issue 75, Alison Gallant Making Jewellery issue 81, Sue Corrie

Making Jewellery issue 73, Lizzi Bucklow-Holt

Making Jewellery issue 69, Lizzi Bucklow-Holt

Making Jewellery issue 58, Alison Gallant

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PROJECT

MONDRIAN-STYLE IN POLYMER CLAY LISA WALKER

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, LISA WALKER

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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Premo! Sculpey clay in Black, White, Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Red, Ultramarine Blue, Wisteria, Purple, Gold Pasta machine Tissue blade Flat nose pliers Measuring grid Rolling pin Wax paper Square cutters Jumprings Earring findings Threading material Wet and dry sandpaper

1. Condition the blocks of clay using your preferred method. I like to roll out the clay, fold in half and the roll out again. Keep repeating this until the clay will fold in half without showing any signs of cracking. Run the sheets through your pasta machine on the thickest setting (except for the black clay, which should be on one setting lower). 2. Cut the prepared clay in to the following quantities and dimensions. For blue and red, cut five strips at 9cm long x 2cm wide. For the white, cut 11 strips at 9cm x 2cm. The yellow needs to be two pieces at 9cm x 4.25cm and the black is one piece at 9cm x 4.25cm. Keep an extra piece of the black clay on one side for use in Step 6. 3. To assemble the cane, start by placing the two yellow on top of each other. You don’t need to worry too much about matching the edges as these will be trimmed later but do take care to press the pieces firmly together and smooth

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with you fingers to remove any air bubbles. Set these pieces aside for later (Step 8). 4. Stack the remaining coloured strips together – five red, five blue and two stacks of five white. Again, smooth with your fi ngers to form solid stacks and avoid any bubbles. 5. Trim one of the long edges of each stack using a tissue blade to give a smooth, fl at surface. 6. Using your extra piece of black clay (from Step 1) cut two strips at 9cm x 2cm. Assemble one stack of white with the stack of red and include one of the these black strips in the centre. Make sure that you keep the trimmed edges of your stacks even and flush on one side of the assembled block. Repeat this process using the red stack and the remaining white – remember to include the black strip in the centre once again.

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have chosen a design inspired by the Mondrian-based fashion of the 1960s. Piet Mondrian was a Dutch artist who became popular during the 1920s and 1930s for his unique style of geometric art. This style was adopted by the fashion designer Yves St Lauren who launched the first Mondrian-style dress during the autumn season of 1965, with his famous A-line dress appearing on the cover of the French Vogue magazine in September of that year. Many variations of the dress have been produced since then and appeared on catwalks across Europe during the second half of the 1960s. This polymer cay project will create a pendant, cuff bangle and earrings using that same classic style.

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PROJECT

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For best results leave the completed cane to rest for 24 hours before moving on to Step 10.

7. Place the assembled blue and white stack on to the piece of 9cm x 4.5cm black clay with the trimmed, smooth edge face down. Gently lift the clay from your work surface and turn over so that the black is now on top. Repeat the process but this time place your red and white stack on the black. Gently smooth the whole block together to form one piece but be careful not to distort the size or shape.

10. For the earrings, cut two slices off your finished cane using a tissue blade. These can be cut at varying sizes to suit your own personal preference but I cut mine to approx. 0.5cm. Make a small hole centrally near the top of the slice for a jumpring to be added after baking.

8. Now place the assembled block on to the yellow and black pieces that we assembled in Step 3 (yellow on the bottom).

11. For the pendant, cut a slice approx. 1cm thick and place an eye pin centrally in the top of the piece. Set aside for baking.

9. Trim the assembled cane so that all the faces are smooth and flush. This method of cane assembly does not require a large amount of reducing work to produce a usable piece. For this project the cane is ready to use after a small amount of smoothing and compressing. You can experiment with reducing the cane to a smaller size if you want to produce the same pieces in different dimensions.

12. For the cuff bangle I have used a bangle template to create the desired shape but the same effect can easily be achieved by using an old tin can. Roll out a piece of clay that will be large enough to form the base of your bangle and put this through your pasta machine on the thickest setting. Cut thin slices from your Mondrian cane and place on top of the white to create a veneer effect. People have different wrist sizes and preferences so cut enough slices

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to cover the entire bangle. Lay the slices in places and burnish the joins using wax paper and a rolling pin. Using your template cut out your cuff and place on the template or can ready for baking. 13. Bake the earrings, pendant and cuff bangle together as per the clay manufacturer’s instructions. 14. When the pieces have been baked and cooled you can add your jewellery findings to complete the finished items. Add a jumpring and attach earring wire to each of the earring pieces. For the pendant, add a jumpring and thread with the material of your choice. Polish or varnish the finished pieces using your preferred method. 15. For an up-to-date alternative you can use some of the 2018 on-trend colours in place of the traditional red, blue and yellow. In the purple set I have used Premo! Sculpey purple, wisteria and 18k gold. Follow the previous steps as a guide to make this set.

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PROJECT

RESOURCES All other materials available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT Facebook: Lisa Walker Designs

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CELEBRITY STYLE

BRIDAL LACE EFFECT TANSY WILSON

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have made this bracelet for Meghan Markle, who marries Prince Harry on 17 May when this issue is on sale! Using twisted jumprings in this design recreates the look of wedding dress lace.

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CELEBRITY STYLE

STYLE

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PHOTOGRAPH: S_BUKLEY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

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23 x 10mm twisted jumprings 7 x 15mm twisted jumprings 116 x 6mm twisted jumprings 15mm twisted toggle clasp 2 x chain nose or flat nose pliers

1. Make sure all of the 10mm twisted jumprings are tightly closed so they look like one solid ring. Open all of the 6mm twisted jumprings using chain nose or flat nose pliers, as this will make the linking much easier. Link all 23 10mm twisted jumprings together by using two 6mm twisted jumprings in between each one. See page 95 for the correct way to open and close jumprings. 2. Make sure all of the 15mm twisted jumprings are tightly closed so they look like one solid ring. Pick up a 15mm jumpring and link the end 10mm jumpring to it using two 6mm twisted jumprings.

DESIGNER TIP You can make this bracelet shorter by removing one 15mm jumpring and the relevant 10mm surrounding jumprings and then making it up to the desired length with chain.

EXTRA PROJECTS Try this design using plain jumprings for a different look.

3. Working flat on a table you can manipulate the line of 10mm jumprings so they curve around the 15mm twisted jumpring. Link another pair of 6mm twisted jumprings to the next 10mm jumpring along. Keep repeating this process so you add two 6mm twisted jumprings to each 10mm jumpring until you have joined five 10mm twisted jumprings to the first 15mm twisted jumpring. 4. Take another 15mm twisted jumpring and also link this using two 6mm twisted jumprings to

the fifth 10mm twisted jumpring last added in Step 3. Start to manipulate the line of 10mm jumprings around this 15mm jumpring so they are now going the other way around the ring so you start to form a wiggley pattern. You will see in this picture that for extra security you also need to add two 6mm twisted jumprings to the fourth 10mm jumpring. 5. Keep repeating Step 4 so you add a 15mm twisted jumpring at every fourth and fifth 10mm twisted jumpring until you have used all seven 15mm rings. This will give you a length of chain suitable for an adult size wrist. 6. Finally add a 15mm twisted style toggle clasp to each side using a 6mm twisted jumpring.

RESOURCES All materials can be sourced from advertisers listed throughout this magazine.

CONTACT tansywilson@hotmail.com

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Meghan Markle is an American actress who has played roles in several United States’ television series, including more recently the legal drama series ‘Suits’ for seven seasons. Her fi lm credits include Remember Me and Horrible Bosses. In 2017, she became engaged to Prince Harry, and announced her retirement from acting and her intention to pursue humanitarian work.

PHOTOGRAPH: MAMEZITO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

MATERIALS & TOOLS

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PHOTOGRAPH: IHEREART/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BUSINESS MATTERS

STARTING UP A BUSINESS Angela Edwards suggests some areas you should consider if you are thinking of starting your own jewellery business

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tarting a handmade jewellery business can be a very exciting time. You may have dreamt of having your own venture, creating beautiful designs and selling your work to people who appreciate your skills and talent. The jewellery business in the UK is strong and growing each year, providing plenty of room and opportunities for everyone, including handmade jewellery business owners. Every year, many people decide to turn their hobby into a business and run a successful enterprise. If you are thinking of starting your own handmade jewellery business and selling your creations, there are a few areas to consider carefully.

YOUR BUSINESS PLAN Firstly, write a plan. The idea of a plan is to get all your ideas out of your head and onto paper. In doing so, you can note down information of things you need to do, research and get in place. Your plan will be your guide and keep you on track, bringing clarity to your activities. As time goes by, you can work on developing your plan to include all aspects of your business such as pricing, marketing, niche and target customers etc. Next, give consideration to choosing your business name. Your name is your identify and will help people build up an image of you, your

products and your business. Try to choose a name that is memorable, ensuring it is easy to spell. This will enable people doing an internet search to find you easily. Do avoid names that are currently being used, or that is similar to others as this can cause confusion and make it difficult to be found by your customers. If you decide to take your business online and have a website, you will need a domain name. There are several domain name service providers available on which you can check the availability for free. Deciding on a business name and a domain name at the same time can be a good idea. Many creative business owners start out as a sole trader as this is the simplest option to get started and it is free. Before you start trading, there are a few places to inform about your business. Whether you consider your planned activities as a business or not, do ensure you inform HMRC. Even if you only plan to sell occasionally to friends, family, colleagues or at the odd craft show, you still need to register. The process for registering is quick, easy and can be done online or over the phone. If you are claiming any type of welfare benefits, do check with the DWP whether your planned activities will affect any benefits you are claiming.

REGULATIONS AND INSURANCE Before you take the plunge and sell your first items, make sure you are fully aware of all the trading laws that apply to you. There are several regulations to consider and two of them include the Consumer Contracts Regulations 2014 and the new GDPR (General Data Protection Regulations).

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Make sure you have sufficient insurance in place to cover and protect your business. Two important insurances you will need include Product and Public Liability insurance. These are easy to get from a wide variety of insurance providers, but do shop around as costs and level of cover do vary. There are other insurances you may need to consider, depending on your planned activities, so make sure you get good advice to ensure you are suitably and appropriately covered. There are some jewellery standards that you need to adhere to around ring sizing, nickel-based findings, magnetic products and weights which your local trading standards service should be able to advise on. Once you have good foundations in place, work through how you are going to sell your work including exploring your niche, finding your customers, pricing, marketing, packaging and so forth. Write all these areas up in your plan and work through them one by one. For several years, Angela has been helping people set up and sell their work successfully through her training courses and programmes. In recent years, she has published four bestselling books and now offers her courses online, including a membership programme. Get a free copy of her e-booklet entitled ‘Creative Business Checklist’ by visiting her website at jewellerycraftsacademy.com and registering your email details. The e-booklet provides more information to help you get started with your handmade jewellery business.

Angela Edwards, Jewellery & Crafts Academy www.jewellerycraftsacademy.com

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PROJECT

AMERICANA TROPICANA CHLOE MENAGE

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eplicate kitsch 1950s acrylic jewellery designs for a great beginnerintermediate beading project. I love kitsch retro jewellery and for this project I took inspiration from 1950s acrylic jewellery and re-created the style with Delica beads using brick stitch. This project is ideal if you already have a little experience of brick stitch. If you’re fairly new to the stitch then start with the pineapple as the increases and decreases are nice and easy! The flamingo is a little more fiddly, but keep a tight tension as you work and take it slow. You can choose whether to stitch your items all in one, or add some fun to them by breaking them up with jumprings.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, DIAGRAMS: CHLOE MENAGE

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE MATERIALS & TOOLS Pineapple ● Approx. 1g x size 11 Delicas in gold (DB410), brown (DB794), orange (DB651) and green (DB724) or for gold/bronze: gold (DB410) and metallic bronze (DB022) ● 2 x 4mm gold-plated jumprings ● 2 x 5mm or 6mm gold-plated jumprings Flamingo ● Approx. 1–2g x size 11 Delicas in pink (DB1371), white (DB200), pale pink (DB244) and black DB001) or approx. 2g in gold (DB410) ● 2 x 4mm gold-plated jumprings ● 5mm or 6mm gold-plated split ring ●

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1. Begin with a strip of ladder-stitched beads, six beads long. Follow the chart for the placement of colours and increases/decreases. For row 2, begin by picking up two beads; stitch under the first joining thread and back through the second bead picked up to increase. Brick stitch along, picking up one bead at a time and then add two beads to the final thread join to increase at the end. 2. Increase for five more rows, until you have a total of seven rows of brick stitch. Decrease for the next row (row 8) and then increase for row 9. Decrease for the next seven rows. The diagram shows decreasing; simply pick up two beads and skip the first thread join, stitching into the next. Only add one bead to the last thread join on the row below. 3. Attach a 4mm jumpring or split ring to the first and last thread paths on the top row. Split rings will be more secure, but they do look bulkier. I chose to use jumprings because they looked better, but of course they come with the risk of the thread slipping through the opening. To prevent this, ensure you attach them very securely, reinforcing five or six times.

4. To make the top of the pineapple, begin with a row of four ladder-stitched Delicas and leave a tail thread of 15cm. Increase by one for the second row. For row 3 you will increase by three; to do this increase as per usual, then exit from the end most bead and ladder stitch a bead to this one. Work through to exit from the green bead picked up in this step to carry on. Repeat on the other end. 5. Increase for two more rows, then decrease for row 6. Increase for row 7, then decrease for the next three rows. To create the tops, pick up two Delicas and brick stitch to the second thread path as if you are going to decrease. Pick up a 5mm jumpring and pass into the other bead in the pair. Work into the row below and back up. Reinforce until it is secure. 6. Work your way across to exit from the last bead in the row and add a second pair of beads in the same way as in the previous step. Add a jumpring as before. If your beads are not sitting straight, then work through them to ensure that they are anchored to both of the beads below them, keeping a tight tension – this should force them to sit in place. Work in your thread and trim. Use the tail thread to join the greenery to the rings on the fruity part of your pineapple. Once secure, work in your threads and trim.

Toning beading thread (One-G, KO or Miyuki) Size 10 or 12 beading needle Synthetic wax Sharp scissors

Pineapple

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PROJECT

Row 16

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Flamingo 7. The flamingo involves a little more counting and more use of ladder stitch. Make sure you wax your thread well before you begin and use a tight tension to ensure a stiff finish. Use the chart to help you with colour placement; you will be working from left to right instead of bottom to top, starting with the head (see *), then the neck, then the body. The legs can be created separately and added with rings, or stitched as part of the body. Begin with a ladder stitch of five beads for the beak. 8. Follow the chart to create seven rows in total. Then work through row 6 to exit from the fifth bead (on the beak side – shown in green in the diagram). Brick stitch three beads then ladder stitch a further nine beads working away from the beak for a total of 12 beads. Exit from the second bead up on the beak side. Brick stitch seven beads, then work through to exit from the third bead down and brick stitch a row of three beads. 9. Work through to exit from the bottom of the third row of the body/neck, exiting away from the beak. Increase and stitch a row of six beads. Stitch four more rows, increasing each time. For the ninth row, decrease at the beginning and brick stitch a row of 11 beads, increasing at the end. Row 10: increase at the beginning and stitch a row of 12 beads. Row 11: decrease at the beginning and stitch a row of 12 beads, increasing at the end. You will decrease at the beginning and end for the next three rows. 10. Row 15: exit from the second bead from the top end of row 14 and brick stitch a row of

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Row 9

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six beads. Row 16: increase at the beginning and stitch a row of six beads. For row 17: exit from the second bead from the end of row 16 and stitch a row of four beads. Row 18: increase at the beginning and stitch a row of three beads. Row 19: decrease at the beginning and stitch another row of three. The fi nal row of two beads is stitched to the second of the two joining threads. Leave your working thread attached. 11. To create the legs, you can either start a fresh length of thread or continue working on from the body. Begin with the straight leg first and create this using a strip of 18 ladderstitched beads. To create the toe exit from the final bead, pick up a single Delica and pass into the next bead – see diagram. Reinforce, then work your way up to exit from the eleventh (counting from bottom). Stitch a pair of beads on the toe side of the leg. Then stitch a pair to this pair and extend it to create a row of four.

* *

12. Work through to exit from the twelfth bead up in the row of ladder stitch. Stitch three rows of two, working away from the toe. Then increase the final row by ladder stitching four more beads, working upwards. Decrease to create the final row of four beads. Exit from the second bead along and add a single bead for the knee as you did for the toe, passing into the third bead. 13. You can either securely stitch the legs to jumprings and then join the rings to the body with your working thread, or join them straight onto the body with ladder stitch. To complete stitch a split ring to the two beads on the top of the head or to the middle of the back.

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RESOURCES spellboundbead.co.uk mailorder-beads.co.uk

CONTACT info@pinkhot.co.uk pinkhot.co.uk

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

RETICULATION TECHNIQUE TANSY WILSON

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eticulation is a technique that uses a soldering torch to produce really interesting textures of peaks and valleys onto a sheet of silver metal. Due to the nature of the reticulation process, you will obtain different outcomes every time, which makes each piece totally unique to go on to make any type of jewellery item. The reticulation process begins by depleting the copper from the surface of the silver sheet.

This depletion process will leave a silver-rich top layer and a bottom layer that has a higher percentage of copper. This means the entire sheet of silver has two different melting points. This unique composition is what makes reticulation possible. I will show you how to do this using 925 Sterling silver sheet as well as an amazing metal that has already been copper depleted and prepared for you. It is called silver crinkle sheet and is available from Kernowcraft.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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Kernowcraft silver crinkle sheet (cut to the size of your final piece) or 925 Sterling silver sheet (larger than required for your final piece) Soldering torch Pickle Reverse tweezers Brass wire brush Pliers and findings Flux, easy solder and soldering probe (if soldering pieces) Drill and 1.5mm drill bit (if drilling holes)

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WILSON

TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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HOW TO MAKE

Using silver crinkle sheet 2. Starting with the silver crinkle sheet, you can simply cut the exact shapes you want for your piece and place directly onto your soldering block, with the blue-veined side facing up. Use a slightly yellow soft hot flame (as opposed to a blue sharp hot flame) and wipe the tip of the flame across the entire surface of the piece, heating it evenly. 3. Continue to move the heat back and forth heating the piece evenly and you will see it start to turn grey and buckle at the edges. 4. Keep moving the fl ame to heat the piece evenly. As the metal increases in temperature

it will start to glow a salmon colour. This is when the full crinkling appears. If you overheat the silver close to melting point you will not lose the crinkles, but they will soften and not be so defi ned in texture – so keep a close eye on how hot you go. 5. Once the full crinkle has occurred, pick up the piece using reverse tweezers and place in a freshly mixed pickle made with warm water. This will instantly remove any further oxidisation of the surface. When it becomes a white silver colour, remove from the pickle and rinse in water. Preparing 925 Sterling silver sheet 6. When using Sterling silver for reticulated pieces, don’t cut out the shapes fi rst but instead, prepare and reticulate a larger sheet of 925 silver that is 0.6mm or thicker so you can then choose the best sections of the reticulated texture for your pieces out. Place the sheet onto your soldering block and heat with a hot soft fl ame until it starts to

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glow a dull red. Keep the sheet heated at this temperature for a few minutes, then remove the fl ame. 7. Allow the sheet to air cool and you will see that it turns a very dark grey colour. This grey is the first layer of copper oxide that has risen to the surface of the metal. 8. Once cool, place the sheet into your warm pickle until this dark grey layer is removed and rinse in water. Keep a mental note of what surface you want to keep heating as you only do this process to the one side. 9. Place the sheet the same side up as before onto your soldering block and heat with a hot soft fl ame. Again, keep it glowing a dull red for a few minutes then allow to air-cool. Place in the warm pickle to remove the grey layer and rinse in water. After repeating this step a few more times you will see that when you aircool the piece it now is only a light grey. This means your surface is becoming ‘silver rich’ with less copper content.

1. Kernowcraft’s silver crinkle sheet is characterised by its blue-veined surface, which indicates that this is the side to be heated. It doesn’t come with a plastic fi lm on so is ready to use. In contrast ordinary 925 Sterling silver sheet usually comes with a translucent blue or green fi lm on that must be peeled off before preparing for reticulation.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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10. When you place it in the pickle for the last time it will have a very white silver-coloured surface. Rinse in water. It is now ready to be reticulated. 11. This Sterling silver sheet is now composed of two layers with different melting points. When the metal is brought to a temperature in which one layer begins to melt, the other layer will still be in a solid state. As heat is moved around, these layers will solidify and contract at different times, which causes the surface layers to wrinkle and reticulate. Heat your soldering block first and then place the prepared sheet onto a wire rack on your soldering block so you are allowing heat to rise up into the sheet. Heat the metal with a hot blue flame on the prepared white surface and once it starts to glow brightly, concentrate the flame in one area. Heat that spot for a second or two until you see the metal just begin to shimmer and then move the flame

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away, you will see the metal begin to wrinkle. Move the flame to another area and repeat and you will soon reticulate the entire surface. 12. Once fully reticulated, place the piece into a warm pickle to remove any further oxidisation and then rinse in water. Comparing silver crinkle sheet (on the right of this image) to the 925 sheet, you will notice that 925 sheet does tend to have larger less even crinkles but it has unpredictably created some really gorgeous bumps. This is the uniqueness of reticulation and you will never get the same effect twice. 13. Both silver crinkle sheet and reticulated 925 Sterling silver sheet will now be quite brittle so I would advise keeping the sheet quite flat or only gently curving the shapes. Do not undertake any heavy hammering to avoid cracking. Both types of sheet can be soldered using an easy solder so as to not to overheat the

reticulated surface too much. This is the silver crinkle sheet gently curved with a tube soldered onto the back that has a large enough diameter to thread a thin chain through. 14. This image is the 925 Sterling silver sheet and I have selected the textured areas I want for my pieces and have marked them out using a scribe and ruler and will cut them out using a piercing saw. 15. Once all the pieces are cut, shaped, drilled or soldered they are ready to be cleaned up. You can polish the reticulated surface using a polishing mop and motor, but this rigorous form of polishing will soften the texture. The easiest and most effective way of cleaning the pieces is to use a brass wire brush and some soapy water. It really puts a lovely sheen onto the surface.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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16. I have made a pendant from the silver crinkle sheet (on the right) and a pendant with the 925 sheet, to show the comparisons in their ďŹ nished state. Your design skills can come to the fore here and you can either solder ďŹ ndings on or you can simply drill holes in the shapes if you do no wish to solder to create beautiful statement pieces. 17. If you reticulate a much larger piece of 925 Sterling silver sheet you have the scope to make a lot more items. I have cut out two small squares and two small ovals from the same

sheet to make two pairs of earrings. I gently domed the squares and soldered a stud post onto the back of each one for the studs and for the hoops I simply drilled a hole into the top of each oval so they could thread directly onto the sleepers.

RESOURCES Silver crinkle sheet or Sterling silver sheet: kernowcraft.com

CONTACT

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tansywilson@hotmail.com

Inspirational pieces 1. Coast-inspired silver cufflinks, moltensilverjewelry on etsy.com 2. Reticulated hematite pendant, Jacqui Walsh 3. Reticulated overlap ring with wrapped wire, shawthingsjewellery on etsy.com 4. Reticulated ring with green amber stone, shawthingsjewellery on etsy.com

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Designed By: Lena Gillespie

BOW John Bead Corporation — Beads, Crystals & Components Tel: (416)757-3287 | Toll Free: 1(888)755-9055 | E-mail: sales@johnbead.com | www.johnbead.com

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SHOPPING

Making Jewellery

TOP 8 VINTAGE BEAUTIES Classic charm. By Zoë Lynham

Sterling Silver Locket, 15mm Heart, Vintage Style, Cubic Zirconia Set, Blue Insert, £29.98 cooksongold.com

Collage Sheet, Paris, £4.50 metalclay.co.uk

Czech Glass Leaf Bead, 16 x 14mm, Green Picasso, £0.25 each thebeadstore.co.uk

Rosette Pendant Kit, £6.50 beadsisters.co.uk

Czech Glass Fire Polish Beads, 6mm, Halo-Regal, £2.28 per strand thebeadstore.co.uk

Silver Fancy Brooch Setting for 6mm Stone, £7.99 caverswallminerals.com

Sterling Silver Vintage Style Gem Set Charms, 18 x 15mm with Garnet Round Cabochon, 7mm (x3), £12.95 jewellerymaker.com

Resin Vintage Drop, Blue and Gold, $2.99 potomacbeads.com

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PROJECT

U

se the technique of reticulation to create these gorgeous vintage looking pieces. Reticulation is the process of heating silver to such a high temperature that the surface melts and distorts making really gorgeous textures. This process can be carried out by a beginner silversmith though the designs that I have made require quite precise soldering so some soldering experience is necessary. However, you can simplify any of these designs to suit your own skill level.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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Piece of Kernowcraft Silver Crinkle Sheet (Code A94) or 0.7mm sheet of Sterling silver (sizes relevant to what you are making) 30cm length of 0.6mm Sterling silver wire Selection of 3mm, 4mm and 5mm Sterling silver jumprings 10mm freshwater coin pearls Chain 2 x earring hooks Piercing saw Coarse hand fi le and needle files Reverse tweezers and soldering probe Soldering torch Flux, solder and pickle Drill and drill bits Side cutters Brass wire brush Round and flat nose pliers

SILVER TEXTURES TANSY WILSON

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

PROJECT

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1. Use either the silver crinkle sheet or prepare a sheet of 925 Sterling silver as shown in the technique on page 45-46 – as I have done in this image. 2. Heat the soldering block and then place either your silver crinkle sheet blue veined side up, or your prepared sheet of Sterling silver. Gently heat the crinkle sheet until it wrinkles. Alternatively, heat your Sterling silver sheet with a hot intense fl ame to produce the texture as shown in the technique on page 46. Pickle and rinse. 3. Draw two oval shapes on your textured reticulated sheet. 4. Pierce out both oval shapes using a piercing saw. Keep your blade 90° to the surface of the textured metal to obtain as much control as possible – and prevent the blade from snapping.

5. Use a coarse fi le to fi le both ovals to your exact desired shape.

will need to push the wire with a soldering probe so it solders evenly across the texture.

6. Grip the 0.6mm Sterling silver wire in your reverse tweezers and heat one end with a hot flame until you start to melt the silver to make your own headpins. The silver melts onto itself forming a small ball. Remove the heat and cut the wire so the ball is on a 3cm stem. Place in pickle to remove fire-stain and then rinse in water. Repeat this step to make four headpins.

8. Place the soldered piece into pickle to remove any fire-stain and rinse in water. You can then trim any wire that is overhanging and fi le smooth. Repeat Steps 7 and 8 to solder your headpins on and shape the other oval.

7. Place one of your ovals onto your soldering block and then curl two of your headpins and place onto the textured surface. Add flux and tiny squares (pallions) of easy silver solder to where the headpin meets the surface of the oval. Heat gently so the flux bubbles and sticks the solder. Then increase the heat until the pallions melt. The solder will naturally run under the wire making the soldering easy. However, you

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9. Put one oval back onto your soldering block and place a 4mm jumpring right on the edge of one side. Ensure it is also central on this edge as this will be where the oval will hang from. You can also add a jumpring onto the body of the oval to create a more intricate pattern. Add flux and a pallion of easy solder and heat the piece so the solder melts joining the jumprings to the oval. Pickle and rinse. Repeat for the other oval.

HOW TO MAKE

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PROJECT

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10. Use a 3mm drill bit and drill a hole right in the middle of all the jumprings on both ovals soldered on in Step 9. Remove the burr from the back of the piece with a needle fi le. You can then use a brass wire brush with soapy water to give both earrings a shine. 11. Place an eye pin into a freshwater coin pearl bead and form a hook using round nose pliers as close to the other side of the bead as possible. 12. Link the hook formed in Step 11 through the jumpring hole on the top of your oval made in Step 10. Then continue wrapping the excess wire around the base of the hook to form a wrapped eye loop. Add an earring hook to the eye loop now at the top of the bead. Repeat Steps 11 and 12 to complete the other earring.

contrast of an over-melted edge next to a crisp fi led edge to make the following pendants. 14. Exactly as done in Steps 6, 7 and 8 make silver headpins and place onto the textured surface along with some jumprings adding flux and tiny pallions of easy solder. Solder all the pieces in place, pickle and rinse. 15. Place a selection of different sized Sterling silver jumprings onto your soldering block brushing each one with flux as you position it. Add tiny pallions of easy solder and solder all the jumprings together. Pickle and rinse.

have soldered on. Use a drill bit 1mm smaller than the jumpring you are going to drill. For example, I used a 3mm drill bit for the 4mm jumprings and with the 3mm jumprings I used a 2mm drill bit. Remove any burr from the back of each pendant using a needle fi le. 18. Wire brush both pendants to a shine. Then following Steps 11 and 12, you can add an eye pin through a coin pearl and attach it to the top of each pendant. Make sure you make the eye loop large so you can slide a chain through it.

Pendants

16. Place this jumpring formation onto the textured side of another rectangular section of your reticulated metal. Again add flux and pallions of easy solder and solder them all in place.

Silver Crinkle sheet or Sterling silver sheet: kernowcraft.com

13. Rather than cutting ovals out you could use a strip of the reticulated sheet. I have used the

17. For both styles of pendant you need to drill holes inside all of the jumprings that you

tansywilson@hotmail.com

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RESOURCES

CONTACT

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

VINTAGE OPULENCE ZOË LYNHAM

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he inspiration for these projects came from vintage jewellery from the Victorian and Art Nouveau periods. The mix of rhinestones, crystals, gemstones and pearls, with polymer clay focal pieces, makes a real statement: perfect for a special night out. This project is suitable for beginners and experienced jewellery makers alike; an extruder is a ‘must’ to get consistency in your finished designs.

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MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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Pasta machine/clay roller Acrylic roller Rigid and flexible blades Craft knife Needle tool Ball-stylus tools Ceramic or glass tile Large baking sheet Ceramic tile and foil (for curing) Texture sheet Pin vice and drill bits (1–2mm) Clay extruder and discs (small circular holes) Sculpey Translucent Liquid Clay Container for mixing Mica powders in chosen colours Sculpey Premo Polymer clay in Black Metallic acrylic paint in Antique Gold, Silver and Pewter Flower cutters in three sizes, marquise shaped cutters in two sizes, large circle cutter and a small teardrop cutter Paintbrushes for painting and varnishing Sponge dauber Polymer clay compatible varnish (gloss finish) Superglue Cocktail sticks Wax pencil/tweezers Foiled, pointed back glass rhinestones in chosen colours, 2mm–8mm rounds and one 10 x 6mm marquise shaped rhinestone Plated copper wire in 0.6mm (22 gauge) thickness, Champagne, Gold or Silver coloured Findings: chain, jumprings, clasps, shepherd’s hooks, ring blank with pad, featherweight headpins Briolette cut gemstones, shell and/or freshwater pearls, faceted glass crystals Jewellery pliers and cutters

HOW TO MAKE Art Nouveau-inspired set 1. Roll out a medium thick conditioned sheet of black polymer clay. Cut out a large flower shape and press the reverse edge of the large circle cutter gently in the centre. This will act as a guide later, for placing the extruded strings of clay into position. Do not cut through the clay. 2. Use the disc with small circles in your extruder set and some conditioned black clay, to extrude strings of polymer clay. 3. Lay the extruded strings on the clay, following the circle guideline and cut where they meet. Gently smooth over, but do not worry too much at this stage, as you will add details later that will hide the join. Repeat this process, adding clay strings around the outside edge of the flower. Ensure you have a good connection between the clay strings and the flower shape but do not squash the strings. Roll a ball of clay big enough to hold the 8mm rhinestone and place in the centre of the flower. Use the tweezers to push the rhinestone into the clay, so the clay acts as a bezel for the stone. The clay must be cured with the stone in position, so do not remove it at this point. 4. Now add spokes of extruded clay from the central gemstone to the edge of the flower, as shown in the photograph. Roll small balls of clay and press these in to position at each end of the spokes, using a ball-stylus tool. Where

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the spokes meet the circle of extruded clay in the centre, roll a ball of black clay and press gently in to position. Use the tweezers or wax pencil to position smaller rhinestones into the clay, so that the clay once again acts as a bezel. Leave these rhinestones in position. 5. Roll a thin sheet of conditioned black polymer clay and pass it back through the pasta machine with a texture sheet. Place the flower focal piece on to the clay, with the textured side down, and use the needle tool to cut around the flower shape. This gives a good fi nish to the back of the piece. If you prefer, you can add closed jumprings between the focal piece and the backing sheet, to as connectors, rather than drill through the cured clay later. (Optional: if you are concerned about squashing the focal piece, then cure it without the backing and add this afterwards, using the liquid clay to join the two pieces together, before curing again.) You may notice fi ngerprints at this point: do not be concerned, as the next step will cover any visible marks. Cure the whole piece according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. 6. Use a craft knife to carefully pop out the rhinestones once the piece has cooled. Set these to one side for later. Paint both sides of the piece using the Antique Gold acrylic paint. You may need two or three coats to cover the clay evenly. Let the paint dry thoroughly before moving on to the next step.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, ZOË LYNHAM

PROJECT

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8. Once cool, use the pin-vice and drill bit to drill four holes to attach the focal piece in to the necklace later. Apply a coat of gloss varnish to both sides of the piece and once dry, glue the rhinestones back into place using the superglue and wax pencil or tweezers to re-place them in their polymer clay bezels. 9. Add two pieces of chain of equal length to the bottom of the focal flower using large jumprings. Join these together at the bottom using a smaller jumpring. Add a dangle to this jumpring, consisting of a wrapped briolette gemstone, a shell pearl link and a faceted crystal link. 10. Make more beaded links using the shell pearls and faceted crystals and attach these to the chain using jumprings, as shown in the photograph. Join the beaded chain to the top of the flower focal using large jumprings and

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attach a clasp at the other end of the chains, to complete the necklace. 11. Repeat Steps 1–8 to make a medium-sized focal flower for the bracelet. Use beaded links made from the shell pearls and faceted crystals, jumprings and a magnetic clasp to join these elements together to form the bracelet. 12. Repeat Steps 1–8 to create two smaller focal flowers for the earrings, but omitting the circle of extruded clay in the middle and using just one colour of the liquid clay and mica powder mix. Create a simple dangle for each earring using a wrapped briolette gemstone, a shell pearl link and a faceted crystal link and add to the bottom of each flower using a large jumpring. Add shepherd’s hooks to the top of the flowers using another large jumpring, to complete the earrings. Victorian-inspired set 13. Use the larger marquise-shaped cutter to cut out the base for the pendant, from a medium thick sheet of conditioned, black polymer clay. Cut out a window in the centre using the small teardrop-shaped cutter. Use the extruded strings of polymer clay to add decorative detail, laying the strings around the edge of the teardrop shape first, before working from the outside edge of the marquise, into the

centre. Add small balls of polymer clay down the central, vertical line of the piece and secure in position using the ball stylus tool. This adds further decorative detail and hides any joins in the extruded strings. 14. Roll out a thin sheet of textured clay and place the textured side down on your tile. Cut out a matching marquise shape with the teardrop shape also cut out in the middle. Create a double-ended eye pin, long enough to go across the teardrop shape, using the 0.6mm wire. Position it on the textured marquise, in the teardrop window; ensuring the rounded ends of the eye pin will be embedded between the backing and the focal pendant. Place the focal pendant on top, carefully lift the pendant off the tile using the flexible blade, and press the texture sheet on the back to ensure the two layers are securely joined. Trim the edges if necessary with a craft knife or needle tool. Roll some small balls of clay, big enough to hold the rhinestones, and add them to the marquise pendant. Use the tweezers or wax pencil to embed the rhinestones into the clay, forming a bezel for them. Cure the pendant according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and allow to cool. (If you are concerned about squashing the detail on the front, you can finish the focal piece first and cure it, before using the liquid clay to add the backing, and cure again.)

7. In an artist’s mixing palette, squeeze out a small amount of liquid clay and mix in some mica powder to add colour. Repeat this with a different coloured mica powder. Now use your cocktail stick to add the liquid clay, a little at a time, until the recesses in the focal piece are fi lled. You can see I used one colour in the centre, and the other around the edge. Cure the piece again, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.

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PROJECT

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15. Remove the rhinestones using a craft knife and put them aside for later. Use the silver acrylic paint to cover both sides of the pendant and allow to dry. You may need to add two or three coats of paint for good coverage of the clay. Use a sponge dauber to add highlights of the pewter acrylic paint on the front only. Once thoroughly dry, drill the holes to attach the pendant into the necklace later, add a protective layer of gloss varnish on both sides and glue the rhinestones back into position using the superglue. 16. Create a dangle for the pendant using a wrapped, long, briolette gemstone and attach it to one end of a beaded link made from freshwater pearls. Create a larger loop at the other end of the link that will go through the drilled hole at the bottom of the pendant and make a wrapped loop, so the dangle is securely attached. 17. Add a smaller pearl to a featherweight headpin and make a loop at the top. Place this loop so that it is on the wire embedded in the pendant, and form a wrapped loop to secure this pearl drop in place. Make more beaded links from the larger, freshwater pearls and faceted crystals, joining them together as you work to create two beaded strands to the

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desired length. Attach one to each side of the pendant using a large wrapped loop and then add chain to the other ends of the beaded strands in the same way. Attach a clasp to complete the necklace. 18. To create the earrings, cut out two smaller marquise shapes and proceed as before, using Steps 13–17 as a guide. However, when adding the wire between the two layers in the teardrop window, also add a closed jumpring to the top and bottom of each marquise. This makes it easier to add the gemstone and pearl dangle on the bottom, and the shepherd’s hooks at the top, to finish off the earrings.

RESOURCES Glass rhinestones: pandahall.com Gemstones/pearls and featherweight headpins: jewellerymaker.com Other materials widely available from advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT zoelynham@googlemail.com Facebook: @ZLJewelleryObsession Twitter: @ZoeLynham Instagram: zoelynham

19. To make the ring, proceed in a similar way to Step 13, with two exceptions: do not cut out a teardrop window and add a marquise-shaped rhinestone to the centre of the ring before adding the extruded strings. There is no need to embed any findings or wire when you back the piece, as in Step 14. Proceed as in Step 15 to finish off the marquise ring focal, but do not drill any holes in the piece. 20. Once the marquise focal is complete, use a ring blank with a pad and glue the marquise to it using superglue (you could also use a twopart epoxy glue).

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03/04/2018 10:15


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03/04/2018 10:20


TIPS & TECHNIQUES

EFCOLOR ENAMELLING Part 3 KAREN CAINE

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fcolor enamel is a low-cost way of achieving an enamel-like finish, but there’s a great deal more to it than flat colours. In this issue we look at how you can use Efcolor enamel pieces as a support for embossing crystals and alcohol inks with techniques inspired by the pioneering work of Fiona Jones. You can see more of Fiona’s work at the end of this article or by visiting projects4crafters.com.

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Efcolor stove set (includes all the tools required), tea-light candles, long matches or lighter, wooden peg (optional) Or a domestic oven, dedicated baking sheet, tin foil, firing stand, U-stand and tweezers Efcolor enamel powders Brass, copper or aluminium blanks with holes File Sandpaper Sieve tops Oven mitt

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Heatproof surface Needle tool (or needle in a cork) Embossing crystals Alcohol ink Alcohol blending solution (or 91% rubbing alcohol) 1ml syringes and blunt needles Alcohol ink pens Latex gloves, safety glasses, protective clothing Compressed air, air puffer or straw

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, KAREN CAINE

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HOW TO MAKE Embossing crystals

Stencils revisited

1. All the techniques covered in these steps start with a metal blank covered with Efcolor enamel. To make these, place a metal blank on a U-stand and add a thick layer of Efcolor enamel. Fire it in a tea-light stove or domestic oven at 160°C. Allow it to cool, then repeat with a second layer of enamel. (See MJ114 for a detailed version of this process. Back issues available via makingjewellery.com.)

4. Another option is to sprinkle the embossing powder through a stencil to give it a shape. In this case, you need to sprinkle the embossing powder on to a fired layer of Efcolor. This is because you can’t lay the stencil down on top of soft powder. Once the embossing crystals are in position, fire the blank in the usual way.

2. Add another layer of Efcolor enamel and sprinkle on a tiny amount of embossing crystals. We’re using Be Creative! Wonder Embossing Crystals, but thick Cosmic Shimmer and Wow! powders also work. If you have other brands, you can try them out before investing in new ones.

5. Embossing powder looks great simply sprinkled on an Efcolor enamel surface, but you can also swirl the melted powders around to create interesting effects. You’ll need a tea light stove rather than a domestic oven to try this particular technique, as the melted powder needs to stay hot as you swirl it. For this reason, you won’t be able to enamel the back of these pieces, either, as the blank needs to sit on the firing plate, rather than being lifted up on the stand as it would be if you enamelled both sides. To begin the process, repeat Steps 1 to 3, but leave the blank on the stove once

3. Fire the blank in the usual way until the Efcolor and embossing crystals have melted and formed a smooth surface. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

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Swirling the crystals

everything has melted. Use a pair of tweezers to keep the blank in place (this is easier if your blank has a hole), then swirl the melted powder around with a needle tool. 6. Make sure that you keep the melted powders hot when you swirl them. They should move easily as you push them with the needle tool. If they start to become stiff and sticky, stop and put the stove’s lid back on for a minute or two then continue from where you left off. 7. Once you are happy with the design, put the lid back on the stove and allow the disturbed surface to re-melt and become level once more. As the lines that you have carved out of the surface refill, a feather-like effect is created. (If you decide that you don’t like your design, cover the blank with a fresh layer of Efcolor powder and start again. As long as the enamel is still reasonably flat, you can do this a number of times). 8. You can achieve a lot of variety by using a single powder on different backgrounds and by swirling them in different ways.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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Alcohol inks 9. Another way of adding patterns to Efcolor enamel pieces is with alcohol inks. As before, start by enamelling a blank with two layers of powder. Next protect your work surface, clothes, eyes and hands from accidental dyeing (this applies to all work with ink), then take two bottles of ink and add a drop of each to an applicator. You can use purpose-made felt applicators if you like, but cosmetic sponges make a cheap alternative and they don’t leave tiny threads of felt in your work. 10. Blot the ink on the enamelled surface. 11. Keep adding drops of ink and blotting until you have the effect you’re looking for. If you want the colours to meld more, you can add blending solution to the applicator before you start. 12. You can use blanks patterned in this way as a background for a mask, stencil or stamped image. Here we chose the former. To try it for yourself, create a patterned blank, then cut out a paper shape, attach a handle using masking

tape, place it on the blank, sprinkle coloured enamel on top, then remove the paper shape by the handle. Sweep away any stray powder with a fine paintbrush and fire in the usual way. (For more detail on using masks, stencils and printing, refer to MJ115.) Blown ink 13. In addition to blotting, you can also blow alcohol ink across the surface of an enamelled blank. Sadly, the droppers on the bottles are designed for use on larger craft projects and release too much ink on small jewellery-scale pieces. You can use 1ml syringes with blunt needles to overcome this problem. Drip your ink into the depressions of a used pill packet, then suck up the liquid with the syringe. Keep one depression and one syringe for each ink. This will avoid accidentally muddying your colours. 14. Hold a small wad of paper or cotton wool up against the needle’s tip to catch any spills, then, holding the syringe vertically so that any air inside is forced to the top, slowly push the

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plunger until the air has been expelled and the needle is full of ink. 15. Form a screen around your work area to avoid splattering unintended surfaces and make sure that the blank is in a position where you can easily blow the ink on its surface. You need to work reasonably quickly once you add the ink drops, so make sure everything is in the right place before you start. A can of compressed air will enable you to make powerful puffs of air, but if you don’t have one you can try blowing through a straw or using an air puffer. If you do opt to use compressed air, make sure you keep the can upright otherwise you’ll release a super cold liquid that may fracture your Efcolor enamel (especially if the blank is still warm) and give you a very nasty burn if it hits your skin. 16. Use the syringe to add a small drop of ink to the enamelled blank. 17. Blow it until the ink no longer moves. 18. Add another drop of ink.

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19. Blow it as before. 20. Repeat until you have a design you like. You can add as much or as little ink as you wish. The more you add, the more the colours will merge. With practice, you can use this technique to paint flowers, butterfl ies and birds or you can stick to abstract pieces. If you don’t like the design, you can wipe it off with alcohol blending solution and start again. Don’t try to enamel over wet alcohol, though, as that will result in air bubbles developing and collapsing, giving your blank a moon crater look (which is interesting, but possibly not the style you planned). Alcohol ink pens 21. Another way of applying alcohol ink is using pens. Let the colours overlap to create a blended look or keep them distinct by had adding transparent enamel between layers of overlapping colours (see the project on page 75 for more about this technique). You can also combine pens and liquid ink to get a more organic effect. For instance, try using a syringe

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to add a few drops of clear alcohol or coloured ink to a design drawn with pens and then blow them across the piece. 22. We looked at embedding objects under transparent enamel in MJ114, but you can also use this technique in conjunction with alcohol inks. For instance, you can divide a blank using cut lengths of wire and fi x them in place with transparent powder...

Missed parts 1 and 2 of our Efcolor series? Go to makingjewellery.com and order issues MJ114 and MJ115 now!

RESOURCES metalclay.co.uk onceuponastamp.co.uk

CONTACT facebook.com/thecraftydwarf

23. …then colour in between with alcohol ink pens... 24. …before embedding more pieces. Notice how the colour here has changed between firings. The longer you fire the blank, the more the colours fade, so it’s important to set a timer when working with alcohol inks. As always, feel free to experiment with the ideas shown here. There are plenty of craft tutorials on the web covering embossing powders and alcohol inks that you can adapt for Efcolor enamel jewellery. There’s also a simple project for you to try out on page 75.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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Inspirational pieces 1. Stonewashed and Cool Peri Tim Holtz Alcohol Inks on White Efcolor enamel 2. Tim Holtz Far mer’s Market Alcohol Ink Set on White Efcolor enamel 3 & 4. Arctic Lake & Lapis Pearl Lustre Cosmic Shimmer Embossing Powders on Ivory Efcolor enamel 5. Metallic Gold Rich Ultra High WOW! and Tropic Moss Blaze Cosmic Shimmer Embossing Powders on Black Efcolor enamel 6. Carnelian be Creative! Wonder Embossing Crystals on Transparent Blue Efcolor enamel 7. Tiger Eye be Creative! Wonder Embossing Crystals on Black Efcolor enamel

All pieces by Fiona Jones, projects4crafters.com 6

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06/04/2018 15:54


PRODUCT TEST

SHAPE CUTTERS This month Zoë Lynham tests a set of shape cutters from Debbie Bulford Designs. THE PRODUCT This is Shape Cutter Set 1, from Debbie’s brandnew range of shape cutters for polymer clay.

threading channel, adding the top layer and how to sand your completed piece to achieve a good finish.

from just one set. They are perfect for using with polymer clay, but could also be used with metal clay.

WHAT DOES IT DO?

WHAT ELSE WILL YOU NEED?

HOW EASY IS IT TO USE?

This set of five, reversible shape cutters can be used to create a range of graduated designs, including necklaces and bracelets, as well as feature pendants.

You do not need anything else in order to use the cutters themselves, but to create a piece of jewellery, you will need a clay roller or acrylic roller, some polymer clay for the backing and top layer, as well as some liquid clay. To complete the piece, you also need sandpaper in various grits, plus beads and findings of your choice.

The cutters are very easy to use. Since the join is soldered, you get a smooth cut, with no overlap to trim off, unlike some other cutters. They are reversible, which means you can create symmetrical designs, or use them to create matching earrings.

WHAT IS INCLUDED? This set has five different-shaped cutters and an A4 information sheet that contains images of different finished designs, with matching cutters, as well as instructions on how to make a graduated necklace design, including a channel for threading.

HOW GOOD ARE THE INSTRUCTIONS? The instructions are very clear and easy to follow. Each step has colour photographs or diagrams, with accompanying text. It covers forming the back of the pieces, creating the

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CAN IT BE ADDED TO? These cutters are a standalone product; the designs included are specific to the shape of the cutters. However, Debbie has created six different shaped sets, providing endless design opportunities. These will be available between £9 and £15 per set.

IS IT VALUE FOR MONEY? These are great value for money, as there are several, different designs that can be made

SCORE

COST £15

RESOURCES debbiebulforddesigns.co.uk info@debbiebulforddesigns.co.uk 07885 360210

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PRODUCT TEST

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PHOTOGRAPHS: DEBBIE BULFORD

PHOTOGRAPHS: ZOE LYNHAM

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More of Debbie’s cutter sets

1. The packaged cutter set. 2. The individual cutters, labelled A to E. 3. The A4 inspiration/instruction sheet. 4. The soldered join from inside the cutter. 5. The soldered join from outside the cutter. 6. Creating the backing of the feature pendant. 7. Creating the front of the feature pendant. 8. The finished, feature pendant. 9. Completed jewellery, including graduated necklace design and feature ring. MAIN. Graduated necklace design

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NEXT MONTH

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PROJECTS & IDEAS

IN THIS ISSUE...

Wirework, polymer clay, beading, linking and much more...

ON SALE 24 MAY

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10/04/2018 10:16


What inspires

BECKY EVERETT OF BECKY’S JEWELLERY BOUTIQUE

MY INSPIRATION I’m a British jewellery designer and maker with a love of the beautiful and exotic, a passion for nature, and a taste for adventure. I am a country girl and wild at heart. This has been a big influence in my life – and subsequently on my jewellery. All of my pieces, while dainty and

delicate in design, are packed full of meaning to celebrate the innate beauty of the world around us and reflect the positive philosophies in life. My overall ambition is to inspire women of all ages, cultures, and styles with the confidence to enhance and express their own individuality.

MY TECHNIQUES I started out doing simple beading and wire wrapping but as I heard from my customers about why they chose particular pieces, I wanted to create something more unique and with deeper meaning. The symbolism and unique expression of something of the wearer or receiver of the gift can be profound, as well as it giving pleasure and beauty. So I continue to expand my skill set and learn new techniques to create special pieces that people can wear every day or give to their favourite people.

CONTACT etsy.com/shop/BeckysBoutiqueOnline

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PHOTOGRAPHS: BECKY’S JEWELLERY BOUTIQUE

MY DESIGNS I have admired jewellery for as long as I can remember. While I love and admire lots of different jewellery designs, I think my style can be summed up in three words: meaningful, simple, delicate. Every piece at Becky’s Jewellery Boutique holds special meaning with positivity and wellness at its core and is organised around three main collections: the Rose Collection, Nature Collection and Karma Collection. I love to keep things simple and focus on delicate details, so I have deliberately designed my jewellery to make a subtle statement and be the perfect fit for every way of life – whether you’re an adventurer, a fashionista, or a free spirit.

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Jewellery MAKING

Free early delivery direct to your door Subscriptions start from £25.16 +44 (0) 1273 488005 makingjewellery.com/subscribe

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05/04/2018 15:11


PROJECT

SIXTIES STYLE KAREN CAINE

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ou can combine Efcolor enamel and alcohol inks in a number of ways, but the modern nature of these materials make Sixties styling a natural fit. The block colour palette of Mondrian was an iconic style for Yves Saint Laurent in 1965, while 1967’s Summer of Love took place against a backdrop of psychedelic art. By adding silicon to the mix, there’s also a nod to the so-called space age plastic materials that fashion designers Cardin and Gernreich adopted in their late Sixties’ collections. If the Sixties aren’t your thing, though, you can easily adapt the methods shown here to build up layers of colours for your own designs, which as Austin Powers might say, is just groovy, baby.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ●

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Efcolor tealight stove and accompanying tools or domestic oven, firing plate and spatula Heatproof surface Centre punch and drill or hole punch for metal Hole punch for plastic Sharp blade or scissors Ruler, pencil, grid Efcolor enamel in black (or other colour), white and transparent with sieve tops Alcohol ink pens Square and circle blanks 1.5cm and 0.5cm plastic lace 2.5cm 16g stainless steel piercing barbells 6mm big hole beads Chain Findings: jumprings, clasps, ribbon ends, earring posts with pads and backs, brooch back E6000 glue

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HOW TO MAKE Mondrian pendant 1. Mark the position of two holes on opposing corners of a square metal blank. Create a divot on the mark using a centre punch and then drill the holes (or use a metal hole punch if you prefer). Make sure that the holes are large enough to easily accommodate your chosen jumprings. They may become partially clogged by the multiple layers of enamel used in this project, so it’s best to make them a bit bigger than you need. File away any burrs around the holes and sand the blank to clean the surface. 2. Place the blank on a U-stand and add a thick layer of Efcolor enamel. Fire it in a tealight stove or domestic oven at 160°C. Allow it to cool, then repeat with a second layer of enamel. If you wish, you can also enamel the back of the blank by using a firing stand, rather than the firing plate. (See MJ114 for a more detailed version of this process.) 3. When the blank is ready, use a pencil to lightly mark out your chosen design. For a Mondrian-style piece, divide and subdivide the surface with parallel lines. 4. Use alcohol ink pens to colour in any parts of

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the design that don’t touch. Don’t worry about the edges being a bit ragged, you’ll cover them in the next step. Once you have finished colouring, add a layer of transparent Efcolor powder and fire the blank in the usual way. Make sure that you use a timer because the longer you fire the blank, the more the colour fades. Three minutes should be sufficient to turn the powder into a smooth, glossy enamel-like layer. 5. Once the blank has cooled, use a ruler with a raised edge to go over the pencil lines with a black alcohol ink pen. It’s important to have a ruler with a raised edge to ensure that you don’t smudge the ink as you move it away. If you don’t have one, use masking tape to fix a coin to the bottom of an ordinary ruler instead. Once the lines are drawn, colour in any other parts of the design that should be black, then add another layer of transparent Efcolor powder. This two-step approach, with clear enamel between the layers, keeps the colours pure and stops overlapping colours (such as the black lines on the colour blocks) from blending. If you wish, once the black ink has been sealed, you can go over the coloured parts again to help counter earlier fading. If you do this, add a final layer of transparent powder to finish. If you notice that the holes in the blank are becoming smaller when

you add new layers, rotate a needle tool or tooth pick in the hole when adding the transparent powder. Don’t try to enlarge the hole once the enamel has set as the surface will crack and chip. 6. Cut a 4cm length of 1.5cm wide plastic lace, fold it in half and cut the ends to a point with a sharp blade or scissors. Keep the lace folded and punch holes in both ends. Use a jumpring to attach the folded lace to the enamelled blank to form a bail. You can hang the pendant by sliding a necklace through this bail. Alternatively, for a more space age look, slide a barbell through the bail and connect the necklace to that by unscrewing and rescrewing the balls at each end. 7. Add lengths of chain to a jumpring to create a mini tassel and then connect it to the pendant with another jumpring to finish. Mondrian earrings 8. Enamel two freshly sanded blanks as discussed in Step 2, but on this occasion you should only enamel one side of the blank. If you would like matching designs on the earrings, lay the blanks on top of a grid to ensure the space between the lines remains consistent. Then use light pencil lines to mark out your design.

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9. Colour in and enamel the blanks as you did in Steps 4 and 5. Once they have cooled, sand the backs to clean off any stray Efcolor enamel and provide a better key for your glue. Remove any dust, then dab a little E6000 glue onto the pad of an earring post. Leave it for a couple of minutes until it becomes tacky, then, making sure the earring will hang from the correct point, press it against the back of the blank. Clean up any excess glue with a cocktail stick and set aside for 24 hours to let the glue cure. Add earring backs to fi nish. Mondrian bracelet 10. Measure the circumference of the recipient’s wrist followed by the diagonal of the blank you intend to use. Subtract the second number from the first to calculate the size of the wristband you need. Cut that length of plastic lace, fold the lace in half and taper the ends with a sharp blade or scissors so that they will fit neatly inside the ribbon end. Next cut the lace in half and line the two halves up on top of one another. Then, using the corner of your blank as a template, cut two points in the ends. Keep them aligned on top of one another and punch holes in the two points (check that the punch will enter and exit in the middle of the point before you form the hole). Finally, squeeze the ribbon ends over the ends you

shaped earlier – there’s no need for glue as the metal can’t slip off the silicon.

12. Follow Step 2 to create a white enamelled blank, then use an alcohol ink pen to begin your psychedelic design. If you want your colours to merge, you can add all the colours at the same time...

17. Take a new blank, make a hole in one corner and then enamel it with a single colour as discussed in Steps 1 and 2. Put the new blank on a U-stand and lay the patterned blank on top of it. Make sure that the patterned blank is flat against the bottom one, that the hole uncovered and that it is positioned correctly for your design, checking any symmetry if necessary. Cover the blanks in transparent powder. Carefully lift the two blanks off the U-stand and place them on a firing plate. Readjust the blanks if they shift slightly during this process and then fi re the blanks in the usual way. Once the transparent enamel has melted, the two blanks will be fi xed together and can be lifted from the firing plate easily.

13. ...or you can keep them distinct by adding a layer of transparent powder between each colour just as you did between the primary colours and the black lines of the Mondrian-style pieces. As before, use a timer to minimise ise any colour fading.

18. Once the joined blanks have cooled, sand the back of the bottom blank and wipe away any resulting dust. Dab a little E6000 glue on a brooch finding. After a couple of minutes, when the glue has become tacky, stick it on to the back of the brooch.

11. Prepare the blank you measured in Step 10 by following Steps 1 to 5, but add two holes to each corner rather than one. Use jumprings to attach the wristband pieces to the blank, then add a clasp of your choice to fi nish the bracelet. Psychedelic brooch

14–16. Continue to build up your design by adding each colour in turn, followed by a transparent layer. You can go back over earlier lier colours if they start to fade too much. As long ng as they aren’t touching the other colours on n that layer there shouldn’t be any blending or smearing.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, KAREN CAINE

PROJECT

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PROJECT

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19. Take another blank and make a hole in one of its corners then follow Steps 12 to 16 to give it a pattern. Once it’s fi nished, attach it to the rest of the brooch using jumprings and a short length of chain. This extra blank will swing from the brooch when worn, adding movement to the piece. Psychedelic pendants 20. The triple circle pendant is made in a similar way to the brooch. Take three circle blanks of different sizes and make a hole in the smallest one. Add a coloured enamel to the smallest and largest ones and white enamel to the middle one. Make a pattern on the white one as you did in Steps 12 to 16. Put the middle blank on a U-stand and add the smallest one on top, making sure that it is lying flat and is correctly positioned, then cover the whole arrangement in transparent powder and carefully lift it on to the fi ring plate before firing in the usual way. 21. Once the two circles have cooled, repeat the process by laying the largest circle on the U-stand and adding the two joined circles on top. Fire as before. Don’t be tempted to try to join all three circles at once: the arrangement is too unstable to be lifted.

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22. Once the three circles pendant is complete, slice a 6cm length of 0.5cm-wide plastic lace and fold it in half. Cut the ends into points. Unfold it and punch holes at both ends and in the middle. Attach lengths of chain to each end with jumprings. The length of these chains depends on how long you want the necklace to be, but they should be at least 18cm. Add a clasp to fi nish the necklace part. Begin the bail by cutting a 4cm length of plastic lace. Again, fold it in half, cut the ends into points, unfold it and punch holes at the ends and in the middle. Put a jumpring through the holes at the ends to keep them together. To attach the bail to the necklace, unscrew the end from a barbell and put it through the middle holes of the bail and the plastic lace on the necklace, then re-screw on the end. Finish the whole thing by putting a jumpring through the hole in the three-circle pendant and hanging it from the jumpring on the bail. 23. Follow Steps 12 to 17 to create and fi x together a patterned, circle blank and a drilled, single-colour, square blank. Make the joined pieces into a pendant by putting a jumpring through the hole. Cut two 6cm lengths of 0.5cm plastic lace, line them up on top of one another and punch holes at both ends. Unscrew the end

from a barbell and thread it through one of the holes you just made, then slide on a bead, the pendant, another bead and then put it through one of the holes in the other plastic lace. Rescrew the end on the barbell. Attach lengths of chain and a clasp to the other ends of the laces to complete the necklace. 24. Produce a two-square pendant by following Steps 12 to 17. Make the bail by cutting a 4cm length of 1.5cm wide plastic lace, folding it in half and then shaping and punching holes in the ends just as you did in Step 10. Use jumprings to hang the pendant from the bail. Slide a necklace of your choice through the bail to finish.

RESOURCES Efcolor stove, stands, tools, powders, blanks: metalclay.co.uk Plastic laces: perlesandco.co.uk All other supplies: cooksongold.com and ebay.co.uk

CONTACT facebook.com/thecraftydwarf

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PROJECT

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PROJECT

LACY HEARTS CHARLOTTE WAKELING

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his project is aimed at beginners and is perfect for those who have never worked with silver clay. Silver clay is a wonderful material to work with; you can texture it, mould it or even carve it. You can use lots of things to texture your jewellery; these pendants and earrings are textured on the front, using a vintage lace tablecloth.

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ●

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Small pack of silver clay Teflon worksheets Texture (lace) Spacers Badger balm Acrylic roller CoolSlip Heart-shaped cutters Circle-shaped cutters Needle tool Round fi le Sanding sponges (800, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit) Sterling silver jumprings (8 x 8mm, 2 x 6mm and 4 x 5mm) Stainless steel brush Hand torch (cook’s torch) Heatproof firing block Rubber block Polishing cloth Jeweller’s pliers

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PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CHARLOTTE WAKELING

PROJECT

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HOW TO MAKE

2. Place your ball of silver clay onto one of the Teflon worksheets. Make sure that the worksheet is on a flat, even surface, such as a tile. On either side of the clay place the grey spacers (1.5mm thick) on top of the red spacers (2mm thick). Take the Badger balm and lightly coat the acrylic roller, which will stop the clay from sticking to it. Now roll out the clay to 3.5mm thick. 3. Remove the grey guides from either side of the silver clay. Take the lace or chosen texture and place it on top of your silver clay. Using the roller, roll once, away from you, ensuring that you do so with enough pressure to leave a nice impression on the silver clay. Don’t roll again. If you’re not happy with the impression left, repeat Steps 1 and 2; you will need to do this swiftly, as the silver clay will start to dry out.

Remove the lace carefully so the impression isn’t distorted. If using a rubber texture matt, spray with an anti-stick solution such as CoolSlip to stop the texture sticking. 4. This is what the silver clay will look like when you remove the lace (or texture). 5. Cut one heart for a pendant and two smaller hearts for the earrings. I’ve used the medium sized heart cutter for the pendant and the small sized cutter for the earrings. 6. Remove the excess clay from around the edges carefully, using your needle tool. Make a small hole where you want the jumpring to be attached on the pendant and a small hole on each earring for the jumpring to be attached to the earring wire. Here you can see that I have moved the hearts on the Teflon worksheet. If you want you can leave them as they are to dry.

8. For the circle earrings, repeat Steps 1–6. I used the medium sized circle cutter and the smallest circle cutter in the set. 9. For the heart, which is half textured, repeat Steps 1–6, but only place the lace (or texture) on half the silver clay. I used a small sized heartshaped cutter for this.

7. If you plan the shapes you need to cut before rolling out your clay, you should be able to cut

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all the shapes for the designs out of one sheet of silver clay. However, if you are going to reroll the clay and cut as directed below for each piece of jewellery, then you will need to do this quickly to prevent the silver clay from drying out. For the large circle pendant with the cut-out heart, repeat Steps 1–6, but using a large circle cutter and small heart cutter. For the textured circle, repeat Steps 1–6, but using a medium sized circle cutter. For the smaller circle with the cut out heart, repeat Steps 1–6, but don’t use a texture on the front. I used a medium sized circle cutter and the smallest heart cutter in the set.

1. I’ve chosen to use a beautiful vintage lace tablecloth to texture the front of my jewellery pieces. This lace provides a lovely texture on the precious metal clay. Try different fabrics and materials and see what textures you get!

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PROJECT

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10. Leave the pieces to dry for 24 hours. 11. Using sanding sponges in four grits, 800, 1000, 1500 and 2000 (in this order), sand the edges and reverse of each piece. Don’t sand the front, where the texture is, as this may sand it away. Sand the pieces until they are smooth, paying particular attention to the ones without the texture, as any mark or pit will show up more on these once they are fired. Use a round fi le to make the holes larger for the jumprings. 12. Fire each piece using the hand torch, following the manufacturer’s instructions. This is a time-consuming process, as each piece will need to be fired for a minimum of five minutes. Wait until the pieces are cool before picking them up, as they will be very hot.

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13. Place your fired pieces on a rubber block and brush them using the stainless steel brush. This will give them a lovely satin finish. 14. If you want to achieve a higher shine, use the sanding sponges, as detailed in Step 11. You don’t want to sand the areas with the textures too much, if at all, as this may ruin the pattern you’ve created. Pay particular attention to the edges, backs, and areas with no texture. 15. Attach an 8mm Sterling silver jumpring to each pendant, using jeweller’s pliers. Thread your pendant onto the chain of your choice. 16. Assemble the circle earrings, guided by the step image. You will need four 5mm jumprings and two 8mm jumprings and a pair of Sterling silver earring wires.

17. Assemble the heart earrings, guided by the step image. You will need two 8mm and two 6mm jumprings, and a pair of Sterling silver earring wires.

RESOURCES pmcstudio.com metalclay.co.uk

CONTACT Charlotte Wakeling 07968 224792 contact@felixandreuben.co.uk facebook.com/felixandreuben instagram.com/felixandreuben

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PROJECT

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PRODUCT REVIEW

THE VINTAGE LOOK This month we take a look at products that can add a vintage feel to your jewellery. y j y Byy Zoë Lynham y

RIBBON Using ribbon as an alternative stringing material adds a dainty touch to a vintage style piece. Nosek’s Just Gems offers a range of ribbons including some pretty, floral styles that would be very attractive in a necklace or bracelet. These ribbon examples are the brand ‘Bertie’s Bows’ and are cut in one single length if multiple metres are purchased. Combine with ribbon clamps, Czech glass crystals, pearls and fi ligree findings, to create

BEZELS Nunn Design have created some beautiful, hand-crafted bezels with an antique finish, perfect for this month’s theme. They are ideal for using with a range of mediums; try adding a vintage image with glazing resin, fill with textured polymer clay, highlighted with metallic accents or use Swarovski’s Ceralun epoxy clay and pointed back rhinestones, to add a little ‘bling’. Beads Direct offer a choice of these bezels that can be used as a pendant in a design, or a connector for a necklace or bracelet. This connector measures Antique Gold connecto or filigree rectangle measure es 1 15 x 38mm, with

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a stunning necklace or bracelet. This burlap ribbon in Antique Rose, has a width of 50mm and is sold at just £1.29 per metre. The adorable Vintage Fuschia Pink Daisy Print burlap ribbon has a very pretty lace edging and is 25mm in width. It is sold by the metre at £1.50. If you like the elegance of crocheted ribbon, this beautiful Cotton Lace ribbon in Pale Green is 22m wide and available at £1.78 per metre. noseksjustgems.com

threading holes measuring approx. 2mm. It has delicate details on the back of the pendant and can be purchased for £5.39. This Antique Silver charm rectangle bezel has a setting that measures 11 x 29mm with a threading hole of 2mm. It is sold individually for £3.29. Hearts are always very popular, so this Antique Silver charm setting in a fancy heart shape is going to make a lovely focal point for your designs. It has fine detailing on the back of the bezel, as well as around the sides, and measures 30 x 35mm in size. The threading hole is slightly bigger at 3mm, and retails at £7.19. beadsdirect.co.uk bea

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PRODUCT REVIEW

STERLING SILVER CHARMS

GEMSTONE CONNECTORS Add an elegance to your jewellery designs with these beautiful gemstone connectors. The Curious Gem offers a range of connectors in rounds/coins, s/coins, ovals and pears, in either Sterling silver or gold vermeil. There is a huge range of gemstones to choose from, so you can easily fi nd one to suit the colour scheme of your design and your budget. Here we have an example of a round connector. This Sterling silver bezel set Green Onyx connector is 17 x 11mm in size, with attached, closed loops. They are priced individually at £3.95. The gold vermeil is Sterling silver, fl ash-plated with 24k gold. This Crystal Quartz pear connector is 16–20mm x 8.5–10mm, including the loops, and the gemstone is faceted on the front and back. It is priced at £3.50 each. The fi nal example shown is a Sterling silver Carnelian oval connector, 14 x 7mm including loops. Slight variations in shape can be expected as this item is handmade. It is priced per piece at £2.75 and once again, the gemstone is faceted on both sides. thecuriousgem.co.uk

BOX CLASPS If you are working with pearls or genuine gemstones, then a box clasp (sometimes referred to as a pearl clasp) in Sterling silver offers a perfect, complementary finish to a vintage style piece of jewellery. Beadhouse have different designs of box clasps in plated metal, Sterling silver and gold filled – that are ideal for this style y of jjewellery. y This large, g round necklace/bracelet clasp in Sterling silver, has delicate filigree detail, tail, with a V-shape insert that clips inside. It is available to purchase at £12. This oval necklace/bracelet ligree clasp celet clasp in Sterling silver, is a lighter, fi ligr p that retails for £4.50. Finally, this delicate ribbed necklace/bracelet clasp in Sterling silver is priced att £2.30. p beadhouse.co.uk

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Whether you choose to add these to a Sterling silver charm bracelet or as a pendant on a chain, or combine with other elements in a mixed media piece of jewellery, these charms are beautifully made and very versatile for creating jewellery in a vintage style. Combine them with gemstone beads or briolettes, pearls, leaf or flower charms to create a special piece of jewellery. The charms can be antiqued using Liver of Sulphur, or left with a polished finish, depending on your preference. This delightful Sterling silver key charm is a great gift on a chain or bracelet, or for a special treat for yourself. It measures approx. 20 x 8mm, including the loop, which is approx. 0.8mm. Sold individually, this costs £3.35. If you like Art Deco, this Sterling silver vintage Deco pendant charm might appeal. The top section has a lovely filigree design and you could easily add your own beads or pearls by wire wrapping them on to the charm. It measures 24 x 16mm, including the loop, which is approx. 1mm in size. These retail at £4.75 each and would make a beautiful pair of earrings if bought in pairs. This endearing sparrow Sterling silver bird charm would look wonderful combined with a branch connector or in a bracelet, perhaps with some gemstone mstone beads for a drop of colour. It measures asures 26 x 11mm and has a loop size of 1.5mm. .5mm. It is stamped 925 and iss sold individually at £4.50. kernowcraft.com

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NOT-YOURGRANDMOTHER’S CAMEOS

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PHOTOGRAPHS: CYNTHIA SHAFFER

TAMARA BERG

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PROJECT

HOW TO MAKE

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ake the old-fashioned charm of cameos and combine it with shrink plastic for necklaces that are both sweet and fun

MATERIALS & TOOLS ● ● ● ●

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Templates Basic shrink kit Matte shrink plastic 8.9cm diameter scalloped circle punch (optional) 7.6cm diameter circle punch (optional) Permanent stamp ink or permanent markers 3mm hole punch (optional) Jewellery adhesive Drill with 1.6mm bit (optional) Large, long needle (optional) Butane lighter (optional) 3 x jumprings Chain 45.7cm in length Clasp set

DESIGNER TIP

PHOTOGRAPHS: CYNTHIA SHAFFER

For a little extra pizzazz, use a coloured metal jumpring or make a bail for the pendant using pearls or crystals and wire wraps.

1. Either use the scalloped circle punch to punch the base shape from the shrink plastic, or use the template provided to trace a scalloped circle onto the shrink plastic and then cut it out with scissors. 2. Either use the plain circle punch to punch a circle from the shrink plastic or use the template provided to trace one onto the shrink plastic and cut the circle out with scissors. 3. Trace the image of your choice from the templates onto the plastic and cut it out with scissors. The letter T was created using the Lucida Calligraphy font at 140 points. Simple cursive fonts tend to work best for monograms when using shrink plastic. 4. If you’re going to use permanent stamp ink instead of permanent markers to apply colour to your plain circle, use sandpaper to roughen one side of the circle. Apply a light layer of the colour of your choice. Remember that colours intensify as the plastic shrinks – try out a few test scraps first and shrink them to and the finished colour desired. Sometimes the shrunk plastic looks great when viewed from the wrong side – because it’s just a circle, using it ‘backwards’ is certainly an option.

BOOK DETAILS

5. Preheat your oven, following the shrink plastic manufacturer’s instructions.

Extract from Shrink! Shrank! Shrunk! by Kathy Sheldon, published by Lark Crafts, ISBN 9781454703495, available from thegmcgroup.com, £18.99.

6. It can be tricky to get the holes in both the scalloped and plain circles to align after the pieces are shrunk. Try arranging them as shown in the photos and use the 3mm hole punch to punch a hole through both circles simultaneously. If this method doesn’t work, follow Step 11 to make a hole in the circles after the pieces are shrunk and glued together.

7. Place both the plain and scalloped circles on baking paper on a baking sheet. Follow the shrink plastic manufacturer’s instructions to bake and shrink the pieces. Meanwhile, have something flat and smooth, such as a hardcover book, ready nearby to use as a flattener. 8. When the pieces are shrunk and flat, carefully remove the entire baking sheet from the oven, and press down on the baking papercovered pieces with your flattener. Repeat Steps 7 and 8 to bake your cameo image. 9. Once all the shrunk pieces are cool, sand the edges if needed. 10. Apply jewellery adhesive to the back of the plain circle and centre it on the scalloped circle, taking care to align the holes in the circles if you punched them before shrinking. Apply adhesive to the back of the cameo’s image and centre it in the plain circle. Allow the glue to set completely. 11. If you gave up on the hole punch method, use one of the following methods to make the hole through both circles. Either drill a hole near the centre top of the inside circle with a drill and a 1.6mm drill bit, or carefully heat a large, long needle using a soot-free source, such as a butane lighter, and poke the needle through both pieces of the plastic to create a hole. 12. Attach a jumpring through the hole and then thread your chain through the jumpring. 13. Connect the clasp set to the ends of the chain with jumprings.

TEMPLATES Reproduce at 200% for actual size

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INSPIRATION

BE INSPIRED BY... Pearls, glue, gardens and hammers By Karen Caine

GEMS

MATERIALS

PEARLS

GLUE

The start of summer in June is the time for pearls. Once harvested from oysters, naturally occurring pearls are now incredibly rare with price tags to match. Thankfully, cultured pearls are more widely available. They come in two varieties: freshwater and saltwater. The former are less expensive and are developed by embedding a small piece of mantle tissue into a mollusc. The fragment acts as an irritant, causing the mollusc to cover the fragment in layers of nacre (which gives the pearl its distinctive lustre). This process results in an irregular shaped pearl of solid nacre. Saltwater pearls, on the other hand, are grown around a round shell bead. This results in rounder pearls, but they are not solid nacre throughout. Finally, there are imitation pearls, which contain no nacre at all. These range from cheap, plastic-looking beads to Swarovski’s excellent, but pricey crystal core offerings. As ever, the choice depends on your budget and intentions...

The three most popular glues for jewellery are GS-Hypo Cement, E6000 and two-part epoxy adhesives, such as Devcon 5 Minute Epoxy Glue. All three are waterproof and dry clear and in the ideal world, you’d have all three in a drawer. If you do have to pick just one, though, here’s a quick guide to help you choose... GS-Hypo Cement’s precision applicator is great for applying specks of glue to hard-to-reach areas, such as on knots between beads. It takes 24 hours to dry and remains flexible, which means it acts as a shockabsorber if the piece is dropped. It can be used with stringing materials, plastic, glass, metal and ceramics. E6000 has the same properties as GS-Hypo Cement, but it’s also photo safe, washable and can glue wood and stone. E6000 is gloopier and has a big nozzle, so you need to use a cocktail stick to apply it to small areas. Devcon’s epoxy glue’s chemical bond is stronger and sets within an hour, but is brittle compared to the others. It works with wood, stone, glass, ceramics and metal and the syringe applicator makes mixing the chemical components easy. It fi lls gaps well, making it a great choice for gluing cabochons into settings.

30+ 8mm freshwater white smooth nugget beads, £4.69, charming-beads.co.uk

All available at cooksongold.com BELOW: Devcon 5 Minute Epoxy Glue, e, 25ml syringe, £6.86 RIGHT: E6000 5.3ml, £2.74 BOTTOM RIGHT: GS-Hypo Cement nt 17g, £6.04

6mm saltwater cultured pearl, from £4.40, manchesterminerals.co.uk 15 x 8mm Swarovski halfdrilled drop pearl, £3.79, bluestreakcrystals.co.uk

40c strand top-to-side drilled 40cm freshwater firecracker pearls, fre ffrom £4.89; beadshopuk.com 14mm freshwater pearl peach cluster bead, £1.75, jillybeads.co.uk

50+ 6–7mm freshwater rainbow round potato beads, £6.19, charming-beads.co.uk

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INSPIRATION

Mari Yun, etsy.com/shop/ mariyunjewelry

Beadsmith Whammer, £20.66

TOOLS HAMMERS

TRENDS

Katya Gavrylenko, etsy.com/shop/ GAVRYLENKOjewelry

GARDENS The rest of the world may be mired in negative politics, but fashion is fighting back in 2018 with a serious dedication to fun. Anything goes – bright primaries or ice-cream pastels, see-through clothes, feathers and fringes – as long as it’s jolly and playful, it’s in. So as summer peeks from behind the clouds of spring, what could be more fun than designing some cheerful, cheeky garden-themed jewellery? If you’re looking for inspiration, then take a look at the pieces assembled here. Cute critters in polymer clay, colourful daisy rings and an incredible floral array made from thousands of seed beads, not to mention crocheted wire flowers and sweet soutache earrings. Summer is here: think bright, think creative – think fun!

If you want to work with any kind of metal, sooner or later you’ll need a hammer. The question, though, is which one? If you’re buying your first hammer, you need to focus on what you want to do. If you fancy having a go at metal stamping, you’ll need a heavyweight brass hammer, but if you simply want to persuade a piece of wire to keep its shape, look for a rawhide or nylon mallet. A polished flat- or domed-faced hammer will help you spread out metal, while a ball face is great for producing a dimpled texture. If you want it all, why not go for a hammer with interchangeable heads, such as Beadsmith’s smith’s Whammer? A great all-in-one option for beginners, the Whammer mer has a domed, nylon and ball all face making it a perfect choice oice for basic sheet and wire re work. All available at cooksongold.com d.com Jobbing hammer, mer, £10.91 91

Rawhide mallet, from £10.04

Omifimo, omifimo.com

Brass head mallet, from £30.78

Oksana Thomas, etsy.com/shop/KvinTal

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10/04/2018 10:40


Make time for yourself...

THE ORIGINAL MINDFULNESS MAGAZINE

THE DELIGHTS OF BREATHE FOR YOUNGER READERS

SUBSCRIBE TODAY AND NEVER MISS AN ISSUE To subscribe or purchase back issues, call +44 (0) 1273 488005 or visit:

breathemagazine.com/subscribe Breathe & Teen Breathe are available from all major supermarkets and newsagents

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BLOG

IT’S A JEWELLER’S LIFE We share life behind the scenes with blogger Anna Mcloughlin, who is a gold and silversmith with a passion for using environmentally friendly and ethically sourced materials in her designs.

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oday’s blog is a little bit about computers; about how I’ve turned my sketchbook ‘digital’, and quite a lot about drawing. Now, to begin with, for those of you who have already just switched off because you think you can’t draw, here’s a little story.... So, I’ve been drawing for as long as I’ve been able to hold things in my hand! I remember one of my teachers at primary school telling me that she thought I should go to art college, and that’s exactly what I did. Then, fast-forward a few years, to a lecture at the beginning of my postgraduate teacher training – that was all about how children learn to draw. The one thing that stuck with me from that lecture, was the idea that ‘every child with hands’ can draw, and more importantly, that if you ask a three or four-year-old to draw a person, a dog, a cat, a house or a car, they just will. It may not look anything like the actual object or person, but the child won’t care and will be perfectly happy with their efforts, as the idea of ‘I can’t draw’ hasn’t lodged itself in their brains yet. This is the very beginnings of a child’s creative development and they enjoy just being able to make marks on paper but when they go to school, things start to change. All of a sudden, it’s writing that becomes the most important thing to learn, and the time given over to drawing is vastly reduced. As a secondary school

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teacher, I’ve told this story so many times to all of those children/teenagers that have told me that they ‘can’t draw’. I ask them to think back to before they started school, and how they would enjoy just playing with paint or crayons. Then I’d ask them to think about when they started school and about how it took them years to learn how to be able to ‘write’ letters and sentences. I then told them that this was actually no different to drawing, but because they haven’t spent years and years of practising it every day, they find it difficult. As with anything, if you keep practising, you get better at it! So, onto the idea of digital drawing. About three years ago now, I watched an Apple keynote presentation that introduced the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil. I immediately thought ‘Wow!’ and then I saw how much it cost and decided that I really couldn’t justify swapping my £10 sketchbook for something that would cost over £1,000! I didn’t own any sort of iPad though, and had been stealing my daughter’s one in order to show a video of me in my workshop at wedding fairs, so I thought maybe I would allow myself a business purchase of the cheaper iPad Air. I also bought a different brand of ‘pencil’ stylus in the hope that I might be able to also use it as my sketchbook. Well, I tried, but I had never tried to do a detailed drawing with a thick plastic stick,

drawing on glass, and frankly, my first efforts were rubbish! I persevered though, and although my digital drawings did improve, I really didn’t enjoy drawing on a screen, and soon went back to good old paper and pencil. Then, my MacBook Pro started to become really slow. It was just old and needed upgrading, so it was at this point, that I decided to bite the bullet, and invest in my iPad Pro. I had already had a play with Apple’s own brand ‘pencil’ and found it much easier to use than the stylus I had previously used. I’d also done my research to discover that I could run my business from it, and therefore wouldn’t need to invest in a new laptop. Since I bought my iPad Pro last summer, I think I’ve maybe needed to use my old laptop once and my paper sketchbook has stayed firmly closed! The main app that I use to produce all my drawings is called Procreate, and I don’t have a great deal of advice about using it apart from that you just use the pencil as you would a normal one. Once you’ve got used to the fact that it’s a bit heavier, and plastic, it really is amazing how it behaves just like an actual pencil, but one that never needs to be sharpened! I also really like the fact that you can work in layers, kind of like I would have done in the ‘old days’ with tracing paper, but now, if I need to draw a ring with twenty

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ABOVE: Children’s drawing, age 5 BELOW: Children’s drawing, age 13

iPad LEFT: Children’s drawing, age 4 RIGHT CIRCLE: Children’s drawing, age nearly 14 BELOW: Pencil and paper drawing BELOW & RIGHT: iPad drawing diamonds in it, I can just draw one and then copy and paste it nineteen times! There are loads of different pens and pencils to choose from, although I only tend to use the technical or HB pencil, they don’t get all smudgy across the paper like a real pencil would! The tool I love the most though, is the rubber. I can make this one as thin as the thinnest technical pencil, meaning that my drawings can be as ‘sketchy’ as I like to begin with, but I can then rub out all the parts I don’t need, without also rubbing out half of what I do want to be there! Another big plus, is that I will now never lose a drawing, as everything is stored in my iCloud library, rather than in one of my many sketchbooks. I can also, email my client’s designs straight to them without the need to scan a piece of paper first. Oh, and I obviously still have all the business stuff as well as the internet for all of my social media and essential online shopping. So... I love my iPad Pro. It’s taken quite a lot of practice and getting used to, but now I’m there, it’s allowed me to make some great improvements as well as speeding up how long it takes me to get an idea out of my head, down on paper (erm, screen) and sent to my customer’s inbox! Thank you very much to my now 13-year-old daughter for allowing me to use her artwork to demonstrate how drawing is something that we ‘learn’ how to do.

Eclectic Wedding g Extravaga Extravaganza g nza Find out more about Anna’s jewellery at annafinejewellery.co.uk

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

BASIC TECHNIQUES HOW TO MAKE A WRAPPED LOOP

1. Thread a bead onto a head or eye pin. Grip the wire with round nose pliers next to the bead.

2. Bend the wire above the plier jaw to a right angle. You will need about 2mm of wire above the bead before the bend.

3. Move the plier jaws to sit at the top of the bend.

4. With your thumb push the wire back around the pliers, keeping it tight to the jaw.

5. Keep pushing the wire around the jaw until you meet the bead.

6. Move the pliers around the loop and continue to bend the wire around until it is facing out at a right angle and you have a complete loop.

7. If attaching the loop to a chain this is the stage to do that. Use a pair of chain nose pliers to hold across the loop firmly.

8. Wrap the wire around the neck of the loop until it meets the bead. Snip off any excess wire and push the end against the coil to finish.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SIAN HAMILTON

MAKING A SIMPLE LOOP

1. Thread the bead onto a head or eye pin and cut the pin about 1cm above the bead. Bend the wire to a right angle above the bead.

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2. Using round nose pliers, grasp the wire at the very end and curl it around the plier jaws.

3. Roll the wire around to meet the bead. If it does sit centrally move the plier jaws around the loop to sit by the bead away from the open end. Bend the loop back to sit directly above the bead.

4. Use chain nose pliers to tighten the loop by twisting it from side to side. Do not pull it outwards as that will distort the shape.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

USING JUMPRINGS

CRIMPING A BEAD

ADDING A COVER

MAKING AN EYE PIN

Always make sure you follow this guide and don’t pull jumprings apart as they can easily distort.

To show this process clearly it is being shown without using thread; the thread or wire should be inside the bead.

Crimp covers make your finished jewellery look more professional and clean.

Make your own eye pins using 0.8mm (or 0.7mm) wire. You can use 1mm if you need strong pins.

Take a jumpring in two pairs of pliers with the opening centred at the top.

Hold the crimp bead in the pliers with the bead sat in the hole that has a round side opposite a ‘W’ shape.

Take a crimp cover and place it over the crimped bead, making sure the bead is completely inside the cover.

Take the very end of the wire in round nose pliers. If the wire is quite hard it may slip out of the pliers, so start the loop about 2mm in and snip off the straight piece as you make the first curve.

Hold the jumpring either as shown in the step above or this step.

Before closing the pliers, check that the bead is sat straight. When you close the pliers the thread should fall either side of the bend.

Take a pair of chain or flat nose pliers and carefully grasp the cover. Gently press the cover closed.

The shape you want to create is a P. The advantage to making your own eyepins is that you can make the loop any size you need.

Whichever way you hold the jumpring, the opening motion is the same. Twist one hand towards you and the other hand away; never pull apart. Reverse the action to close.

Move the ‘U’ shape crimp to the other hole with two round sides. Turn the crimp so the ‘U’ faces sideways, press the pliers closed tightly.

The finished bead should be closed into a perfect bead shape. Nylon nose pliers do this job very well as they won’t mark the cover.

To finish the pin so the loop sits centrally on the wire, take the round nose pliers and place them where the round P shape meets the wire. Press the wire back against the pliers until the loop is centred.

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TIPS & TECHNIQUES

BASIC TOOLS TYPES OF PLIERS

ROUND NOSE These are a must-have for a basic kit. When making jewellery, being able to create loops and rings is essential.

NYLON NOSE Another similar style to flat nose, these pliers have jaws that are covered in nylon to stop them marking the metal.

CRIMPING These pliers are used with crimp beads. If you want to have a nice finish to your crimping then these pliers are a good investment.

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CHAIN NOSE (SNIPE) Also called half round, these are the most versatile. They are used for many jewellery applications, so are another must-have for the basic kit.

FLAT NOSE Similar to chain nose, these pliers have a wider jaw that is completely fl at. Good for holding jumprings/findings as the wide jaw grasps a large area.

BENT NOSE

BAIL MAKING

Used for getting into small tricky spaces where a straight nose pair cannot reach.

These pliers have fixed sized jaws, with each jaw being a different size, usually with a 2mm difference (such as 3mm and 5mm). They come in a wide variety of sizes and are great if making a lot of the same size jumprings or coils.

CUTTERS/SNIPS

MEMORY CUTTERS

These pliers are also called side cutters. They come in a vast range of prices and styles. Be careful what you cut as they can blunt easily if used with hard or large dimension wire.

Used exclusively for cutting memory wire. If you are going to use memory wire you must invest in these; the wire will damage standard cutters.

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D E S I G N B Y H E L E N A C H M E L Í K O VÁ

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Making jewellery june 2018  
Making jewellery june 2018  
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