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May 2018

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C ON T E N T S May 2018 ON THE COVER The kitchen of an Arts and Crafts house in London, designed by Ben Pentreath (pages 182–191), photographed by Paul Massey. Cover stories are in colour

Hotels by Design 6

Contributors

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From the editor

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The List Flooring specialists

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Art scene The untold story behind a piece by Eric Ravilious; exhibitions to see; and a brief history of Cedric Morris, the focus of three exhibitions this spring

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Books A selection of literary offerings DE COR AT I NG

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Swatch Charlie Porter creates colourful lanterns from new patterned wallpapers

I NSI DE R

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO THE MOST BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED HOTELS IN THE WORLD 2018

VOLUME 73 앫 NUMBER 5

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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Shopping Charlie Porter selects furniture and accessories with scalloped edges

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Rita notes Rita Konig explains the beauty of sculleries and pantries

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Notebook What’s new in fabrics, wallpaper and home accessories

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Wise buys Rémy Mishon presents a variety of cushions for under £50

Profile Fiona McCarthy talks to the German designer and architect Julia von Werz about her own London house

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News and views The new tile company to watch; a preview of London Craft Week; and highlights from Maison et Objet

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Floral code Inspired by the garden of her childhood home, Melissa Richardson left the world of fashion to start JamJar Flowers. By Olinda Adeane

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Two’s company David Nicholls talks to three design company partnerships about working and living together 컄

F R E E M AGA Z I N E , PAG E 1 01 56 pages of inspiring international interiors, from Copenhagen to Australia

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Outside interests Clare Foster focuses on spring-flowering clematis; plus outdoor heat and light sources for spring

PLUS, W I N A GR EEK ISL A N D HOL I DAY (DETA I L S ON PAGE 1 57 )

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Out and about Laura Houldsworth reveals her best buys

LIFESTYLE

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 3


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EDIT: INTERIORS, GARDENS, STORIES 182 Distinct presence Designer Ben Pentreath has given each room in this reconfigured Arts and Crafts house in London its own personality, combining colour and texture with interesting pieces from different periods. By Elfreda Pownall

192 Acting on impulse A spontaneous viewing led to a quick purchase for Miranda Alexander, but her Dorset house, made up of two buildings from different periods, has turned out to be the perfect fit. By Ros Byam Shaw

200 Green dreams Hidden among trees in rural Columbia County, New York, is a collection of buildings that provide a welcome sense of escape for its owner and reflect his commitment to sustainability. By Dominic Bradbury

From £7,500 to £125,000

208 Bold comfort The owners of this end of terrace in north London called upon Suzy Hoodless to help them add colour, pattern and a dose of fun to its restored and extended Victorian bones. By Emma J Page

214 The knowledge Inspired by the houses in this issue, Bethan Hyatt gives directions on how to achieve similar style

216 Calm and collected Ruth Sleightholme combines neutral and monochrome Korean-inspired textiles with English furniture for stripped-back schemes

HARLECH 09

222 Legacy planting At San Giuliano, the 800-year-old estate of a Sicilian marquis, evolving displays of succulents and tropical flowers ensure the garden always feels beguiling and alive. By Helena Attlee

228 Show and sell With the help of designer Simon Irvine, curator and potter Joanna Bird has turned her garden into an exhibition space, where sculpted ceramics meet calming evergreens. By Francesca Ryan

232 Sowing the seeds In the second part of the series, Clare Foster reflects on a busy month in her kitchen garden, planting and weeding in anticipation of an abundant summer

E N T E RTA I N I NG

Designed by Madeline Weinrib, hand made in London

235 Nordic soul Danish chef and food writer Trine Hahnemann devises a selection of dishes for a casual seasonal supper

243 Taste notes News, reviews and tips for cooks and food lovers E V E RY I S S U E

241 Subscriptions How to subscribe to House & Garden in the UK and US 245 Stockists 264 Self portrait George Khachfe, the CEO of Poliform UK, paints a picture of his life, work and inspirations 첸

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T h i s m o n t h’ s c o n t r i b u t o r s

BEN PENTREATH Architectural designer

LINE T KLEIN Photographer Line Klein says she was ‘spellbound’ by the first darkroom she saw when she was 14. She worked in the photography department of a newspaper in Denmark before becoming a photographer full time. Working with stylists on shoots has inspired Line to see her home ‘as a playground’ and to invest in ‘fewer but better pieces of furniture’. This month, she photographed the recipes of fellow Dane Trine Hahnemann (from page 235) .

Where is the most amazing place you have visited? ‘Trancoso in Brazil, which I photographed for House & Garden’s Hotels by Design supplement last year. It is breathtakingly beautiful.’

Ben Pentreath describes his style as ‘hopefully timeless and never dull’. Indeed, when asked about the people who inspire him, he lists a varied cast of design-world characters, including Terence Conran, David Mlinaric, Billy Baldwin and David Hicks. A formative moment for Ben came at the age of 21, when he visited the house of the former House & Garden editor Robert Harling, an experience he says he ‘will never forget’. More recently, Ben found inspiration in a less likely place – Matthew Walker’s book Why We Sleep: ‘My mind has been a lot more rested since I read it and that is the greatest design inspiration I can hope for.’ An Arts and Crafts house in London that he designed features from page 182.

When you are not working, where would we ind you and what would you be doing? ‘I’d be pottering around in Dorset, with my husband Charlie – getting sunk into several pints at a pub or lying on a beach reading.’

HELENA ATTLEE

If you could choose one garden to own, which would it be? ‘San Giuliano. The planting is so rich and it is surrounded by blood orange trees – that’s my favourite fruit’ 첸

WORDS: LEANNE WALSTOW. PHOTOGRAPHS: SIMON BEVAN; ALEX RAMSAY

Writer ‘This week I’m in Sicily teaching on Cook the Farm, a course all about sustainable farming, cooking and eating,’ Helena Attlee says. Always passionate about Italy, she has written many books on its gardens. Her most recent, The Land Where Lemons Grow, focuses on the story of Italy’s citrus fruit. What she enjoys most in a garden is ‘the compromises and interactions between plants and architecture’. For this issue, Helena visited San Giuliano (from page 222).


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From the editor

Follow us on Twitter (@_houseandgarden), Facebook (@houseandgardenuk), Instagram (@houseandgardenuk) and Pinterest (houseandgarden), and for more decoration inspiration, visit houseandgarden.co.uk

I was delighted to discover a BBC documentary from 1992 on iPlayer called Signs of the Times. It’s a funny, fascinating and poignant portrait of the nation’s interiors tastes, captured brilliantly through the deadpan photography of Martin Parr. As a nation, we do like to talk about our houses. Working at House & Garden gives me leave to quiz people about their homes and I’m amazed at how many (often quite unlikely) characters are more than happy to talk at length about them. A simple question about a chair or a fabric can quickly lay bare the range of emotions that were behind that decorating decision. Other people’s taste is always fascinating – ‘what WERE they thinking?’ must be one of the most gleeful questions in decorating. I’m always a bit daunted by the expectation that people have when visiting my flat, in a 1740s town house in central London. I rent it from Rugby School and while I have made lots of changes (new kitchen, new floors), there are still plenty of details I would want to apologise for – like the horrible door handles and the paint swatches that have been on my bedroom wall for four years with no colour chosen. This is why a good interior designer is such a wise investment. They’ll actually finish the job. In this issue, we have our annual Hotels by Design supplement (from page 101) – 56 pages of the most beautiful and often quite remarkable places to stay, and of course, to take decorating inspiration from. In the main issue, on page 81, Rita Konig muses on the luxury of a good scullery; now so many of us eat in our kitchens, it makes sense to have a space where the dirty dishes can be whisked away to. If you had a kitchen as beautiful as that pictured on the cover, in a fantastic Arts and Crafts house decorated by Ben Pentreath (from page 182), you’d feel the same way. The interior seamlessly marries pieces from the eighteenth to mid-twentieth centuries and is full of wonderful wallpapers. If it leaves you craving pattern for your own walls, turn to Swatch (from page 75), where Charlie Porter has lined up the best designs for the new season. As spring arrives, so does the return of our editor Hatta Byng from maternity leave, so I bid you farewell and hope you enjoy all the beauty of the May issue.

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ANTHROPOLOGIE does a great job of transcending homogeneous high-street style, a good case in point being this ‘Kinsella Rattan Bed’ (£1,800). anthropologie.eu

10 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

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Interior designer BEATA HEUMAN has a brilliant eye, so there’s no chance of her great new ‘Dodo Egg’ brass and glass pendant lights (£1,140) becoming extinct any time soon. beataheuman.com

COLEFAX AND FOWLER has just launched a collection of new floral prints, including this pretty linen, ‘Constance’ (£75 a metre). colefax.com

IKEA has a place in all our homes, even if it’s just its brilliant, affordable wine glasses (£6 for six). I love coloured furniture and can imagine this new ‘Fridafors’ tray table (£40) sitting very comfortably in my flat. ikea.com 첸

MICHAEL SINCLAIR; PIXELATE IMAGING

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Dynasty Collection: Wallpaper, Print and Woven Fabrics     


INSIDER SHOPPI NG | N EWS | A RT | BOOK S

Follow the curve CHARLIE PORTER makes waves with furniture and accessories with scalloped edges Upholstered and painted beech ‘Editor’s Chair’, 85 x 56 x 63cm, £1,350 excluding fabric, from David Seyfried; covered in ‘Shore Thing’ (green), by Thibaut, linen/cotton, £78 a metre, from Turnell & Gigon. ‘The Rattan Ripple Console’, 78 x 167 x 47cm, £5,300, from Soane. ‘Lillee’ wooden table lamp (whitewash), 39 x 12cm base diameter, £60, from Pooky. Raffia and cotton ‘Denim Scallop Lampshade’, 36cm diameter, £135; ‘Scallop Tole Plant Pots’ (green), 15 x 8cm diameter, £28 each; all from Matilda Goad. ‘Flora Wall Mirror’ (cobalt blue), 100cm diameter, £1,100, from Balineum 컄

PHOTOGRAPHS RACHEL WHITING

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 13


INSIDER | SHOPPING

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1 Brass ‘Recinto Tray’, 35 x 52cm, £159, from Alessi. Brass and enamel ‘Limited Edition Set of Four Heart Teaspoons’, £19, from Oliver Bonas. 2 ‘Ribbed Beeswax Candles’ (from top: rose, dusty blue, lilac), £35 for a pack of six (single colour or mixed colours); ‘Ribbed Murano Glass Candleholders’ (blue, red, light green), £70 each; all from Matilda Goad. Powder-coated steel ‘Scallop Shelves’ (white), 29cm wide, £20 each, from Bobby Rabbit. 3 From left: cotton ‘Scalloped Edge Square Pillow Case’ (blue), 65cm square, £22; ‘Scalloped Edge Oxford Pillow Cases’ (coral, blue, green), 50 x 75cm, £20 each; all from Sophie Conran. Bottom: Cotton ‘Celine Standard Oxford Pillowcase’ (blue), 50 x 75cm, £26, from Cologne & Cotton. 4 Irish linen ‘Scallop Placemats’ (sapphire), 33 x 48cm, $95 for a set of four, from Matouk. ‘Chrysanthemum Porcelain Plates’, 9.5cm diameter, £14, 14cm diameter, £26, and 18.6cm diameter, £35, from Native & Co 컄 14 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


Channels Copper by Kelly Wearstler THERUGCOMPANY.COM


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Polished brass ‘The Scallop Helios Lights’, 39.5cm diameter, £1,990 each, from Soane. Oak ‘Blythe Dining Chair’, 111 x 55 x 64cm, £1,267; with loose cover in ‘Secret Garden’ (burnt summer), linen, £135 a metre, from Justin Van Breda. ‘Large Painted D-end Table with Scalloped Frieze’, 89 x 118.5 x 30.5cm, £1,680, from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. ‘Italian Aluminium Candlesticks’, 12cm diameter, £4 each, from Re. ‘Ribbed Beeswax Candles’ (natural), £35 for a pack of six, from Matilda Goad. ‘Lillee’ wooden table lamp bases (orange), 39 x 12cm base diameter, £60 each, from Pooky. ‘Huaca Empire Card Lampshades’ (mid blue), 46cm diameter, £98 each, from Oka. ‘Large Belles Rives Tray’ (bordeaux red), by Rita Konig for The Lacquer Company, 10 x 58 x 42cm, £375, from Rita Konig. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸

16 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


ALFRED SOFA RIVIERA COFFEE TABLE MEMOIRE ARMCHAIR JACQUES COFFEE TABLE CARMEN OTTOMAN design Roberto Lazzeroni

UK AGENT ALBERTO SCHIATTI tel. +39 0362 328162 info@schiatti.it

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Matki-ONE Pivot Contemporary style, technical innovation. Beautifully engineered in the UK

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Linen, from left: ‘Arrow’ (midnight, mineral); ‘Weeping Willow’ (midnight); by Clay McLaurin Studio, £170 a metre, from Alice Lily Interiors

‘Guinea Floor’ Portoro marble, oak and organza lamp, 170 x 35cm, €2,841.30, from Servomuto

RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME shows us what has caught her eye this month

‘Resin Tall Stone Jugs’ (from left: turmeric, lagoon, oyster shell), 32 x 12cm diameter, £205 each, from Dinosaur Designs

PIXELATE IMAGING; EDWARD ADDEO

Rattan and leather ‘Fish Scale Screen’, 165 x 160cm, €4,900, from Atelier Vime

Walnut ‘Brampton Sofa’, 74 x 256 x 85cm, covered in ‘Glamour’ (boulder), cotton/polyester, $10,250 as seen, from Dmitriy & Co 컄

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 19


INSIDER | SHOPPING Painted plaster ‘Gourd Lamp’ (matte white), 46 x 20cm diameter, $3,640, from Stephen Antonson. ‘Fez’ linen shade (chalk), £169, from Porta Romana

‘Arch’ and ‘Tate’ encaustic tiles (f lush/milk), by Popham Design, from £225 a square metre, from Day True

‘Livorno’, polyester, 345 x 630cm for 5 panels, €3,690 as seen, from Dimore Studio

‘Boma’ aluminium three-seater sofa, by Rodolfo Dordoni, 90 x 260 x 90cm; covered in ‘Terrain’ (ash rose), acrylic, by Doshi Levien, €6,950 excluding scatter cushions, from Kettal 컄

20 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

PIXELATE IMAGING; SALVA LOPEZ

Resin ‘Bon Bon Boxes’ (pink, pale rose, cobalt blue, ocean blue, signal red), from €58 each for 14 x 8cm square, from Tina Frey Designs (also bottom of page)


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Handmade enamel ‘Macchia Tiles’ (green-black), by Ceramica Pinto, 20cm square, £110 for 4, from Artemest

Rattan mirror, 120 x 100cm, €275, from Lrnce

‘Papyrus’ wallpaper (ambre), by Alexandra Bruel, 44.7cm wide, €57.90 a 3-metre roll, from PaperMint

Beech and woven cane ‘Hideout Loveseat’, by Front, 116 x 145 x 86cm; covered in ‘Tessere’ (lemon grey), by Dedar, cotton, €6,550 as seen, from Gebrüder Thonet Vienna. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸

22 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

MARGHERITA BORSANO

‘Cartocci Collection’ paper clay vessels, by Paola Paronetto, from 24 x 15cm diameter, from €112, from William Yeoward


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Cushions RÉMY MISHON presents a stylish selection for under £50

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1 ‘Ratapiko’ cotton cushion cover (orange/black), 40cm square, £32, from La Redoute. 2 Ikat velvet cushion cover (bone/indigo), by Junipa, 50cm square, £25, from House of Fraser. 3 ‘Poppy Field’ cotton mix cushion, 50cm square, £32 including pad, from French Connection. 4 Tassel velvet cushion cover, 45cm square, £15, from J D Williams. 5 ‘Kamala’ tussah silk and cotton cushion cover, 51cm square, £44, from Oka. 6 ‘Renrepe’ cotton cushion cover, 50cm square, £4.50, from Ikea. 7 Conscious patterned cotton cushion cover (natural white/black patterned), 50cm square, £3.99, from H&M Home. 8 ‘Hands’ cotton cushion, 45cm square, £25 including pad, from Habitat 첸

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FOR SUPPLIERS’ DETAILS, SEE STOCKISTS PAGE. FOR MORE DESIGNS, VISIT HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK/CUSHIONS


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By ELIZABETH METCALFE

Something to grout about Introducing a new tile company, founded by a trio with an impressive design pedigree and a focus on finish, colour and texture PHOTOGRAPH GREG FUNNELL

etween the three of them, Rob Whitaker, Andy Manders and Lucy Kenna have over 40 years’ experience in the world of beautiful tiles. They met at Fired Earth, where Rob was creative director, Andy the CEO and Lucy the marketing director. Last year, however, the trio decided to take a chance and set up their own company, Claybrook. As with most start-ups, the plan was to begin small. But that’s not to say they don’t have big ambitions. It will come as no surprise that high-end f loor and wall tiles are the brand’s initial focus. ‘Who knew that a tile could be so addictive?’ reads the Claybrook launch

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statement. As addictions go, it is an innocuous one to have, although clearly still exhilarating. ‘There’s something amazing about meeting specialists round the world who are passionate about ceramics or creating unique glazes,’ Rob explains. ‘It is such an underappreciated art form.’ The debut collection will draw plaudits for its modern feel, stylish palette and distinctive finishes. The white marble ‘East Haven’ range has been cut into arabesque, hexagonal and circular patterns; in the ‘Raku’ range, porcelain stoneware tiles are reimagined with a nod to the Japanese firing process; and myriad textures grace the glazed terracotta ‘Cannes’ range. The tiles are made all over the world– from Italy and Spain to the US, China and Turkey. At the time of writing, Claybrook had

not yet signed on the dotted line for its showroom in central London, but the plan is for it to open later this spring. (A shoppable website launched earlier this year.) The showroom will cater to individuals who are doing up their houses, as well as interior designers who are working on large-scale commercial projects. In addition to its off-the-shelf collection, the company is offering a bespoke service for its trade customers. It bodes well that Claybrook took its first order for a hotel project weeks before it officially started trading. You can be sure that there will be many more to follow. claybrook.studio David Nicholls

Visit houseandgarden.co.uk/claybrook for an update on the London showroom and to see more tiles from the collection 컄

ABOVE LEFT A selection of tiles from Claybrook’s debut collection. In the background: porcelain stoneware ‘Raku’ (yokohoma), £2.59. Clockwise from top: glazed terracotta ‘Cannes’ (florence), £13.45; recycled glass ‘Coniserie Mosaic’ (blush chevron), £7.68; glazed ceramic ‘Metro Deco Dado’ (penn station), £1.79, and ‘Metro Deco’ (penn station), 50p; porcelain stoneware ‘Raku’ (sapporo), £2.59; glazed ceramic ‘Sagrada Border 1’ (nave), £3.98. All prices are for a single tile. Bowls and plate, stylist’s own. ABOVE RIGHT The founders, from let: Rob Whitaker, Lucy Kenna and Andy Manders HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 27


INSIDER | NEWS

S E E N AT MAISON ET OBJET

Finely woven

‘I

started weaving as a child, when my mother bought me a toy loom from Ikea,’ says 26-yearold London-based weaver Christabel Balfour. Twenty or so years later and the toy has been replaced by two slightly more serious models – a 1976 Harris floor loom and a two-metre-wide tapestry loom from 1992 – which she uses to weave rugs and wall hangings in her Peckham studio. Christabel’s designs are simple and contemporary, featuring geometric patterns and an earthy palette, with splashes of colour. It takes her three to four days to weave a large rug, and she starts out by drawing a rough pencil sketch. ‘I plan how large each section will be and then set the warp on the loom, which takes a day or two,’ she says. ‘I can weave a simple design at 20cm an hour, but a complicated pattern is more like 4cm an hour.’ This month, the maker will take part in two free events as part of the fourth annual London Craft Week (May 9–13), where studios and craftspeople across the capital open their doors to the public. She will be showing her work at Peckham’s Copeland Gallery (May 10–13), as well as giving weaving demonstrations at the Barbican Centre (May 9–12), where she will be installing her loom. christabel-balfour.co.uk | londoncraftweek.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP One of Christabel’s designs on the loom. The weaver at her studio in Peckham. A selection of her rugs and wall hangings

Glass was the material du jour at January’s Maison et Objet design and decoration fair in Paris. A host of designers embraced the material’s versatility to create striking sculptural pieces, including tables, lighting and tableware. Here are some highlights.

These ‘Zigzag’ ribbed glass side tables were designed by Lars Kemper and Peter Olah for Czech brand Lasvit. lasvit.com

Sebastian Herkner’s toadstool-like ‘Delight’ side table, designed for the German brand Pulpo and made from mouthblown glass, has a dusty matt inish. pulpo-shop.de

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The shops of PIMLICO ROAD are always a fount of inspiration. The Midas Touch at Rose Uniacke is a free exhibition on the art of gilding. At Soane, you can see weavers at work on rattan furniture and lighting. roseuniacke.com | soane.co.uk

Echoes of Process, a free exhibition at CONTEMPORARY APPLIED ARTS in Southwark Street, SE1, will feature items from the studio of metalsmith Adi Toch and highlight elements of her craft that are usually discarded. caa.org.uk

Pay a visit to LONDON GLASSBLOWING’s studio on Bermondsey Street, SE1 between 2 and 4pm on May 12 to watch the glassblower Charlie Macpherson create works of art from molten glass. londonglassblowing.co.uk

For our pick of 10 more of the best events, demonstrations and talks at London Craft Week (May 9-13), go to houseandgarden.co.uk/londoncraftweek2018 28 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

As part of Nude’s latest collection, the Amsterdam-based design duo Studio Formafantasma presented the ‘Pigmento’ range of mouth-blown glass serving plates and containers, which have been coloured with pastel pigments. nudeglass.com 컄

LUCIE ELEANOR; YESHEN VENEMA PHOTOGRAPHY

Three more London Craft Week events


plainenglishdesign.co.uk 020 3026 4782


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ANTIQUES DI A RY

Spring Decorative Antiques and Textiles Fair April 17–22 Over 150 dealers will be at this fair at Battersea Park, SW11. This Seventies leather chair and footstool are from Philip Thomas. Admission £10, free if you book online. decorativefair.com

ver the course of three centuries, Chippendale has become a byword for a wide swathe of fine furniture that was either designed by Thomas Chippendale (1718–1779) or heavily influenced by him and produced by joiners across Britain, Europe and America. Surprisingly little is known about the man himself, who moved to London from his home town of Otley in Yorkshire at the age of 30. He set up a workshop on St Martin’s Lane and employed between 40 and 50 men to make everything from chairs and writing tables to sconces and clock cases. Chippendale’s style reflected the tastes of the day, incorporating French, Gothic, Chinese and rococo elements. He made a name for himself in 1754 when he published The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director, a pattern book that contained 160 engravings of furniture, including designs for the ‘Gothic, Chinese and Modern Taste’. Nothing of this scale had been published before and it attracted the attention of many aristocrats, craftsmen and cabinet makers. It is unlikely that Chippendale would have made any furniture himself, but he was a savvy businessman who set up a framework for furniture design that is still influential today.

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Many contemporary brands, including Oka, Titchmarsh & Goodwin and Jamb, produce furniture that includes Chippendale elements. This year marks the tercentenary of Thomas Chippendale’s birth and, as part of The Chippendale Society’s initiative Chippendale 300, several exhibitions are highlighting his significance. Visit Leeds City Museum to see a remarkable collection of Chippendale’s drawings, documents and furniture. To see the designer’s work in its intended context, drive half an hour north to Harewood House. Chippendale’s firm was commissioned in the late eighteenth century to fit out the house with furniture, curtains, wallpapers, upholstery and carpets, and now a special trail highlights some of the finest pieces. Other events will take place at venues including Nostell Priory to the south of Leeds and Dumfries House in Scotland. ‘Thomas Chippendale, 1718–1779: A Celebration of Craftsmanship and Design’ is at Leeds City Museum until June 9. ‘Thomas Chippendale – Designer, Maker, Decorator’ is at Harewood House until September. For details of Chippendale 300 events, visit chippendale300.co.uk TOP Chippendale chairs in the entrance hall of Harewood House in Yorkshire. LEFT This lyre-back chair is on display as part of the exhibition at Leeds City Museum

Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers’ Association Fair (CADA) April 19–22 This fair at Blenheim Palace features over 30 dealers, selling furniture, textiles, ceramics and more. This Chinese porcelain wucai jar is from Catherine Hunt. Admission free; register online. cadafair.com

The Petworth Park Antiques & Fine Art Fair May 11–13 With over 50 exhibitors, this fair in Sussex is a great place to find fine furniture, sculpture, lighting and ceramics. Above is Chanctonbury Ring by Stephen Palmer, from Moncrief-Bray Gallery. Admission £10; free if booked online. petworthparkfair.com 첸

HAREWOOD HOUSE TRUST/PAUL BARKER

REINTRODUCING: THOMAS CHIPPENDALE


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paloform.co.uk

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Outside Interests CLARE FOSTER finds fresh gardening inspiration

Wi n n i ng c o m b i na t i o n Recreate designer planting combinations with border collections from Crocus. The online nursery supplies a range of collections for shade, sun, wildlife and in many colours and styles. The ‘Stars of the Show Plant Combination’ shown here was designed by Luciano Giubbilei for his gold medal-winning garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show in 2009. It contains one plant each of Paeonia ‘Buckeye Belle’, Astrantia major ‘Claret’, Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ and Foeniculum vulgare ‘Giant Bronze’. All plants flower from May to June and are suitable for an open, sunny border. The collection costs £31.96 for four plants in 9cm pots. crocus.co.uk

In Season CAMASSIAS are in bloom in May, and one of the best places to see them is at Hare Spring Cottage Plants in North Yorkshire, where owner Stella Exley has a National Collection with over 80 varieties. Seen here are C. cusickii ‘Zwanenburg’ (left) and C. leichtlinii ‘Semiplena’ (right). Thriving in either damp heavy soil or drier ground, these hardy North American bulbs look equally good in a meadow or a mixed border. Flowers come in shades of blue and white – some with variegated foliage or double f lowers – and they bloom from late spring into early summer. You can buy camassia plants from Hare Spring Cottage Plants during its open weekend on May 5–6, or see the nursery’s camassia exhibits at the RHS Malvern Spring Festival (May 10–13) and RHS Chelsea Flower Show (May 22–26). harespringcottageplants.co.uk 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 33


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Focus on... SPRINGFLOWERING C L E M AT I S here are clematis species and varieties for every season, and in spring the hardy Atragene group really comes into its own. It includes C. alpina, C. macropetala, C. koreana and C. chinensis and their hybrids, which have delicate, bell-like flowers in a spectrum of colours from white and pale yellow to blue, mauve and pink. These easy-to-grow climbers need less cosseting than some larger-f lowered varieties, and do better in poorer, drier soils as their root systems are light and fibrous. There are dozens of hybrids to choose from. My favourites include the C. alpina cultivars ‘Frances Rivis’, a deep vibrant blue, and ‘Ruby’, with velvety f lowers in deep pink-maroon. Seen here is C. koreana ‘Amber’, plant of the year at RHS Chelsea in 2016, which has pale yellow double f lowers like frilly tutus. Other double f lowers include the blue C. macropetala and its pale-faced cousins ‘Albina Plena’, which has pure white flowers with green-tinged centres, and the delicate ‘Lemon Dream’, with flowers of palest creamy yellow. All these varieties will f lower for several months from mid spring through summer, with a height and spread of about 2.5 metres. Grow them in a light soil in a sunny, sheltered spot, giving them support as they grow. Add bonemeal to the soil when you plant, and make sure you plant deep enough to cover the root ball in order to ensure the roots are kept cool. Clematis plants are available to order from Thorncroft Clematis, from £11.25 for a 2-litre-size plant. thorncroftclematis.co.uk

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HEAT AND LIGHT Make the most of your garden as the days get longer with fire bowls, lanterns and outdoor fireplaces

Bol’s minimal ‘Corten Fire Bowl’ has a grate for wood burning. It is also available with a natural gas or propane burner. The bowl has a 107cm diameter and costs from £2,300. paloform.co.uk 34 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Perfect for a small space or a terrace, this ‘Outdoor Fireplace’ from Dobbies has a built-in log store below the fire. The fireplace measures 150 x 60 x 32.5cm and costs £229. dobbies.com

Try draping these ‘Anker Outdoor String Lights’ on a pergola. The 10 metal shades are 14cm in diameter and come with a 7.66-metre cable. The set costs £118, plus £68 for 10 LED bulbs. rowenandwren.co.uk

Made from iron and glass, the ‘Elegant Filigree Lantern’ from Cox & Cox is designed to hold a church candle. It measures 40 x 38cm diameter and costs £75. coxandcox.co.uk


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Get growing

PAULO TOUREIRO; JONATHAN BUCKLEY; JÉRÔME HOUYVET

April and May are prime sowing and planting times in the kitchen garden, and vegetable seedlings will get you off to a head start. Sarah Raven’s ‘Bestselling Veg Seedling Collection’ includes 51 seedlings: 20 x beetroot ‘Boltardy’; 10 x broad bean ‘Stereo’; 1 x courgette ‘Romanesco’; 10 x french bean ‘Blue Lake’; and 10 x pea ‘Alderman’. The collection costs £42.95 from sarahraven.com.

Channel hopping If you want to broaden your garden-show repertoire, a visit to Les Journées des Plantes de Chantilly near Paris is a must. With the stunning Château de Chantilly as a backdrop, this charming show, on May 18–20, combines excellent nursery exhibits with select garden sundries. A passion for plants is the keynote, with each nursery nominating a seasonal favourite, which will be judged by a panel of horticulturists from all over Europe. The show is less than an hour by train from the centre of Paris and Gare du Nord for the Eurostar, and only a 20-minute drive from Charles de Gaulle Airport. domainedechantilly.com 첸


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Latest launches… chic showrooms… hot buys… LAURA HOULDSWORTH takes note SOMETHING NEW It is a real treat being invited to see a preview of a company’s new fabric collections. At Colefax and Fowler, this pretty ‘Mereworth’ linen in pink and green stood out. It is available in another two colourways and costs £79 a metre. 020-8874 6484; colefax.com

Colourful collection Fermoie has opened a new flagship showroom at 53–55 Pimlico Road, SW1, to house its fabrics and accessories. These cushions are in, from top: ‘Green Sicily’ cotton, ‘Green Quartz’ cotton/ linen, ‘Green Plain Linen Aventurine’ and ‘Red and Green Sicily’ cotton. They are 43cm square and £76 each, including a pad. 01672-513723; fermoie.com

Set the tone ‘Rugs are all about colour and mood,’ says specialist Robert Stephenson. This original Sixties flatweave design by Ingegerd Silow measures 145 x 196cm and costs £1,985. 020-7225 2343; robertstephenson.co.uk

All lined up

All the trimmings Samuel & Sons’ showroom at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is a treasure trove of trims and fringes. Pictured are some of the new Matelassé collection borders, from £72 a metre. 020-7351 5153; samuelandsons.com

NEWS IN BRIEF If you are visiting the RHS Chelsea Flower Show (May 22-26), don’t miss The Dorchester’s pop-up bar, serving Champagne breakfasts, afternoon tea and cocktails. Breakfast costs £45. rhs.org.uk 컄

36 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

JOSHUA MONAGHAN; PIXELATE IMAGING; DEBORAH HUSK

You cannot go wrong with a striped fabric and Robert Kime’s ‘Tynemouth Ticking’ linen in blue looks particularly smart on this ‘Medium Standard’ armchair from George Smith. The chair measures 85 x 81.5 x 101.5cm and costs £3,730 including the fabric. 020-7384 1004; georgesmith.com


A PALETTE OF 180 COLOURS FREE COLOUR CARD | PAINT TO ORDER Nationwide Stockists | paintandpaperlibrary.com +44 (0) 161 230 0882 | info@paintandpaperlibrary.com London Showroom | 3, Elystan St, Chelsea, London SW3 3NT | +44 (0) 020 7823 7755


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Shopping trip

Chef Brett Graham

If you are heading to New York, pop into the new Bottega Veneta Maison at 740 Madison Avenue. The Italian company’s largest store in the world, it is set over ive floors, carrying all home and furniture collections alongside ready-to-wear and leather accessories. This table lamp is crated from Murano glass with a vintage leather wire cover. It measures 61 x 40cm and costs $6,000. bottegaveneta.com

DESK DECORATION Stationery specialist Smythson is launching a new ‘Bond’ collection inspired by previously unseen archive pieces. These leather ‘Animal Pen Pots’, in nile blue and palm green, will brighten up your desk. They cost £195 each. 0808164 1801; smythson.com

NATURAL BEAUTY The colours of these plain linens from the new ‘Loom’ collection at Mark Alexander take their cue from the natural world. The fine linen weave, made from a specially created crimped yarn, is gently washed for a beautifully relaxed fabric. Each of the 20 colours (this sofa is in indigo, with cushions in peacock and atlantic) costs £145 a metre. 01623-756699; markalexander.com

Cookery masterclass with Brett Graham of The Ledbury

Kitchen event

oin House & Garden and Martin Moore for a cookery masterclass with Brett Graham, chef and patron at The Ledbury restaurant in Notting Hill – consistently listed as one of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. Brett will be at the Martin Moore kitchen showroom in Westbourne Grove, W11, close to the restaurant, on Tuesday, May 15, 10.30am–1.30pm. Since starting work in a fish restaurant in his native Australia at the age of 15, he has risen to the upper echelons of London’s dining scene and is one of the only UK-based chefs to boast three Michelin stars (for The Ledbury and The Harwood). This is a rare opportunity to see Brett cooking outside his own restaurants. He will be preparing a selection of dishes in his signature style – a combination of classic French with Japanese and British influences. Martin Moore’s design director Richard Moore will start the day with a short conversation on the art of bespoke kitchen design, followed by a cookery masterclass with Brett.

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Tickets cost £30 each, including morning cofee and pastries, lunch with wine, and a git bag. To book visit theledburymasterclass.eventbrite.co.uk 컄 38 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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In London, Sphere8 creates seamless poured resin floors, which can be combined with hand-applied rock resin wall finishes, to help you transform your space. sphere8.com


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From classic to contemporary, four distinct yet complementary events, featuring a wealth of expertise and shopping from interior, lifestyle and garden brands alongside leading art antique dealers


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art scene Edited by EMILY TOBIN

THE UNTOLD S T O RY Exploring the history behind works of art

EDWARD BAWDEN WORKING IN HIS STUDIO, 1930, BY ERIC RAVILIOUS

ric Ravilious was the son of a shopkeeper and, by all accounts, a resolutely jolly person. Douglas Percy Bliss, a peer from his art school days, recalled, ‘Even when [Eric] fell in love – and that was frequently – he was never submerged by disappointment. Cheerfulness kept creeping in.’ Edward Bawden was the son of an ironmonger; in contrast to Eric he was a solitary child and a shy adult, albeit one with an irrepressible sense of humour. Despite their differences, when the pair met at the Royal College of Art, they became friends and remained so until Ravilious’s plane disappeared off Iceland in 1942. He was not yet 40. In 1928, Ravilious and Bawden were commissioned, at the rate of £1 a day, to create murals for the Refectory and Prince of Wales Hall at Morley College in south London. This was a sustained collaboration, which they worked on for 16 months while also living together at 52 Redcliffe Road, SW10. Sadly, the murals were destroyed in 1940, when a bomb hit the college. In 1930, Ravilious created this painting of Bawden in his studio in Redcliffe Road. He painted it several months after he had left the address and the murals had been finished, yet it captures poignantly the intimacy of their friendship and life in London.

© ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART

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Bawden’s heel hovers above his slipper, the cat cleans itself, cartoons for the murals are rolled in the corner, a guardsman’s jacket is discarded on the floor – an image of artistic irreverence. In 1931, Bawden and Ravilious teamed up to lease Brick House in Great Bardfield. They spent two-and-a-half years in Essex. Biographer Andy Friend has described it as ‘a period of comradely competitiveness and unselfconscious bohemianism that had yielded a rich artistic haul’. Bawden was devastated by the untimely death of his friend. He wrote to Ravilious’s wife, the artist Tirzah Garwood: ‘No one I know or have known seems to possess what he had, an almost flawless taste, that and our long friendship which commenced on the first day each of us entered South Kensington produced I think, by habit and intimacy, an understanding of each other that went deeper than with anyone else… But my dear Tirzah it is so much more than all that – I simply can’t tell you, or anyone else, or even myself what it is, or how much it is I miss by losing Eric – I find myself in tears at this moment.’ Ravilious left everything he owned to Tirzah. Except this painting, which went to Bawden. ET The painting features in ‘Ravilious & Co: The Pattern of Friendship. English Artist Designers 1922–1942’ at Compton Verney, Warwickshire, until June 10; comptonverney.org.uk 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 45


John Thomson, Ruilin, Governor of Guangdong and Guangxi, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 1869–71

INSIDER | ART

EXHIBITIONS

THROUGH THE LENS OF JOHN THOMS ON: CHINA AND SIAM A nineteenth-century photographer’s reflections on Asia John Thomson was a Scottish photographer and writer who set off for Asia in 1862. He spent 10 years photographing Siam (now Thailand), Cambodia and various provinces of China. This exhibition at the Brunei Gallery, at SOAS University of London, unveils newly discovered negatives held at the Wellcome Library in London. April 13–June 23; johnthomsonexhibition.org 46 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


ANTHONY HOBBS/COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MARLBOROUGH FINE ART; © SUCCESSION PICASSO/DACS 2017/© TATE; ALBERT HARLINGUE/© MUSÉE RODIN; CHRISTIAN HOYER THE WELLCOME LIBRARY, LONDON

INSIDER | ART

SCHOOL PRINTS In 1946, a letter was sent to a number of artists asking them to produce a series of lithographs for use in schools, as a means of giving pupils an understanding of contemporary art. Some 72 years later, the Hepworth Wakefield has reinvented the concept and asked six British artists, including Martin Creed and Rose Wylie, to create limited-edition prints that will be given to six local schools. As with the original prints, these will be on sale to the public, with profits going into the Hepworth’s education programme. The latest commissions are on display alongside the original prints at Hepworth Wakefield. Until June 3; hepworthwakefield.org Pictured Pablo Picasso, Composition, 1948

RODIN AND THE ART OF ANCIENT GREECE Sculptures by Auguste Rodin will be displayed at the British Museum along with the Parthenon sculptures that inspired him. The exhibition will explore his relationship with ancient Greece, revealing how he regularly travelled to London to sketch antiquities. April 26–July 29; britishmuseum.org Pictured Rodin in his Museum of Antiquities at Meudon on the outskirts of Paris, 1910

BUYING ART Three limited-edition prints to consider adding to your collection

[1 ] FRANCO GENTILINI 1957, art print on cotton, edition of 400, 80 x 83cm, £770, from Helle Thygesen Art & Antiques. hellethygesen.com

[2] EDDY VAREKAMP Swimmers, stencil print, 76 x 56cm, €75, from Eddy Varekamp. eddyvarekamp.nl

[3] ANDRÉ BICÂT HUGHIE O’DONOGHUE : SCORCHED EARTH This month, Marlborough Fine Art will exhibit works by Hughie O’Donoghue, known for his rich colours. The show is inspired by Van Gogh’s years in France. Until April 14; marlboroughlondon.com Pictured Hughie O’Donoghue’s County Mayo studio

Bathers, linocut, artist’s proof, 47 x 57cm, £650, from Jenna Burlingham Fine Art. jennaburlingham.com 컄

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INSIDER | ART

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT Poppies, 1926. Cedric Morris, c.1930. Connemara Landscape, 1936. Cotyledon and Eggs, 1944. May Flowering Irises No 2, 1935. All oil on canvas, by Cedric Morris

a brief history of

he reputation of the artist Cedric Morris has been through ups and downs. In the Twenties and Thirties, he was an exotic creature in London with exhibitions at all the best galleries. He had lived in Paris, where he attended Académie Moderne with Fernand Léger. He was friends with Man Ray, Juan Gris and Constantin Brancusi, and was godfather to Peggy Guggenheim’s son, Sindbad. Twenty years later, his work had fallen out of fashion, but today, Morris is finding favour with a new generation, with his early flower paintings increasing four-fold in value in five years. He was an abstract painter, but also painted landscapes, flowers and birds with an acute sense of realism, presence and power. He was a member of the Seven and Five Society, the nurturing ground for all the big names in modern British art – Hepworth, Moore, Nicholson. In 1932, he resigned, feeling his kind of painting was not in step with the Society’s direction; he moved out of London to create a garden, becoming better known for his plant breeding. He lived in the Essex village of Dedham with his partner Arthur Lett-Haines, one of the first English surrealist painters. The pair made a different kind of contribution to British art when they opened the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing. Unusually for the time, the school did not give formal

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instruction, just encouragement and the occasional comment. Students were required to have a clear idea of their painting style and a willingness to work hard at it. ‘We propose to work on this assumption and not on the current idea that the student is the depository for the theories of the master,’ the prospectus stated. One of their first pupils was the young and wayward Lucian Freud, who had been expelled from two schools. He described the EASPD as ‘a place where people were working and that there was a very strong atmosphere’. It was where he gained what he called a feeling of ‘sureness’. In the early Sixties, Maggi Hambling knocked on the door and got a job in the kitchen so she could paint there. Elizabeth David was a guest and swapped recipes with Lett-Haines, an exceptional cook who did all the catering. This year, for the first time in 35 years, not one but three exhibitions will present reassessments of Morris’s varied subject matter: landscapes at Philip Mould & Company, SW15 (Cedric Morris: Beyond the Garden Wall, April 18–July 22); f lowers at the Garden Museum, SE17 (Cedric Morris: Artist Plantsman, April 18–July 22); and portraits and drawings at Gainsborough’s House, Sudbury (Cedric Morris, until June 17) 첸 philipmould.com | gardenmuseum.org.uk | gainsborough.org. Hugh St Clair’s biography, ‘The Life of Cedric Morris & Arthur Lett-Haines’ (Pimpernel Press, £20), will be published this autumn

COURTESY THE CEDRIC MORRIS ESTATE; © NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, LONDON 5407; © PHILIP MOULD & COMPANY; © COLCHESTER ART SOCIETY

CEDRIC MORRIS Hugh St Clair profiles the British artist and plantsman, who is the subject of three new exhibitions


INSIDER | BOOKS

WOR D S A N D P IC T U R E S What to read: the latest books reviewed by ELIZABETH METCALFE

M ay r e a d i n g l i s t ART, PASSION & POWER: THE STORY OF THE ROYAL COLLECTION by Michael Hall (BBC Books, £30)

Even if it did not have a foreword by HRH The Prince of Wales, this would still be a noteworthy book. It is the first to tell the story of one of the world’s greatest collections of fine and decorative art. Rather than just summarising what is in the Royal Collection – there are over a million works, including masterpieces by Van Dyck and Rembrandt – art historian Michael Hall explores what motivated individual monarchs when it came to acquiring and commissioning art, from the Middle Ages to the present day. This is a book that will delight historians and art enthusiasts alike. GARDENING NOTES FROM A LATE BLOOMER by Clare Hastings (Pimpernel Press, £12.99)

by H Walter Lack (Taschen, £50)

icknamed the ‘Raphael of f lowers’, Pierre-Joseph Redouté was one of the most acclaimed botanical artists of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Born in Belgium in 1759, he moved to Paris at the age of 23 and began drawing and painting the plants in the city’s gardens and nurseries. His subjects ranged from rare species to more common lilies and roses – flowers that he chose for their obvious decorative appeal, to ensure his works would sell. In turn he attracted a number of high-profile patrons, including Marie Antoinette and Napoleon Bonaparte’s first wife Joséphine.

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This spectacular tome brings together over 1,000 of Redouté’s prints, including those from his books on roses and other beautiful flowers (Les Roses, 1817–1821 and Choix des Plus Belles Fleurs, 1827), and a selection from his earlier book on lilies (Les Liliacées, 1802–15). The prints, reproduced at full-page size, are astonishing in their freshness, and it is hard to believe that some were painted over 200 years ago. The introduction, by the botanical historian Hans Walter Lack, explains the context within which Redouté was working, as do the additional illustrations of greenhouses. A visual feast, this book is a must for art lovers and horticulturalists.

STUDIO KO by Tom Delavan and Julien Guieu (Rizzoli, £55)

Architects Olivier Marty and Karl Fournier, the hip duo behind the Paris-based firm Studio KO, have made quite a name for themselves over the past 18 years. Their sleek creations – from houses in France and Morocco to the new Musée Yves Saint Laurent in Marrakech – are the subject of this new monograph. Eight of their buildings are illustrated using large-format photographs by Dan Glasser. The duo, as writer Tom Delavan points out in the introduction, avoid a signature look, but their buildings are united by their simplicity and use of natural materials, which form a nice link with the surrounding landscape 첸

PIXELATE IMAGING

PIERRE-JOSEPH REDOUTÉ: THE BOOK OF FLOWERS

In her 1990 book Gardening Letters to my Daughter, the writer Anne Scott-James imparted some greenfingered advice to her daughter Clare Hastings. Nearly 30 years later, in this new book, Clare shares her own thoughts on gardening with her daughter Calypso. Focusing on her ‘higgledy-piggledy cottage garden’ in Berkshire, Clare covers various topics, from pruning and weeding to her favourite scented flowers. It is an amusing read – she admits to getting ‘too emotionally involved with severed branches’ – but there is also plenty of practical advice. Comical illustrations by Clare’s stepfather, the late cartoonist Osbert Lancaster, add to the book’s charm.


LON DON 020 7091 9781 westburygardenrooms.com Call to visit our showrooms: 61 Lambeth Walk, 46-52 Cutlers Road, London, SE11 6DX South Woodham Ferrers, Essex, CM3 5XJ


Edited by ARTA GHANBARI

SUMMER LIVING

PAUL MASSEY

Make the most of the season with our definitive guide


LIVING LIFE OUTSIDE Broadwalk Seat Timeless Design Handcrafted in Oak

+44 (0)1420 588444 info@gazeburvill.com www.gazeburvill.com

Garden Designed by Randle Siddeley Ltd Photo Credit: Randle Siddeley Ltd


SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

PIXELATE; GRAEME HENDRY; JOSELE CASTELLON PASCUAL

Metal ‘Indu’ bench (raspberry pink), 85 x 124 x 57cm, £175, from Habitat. ‘Lopi’ (blush, lime) fabric, acrylic, £124 a metre, from Sunbrella. Aluminium ‘Tangier’ dining table (shenandoah grey green), 76 x 110cm diameter, £9,020, from McKinnon and Harris. Melamine ‘Decomel Tuscany’ plate (taupe), €12.50, from Baci Milano. Polypropylene ‘Garden Layers’ cushions and mats (almond/ peach, almond/ivory), by Patricia Urquiola, from €250 for a cushion, from Gandia Blasco 컄

Inspiration RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME creates three looks for stylish outdoor schemes

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 55


SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

PIXELATE

Concrete ‘Tobi-Ishi’ table (anthracite), by Barber Osgerby, 72.5 x 162cm diameter, £5,580, from B&B Italia. Woven PVC ‘Sweet 91’ light, by Paola Navone, 29 x 26cm diameter, £430.80, from Gervasoni. Melamine ‘Rule’ tableware, from £4.80 for a salad plate, from Nina Campbell. Balau wood and synthetic rattan ‘Basket’ chair, by Nanna & Jørgen Ditzel, 76 x 85 x 79cm, €1,845, from Kettal. ‘Breton’ (pebble, navy) fabric, polypropylene, £84 a metre, from No 9 Thompson 컄

56 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


L UXU RY O U T D OOR L I V I NG from

L E I S UR EPLA N.CO.UK


SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

PIXELATE; CHARLES EDWARDS; ADAM CARTER

‘Tacana’ (mother of pearl), acrylic/polyester fabric, by Pollack, £214 a metre, from Altield. Glass and brass ‘Genghis’ lantern (verdigris), 73 x 44.5 x 44.5cm, £2,322, from Charles Edwards. Cotton ‘Cypress Tree’ parasol, 185cm diameter, £225, from Raj Tent Club. Rattan and wicker ‘Fleur’ chair, by Robert Wengler, 97 x 55 x 42cm, €399, from Sika Design. Linen ‘Lotus’ table mats (green, blue), 32cm diameter, £13.50 each, from Birdie Fortescue. Acacia and stone composite ‘Hudson’ dining table, from 75 x 190 x 95cm, from £1,540, from Neptune 첸

58 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE THE DIFFERENCE


TA B L E TA L K

Inspired by the Mediterrean way of life, OKA’s summer collection features all the essentials to create a relaxed and elegant al fresco dining scheme

When it comes to al fresco dining, do as the Mediterraneans do and blur the line between interior and exterior, borrowing the best from both to create a sophisticated scheme. With its sculptural pedestal base reminiscent of a Corinthian capital, the ‘Acanthus’ dining table (above) takes centre stage, and is perfectly paired with ‘Greenwich’ outdoor armchairs with their filigree wrought-iron work. Add cushions for deep comfort and a pop of colour. Cast your guests in a flattering glow with botanical candleholders in varying heights and create a sense of grandeur with a chandelier. Don’t be afraid to mix and match the tableware: the patterned ‘Aragonez’ plates designed by Penny Morrison look wonderful here with the new fig-leaf shaped side plates.


PROMOTION

‘Not only do our vibrant ‘Aragonez’ plates look exquisite on your dining table, but they’re also made from hardwearing melamine, making them perfect for picnics or dining al fresco.’ Sue Jones, OKA founder

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*TERMS AND CONDITIONS: RETRIEVE YOUR UNIQUE CODE AT OKA.COM/HOUSEGARDEN18. SINGLE USE ONLY. REDEEMABLE ON FULL PRICE PIECES AND EXCLUDES LIMITED EDITION, GIFT CARDS AND DELIVERY. EXCLUSIONS APPLY. CANNOT BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH ANY OTHER OFFER/DISCOUNT. NO CASH ALTERNATIVE. EXPIRES 17.05.18. FOR FULL TERMS AND CONDITIONS, VISIT OKA.COM/TERMS.

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GET THE LO OK FROM OKA 1 ‘Marmont’ urn, £425. 2 ‘Curlicue’ chandelier, £785. 3 ‘Aragonez’ dinner plate, £78 for set of four, and side plate, £69 for set of four. 4 ‘Fig Leaf’ side plate, £28 for set of four. 5 ‘Greenwich’ armchair, £475. 6 Tapered LED candles, £18 a pair. 7 ‘Tropical’ candleholder, from £28 for small size. 8 Cushion pads, from £14, and cushion covers, ‘Plain Velvet’ (alchemilla), £54, ‘Mesmer’, £38. 9 ‘Ranelagh’ glassware, Champagne flute, £42 for set of four, large wine goblet, £48 for set of four, small wine goblet, £42 for set of four. 10 ‘Round Acanthus’ dining table, £2,625. Opposite: ‘Ignis’ rug, £795 첸

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Exclusive Reader Offer

15% OFF* YOUR FIRST ORDER Find your unique code at oka.com/housegarden18 Redeem at stores nationwide | oka.com | 03330-042042 Valid until May 17, 2018


SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

As the summer months draw closer, ELIZABETH METCALFE considers the joys of outdoor living, and suggests ideas for smart seating areas, conservatories and poolside accessories

MONTSE GARRIGA GRAU

Great outdoors

A wisteria festooned pergola provides shade for this charming dining area in Andalucia, with its green wrought-iron chairs and round table. Dress your table as you would indoors with layers of linens, glassware and ornate candlesticks to create interest. Oka has a beautiful range of tableware, including its ‘Daun’ tablecloth (£178), ‘Capital Storm Lantern’ (£145) and ‘Twisted’ wine glasses (£26 for four). oka.com

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 63


THE HEVENINGHAM COLLECTION

GIVING YOUR HOME THE GARDEN IT DESERVES

www.heveningham.co.uk sales@heveningham.co.uk +44 (0) 1424 838483


SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

GARDEN FURNITURE To really get the most out of your garden, it’s worth investing in a few good pieces of outdoor furniture, and carefully thinking about where to put them. Split your garden into distinct areas or ‘rooms’ using plants, different levels, steps and various surfaces. Added insight: Planting ‘I like to use a mix of climbers, shrubs, trees, annuals and herbs around seating areas. Try planting jasmine, passion flowers, lilies and fig trees for a nice layered scheme. Look to use plants with differing flowering times to extend the season and ensure interest throughout spring, summer and early autumn. I love to use herbs as they provide a fabulous and varying scent, and many, such as lavender, mint, basil and lemon balm, are wonderful insect deterrents. Pots and planters are a very useful addition to a seated area, as they can be moved around easily.’ Alasdair Cameron, managing director of Cameron Landscapes and Gardens

MARCUS HARPUR

TA K E A S E AT

FROM LEFT OKA ‘Bridgehampton Armless Chair’ (cloudy white), 87 x 57 x 85cm, £785. THE HEVENINGHAM COLLECTION ‘Deck’ chair, £1,095. heveningham.co.uk GAZE BURVILL ‘Splash’ armchair with cushion, 80 x 116 x 81cm, £5,295. gazeburvill.com MCKINNON & HARRIS ‘duVal Club Chair’, 97 x 92 x 77cm, £4,120. mckinnonharris.com LEISURE PLAN ‘SwingMe Lounge Chair’, by Dedon, 71 x 89 x 81cm, £2,508 excluding cushions. leisureplan.co.uk

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 65


SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

POOL AREA AC C E S S O R I E S

To give a swimming pool a bit of soul and prevent it from looking like a turquoise blot, border it with smart stone tiles or decking and furnish the area around it with loungers, pretty fabrics and other stylish accessories. 66 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

CHRIS TERRY

FROM TOP MANDARIN STONE ‘Dijon Tumbled Limestone’, £41.85 a square metre. mandarinstone.com DEDON ‘Hexagon’ parasol, 267 x 287cm, £2,394. dedon.de NEPTUNE ‘Hudson’ side table, 50 x 50cm square, £500. neptune.com INDIAN OCEAN ‘Basquette’ (sole), £130, from Indian Ocean. indian-ocean.co.uk SUMMIT FURNITURE ‘BR607’, 33 x 203 x 74cm, £4,816. summitfurniture.com


Natural Stone, Porcelain & Decorative Tiles

H OT O F F T H E P R E S S

NEW Collections

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2018

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SUMMER LIVING SPECIAL

GARDEN ROOMS

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1 Take advantage of the south-facing side of your house by adding a conservatory or orangery. This elegant example by Vale Garden Houses features reeded columns and simple capitals, and ties in beautifully with the Georgian house. It has a traditional lead roof, which is topped with a decorative lantern. valegardenhouses.co.uk 2 A garden room is a great way to create an all-weather sanctuary. This freestanding orangery by David Salisbury provides a charming escape from the house. Built from locally sourced stone and Siberian larch, it blends in well with the landscape and surrounding walls, and is softened by the lush borders around it. davidsalisbury.com

3 Haddonstone’s classical ‘Pavilion’ is ideal if you want to add a small folly to your garden without having to design it from scratch. With its smart Tuscan-style columns, it’s the perfect spot to read a book or have drinks with friends. The ‘Pavilion’ is available in Portland or Bath stone or terracotta, and costs from £7,686. haddonstone.com 4 This sophisticated pool house by Westbury Garden Rooms blurs the boundaries between inside and out, thanks to three sets of bi-folding doors and the large roof lights. There is also ample space for seating inside the pool house, meaning that it can also just be used as a space to relax. westburygardenrooms.com 첸


We believe in a diferent perspective.

We see an oak bench. They see a rope bridge. The Arundel dining table and bench. Made from nothing but North American oak. Designed to last a lifetime. neptune.com/adifferentperspective


Les Jardins d’Étretat overhang the famous Amont Cliff, which still attracts painters from all over the world. It was on the very terraces of Les Jardins d’Étretat that Claude Monet painted his Cliffs at Etretat series, regarded among the greatest works of art ever produced


PROMOTION

POETRY IN PLANTS Inspired by the history and works of Claude Monet, Les Jardins d’Etretat in Normandy is an enchanting assemblage of planting, sculpture and dramatic coastline


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Cypripedium ‘Memoriam Shawna Austin’ from the re-created collection of orchids of Madame Thébault, the garden’s foundress. Topiaries of D’Amont Garden. Clockwork Forest by the art collective Greyworld in The Avatar Garden. Monet sculpture by Agnieszka Gradzik and Wiktor Szostalo in The Impressions Garden. Until the Word is Gone series of terracotta sculptures by Sergei Katran in The Zen Garden. Topiaries of La Manche Garden. Landscape architect Alexander Grivko. Drop of Rain by Samuel Salcedo in The Emotions Garden. OPPOSITE FROM TOP La Manche Garden’s hedge mazes are shaped like waves, crashing against the cliffs. Roxelana villa, named after the role that had catapulted Madame Thébault into stardom


PROMOTION

eyond turreted chateaus, sweeping D-Day beaches and Monet’s much-loved lily pond, Normandy is home to one of the most intriguing gardens in Europe. The creation of the landscape architect Alexander Grivko, Les Jardins d’Étretat is a unique collection of botanicals and art installations from contemporary artists, all skilfully integrated into a hillside cascading down to the sea. Originally founded in 1903 by the French actress Madame Thébault, the gardens are an enchanting Alice-in-Wonderland-style escape just two hours from Paris by train, and has been open to the public since 2016. Filled with a poetic arrangement of planting that grows and blossoms year round, Les Jardins d’Étretat is a must-see for those on the trail of Monet, who lived in Étretat and spent his childhood in Le Havre just a 30-minute drive away. Integreated within the gardens is an array of head-turning sculptures that surprise and capture the eye, and just when you think you’ve seen it all, a magnificent coastal panorama unfolds with the towering chalk-white cliffs of Porte d’Aval on full display, the very cliff Monet often painted in his later years. According to Mark Dumas of the garden design and landscaping company Il Nature, which carried out the construction, Alexander believes that the landscape surrounding a person is an extension of one’s inner self. The garden was inspired by neo-futuristic ideas and the seacoast of Normandy, its cragged outlines and the movement of waves crashing against the shores. This explains the unique sense of timelessness, serenity and transience that the garden evokes in visitors. There’s also a great deal of history to absorb. For example, at the foot of the garden lies a former oyster park founded by Marie Antoinette. From here, her favourite fresh oysters were harvested and delivered straight to her dining-room table. The ‘Power Garden’ located closest to the cliff edge is another highlight. Inspired by the movement of the sea, Phillyrea angustifolia rises in waves and descends in spirals framed by delicate blue Agapanthus africanus. Elsewhere, Enkianthus japonicus imported from Japan has been sculpted into mollusk-like formations (a nod to the oyster farm), brought into focus by a collection of emotive sculptures by the Spanish artist Samuel Salcedo. For exhibitions and events, visit etretatgarden.fr. Les Jardins d’Étretat is located on Avenue Damilaville, 76790, Étretat, France 첸

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D E C O R AT I N G SWAT C H | R I TA N O T E S | P R O F I L E

Making light CHARLIE PORTER creates colourful lanterns with the latest patterned wallpapers PHOTOGRAPHS ANDERS GRAMER

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Missouri’ (vert), 52cm wide, £122.40 a metre, from Pierre Frey. ‘Mikado’ (aqua), by Le Manach, 68cm wide, £374.40 a 4.57-metre roll, from Pierre Frey; with ‘Calisto Key Tassels’ (spearmint), 14cm, £46 each, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Wicker’ (iris), by Neisha Crosland, 52cm wide, £84 a 10-metre roll, from Turnell & Gigon. ‘Zellige’ (olive and print room blue), by Martyn Lawrence Bullard, 52cm wide, £100 a 10-metre roll, from Cole & Son; with tassels (jade), by Jessica Light, 22cm, £9 each, from Bluebellgray. ‘Daisy’ (navy), by Galbraith & Paul, 91cm wide, £134 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène 컄

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 75


DECORATING | SWATCH

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Cathay’ (imperial yellow), by Madeaux by Richard Smith, 70cm wide, £236 a 10-metre roll, from Tissus d’Hélène; with tassels (heather), by Jessica Light, 22cm, £9 each, from Bluebellgray. ‘Aviary’ (midnight), by Madeaux by Richard Smith, 70cm wide, £260 a 10-metre roll, from Tissus d’Hélène; with ‘Calisto Key Tassel’ (spearmint), 14cm, £46, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Pil’ (dark green), 52cm wide, £76 a 10-metre roll, from Sandberg Wallpaper; with ‘Calisto Key Tassel’ (azalea), 14cm, £46, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Cocteau’ (gold mole), by Neisha Crosland, 52cm wide, £84 a 10-metre roll, from Turnell & Gigon. ‘Conway’ (poison), by Zoffany, 68.6cm wide, £80 a 10-metre roll, from Style Library. ‘Oblique Mini’ (vine black), by Zoffany, 68.6cm wide, £74 a 10-metre roll, from Style Library 컄

76 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


Ceiling, walls & skirting: Aquamarine™ Colour Scales, Floor: Pleat™. All colours from the ‘Colours of England’ colourcard.

Colours of England littlegreene.com

London Showroom | Colour Consultancy 3 New Cavendish Street, Marylebone W1G 8UX T: +44 20 7935 8844 Order your free colourcard, or find your nearest stockist at littlegreene.com


DECORATING | SWATCH

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Wicker’ (radish red), by Neisha Crosland, 52cm wide, £84 a 10-metre roll, from Turnell & Gigon; with ‘Calisto Key Tassel’ (azalea), 14cm, £46, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Lanka’ (cadmium), by John Robshaw, 68cm wide, £90 a metre, from Tissus d’Hélène; with ‘Calisto Key Tassel’ (crimson), 14cm, £46, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Simon’s Meadow’, 52cm wide, £76 a 10-metre roll, from Sandberg Wallpaper; with tassels (heather), by Jessica Light, 22cm, £9 each, from Bluebellgray. ‘Cubism’ (blue porcelain), by Tapet-Cafe, 52cm, £114 a 10-metre roll, from Tissus d’Hélène. ‘Silkbird’ (notte), 98cm wide, £415 a 6-metre roll, from Dedar; with ‘Calisto Key Tassel’ (ultramarine), 14cm, £46, from Samuel & Sons. Background throughout, pine ‘Baumann Screen’, 180 x 250cm, £1,200, from Puckhaber. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸

78 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


C O L L E C T I O N

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DECORATING | ADVICE

Rita Notes RITA KONIG explains the beauty of keeping sculleries and pantries separate from the kitchen PHOTOGRAPH CRAIG FORDHAM

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trange as it might sound, there is something very luxurious about pantries and sculleries. Obviously, they are especially luxurious if there is someone other than yourself using them, but these back-of-house rooms bring order that makes life more comfortable, and ultimately luxury is about comfort. The scullery and pantry are appearing more and more on architects’ plans, and they are very valuable, especially when the kitchen doubles as a dining room and living space. I am currently working on a farmhouse where this is the case, so all the washing-up is done in an adjacent scullery, relieving the kitchen of this heavy lifting and allowing it to remain attractive and calm. An added bonus is that it will have walls of cupboards for china and glass, which I find exciting. When you are at the beginning of a project and about to knock down walls to make a large, open-plan kitchen, consider keeping a small room separate for a scullery. It really is lovely to have a place to retreat to, and being able to see into an adjoining but separate room from the main kitchen can give a much greater sense of space than another five foot tagged onto the end. As for the design of the scullery, a wooden sink and draining board might be old-fashioned, but they are very practical – as wood is softer than stone, it is more forgiving when you are washing up china and glass. Add a couple of holes to a shelf by the sink to drain decanters, and consider built-in plate racks to display china, as in the ‘Longford’ pantry by Humphrey Munson (humphreymunson.co.uk). This design also has the clever option of rails on the front of the counter to run a small ladder along to get to high shelves and cupboards. Think of using sliding doors rather than hinged ones – they take up less room. If you are planning on having china cupboards, consider lining the shelves with baize to reduce breakages and think about the depths of the cupboards. You do not really want the upper ones deeper than a dinner plate, but make sure the lower ones are big enough to hold a large serving dish. Order is not the only thing that these rooms bring – they can be fun, too. The butler’s pantry has been gathering pace in the States for a while. I am sure they have been made fashionable by Steven Gambrel (srgambrel.com), whose chic take on the room leaves one swooning – you just know you will have a good time there. While these rooms used to be all pitch pine and linoleum, they are now made in oak with wonderfully dark and glossy paint colours, and are like a bar that doubles as a place to wash up and keep the glasses. I am installing a butler’s pantry by Plain English (plainenglishdesign.co.uk) in a client’s house at the

moment. This will no doubt be used practically during big weekends by staff, but in its everyday life I imagine it much more as a man’s playroom (no gender stereotyping here!). It is where drinks are mixed, the wine kept, decanters stored and ice machines housed – it is such fun having a room dedicated to this stuff. New Orleans native Suzanne Rheinstein, an interior designer (suzannerheinstein.com), has one of the most covetable butler’s pantries at her house in Hancock Park, Los Angeles. It is a long room lined on either side with china cupboards and a counter made up of a chic piece of marble with a pair of lamps on it, an ample drinks tray in between and refrigerated drawers underneath. What is lovely is how she has combined the lamps and tray, which are more ‘front of house’, with the utility of the rest of the room. And just to finish it all off, it has a fabulous door upholstered in red leather with brass nail heads and a porthole window – Suzanne’s Southern take on a green baize door 첸

These back-of-house rooms bring order that makes life comfortable, and luxury is about comfort

Rita at the Plain English showroom in Marylebone

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 81


DON’T MISS

SPECIAL OCCASIONS TRAVEL

TURQUOISE HOLIDAY COMPANY

IN THE NEXT ISSUE


DECORATING | PROFILE DESIGNER

Julia von Werz She says ‘My approach is to create a minimalistic, seamless backdrop against which vintage pieces and eccentric details really stand out.’ They say ‘Julia is an architect with a laid-back style, a terrific sense of colour and an eye for furniture design’ – interiors agent Miles de Lange. House Garden says ‘Personality goes a long way, and Julia is one of the most charming designers we’ve come across recently.’

FIONA MCCARTHY talks to the German designer and architect about her approach to colour and furniture design, illustrated by the palette and pieces she has chosen for her own house in west London

TERRACE (both pictures) Julia is standing on the lowerlevel terrace at her house in west London, which acts as an extension of the open-plan sitting and dining area on the lower-ground floor. The distinctive Moroccan tiles are ‘Zellige’ in emerald from Habibi Interiors. The fabric and cushions on the built-in outdoor sofa on the level above were sourced from Morocco. Another bold fabric, Livio de Simone’s yellow ‘Tria’ cotton from Miles de Lange, was used for the tablecloth. Inside, the dining area features a ‘Parrot’ oak table from Julia’s furniture range, with a selection of vintage chairs PHOTOGRAPHS MICHAEL SINCLAIR

orn in Munich but based in London, Julia von Werz is a bright, enthusiastic and considered architect with a great feel for material and colour. Having studied architecture in Vienna and Berlin, she went on to work at Eisenman Architects, Adjaye Associates and Koch + Partner, in New York, London, Munich and Hanoi. In 2005, she set up her own studio, and has worked on private houses as well as bars and hotels. Julia takes a holistic approach to design. ‘I look at the exterior and interior before figuring out how every detail will work together,’ she says. Julia debuted her own furniture range in 2016 at the London Design Festival, and it includes tables fashioned from large, salvaged slabs of wood and elegant sofas handmade by artisans in Germany. She has also designed a furniture collection for CB2, an offshoot of the US homeware giant Crate & Barrel. The pieces can be shipped to the UK and will be available in July. juliavonwerz.com 컄

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HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 83


DECORATING | PROFILE

ADDRE SS B OOK

VINTAGE FURNITURE Schlicht is a wonderful shop in Munich. I also like Lots Road Auctions. Vinterior’s online marketplace has less expensive pieces. schlicht-designmoebel. com | lotsroad.com | vinterior.co

RUGS Soufiane Zarib sells the best Berber rugs. He is based in the medina of Marrakech and has no website, so I order from pictures he sends me when I need something unique. Instagram: @soufiane.zarib

TILES Habibi Interiors’ handmade tiles have amazing jewel colours. I have used them everywhere in my house. habibi-interiors.com

PROJECT Julia lives in a four-storey terrace house in west London with her husband and two young children. Her aim was to open up the living spaces, while providing lots of hidden storage. The open-plan sitting and dining area on the lower-ground floor extends via sliding doors to an outdoor terrace beyond. The look is streamlined, with splashes of colour and artworks by Franz Hochmayr and Christoph Stepan. Julia has also created a lush tropical garden. ‘Nothing beats lying on the outdoor sofa and looking up at palm trees in the middle of London,’ she says. Her colour palette was inspired by the green marble fire surrounds in the sitting room – she has used similar shades throughout the house, including two paint colours from Farrow & Ball: ‘Calke Green’ for the kitchen units and ‘Card Room Green’ for the cabinets in her bedroom. The green Moroccan-style tiles on the terrace are from Habibi Interiors. ‘The colour scheme has brought the mood of the house together,’ says Julia. 84 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

FIRST FLOOR SITTING ROOM (top left) Julia designed the ‘Edgewood’ sofa in here, as well as the ‘Napier’ lacquered wood coffee table. The table’s wooden base is coated in bronze. KITCHEN (top right) The units are painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Calke Green’. SITTING AND DINING AREA (bottom left and right) Sahco’s ‘Avalon’ velvet covers a second ‘Edgewood’ sofa. Above Julia’s ‘Millbrook II’ walnut table is a drawing by Franz Hochmayr

IRONMONGERY Chloe Alberry’s handles can transform a simple cabinet into something special. chloealberry.com

FABRIC AND WALLPAPER Kit Miles’ eccentric designs are perfect for smaller spaces. kitmiles.co.uk 첸


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Interiors / Recipes Gardens / Travel

ONLINE THIS MONTH Visit houseandgarden.co.uk

RECIPE S FOR SPRING Leave wintry comfort food behind and try something new using fresh, seasonal ingredients, such as Trine Hahnemann’s pork tenderloin with rhubarb, onion and tarragon

OUR HOUSE ARCHIVE Browse by period, country, city, coast or countryside in our easily accessible archive that includes the homes of many celebrated interior designers and artists

WHAT TO DO IN YOUR GARDEN THIS MONTH (and every month for the rest of the year)

LONDON’S HOTTEST RESTAURANTS The capital is a melting pot of culinary talent – find out where to eat out right now

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Petersham Nurseries head of horticulture, Thomas Broom-Hughes, offers 10 gardening tips for the month – in the springtime, it is all about prepping for a new growing season


LIFESTYLE TEXT OLINDA ADEANE PHOTOGRAPHS HELEN CATHCART

Melissa at Sketch in Bloom, part of the annual Mayfair Flower Show

Floral code Inspired by the country garden of her childhood home, MELISSA RICHARDSON left the world of fashion to start JamJar Flowers, which creates characterful displays for clients all over London

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 87


LIFESTYLE | JAMJAR FLOWERS

THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Melissa at JamJar’s studio in Peacock Yard, south London. Director Amy Ireland in the studio. Freelance florist and regular ‘Jammer’ Flora Wallace (on left) with head florist Talena Rolfe. Pressed flowers ready for a JamJar Edit workshop (also bottom left)

88 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

elissa Richardson intends to write a book one day, but until she does, those who know her are the lucky audience for her stories. She has a witty turn of phrase and is an excellent raconteuse, but when describing Long House in Sussex, her childhood home, she becomes almost poetic. ‘I was raised in a beautiful place and my father was a wonderful gardener. Flowers crowded out of beds and onto paths. Clematis, honeysuckle and roses climbed up and tumbled over soft, rosy brick walls to reappear on the other side. And beyond the walls were deep woods, where as children we would pick wildflowers to bring back and put in jam jars on the kitchen table.’ Naturally, the teenage Melissa could not wait to get away from this bucolic idyll. But for many years, Long House remained a retreat where she could recharge her batteries from her busy London life. ‘It was eventually sold and then radically altered by its new owners, so it could only exist in my mind and memory. Jam jars full of flowers became the inspiration for my business, JamJar Flowers, which I started in 2009, after 27 years of running a model agency.’ Melissa married Charlie Alexander, an independent specialist tour guide, in 1986 and they have three grown-up children: Finn, Scarlett and Melissa’s stepson Joe. The family lives in a double-fronted Victorian villa in Brixton. ‘We found it when we were driving around one hot summer day in 1990 with a little boy and a tetchy baby. I shouted to Charlie, “Stop, that’s the house I want,” and he said, “Well, you can’t have it because it isn’t for sale.”’ Miraculously, several weeks later a For Sale sign appeared 컄

M


Melissa and Amy outside the shop front, with bottles and jars lined up in the windows


LIFESTYLE | JAMJAR FLOWERS

and they bought the house. ‘It seems to expand to fit in three children, two cats and a nanny, and then magically shrinks back down when there are just the two of us.’ The villa, which is called Chaucer House, is furnished with finds from Ardingly and other country antique fairs. The atmosphere is relaxed and an open-plan layout is perfect for the seamless overlap of Melissa’s social and working life. No doubt the garden owes its inspiration to Long House, being fragrant and romantic while offering, for a compact London garden, a surprising number of quiet nooks. Joe is now 36 and is a writer and filmmaker; Finn, 29, left his career in finance to partner Melissa in the running of JamJar Flowers; and Scarlett, 27, runs the Piccalilli Caff on Surrey Docks Farm, a charity farm in south London, and is a drummer in a band called Khartoum. ‘My father was a visionary,’ remembers Melissa. ‘He encouraged my sister, my brother and me to start our own businesses, and now his grandchildren have done the same. I started Take 2 Model Management with two friends in 1982 and we traded successfully until 2009, when I found the industry was changing in a way I no longer enjoyed. I just had this yen to arrange f lowers for people who like what I like: simple, beautiful and seasonal f lowers.’ Melissa’s original intention was to work only one day a week, but within two years JamJar had become a full-time job, as a go-to florist’s for London’s top restaurants and fashionable events. It had outgrown Melissa’s kitchen table, so a Dickensian shop and studio was found in Peacock Yard in south London, where her clever idea of scaffolding across the inside of the windows provides shelving for bottles and jars, which look iridescent when lit by natural light from the outside. Amy Ireland is Melissa and Finn’s fellow director at JamJar. The team also includes production assistant Ella Bandtock and head florist Talena Rolfe, as well as a f luctuating 컄 90 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A JamJar Edit test-tube-holder arrangement of garden flowers. Melissa and Finn at JamJar with flowers in a wooden cigar press. Flora preparing deliveries; the nineteenth-century pictures on the wall were given to Melissa by her father


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LIFESTYLE | JAMJAR FLOWERS

ANTICLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Melissa walking through Somerset House to Spring restaurant (bottom left), for which she provides the flowers. Stopping at Chelsea Physic Garden on her way home after work. Gardener Tilly Dallas working on maintaining the garden at Chiltern Firehouse

92 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

number of freelance florists known affectionately as ‘Jammers’. Courses in floristry and flower pressing take place in the upstairs studio. Pressed flowers are a theme for JamJar, which has taken on the challenge of producing bespoke wallpaper and is now contemplating fabric. Melissa and Amy recently started JamJar Edit, which sources, commissions or makes plant-related products. Melissa sources her flowers largely from nearby New Covent Garden Market and meets her prospective wedding and event clients at the studio, but much of her week is spent zooming around London between her various projects. One client is the chef Skye Gyngell, whose restaurant Spring is housed within Somerset House’s west wing. The classically proportioned room is majestic in scale, but the decoration is sleek and modern. Jane Scotter and Harry Astley of Fern Verrow, a biodynamic farm in Herefordshire, provide all the f lowers for Spring. ‘They produce blooms totally unlike the uniform ones that grow in polytunnels. Theirs have personality and action, which is what I like,’ says Melissa. At Chiltern Firehouse in Marylebone, there is a garden created by the US-based designer Miranda Brooks. ‘Miranda asked me to help with maintenance, which is not what we normally do,’ says Melissa. ‘But I asked my friend Annabel Dallas, a brilliant amateur gardener, to advise. We didn’t want the garden to look corporate.’ Today, Tilly Dallas, Annabel’s daughter and a professional gardener herself, works with JamJar to keep the garden looking beautiful. 컄


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condenastjohansens.com Rancho do Peixe, Ceará, Brazil


LIFESTYLE | JAMJAR FLOWERS

Sketch restaurant in Mayfair hosts many art and design projects. One of these is the annual Mayfair Flower Show, for which Sylvain Chevelu, the restaurant’s artistic director, invites florists to pitch an idea and then chooses five of the schemes to be created. Last year, Melissa was one of the chosen five. Having characteristically read up on the subject, the JamJar team recreated a seventeenth-century May Fair based on the annual markets that took place in early summer, when Mayfair was ‘a stinking suburb where people buried their noses in pomanders and danced around a Maypole’. For the Daylesford shop and cafés last summer, Melissa was commissioned to create a ‘hanging meadow’ of dried flowers: ‘The skill to this is in the timing, as flowers dry at different rates. I always test and experiment.’ Melissa’s shop window display at Brora on Symons Street won a silver medal last year in the Chelsea in Bloom flower show. It featured a huge jungle Jeep, in keeping with the ‘Floral Safari’ theme. She is now working on the shop’s entry this May. At the end of the day, it is a respite for Melissa to pop into Chelsea Physic Garden for a wander, before she heads back across the Thames and home. ‘The Physic Garden is a secret oasis of calm. It is a wonderful little “lung” in the middle of London. I believe in the healing powers of beauty as well as its soothing qualities’ 첸 JamJar Flowers: jamjarflowers.co.uk JamJar Edit: jamjaredit.co.uk

94 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

FROM TOP The garden at Melissa’s house in Brixton, furnished with tables, chairs and a daybed from various antique markets. Lunch from Piccalilli Caff, owned by Melissa’s daughter Scarlett, laid out in the kitchen. The front of the Victorian villa. A view from the hall to the music room, with art by Sarah Stitt, Claudia Legge and Jess Illsley


DON’T MISS OUR 30-PAGE GUIDE TO THE VERY BEST INTERIOR DESIGN TALENT IN BRITAIN TODAY IN THE JUNE ISSUE O N S A L E M AY 3

MICHAEL SINCLAIR

Wendy Nicholls, Roger Jones, Emma Burns and Philip Hooper of Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler


LIFESTYLE | COUPLES

TWO’S COMPANY

PHOTOGRAPHS HELEN CATHCART

DAVID NICHOLLS talks to three design company partnerships about the pleasures and pitfalls of working and living together

Oona Bannon and Russell Pinch D I R E C T O R S AT P I N C H | pinchdesign.com

O ONA ON RUSSELL

‘W

hen we got together, Russell was my boss at a branding agency that he had set up. After we got married, he said he wanted to go back to his first love: designing furniture. I thought, “Sounds great, let’s do it. Let’s design a company that works for our lives.” I continued doing the day job as a branding director, and then I’d come home and help Russell. Because we’d already worked together, I wasn’t worried about how we’d get along. I respected the way he worked and it felt natural. In our case, it’s made life easier. ‘When it comes to designing a new piece, we’ll discuss what we want. Say it’s a table. We’ll do lots of research, dig out references from art or fashion, and discuss shape and material. That’s my bit done for a while and Russell goes off to think and draw. And then comes this spiral of despair – it’s like a cathartic panic that he has to go through. “Why are we doing this table? Does the world need another table?” Meanwhile, I do a lot of nodding and passing of tissues. He has to divest himself of the panic and I know that sense will prevail. I have so much respect for him – I don’t know where his ideas come from. So I leave that magic to him, and then I’m involved again with finessing the piece. ‘I’d say Russell knocks off my harder edges, and I think I make him less worried about things. We carry the can together. You’d think that 14 years in we would have a better work-life balance, but we’re entrepreneurs and that means not clocking off at 6pm. Of course, this comes with a personal cost, but I’m doing it with him. We’re managing to do it with the kids. They’re the people I want to be with, so it’s win-win for me.’

96 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

RUSSELL ON O ONA

I

felt as if, in branding, we had spent too much time working with large companies who saw their customers as consumers without any human element. We wanted to go back to basics and be the ones who initiated the creativity, rather than responding to someone else’s brief. I think one of the secrets of success for running the business together is that we knew each other as colleagues first. And although it sounds cheesy, we both have enormous respect for each other’s skills. Oona is influential in the design of our products. The only thing she doesn’t do is draw them, which is a bit more my métier. And it’s not all plain sailing. She challenges me: “It needs to be 2mm smaller, it’s not right.” The result is always a better product. Of course, there’s very little diplomacy compared to speaking to another colleague, but with that comes a shorthand in the creative process. ‘We often say that if we had to work as hard as we both do, but in separate companies, we would have split up. But I understand why she might need to stay up and work late, and she understands when I get into a panic over a blank page. Although we do have to divide and conquer sometimes, Oona and I are rarely two feet apart during the day. She sits right behind me and we finish each other’s sentences. I’m sure if a management consultant ever came in, they’d say we’re mad and that this was not an efficient way of working. But then, I don’t think we’d ever hire a management consultant.’ 컄


Oona and Russell in their showroom in Bourne Street, SW1


LIFESTYLE | COUPLES

Paolo Moschino and Philip Vergeylen D I R E C T O R S AT PAO L O M O S C H I N O FOR NICHOLAS HASLAM nicholashaslam.com

PAO L O O N P H I L I P

‘I

t would be nice to be able to switch off, to finish on Friday, leave the office and not think about work until Monday. But sometimes it’s impossible. The reason we do this job is because we like it, so often Philip and I will be talking about clients and the business at home. When he took his time off from his last job, he would come to visit the office. I thought he just wanted to waste a few hours, but he was really interested. In a way, he was always into design. His mother has a beautiful house and he has such a good eye. So for him it was quite natural to go from spending a few hours a day with us to spending 10 hours a day. And now I’m not an interior designer any more, instead taking care of the shops, accounts and HR, and I don’t miss it at all. The majority of our clients are overseas and that means a lot of travel – I’m a home person. ‘A friend asked me once, “Don’t you find it impossible, seeing him all day and night?” But although we work together, we are so concentrated on what we’re doing it feels like we don’t see each other the whole day. When I started my career with Nicky Haslam, it was from a classic design point of view. But Philip is adventurous, comes up with great ideas and gets so excited. I suppose I’m the one to tone him down. I like not being front-line on the projects, but I’m very much behind the line. It’s beginning to get difficult to take time off together. We feel one of us needs to be here. But it’s important to get away for inspiration otherwise you repeat yourself and become boring. We go to Tangier every July for a few weeks, but sometimes that doesn’t feel like an escape – everyone there is an interior designer.’

98 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Paolo and Philip at their shop in Holbein Place, SW1

P H I L I P O N PAO L O

I

walked into Paolo’s shop about 20 years ago and saw a bronze lamp I liked, but it was very expensive. I came back three times before deciding to buy it, but then it was too heavy for me to take home. Paolo offered to deliver it, and I took one look at him and thought, “All right.” He asked me to dinner and that was it. I was working for American Express as global head of marketing. Then, about nine years ago, they asked me to move to New York. I declined, then resigned after 12 months and took some time off, but within a few months I was bored. Then Paolo’s office had a job in Paris and nobody could speak French. I said, “I can! I’ll do it!” ‘Paolo loves his shops, and his heart has always been in product and trade – which I am clueless about. I’d be bankrupt in the morning if I had a shop. It became obvious he would focus on that and I would grow the interiordesign side of the business. We now have a team of 16. We work separately – if there are too many cooks in the kitchen, it tends to go wrong. But when I’m stuck, I’ll chat with Paolo, and when he launches fabrics, he asks me what I think. My tastes are a bit more out there than his. I find it hard to switch off and sometimes I’ll start talking about a project over dinner, whereas he prefers a clear division between work and home. He’s much more reserved – he’s the Sphinx! But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have opinions.’


Molly and Rollo Mahon F O U N D E R S O F M O L LY M A H O N mollymahon.com

R O L L O O N M O L LY

‘W

hen I met Molly, I had just thrown in the towel as a professional yachtsman after spending 10 years as a nomad, racing around the world. It was time to get out. I decided to retrain in sports therapy and started up my own business. Molly and I left London for the Sussex countryside about seven years ago. When she set up the Molly Mahon business, I was commuting into London for work and coming home at 10.30pm. I’d then sit at the kitchen table with her, cutting up fabric for her orders until one in the morning, and get up again at 5.30am to go to work. ‘Molly was diagnosed with cancer two years ago, so we made the decision that I would step in to help run things while she went through treatment. It’s a funny thing: I had been working in the wellbeing industry and I see that as a big part of what Molly Mahon is. It’s colourful and joyful; it makes people feel good. Our roles are very defined now: I run the paperwork, because that was where Molly was getting bogged down, and this allows her the freedom to design. Sometimes, I have to step in to say, “Molly, you have to slow down with the ideas. We have to do this first and then launch this, and then we can do that.” ‘I am the one man in a team with three women, which I think is a good thing. And although I do give my opinion on designs, I am quite careful. I always remember my father saying to me as a young man, “When you get married, don’t get involved in choosing the curtains.” Molly wears her heart on her sleeve and I’ve loved watching her grow in confidence. We’re both terribly humbled when anybody buys our products, but of course it means more to her. I’m a sensible man and I haven’t thought twice about the decision to forgo my career to join Molly Mahon. And I'm very lucky.’

Molly and Rollo at their East Sussex studio

M O L LY O N R O L L O

R

ollo and I had always talked about working together, but we hadn’t figured out what it would be. I suppose you could say that the cancer decided it. The business was beginning to flourish and we had just signed the contract on our studio, and suddenly we wondered if we should cancel it and rein the business in. But Rollo had already been helping me and knew the ins and outs of Molly Mahon, so while I went through treatment, he took the bull by the horns. The plan was that he would keep the business going, but in fact he improved it and grew it. I couldn’t have done all this myself, and having Rollo with me makes me feel like anything is possible. ‘We’re not working side by side every day, though. It allows me to get out and about, meet people and design on my own, while knowing everything is under control. Rollo and I are really good friends and having him involved creates this wholesome, family life/work balance that I think is rare. Of course, taking time off together can be difficult. There are only four of us in the business, so if Rollo and I are away, it’s a problem. One summer we came back from a holiday early because we received a big order. And there’s no off-duty. It’s impossible not to talk about work outside the studio, but we don’t want to not talk about it. We enjoy Molly Mahon. It’s a lifestyle choice’ 첸 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 99


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166

109 TAKE TEN A round-up of 10 news stories in each of four categories

119 TREND REPORT: NEW DIRECTIONS Juliet Kinsman examines a generation of hotels that is looking beyond beautiful design

127 DESIGN IDEAS Elizabeth Metcalfe presents 21 beautiful bathrooms, plus four moodboards to inspire

134 IF WALLS COULD TALK Bethan Hyatt explores the impact of wonderful, whimsical wallpapers in hotels

137 WOW Boundary-pushing architecture from around the world, compiled by Kate Crockett

145 ENGLISH ACCENT Gabby Deeming visits Beaverbrook, Surrey, to see Susie Atkinson’s romantic interiors

153 INSIDE TRACK: PORTUGAL Mary Lussiana recommends places to stay, eat and shop in Lisbon and the Alentejo region

157 COMPETITION Win an exclusive four-night stay on the Greek island of Mykonos, worth £3,000

158 BACK TO THE FUTURE Wild Coast Tented Lodge in Sri Lanka is pioneering a new take on the safari. By Charlotte Sinclair

166 TAKING THE STAGE In the heart of Copenhagen’s cultural district is the theatrical new Hotel Sanders. By Emily Tobin

122

ack in 2006, when Hotels by Design was launched by this magazine, we were testing the concept of a supplement dedicated to hotels as modern-day showcases for interior design. Little did we know quite what a global phenomenon hotel design would become or, for that matter, how inspiring hotels could be. Who would have thought that remote outposts such as the mountains of Rwanda, the wilderness of Chile, the frozen wastelands of northern Europe – to name but a few – could possibly boast hotels where design is so central to their ethos? In this edition, we visit Sri Lanka, Australia and Denmark, where three new hotels have made bold and beautiful statements. We flit through Portugal and linger near London. We look at bathrooms and wallpapers, and reveal four hotels that make us go wow! Armchair travel is all well and good, but never as wonderful as the real thing; hopefully with this edition of Hotels by Design, we will inspire you to pack your bags and see the world.

172 ALCHEMY IN ACTION Jackalope is bringing a dose of the avant-garde to Australia’s Mornington Peninsula. By Kendall Hill

180 WHO GOES WHERE Pamela Goodman asks design insiders to reveal the hotels they turn to time and again 106 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

PAMELA GOODMAN, TRAVEL EDITOR

COVER IMAGE: SHARYN CAIRNS. PHOTOGRAPH: ANDERS SCHØNNEMANN

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HOTELS BY DESIGN CONTENTS


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HOTELS BY DESIGN

W

H AT ’ S

N E W

TAKE TEN PAMELA GOODMAN GIVES A BIRD’S-EYE VIEW OF NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD, FOCUSING ON 10 HOTELS IN EACH OF FOUR CATEGORIES

- WILDERNESS New for the 2017/2018 winter season to Swedish Lapland was Arctic Retreat (above) – two traditional log cabins remastered with a contemporary twist to include panoramic windows and outdoor hot tubs, tucked away in a deep forest. Coming nearby for the 2018/2019 season is Arctic Bath, an extraordinarily ambitious wellness retreat built on floating (summer) or frozen (winter) platforms in the Lule River.

Round-up Ruaha National Park is Tanzania’s best-kept secret, home to a proliferation of game yet barely explored. Thus the arrival of Jabali Ridge (left), an eight-suite camp in a landscape of boulders and baobab trees, is good news for safari-goers. In Iceland, gorgeous Deplar Farm opens a middle-of-nowhere, two-man retreat, Ghost Farm, accessible in winter only by snowmobile and in summer by foot, bike or horse. On the other side of the world Skye Niseko, in Japan’s Hokkaido National Park, promises sleek, uber-chic design for winter skiers. To hotter climes where Shinta Mani Wild in Cambodia will be truly pioneering in spirit – its creator, Bill Bensley, pushing every design and adventure button possible. Guests will access the private sanctuary (comprising 16 custom-designed tents) via zip line. A little more conventional will be One&Only Gorilla’s Nest in Rwanda, a base for that once-in-alifetime gorilla experience (not forgetting One&Only Nyungwe House, also opening in Rwanda, for chimpanzee trekking). In Botswana, Wilderness Safaris brings us a completely rebuilt Mombo Camp on the northern tip of Chief ’s Island in the Moremi Game Reserve, and in Namibia comes Shipwreck Lodge on the impossibly remote Skeleton Coast. And finally, Six Senses Shaharut is planned in the barren wilds of Israel’s Negev desert. HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 109


HOTELS BY DESIGN

- BEACH To coincide with the new direct British Airways route between London and the Seychelles, Four Seasons opens its second property in the archipelago, this time on the smaller island outpost of Desroches (above), a 35-minute flight from Mahé. There’s a huge range of accommodation options from which to choose – all coming with private pools, beach access and vintage-style interiors – including a handful of three- to five-bedroom residences designed for families and larger parties. And there’s an anti-gravity yoga pavilion – well, why not? 110 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Round-up As the first major hotel project on Grand Anse Beach in Grenada for 25 years, Silversands departs from typical Caribbean style (ie brightly patterned fabrics and wicker furniture), embracing a minimalist, modern style. It also boasts a 100-metre pool (above) – the longest in the Caribbean. Adventurers and keen divers should head to the Andaman Islands, off India, where the Taj Exotica Spa & Resort opens 75 villas on the beach at Havelock Island. Also in the Andaman Sea is the Malaysian island of Langkawi, where long-time favourite The Datai reopens in July after a 10-month refurbishment. Keen surfers should head to Bali where Koichiro Ikebuchi and Paola Navone have been at the design helm of the newly opened Como Uma Canggu, on one of the best surfing breaks on the island’s south coast. In the Maldives, Kudadoo Private Island promises pure escapism – guests, should they choose, can rent the 7.4-acre island in its entirety. Off African shores of the Indian Ocean comes Zuri Zanzibar on the eponymous island, where the beach bungalows will reflect a modern interpretation of African style. Just north of Zanzibar on Pemba Island, Constance Hotels & Resorts has taken over the management of 30-villa, beachside Aiyana. In Europe, all-suite Seven Pines Resort has the perfect sunset position on a west-facing clifftop of Ibiza – it opens in May – while, in Paphos, Cypriot grande dame The Annabelle emerges from a two-year transformation.


HOTELS BY DESIGN

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Round-up First came Awasi Atacama in Chile, then Awasi Patagonia and now comes Awasi Iguazú (left) on the Argentinian side of the Iguazú Falls, where 14 villas on stilts are hidden in the rainforest. Rosewood’s new 23-room hotel in Luang Prabang, Laos, will have interiors – including spectacular tented villas – by Bill Bensley, who echoes the tented theme in Bali, where the 22-tent camp Capella opens in Ubud. This year sees the expansion of Teardrop Hotels in Sri Lanka, with Nine Skies in Ella, Goatfell in Nuwara Eliya and Pekoe House in Kandy. On European shores, Euphoria Retreat in Greece is a holistic destination spa opening in the Peloponnese, with 45 rooms and suites overlooking the Byzantine town of Mystras. For the ultimate romantic journey, Belmond’s Venice-Simplon-Orient-Express launches three new Grand Suites, with private bathrooms and double beds – a first for the legendary train. In the Loire Valley, few châteaux rival Chambord, in the grounds of which comes the refashioned Relais de Chambord. On the theme of stately pedigree, The Langley in Buckinghamshire will occupy the former country estate of the third Duke of Marlborough when it opens in the summer. And, ever-popular The Pig group will open The Pig at Bridge Place in Kent. 112 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

LUCIANO BACCHI

Bhutan, which has been hailed as one of 2018’s travel hotspots, welcomes the first three of five Six Senses lodges later this year. Pictured above is the lodge at Punakha, part of a circuit that additionally takes in Paro, Thimphu, Gangtey and Bumthang, allowing guests to travel from one lodge to the next through the majestic scenery of this remote Himalayan Kingdom.


HOTELS BY DESIGN

- URBAN Perhaps the most interesting hotel design story to come out of the UK this year is the launch of the University Arms in Cambridge, where classical architect John Simpson has led the work on the hotel’s restoration and designer Martin Brudnizki (who has also been busy at The Bloomsbury in London) has fashioned the interiors. There will be 192 rooms in total, overlooking either Parker’s Piece, Regent Street or an inner courtyard, while food will be focused on Parker’s Tavern, which promises quintessential English fare in a brasserie-style setting. 114 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Round-up On Holborn’s Southampton Row, L’oscar, a new 39-room hotel in the former headquarters of the Baptist Church, has been masterminded by French design maestro Jacques Garcia. Heading north to Finland, check out the art collection at the recently launched Hotel St George in a historic Helsinki building, parts of which were designed by renowned architect Onni Tarjanne, best known for creating the Finnish National Theatre. Munich icon Hotel Bayerischer Hof, privately owned by the same family for more than a century, has a newly refurbished six-storey wing (including a spectacular penthouse) with characteristically pared-back, elegant interiors curated by the celebrated Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt. Young designer brand The Hoxton, already in London, Paris and Amsterdam, makes its debut across the pond, first in Williamsburg, New York, and then in Portland, Oregon. Further south in California, the Beverly Hills Hotel unveils the redesign – by Alexandra Champalimaud – of three of its legendary bungalows. In Hong Kong, renowned architects Foster + Partners have adapted an iconic Sixties building into the new, 336-room Murray Hotel, where designer André Fu will deliver the interiors of Guo Fu Lou, a striking, contemporary Cantonese restaurant. André’s biggest hotel project for the year, however, is Bangkok’s new Waldorf Astoria, opening in the summer. Fully closed since December, the much-loved Raffles in Singapore reopens in 2018 after a mammoth restoration programme. Diehard fans will be pleased to know, however, that the hotel’s famous Long Bar will remain unchanged. In Shanghai, The Middle House is the latest of four in The House Collective from Swire hotels – this one with interiors by Piero Lissoni 첸


DETAILS IN DESIGN ALONGSIDE VIKING’S ENTICING JOURNEYS AROUND THE WORLD, ITS AWARD-WINNING SHIPS ARE A DRAW IN THEIR OWN RIGHT, FEATURING COMFORTABLE, DESIGN-LED INTERIORS INSPIRED BY ITS SCANDINAVIAN HERITAGE

iking’s award-winning fleet of ocean ships are the perfect example of stellar craftsmanship. While paying homage to the traditional look, Viking’s ocean ships’ nine decks offer a contemporary, yet refined twist on Nordic style. With a focus on light, space and clean lines, the luxe panelled wood and timber finishes are complemented by customary tonal blues. The furnishings alone are a sensory journey through Scandinavia. Experience Sweden via the staterooms’ mid-century rugs, the Danish influence in the curated Fifties artefacts including pieces by Ole Wanscher, Sergio Rodriguez and Frank Gehry, and saunter into Norway with macramé adorned windows and grand, mountain-inspired Lichen mosaics. Expand your mind in The Explorer’s Lounge, home to maritime maps, architecture models and a reading library, and treat

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your body and spirit in the state-of-the-art LivNordic Spa featuring a hydrotherapy pool and Snow Grotto. Once dried and dressed, take a stroll through The Wintergarden – covered with a retractable magradome roof – before being wined, dined and entertained into the night. Housing 465 exquisitely designed rooms and suites, Viking’s ocean ships are the dream home away from home for their exclusive 930 guests. Whether visiting Scandinavia and the Baltic, the Mediterranean, North America and the Caribbean, or the far east and Australasia, it’s everything you need in each destination 첸 Prices start from £1,790pp for an eight-day Iconic Western Mediterranean cruise departing in 2018, and from £2,490pp for an 11-day West Indies Explorer cruise in 2019. To book or for further information, visit vikingcruises.co.uk or call 0208 780 6533


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As well as being extremely stylish, a Viking ocean cruise is also great value for money, with so much included in the price: return scheduled flights from the UK; all staterooms and suites have a private veranda; an excursion is included in almost every port of call; all on board meals in a choice of dining venues; house wine, beer and soft drinks with lunch and dinner; free use of spa facilities; free 24-hour room service; and free Wi-Fi


HOTELS BY DESIGN A room in Hotel des Grands Boulevards, Paris, the decoration of which underlines its Revolutionera architectural heritage

TREND REPORT: NEW DIRECTIONS JULIET KINSMAN EXAMINES A NEW GENERATION OF CREATIVE, COLLABORATIVE HOTELS THAT ARE LOOKING BEYOND BEAUTIFUL DESIGN TO FOCUS ON AN AUTHENTIC, INCLUSIVE EXPERIENCE FOR GUESTS

- INCLUDING EBEN HOUSE, US Focusing on artwork with depth, meaning and thought

THE PILGRM, LONDON A coffee-shop lobby sets the laid-back, accessible tone

THE HOXTON, PARIS Social spaces with the feeling of a walk-in members’ club

THE BOWER, AUSTRALIA A mini-museum of pieces from the best local homeware companies

ARTIST RESIDENCE, UK Revealing the hidden features of its diverse listed buildings

MAMA SHELTER, PARIS A people-first approach, championing guests and staff over decoration

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 119


(CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE) Bikes outside the main reception of The Bower in Byron Bay. The entrance to one of the Bower Suites. A bedroom in the Bower Cottage, the largest of the accommodation options; a calm palette of whites and greys, linen textiles and a mix of locally sourced vintage and modern details decorate the cottage

here is an art to designing hotels charismatic enough to coax discerning travellers into bed. It does not involve bragging about fancy facilities or whispering sweet nothings about eye-wateringly pricey fixtures and fittings. The most seductive hotels have dropped the attitude, loosened their collars and gone back to basics. They are collaborating with their most creative local friends and inviting everyone back to the bar. When an address unplugs you from everyday life and tunes you into a new place and its community in a thought-provoking way, it gets interesting. Having spent two decades reviewing luxury hotels, I have loved watching inspiring interiors taken to new heights, but it is getting harder to distinguish between what is meaningful and what is ‘premium mediocre’ – those establishments where everything seems great on the surface, but there is no real story or soul. Built in 1776, and now reborn as an idiosyncratic 14-room inn, Eben House brings a new spirit to historic Provincetown in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Owners Kevin O’Shea and David Bowd were frustrated about visiting aesthetes being deprived of a true sense of place. ‘When we travelled, staying in hotels would feel like work,’ says Kevin. ‘We preferred B&Bs for the personal connection you have with the innkeeper. But we missed the amenities, design and comfort of hotels.’ They opened this, their second hotel of four, in 2015. Their weapon in battling the banal has been purposeful artwork, such as Michael Gredler’s witty Primitive Portraits of the eighteenth-century captain owner and his family. ‘Art shouldn’t be a wall-filler: each piece should have depth and meaning and thought behind it,’ says Kevin. Provenance is paramount to this new personality-rich breed

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JESSIE PRINCE

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HOTELS BY DESIGN

(ALL PICTURES) The Hoxton, Paris, is characterised by its inclusive social spaces, furnished with comfortable velvet-covered seating, and its open-plan, informal dining areas, which blur into bars and coffee shops. Clockwise from top left are Jacques’ Bar; the bar in the RiviÊ restaurant and brasserie (also bottom right) and the lobby


HOTELS BY DESIGN

of hotel. Taliah and Sein Lowry specialise in boutique Australian escapes, and for their latest project, The Bower in Byron Bay, they have drafted local designers, stylists, builders, tradesmen and landscapers into the design process, from concept to creation. The resulting beach motel, with a variety of accommodation options, including suites, a barn sleeping two and a cottage sleeping 10, is a mini-museum of their nearest and dearest homeware purveyors: Cultiver’s soft flax bed linens; Tigmi Trading’s kilims; The Dharma Door’s artisan-woven baskets; Phendei’s hand-crafted Cambodian ceramics; Bemboka’s combed-cotton throws; and nutrient-rich natural skincare from Hunter Lab. Visionary hoteliers often hail from unexpected quarters. Artist Residence’s bohemian abodes were born from student Justin Salisbury enlisting up-and-coming artists to revitalise his mother’s Brighton B&B. Since then, he and his wife Charlie have created and curated properties in Cornwall, London and Oxfordshire, with another opening in Bristol in November. There is no cutting and pasting of their fun-loving formula – the spirit of each is site-specific. ‘Our buildings are all historic and listed, so usually it’s a case of removing decoration and revealing hidden features.’ In Oxfordshire, a thatched farmhouse was the inspiration for more rustic interiors. A hallmark is always a vibrant restaurant and bar beloved by locals. ‘A big attraction for people staying is being part of that buzz, with a supercomfortable bedroom to retreat to,’ says Justin. Having first created bars in Paris and London, the Experimental Group’s growing portfolio of hotels, from the Henrietta Hotel in Covent Garden to Grand Pigalle in Paris, is charming all with timeless elegance and a finger-on-the-pulse attention to detail. 122 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

OWEN GALE

(ABOVE) Decorative details pay tribute to the eighteenth-century architecture at Hotel des Grands Boulevards, Paris, such as curved mirrors reflecting archways in walls. (BELOW) A coffee-shop lobby replaces a typical reception area at The Pilgrm in Paddington, setting the tone for the laid-back, well-priced hotel


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HOTELS BY DESIGN

(LEFT) The Barn Suite at Artist Residence Oxfordshire is representative of the hotel’s rustic interiors, with an original pitched ceiling, wooden floorboards, and a log burner. (RIGHT) Artworks chosen by Kevin O’Shea decorate the walls of the conservatory at Eben House, Cape Cod

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‘We encourage a diverse crowd because that’s what life should be: diverse. We are focused on selling happiness’ recent launch of The Hoxton, Paris, 174 locals were invited to pick books to fill the bookshelves in a bedroom. These ‘Hox Friends’ were the first to stay in the hotel, and this will be the modus operandi when outposts in Portland, Williamsburg and Downtown Los Angeles open later this year. Public from Ian Schrager has the same aim in Chicago and New York’s Lower East Side – its name denoting an approach to hospitality in which residents and neighbours are invited to hang out in the stylish communal spaces. Mama Shelter, by Club Med’s creator Serge Trigano and his sons, stirred things up when the first Philippe Starck-designed hotel opened amid north-east Paris’s housing projects. Now owned by Accor Hotels, the streetwise brand has spread from Bordeaux to Belgrade and soon Prague. Sidestepping expensive artwork and designer furniture, it invests in things CEO Jérémie Trigano believes matter more. ‘That’s where most design-led hotels fail,’ he says. ‘By focusing on decoration, they forget the most important element of a hotel: the people. It’s the guests and the staff who make a hotel great – they define the vibe. Mama Shelter encourages a diverse crowd because that’s what life should be: diverse. While other boutique hotels focus on selling a cool attitude and look, we focus on selling happiness’ 첸

PAUL MASSEY

Its newest is the 50-room Hotel des Grands Boulevards in Paris, where designer Dorothée Meilichzon underlines the Revolutionera architectural heritage by using elements popular during Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette’s age: coral marble, baldaquin stone, arched mirrors, Versailles-style wooden floors and limed walls. Co-founder Olivier Bon feels this hotel embodies the spirit of the new generation of traveller. ‘As with all our other hotels, restaurants and bars, design is of huge importance, but we do our best to create the entire atmosphere, down to what the staff wear.’ Busy baristas replace a typical reception area at The Pilgrm in Paddington, a painstakingly restored yet pared-back Victorian property. The coffee-shop lobby sets the tone for this laid-back new kid on a less-than-obvious west London block. ‘With The Pilgrm, we wanted it to be about quality – materials, food, people, relationships. It wasn’t about the five-star or four-star price point, it was about making it accessible and interesting,’ says cofounder Jason Catifeoglou, an ex-director at Zetter Townhouse. Ignoring extras that drive up costs – minibars, room service – meant they could provide considered, well-priced bedrooms. Free-flowing for today’s free spirits, hotel design is also all about the inclusive social spaces: slouchy sofas and armchairs; and openplan informal dining rooms that blur into bars serving flat whites and cocktails. When The Hoxton opened in Shoreditch in 2006, it was one of the first hotels to cultivate a feeling of a walk-in members’ club, where anyone can sit down and connect to the Wi-Fi. It has even hosted food festivals and workshops with local startups, which are open to all. And this co-working-space-inspired lobby set-up marks it out from stuffy grandes dames and Airbnb options as it rolls out the affordable-luxury formula. For the


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GLENEAGLES – SCOTLAND Panelled walls provide a smart backdrop to a pair of oversize mirrors and the ‘Double Lowther Vanity Basin Suite’ from Drummonds (from £7,140). Decorative elements, such as the pendant light, add to the elegance. gleneagles.com | drummonds-uk.com

DESIGN IDEAS WITH DEEP BATHTUBS AND BREATHTAKING VIEWS, HOTEL BATHROOMS EMBODY ESCAPISM, BUT ALSO PROVIDE PLENTY OF INSPIRATION, AS ELIZABETH METCALFE DISCOVERS

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 127


BLACK AND WHITE FRESH TAKES ON CLASSIC MONOCHROME, INCORPORATING METALLIC TOUCHES, TILES AND FREE-STANDING FURNITURE

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ENJOY THE VIEW TAKE IN DRAMATIC VISTAS THROUGH FLOOR-TO-CEILING WINDOWS – OR IN THE OPEN AIR – FROM THE COMFORT OF THE BATH [1] AMAN TOKYO – JAPAN This rectangular bath mirrors Tokyo’s cityscape. Like the walls and floor, it is made from dark grey basalt. Mandarin Stone’s ‘Mimica Basaltina Dark Porcelain’ tiles, £34.80 a square metre, would create a similar effect. aman.com | mandarinstone.com [2] THE ZETTER TOWNHOUSE MARYLEBONE – LONDON A claw-footed copper bath is a luxurious addition to this secluded terrace, which is part of the hotel’s Lear’s Loft. The Albion Bath Company’s ‘Imperium’ bath, from £2,485, is a similar shape. thezettertownhouse.com | albionbathco.com [3] BELLE MONT FARM – ST KITTS Even during the rainy season, bathers can make the most of the outdoor bath in this pavilion, with the roof providing much-needed shelter. bellemontfarm.com [4] VIÑA VIK – CHILE With views across Chilean wine country, this bathroom features a spectacular suspended ‘Hammock Bath’ by Splinter Works, from £23,760. vikchile.com | splinterworks.co.uk

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[2] THE LUDLOW – NEW YORK Smart and fun in equal measure, this bathroom shows the power of a simple black, white and brass palette. It is a classic American look, with art deco details – note the mosaic flooring – and simple white square metro tiles for the walls. The wall tiles have been bordered with black grout and the thin black tiles just over half way up the wall continue the monochrome theme. The Hollywood-style mirror is a fun touch. ludlowhotel.com [3] THE HOXTON – PARIS Caged wall lights, copper taps and a geometric-patterned tiled floor give this bathroom a contemporary, industrial feel. The style is continued with a large single-panel shower screen that is bordered with black metal. Reeded frosted glass protects the modesty of the person in the shower. thehoxton.com/paris [4] ETT HEM – STOCKHOLM A sophisticated brass washstand and large oval mirror take centre stage in this pared-back bathroom. Two opaque glass and brass vertical wall lights illuminate the basins and mirror and add a contemporary element to the space. etthem.se

LUCAS ALLEN; MICHAEL SINCLAIR; NGOC MINH NGO; ERIC PIASECKI; ELSA YOUNG; ANNIE SCHLECTER; PAUL MASSEY

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[1] THE THATCH HOUSE – SOUTH AFRICA With its large chandelier, rugs, glass-fronted cabinet and artwork, this example by La Grange Interiors shows how beautiful a bathroom can be when it is given the same decorative treatment as other rooms. A chair is always a welcome addition, providing a spot for clothes or towels. The built-in bath is encased by a generous marble surround, which provides ample space for a book or glass of wine. thethatchhouse.com lagrangeinteriors.co.za


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SUCCESSFULLY LAYERED MATERIALS SET THE TONE [1] TAYLOR RIVER LODGE – US A carved stone basin and trampwork mirror add further texture to this wood-clad bathroom. The built-in taps look particularly smart – Catchpole & Rye’s ‘La Fontaine Noire’ basin mixer in aged brass, £806.40, is a close match. Lapicida could create a similar basin. elevenexperience.com | catchpole andrye.com | lapicida.com [2] EL FENN – MARRAKECH Green may not be an obvious choice for every surface in a bathroom, but here it has been used to fabulous effect. The walls and bath are covered with tadelakt, a water- and mouldresistant Moroccan lime plaster. Decor Tadelakt could do something similar, from £140 a square metre. el-fenn.com | tadelakt.co.uk [3] SANTA CLARA 1728 – LISBON

Two round limestone basins prevent the white metro-style tiles in this bathroom from appearing too stark, and the round mirrors continue the circular motif. santaclara1728.com [4] THE GARDEN HOUSE AT BEAVERBROOK – SURREY Glossy green tiles and a roll-top bath give this bathroom a warm, cosseting feel. Milagros’ ‘Special Green’ tiles, 75p each, are a close match. beaverbrook.co.uk | milagros.co.uk [5] ARTIST RESIDENCE – LONDON This contemporary white bath – try The Water Monopoly’s ‘Soho Bath’, £5,280 – forms a pleasing contrast with the rough brick and wooden walls behind it. The wooden partition and raised platform create a nook for the bath to sit in. artistresidence.co.uk thewatermonopoly.com [6] AWASI PATAGONIA The neutral palette in this bathroom, using a combination of wood and stone tiles from floor to ceiling, creates a calm space. The wooden washstand provides plenty of storage. awasipatagonia.com 130 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


HOTELS BY DESIGN

MARBLE RUN WHIRLING PATTERNS AND SHADE VARIATIONS CREATE A UNIQUE, LUXURIOUS LOOK [1] BEAVERBROOK – SURREY Pale grey marble lines the walls surrounding the shower and bath in this calm room. Clever use has been made of the otherwise dead space at the end of the bath, where a storage compartment has been built in. The green tiled fireplace and a pretty arrangement of plates finish the look. beaverbrook.co.uk

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[2] COQUI COQUI MÉRIDA – MEXICO With a pair of roll-top baths and a vast mirror, this bathroom is a lesson in belle époque-style opulence. The velvet curtains and smaller giltwood mirror add to the romantic aesthetic. coquicoqui.com

SIMON UPTON; JOANNA VESTEY; DEAN HEARNE; JAMES MCDONALD; PAUL MASSEY; HELEN CATHCART; SIMON BROWN; ANDREW MONTGOMERY

[3] BALLYFIN – IRELAND The spectacular bath here is in fact a repurposed Roman sarcophagus. To create a similar look, invest in a marble bath from Hurlingham – the ‘Simba’, from £8,330, and ‘Tivoli’, from £7,495, are both good options. A plaster plaque hangs above, continuing the Roman theme. ballyfin.com | hurlinghambaths.co.uk [4] FOUR SEASONS LION PALACE – RUSSIA A masterclass in decadence, this bathroom is clad from floor to ceiling in a yellow-veined marble. The bather looks straight up to a floral mural, which sits beneath the archway. It is a charming way to create a view if you have few windows. fourseasons.com/stpetersburg

PLAY WITH PATTERN ADD A NEW DIMENSION WITH FLOOR AND WALL TILES [1] ARTIST RESIDENCE – BRIGHTON Black and white tiles add a playful touch. To replicate the furnishings, choose Bard & Brazier’s ‘Florian’ floor-mounted towel rail, from £978, and the ‘Astonian Rimini’ roll-top bath, from £1,264, from Aston Matthews. artistresidence.co.uk | bardbrazier.com | astonmatthews.co.uk [2] SOHO HOUSE – ISTANBUL In this small shower room, punchy tiles make a strong statement. Other elements are kept simple, letting the tiles shine. sohohouseistanbul.com

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HOTELS BY DESIGN

BATHROOM PALETTES FOUR MOODBOARDS TO INSPIRE, INCLUDING CHOICES OF TILES, BATHS, FURNITURE AND FITTINGS

URBAN

EARTHY

FLOOR ‘Puzzle’ tiles, by Barber & Osgerby, £203.40 a square metre, from Mutina. mutina.it SHOWER ‘Ocean Disc Round Rain Shower Head’, £67.20, from C P Hart. cphart.co.uk LIGHT ‘R W Atlas Wall Mounted Double Arm Sconce’ (burnished nickel), £1,022, from Waterworks. uk.waterworks.com TAPS ‘Allure’ basin mixer, £573.56, from Grohe. grohe.co.uk

WALLS ‘New Terracotta’ tiles, from £170 a square metre, from Domus. domustiles.co.uk TOWEL RAIL ‘Natural Bamboo Towel Rail’, £75, from Rockett St George. rockettstgeorge.co.uk STOOL ‘Brocklesby Stool’ (ash), £275, from The White Company. thewhite company.com BATH ‘The Copper Bateau’ (weathered copper and nickel), from £6,000, from Catchpole & Rye. catchpoleandrye.com

COUNTRY

MONOCHROME

SHOWER MIXER ‘Classic Bath Shower Mixer with Standpipes’, £1,987.20, from Lefroy Brooks. uk.lefroybrooks.com BATH ‘Geminus Roll-top’ (blue), from £2,121, from The Albion Bath Company. albionbathco.com WALLS ‘Margherita’, 75p a tile, from Milagros. milagros.co.uk CHAIR ‘Cranbourne Chair’, from £4,320 excluding fabric, from Jamb. jamb.co.uk

SHOWER ‘Acton’ shower head, £2,220 (including mixer), from Bert & May. bertandmay.com WALLS AND FLOOR ‘Arabescato Carrara’, £418.80 a square metre, from Lapicida. lapicida. com SHOWER SCREEN ‘Trellis’, from £2,800, from Majestic Shower Company. majesticshowers.com BATH ‘Water Jewels’, £11,240, from VitrA. vitra.co.uk 첸

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THEY WOULD TELL OF VOYAGES TO AUSTRALIA, WANDERS THROUGH WHIMSICAL WOODLAND AND STORMY ITALIAN SKIES – AS THESE IMPACTFUL HOTEL ROOMS SHOW BESPOKE From bathrooms in bedrooms to decadent bars, hotels provide ample opportunity for fanciful bespoke wallcoverings. For the Loft Suite at Charlotte Street Hotel, London (1), designer Kit Kemp and painter Melissa White devised a tall tree-filled scene. firmdalehotels.com | melissawhite.co.uk. Also in London, a bespoke Fromental wallpaper in The Goring (2) is inspired by Hyde Park. thegoring.com fromental.co.uk. An exotic scene, custom-made by de Gournay, adorns the basement walls at The Ned in the City (10), depicting Captain Cook’s eighteenthcentury voyage to Australia and New Zealand. thened. com | degournay.com. And pretty flora and fauna by Iksel is apt for the conservatory dining space at Hotel & Spa Urso, Madrid (15). hotelurso.com | iksel.com

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SIMON BROWN; JANOS GRAPOW/HOTEL PHOTOGRAPHY; BENOIT LINERO; JACK HARDY; GEORGE APOSTOLIDIS; DIDIER DELMAS; JAKE EASTHAM; OWEN GALE

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CLASSIC Other hotels look to enduring classics, such as de Gournay’s ‘Earlham’ in Finca Cortesin, southern Spain (3) and Morris & Co’s ‘Seaweed’ at the rejuvenated Kettner’s Townhouse in London (4). fincacortesin.com degournay.com | kettnerstownhouse.com | stylelibrary. com. ‘Verdure’ by Zoffany, at The Bloomsbury Hotel, London (6), is based on a seventeenth-century linen cloth, while the wallpapers at the Mandarin Oriental, Milan (9) and The Bower House in Warwickshire (14), by Cole & Son and CommonRoom respectively, are based on twentieth-century artworks by Piero Fornasetti and C F A Voysey. doylecollection.com | style library.com | mandarinoriental.com | cole-and-son.com bower.house | commonroom.co. The last word in heritage design goes to the historic company Braquenié, whose ‘Marquis de Seignelay’ decorates this room at Relais Christine, Paris (11). relais-christine.com | pierrefrey.com MODERN Irreverent designs by young companies enliven walls from Paris to the Cotswolds. Pictured are the oriental rug-inspired ‘Mey Meh’ by House of Hackney, in Hotel Providence, Paris (7); the abstract ‘Open Season’ by Timorous Beasties, at Adare Manor, Ireland (8); and Molly Mahon’s block-printed ‘Birds & Bees’ in The Swan at Ascott, Oxfordshire (13). hotelprovidenceparis. com | houseofhackney.com | adaremanor.com| timorous beasties.com | swanascott.com | mollymahon.com. Lewis & Wood’s ‘Alhambra’, at Browns, London (5), is a recent design by artist Flora Roberts, while Designers Guild’s ‘Floreale’ gives a bathroom at The Rectory, Wiltshire (12) a modern freshness. roccofortehotels.com| lewisand wood.co.uk | therectoryhotel.com | designersguild.com 첸

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FREE iPad + iPhone edition access for print-edition subscribers See page 241

Find our digital edition on Apple Newsstand (iPad/iPhone), Kindle Newsstand (Kindle Fire) or Google Play (other Android devices). Alternatively, it is available on all devices, including your PC, via Zinio (houseandgarden.co.uk/zinio)

PHOTOGRAPH: NEIL MERSH


HOTELS BY DESIGN

WOW BOUNDARY-PUSHING HOTEL ARCHITECTURE FROM AROUND THE WORLD TEXT KATE CROCKETT

VICEROY LOS CABOS

JOE FLETCHER

BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO Wedged in among the nondescript all-inclusives of San José del Cabo, this striking beachfront resort – originally created as Mar Adentro by architect Miguel Angel Aragonés and reopening this spring with 194 rooms, suites and villas under the Viceroy brand – appears to float on water. There is water, water everywhere. The stark, white modular buildings – renovated and updated by Al Arquitectura de Interiores of Guadalajara – are set on three sides of a vast reflecting pool, cleaved by stone walkways that lead through the resort to more water, this time the Pacific Ocean, by way of a new beach bar and pool. From $325 a night, B&B. viceroyhotelsandresorts.com HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 137


HOTELS BY DESIGN

BÜRGENSTOCK HOTEL LAKE LUCERNE, SWITZERLAND The historic Bürgenstock Funicular is still the way to arrive at the eponymous resort on a mountain ridge above Lake Lucerne. Four minutes and 400 metres later, one ascends into the new Bürgenstock Hotel, built by MKV Design on the site of the 1891 Park Hotel. All 102 rooms have views of the lake, while the Asian-inspired Spices restaurant hangs over it from the edge of the building in a glass box. Nor is Bürgenstock’s new Alpine Spa for the faint-hearted: its L-shape infinity pool wraps around two sides of the spa building, with water appearing to flow into the abyss. From CHF650 a night, B&B, including boat transfer from Lucerne and funicular ride. buergenstock.ch.en

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To find your nearest showroom please visit: vitra-showrooms.co.uk

BASINS | WCs | FURNITURE | BATH TUBS | BRASSWARE | ACCESSORIES | TILES


BIRD NEST AT SEGERA RETREAT LAKIPIA PLATEAU, KENYA Sleeping out in the African wilderness has reached new heights at Segera Retreat, where guests can slumber six metres above the plains of Laikipia in the new Bird Nest. Created by architect Daniel Pouzet of Nay Palad, its first floor houses a luxurious interior suite, but the real magic is on the rooftop platform. It is as good for 360-degree game viewing as it is for sleeping on, with luxury mattresses and hot water bottles as night falls. wilderness-safaris.com. Carrier (0161-492 1353; carrier.co.uk) offers four nights at Segera Retreat as part of a fivenight package, from £7,280pp, based on two sharing, including return flights from London Heathrow with British Airways and private transfers* 140 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

*MADE UP OF 1 NIGHT AT HEMINGWAYS NAIROBI, B&B; 3 NIGHTS IN A VILLA AT SEGERA RETREAT, FULLY INCLUSIVE; AND 1 NIGHT AT NAY PALAD BIRD NEST, FULLY INCLUSIVE. PRICE BASED ON DEPARTURES NOVEMBER 5 2018

HOTELS BY DESIGN


INNOVATIVE SLEEPING CULTURE SINCE 1847

For stockist details and more information contact THE FRENCH LINEN COMPANY LTD Tel: +44(0)1296 394980 enquiries@french-linen-co.co.uk www.brinkhaus.de


HOTELS BY DESIGN

TAVARU TOWER VELAA, MALDIVES The 22-metre Tavaru Tower on Velaa Private Island is the highest vantage point in the Maldives. Designed by Czech architect Petr Kolar, the five-storey building comprises a cylindrical core enveloped in a white mesh stretched over a series of hoops; here and there the mesh is cut with ‘windows’ for views of the Indian Ocean and other islands of the Noonu Atoll. The cocoon gives the tower a playfulness that belies the seriousness at its centre: the largest wine and Champagne collection in the Maldives. velaaprivateisland.com. Scott Dunn (020-8682 5050; scottdunn.com) offers seven nights at Velaa from £6,700pp, B&B, based on two sharing a Beach Pool Villa, including flights and transfers 첸

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PROMOTION

GALLERY AT SEA THEY SAY THAT LIFE IMITATES ART, AND WITH HOLLAND AMERICA LINE, SO DOES THE SEA Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, especially those aboard one of Holland America Line’s magnificent ships. With art at its centre, the ships’ multi-million pound collections – ranging from exquisite antiques to incredible contemporary pieces – are among the largest at sea. Perfect for globe-trotting learners, Holland America Line operates 15 mid-size ships which are more akin to five-star hotels, offering excellent fine dining, world-class entertainment and immersive culture. If museums are your pleasure, then Westerdam is your VIP ticket. Partnered with the renowned Rijksmuseum, reproductions of several famous masterpieces are showcased in the atrium. Or, for those who like to be at one with nature, the Eurodam will take you there literally and visually. Dolphins, penguins and bears by British sculptor Susanna Holt accompany guests to incredible destinations such as Alaska, Antarctica and the Pacific.

If music be the food of love, Holland America Line definitely played on with the innovative Koningsdam. Proffering an ‘architecture of music’ theme, it houses 1,920 artworks by artists of over 21 nationalities including the US, Europe and South Korea. Ready to embark in December 2018 however, is the Nieuw Statendam; a crescendo of collaboration between top hospitality designer Adam D Tihany and seasoned architect Bjørn Storbraaten. The ship features light-filled public spaces and opulent interiors inspired by the curves of instruments. Built to reflect the ongoing evolution of the Holland America Line experience, it is a celebration of the company’s past, present and bright future. To learn more about cruises with Holland America Line, and its worldwide holidays that encapsulate destinations from Alaska to Asia, Panama to the Pacific, Canada to Cuba, the Mediterranean to Mexico, contact your travel professional, call 0344 338 8605 or visit hollandamerica.com 첸

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) A verandah stateroom on Holland America Line. Wings of the Pharao sculpture by Peter Gentenaar hangs in the dining room. Rijksmuseum at Sea in the Atrium on the Westerdam. Die Old, Live Slow mix-media artwork by Miss Buggs


AESME FLOWER STUDIO

workshops | events | weddings aesme.co.uk


HOTELS BY DESIGN

D E S I G N

P R O F I L E :

B E AV E R B R O O K

ENGLISH ACCENT SUSIE ATKINSON HAS TURNED HER EXPERIENCED HAND TO THE INTERIORS OF BEAVERBROOK, SURREY, IMBUING THE ROOMS WITH A ROMANCE AND STYLE THAT PAYS TRIBUTE TO ITS GLAMOROUS HISTORY TEXT GABBY DEEMING | PORTRAIT JOSHUA MONAGHAN PHOTOGRAPHS SIMON BROWN

Susie in the Parrot Bar, where a gilded birdcage from Lorfords Antiques greets guests as they enter. The chair she is sitting on is covered in ‘Jungle’ by Bennison Fabrics HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 145


The decorative tone for the Parrot Bar was set by the existing marble fireplace, overmantle mirror and parrot painting above that. Rupert Bevan built the fluted brass bar and Soane made the ‘Argo’ stools, while ferns and fringed lampshades add to the vintage, glamorous look

uch like actors, it can be all too easy for decorators to feel typecast after a defining role. Imagine being Susie Atkinson then. She is responsible for many jewels in the much-imitated interiors of the Soho House group and, as such, has established a design blueprint that raised the bar for private clubs and hotels all over the world. What a relief it must have been then to be able to take on a project that demanded a style quite different: current but not trendy, comfortable and completely individual. The hotel itself, a late-nineteenth-century mansion set in the Surrey Hills, is named after its best-known former resident Lord Beaverbrook – publicist, political powerhouse and close friend of Winston Churchill. Lord Beaverbrook’s wild parties drew the cream of Thirties to Sixties

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celebrity, and their presence continues to be felt throughout the hotel, not just because each room is named after a one-time starry guest of the house. For irrefutable evidence of Churchill’s attendance, for example, his secretary’s chair sits beside the bath in his now smart, dark blue bathroom. Though there is no doubt that a stay in the Churchill suite will induce less work and more play these days. Susie’s brief was to design something essentially British and romantic. ‘I knew it had to be gentle, floral and quirky with a touch of madness,’ she says, sitting in front of the giant gilded bird cage that greets guests as they enter the Twenties-inspired Parrot Bar. The cage was one of Susie’s ‘lucky finds’. ‘It looks wonderful in the evening filled with candles,’ she enthuses. These discoveries, from antique fairs and vintage shops, are tucked around the hotel, giving a little nudge


HOTELS BY DESIGN

The block-printed floral fabric on the sofa is ‘Pulbrook Bouquet’ by Hazelton House; it provided the starting point for the pretty scheme in the morning room. The large silk dhurrie from Vanderhurd was a special commission for the hotel

to the otherwise immaculate decoration. The art of the unexpected is a trademark of Susie’s style. The bar posed the biggest challenge in terms of decoration, as the mandatory preservation of a purple marble fireplace, overmantle mirror and large parrot painting set a strident tone. ‘Since it wasn’t going anywhere, I just had to embrace the bird,’ declares Susie. The discovery of two large oil paintings after Melchior and the aforementioned cage at Lorfords Antiques sealed the deal and the Parrot Bar began to take shape. ‘I wanted it to feel like a really exciting cocktail bar – it’s wonderful in the evening, the colours and lights mingle to create a really glamorous atmosphere.’ There is a slight Victoriana vibe, with giant ferns and elegant slipper chairs upholstered in a Bennison Fabrics jungle print and a petrol blue moiré silk. Rupert Bevan built the spectacular fluted brass bar – left unlacquered to become

more beautiful with age – and Soane made the elegant ‘Argo’ bar stools with their barley-twist brass legs. ‘I love having a bar in the heart of the building,’ says Susie. ‘In a hotel, the bar is like the kitchen in a home: it’s the hub.’ Next door is the light-filled dining room. The impressive plasterwork ceiling and intricate cornice had to be preserved, so Susie balanced their grandness by introducing gentle colours and soft florals. The linen-lined walls are in a small-scale print from Veere Grenney and a smart floral in olive green and white from Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam is on the chairs. Susie is a self-confessed floral print addict, and while Beaverbrook is quite a showcase for some of the most beautiful examples of this very English motif, it never feels chintzy. The morning room’s scheme began with a beautiful block-printed floral by Hazelton House used on a big sofa, and HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 147


the rest just ‘fell into place’, creating a pretty room of gentle colour and texture, anchored by a vast silk dhurrie from Vanderhurd, a special commission that took months to weave. An eight-month delay during the three years of planning gave Susie the rare opportunity to commission a lot of pieces for the hotel. ‘For me, the whole process should be about creating unique designs for spaces, not ordering from a catalogue. We love finding craftspeople to make special things,’ she says. These pieces make up the majority of furniture in the hotel, 95 per cent of which were made in Britain. Bedrooms range from the grand and quintessentially English Elizabeth Taylor and Dowager suites, with their pretty four-poster beds and country-house scale, to the stylish but fun turret rooms, such as the Maughan. ‘I really hope that people notice all the details: the piping, the 148 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

studwork, the fringing on the curtains. It’s bland without the detail,’ Susie says. The Dowager bathroom induces all the glamour of the Twenties with its elegant bath set in front of sweeping fringed gauzy linen curtains and a view beyond to the Surrey Hills. A brilliant painted cane chair under framed (photocopied) prints by Louise Bourgeois is a quirky flourish. Dressing up is encouraged at Beaverbrook and a sense of occasion was important to Susie. ‘So much informality has been introduced to hotels, you can go anywhere in jeans and that’s great, but sometimes you just want to make an effort.’ Through Susie’s skilful eyes, the scene has been set for many an unforgettable stay – Lord Beaverbrook himself would surely have approved 첸 Rooms in the main house cost from £225 a night, room only. 01372-571300; beaverbrook.co.uk

ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS: JOSHUA MONAGHAN (OPPOSITE TOP RIGHT); ANGUS TAYLOR (OPPOSITE BOTTOM LEFT)

(THIS PAGE) To balance the grand ceiling and cornice in the dining room, Susie lined the walls in ‘Temple’ linen from Veere Grenney and covered the chairs in ‘Aurora’ from Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam. (OPPOSITE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) The bathroom in the Winston Churchill room. The dining room. A cane chair sits underneath framed prints by Louise Bourgeois in the Dowager bathroom. The Maughan turret room. Yellow curtains in the Churchill room. The quintessentially English Dowager bedroom. The bathroom in the Elizabeth Taylor room. The exterior of the hotel. The main hall; the staircase to the rooms is to the right of this picture (centre)


HOTELS BY DESIGN


HOTELS BY DESIGN

GET THE LOOK

‘ETE MOSCOVITE’ (rose), by Nathalie Farman-Farma, linen voile, £272 a metre, from Décors Barbares. decorsbarbares.com

Metal and bamboo ‘PETAL CHAIR’, 34.5 x 34 x 29cm, £1,187, from Chelsea Textiles. chelseatextiles.com

Teak ‘BEDSIDE TABLE WITH THREE DRAWERS’, 74 x 49 x 38cm, £733, from Chelsea Textiles

‘GATEAU’ suspended light (nickel), 66 x 46 x 41cm, £2,196, from Charles Edwards. charlesedwards.com

Brass ‘NUREYEV TROLLEY’ (antique brass), 90.5 x 101 x 60.5cm, £5,300, from Soane. soane.co.uk

Brass ‘ARGO BAR STOOL’, 106 x 56 x 47cm, £7,500 excluding fabric, from Soane

Brass ‘CLOUD TABLES’, by Kam Tin, 35 x 66 x 50cm (largest size), from €7,400 each, from Maison Rapin. maison-rapin.com

‘LIMERENCE ORIEL’ cotton velvet lampshade (ink), 60cm diameter, £415, from House of Hackney. ‘TWISTED GLASS COLUMN’ lamp, 52cm high, £1,008, from Vaughan. houseofhackney.com | vaughandesigns.com 첸

‘BLEACHED OAK BOOKCASE’, 212 x 201 x 36cm, £3,250, from Lorfords. lorfordsantiques.com 150 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

DOMINIC BLACKMORE; BERTRAND CORBARA; ANDREW SMART/A C COOPER

RECREATE THE ECLECTIC STYLE OF BEAVERBROOK WITH BRASS PIECES, FLORA AND FAUNA PRINTS AND QUIRKY SHAPES


PROMOTION

SUMPTOUS STAY THE BERKELEY IN KNIGHTSBRIDGE UNVEILS TWO SUITES BY LEADING ARCHITECT ANDRÉ FU THAT COMBINE ENGLISH SENSIBILITIES WITH A CONTEMPORARY EDGE

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ituated in the heart of one of London’s most desirable addresses, the luxurious, five-star hotel The Berkeley is moments from Knightsbridge’s stylish fashion strip and food scene. Since it opened its doors, The Berkeley has employed some of the most exciting names in the design world to envision its interiors, from the public spaces to the individually designed suites. The latest to add his mark is renowned architect André Fu. Having worked on the design of the Opus Suite in 2014, the hotel has once again called upon his studio to create the Crescent Pavilion and the Grand Pavilion. The former offers guests the experience of a private residence by emulating a contemporary penthouse, while the latter is a two-bedroom urban retreat complete with an open-fire pit and extensive outdoor seating area with views over London’s iconic skyline. Andre’s designs combine traditional English sensibilities with modern elements and culminate in the piece de resistance: a glass pavilion that encases the majority of each suite, allowing for seamless integration between the indoors and out. This theme is seen throughout with the palette of pale racing green, mineral grey and Champagne gold, and the use of materials such as rock glass on the the hexagonal chandelier and the island bar decked in precious quartzite aqua marble . With views over London and a terrace brimming with English foliage, the pavilion suites offer guests a sense of serenity and escape in the heart of the capital. the-berkeley.co.uk 첸

(FROM TOP) The sitting area and outdoor terrace of the Grand Pavilion Suite


Inspired by stone for over 25 years

Natural stone flooring, exclusive tiles and bespoke stone creations Featured stone: Vellenoy Limestone tumbled finish Showrooms (open Monday–Friday only): Design Centre East · Chelsea Harbour · London SW10 0XE Stonebridge House · Devizes · Wiltshire SN10 3DY

Spring offers available on selected ranges. Visit crucial-trading.com/springoffers for more details.

+44 1380 735888 artisansofdevizes.com


HOTELS BY DESIGN

E S I D IN

T R A CK

PORTUGAL MARY LUSSIANA EXPLORES TWO AREAS OF PORTUGAL AT ITS PEAK, RECOMMENDING PLACES TO STAY, EAT AND SHOP IN LISBON AND THE ALENTEJO REGION PHOTOGRAPHS DEAN HEARNE

The special light that those who know Portugal hold so dear is shining even brighter right now, as the burst of creativity born out of the deep recession earlier this century continues. It brings a new level of sophistication in the hotel and restaurant world and a celebration of home-grown, artisanal talent in the shops. Design has never been at its current dizzy heights before, nor has Portugal ever looked quite as good.

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 153


HOTELS BY DESIGN

- STAY LISBON Bucking the trend for globalisation, Lisbon remains resolutely Portuguese, with its trams and tiled façades. But interwoven with these charms is a new breed of Portuguese hotel that offers immersion in the soul of the city from an as-yet-unseen level of authentic luxury. At Santa Clara 1728, six rooms are housed in a skilful blend of eighteenth-century walls and twenty-firstcentury design, which stands atop one of Lisbon’s seven hills. The work of architect Manuel Aires Mateus, this is the fourth property he has designed for owner João Rodrigues, after their initial Casa na Areia in Comporta was chosen to represent Portugal at the Venice Biennale in 2010. This is their first urban project. Furniture comes from Carl Hansen or Aires Mateus. Lighting is by Davide Groppi and beds are from B&B Italia. But best of all are the huge stone bathtubs in which you can soak at night while watching the moon dapple the dome of the National Pantheon. Ornamental original stucco work and early twentiethcentury blue and white tiles decorate the two royal suites in the eighteenth-century Palacio Verride, which has been painstakingly restored. The 16 other rooms are clad in silk wallpapers from de Gournay or raw linens. A 360-degree view of the capital can be experienced from the rooftop, a little less from the lovely pool beneath. The hotel’s detail-driven, personalised service promises to be the best in the capital.

THE ALENTEJO Running from one side of Portugal to the other, the vast Alentejo is a region of full-bodied red wines, olive trees and medieval whitewashed villages. In coastal Comporta, the landscape is all green rice fields and endless beaches, while the region’s interior, towards Spain, is about dolmens and oak groves, rural simplicity and unexpected artisanal talent. Now though, just as in Lisbon, a new level of luxury has arrived. What started as 14 simple rooms almost hidden under umbrella pine trees among the sand dunes has blossomed into Sublime Comporta, a go-to destination for Portugal’s cognoscenti and foreign celebrities alike. The addition of 10 two-bedroom villas with private pools provides the ultimate escape. Undoubtedly the country’s best heritage project, São Lourenco do Barrocal is a nineteenth-century farm brilliantly converted by Portuguese architect Eduardo Souto de Moura. Whitewashed stables and outbuildings have perfectly preserved exteriors, but step inside and an authentically rural luxury prevails – right down to the embroidered cloth bag in which the hairdryer hangs, courtesy of designer Ana Anahory. The tiny six-roomed Casa Azimute captures the essence of the Alentejo, despite its contemporary structure and varnished cement floors. Locally woven rugs and hand-painted tiles differ in each bedroom, while huge windows frame the adjoining whitewashed farmhouse, and in the distance, beyond the pool, the walled city of Estremoz.

(PREVIOUS PAGE) Top row from left: The white buildings and tiled roofs of Lisbon. Fish restaurant Páteo in new multi-restaurant opening Bairro do Avillez. One of the capital’s trams. Bottom row from left: The beach location of Sal restaurant near Comporta. A room at Sublime Comporta and the hotel’s wooded surroundings (far right). (THIS PAGE) The pool at São Lourenco do Barrocal hotel. (OPPOSITE MAIN BLOCK OF PICTURES) Top two rows: Santa Clara 1728 hotel in Lisbon is furnished with modern pieces by designers such as Carl Hansen, with stone bathtubs overlooking the National Pantheon. Third row: Ten new villas, including private pools, have been added at Sublime Comporta. Bottom row: São Lourenco do Barrocal occupies a converted nineteenth-century farm


- EAT -

LISBON For an aesthetically pleasing morning, dip into Dear Breakfast for a Portuguese bica and pastéis de nata custard tart. JNcQUOI brings a new concept to the capital with a culinary treasure trove under one roof, including an oyster bar, deli, and the first outlet of Ladurée in the country. The restaurant itself, designed by Lázaro Rosa-Violán, is crowned by a large dinosaur skeleton. Another multi-restaurant opening is Bairro do Avillez, which houses Taberna (try the pork-skin popcorn), where ceramic fried eggs and chillies, by Caulino Ceramics, are suspended from the ceiling. Beyond this is the fish restaurant Páteo, the recently opened Beco Cabaret Gourmet and, above, Cantina Peruana by chef Diego Muñoz. For a gourmet extravaganza, Alma in the Chiado neighbourhood is the hottest table in town, where chef Henrique Sá Pessoa lays the culinary soul of Portugal on a plate. THE ALENTEJO Sal, near Comporta, on a blindingly white beach, is inevitably all about fish; inland, the decorative restaurant at São Lourenco do Barrocal refashions heavy Alentejan dishes into something surprisingly elegant, drawing on the hotel’s own produce from veal to vegetables, and accompanying them with the estate’s own wines.

(ABOVE) Clockwise from top left: Cantina Peruana and Páteo in Bairro do Avillez, Lisbon. Dishes at São Lourenco do Barrocal (also bottom left) draw on produce grown in the hotel’s grounds HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 155


HOTELS BY DESIGN

(LEFT OF PAGE) Clockwise from top left: Caulino Ceramics in Lisbon, which sells handmade pieces by a range of artisans. Cortiço & Netos sells packs of mismatched, retro tiles. Homewares at Paris em Lisboa. Sheep wool rugs and blankets made in the mountains north of Lisbon are sold at the Burel Factory in Chiado. (RIGHT OF PAGE) Grocery shop Mercearia Gomes sells everything from regional foods to traditional wicker baskets

- SHOP LISBON There is an embarrassment of riches for the shopper in Portugal, such as the luscious watermelon plates from Bordallo Pinheiro. For tiles, old and new, hand-painted or factory-made, try Cortiço & Netos, who make up mismatched, retro packs. Innovative hand-crafted ceramics by Catia Pessoa and young artisans can be found at Caulino Ceramics, and a more general line of homewares at A Vida Portuguesa Intendente. Rugs, another traditional craft that has undergone a twenty-first-century redesign, can be found in the Burel Factory in Chiado. Its 100 per cent sheep wool rugs and blankets come from the mountains in the north. For fine linens and cottons, try Paris em Lisboa, behind a beautiful art nouveau façade. The recently opened Claus Porto shop is a must for its soaps, now accompanied by a new scent launched with Lyn Harris. 156 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

THE ALENTEJO Handsome, traditionally striped Alentejano floor rugs, still made entirely by hand loom, are best found at Mizette in Monsaraz. In Comporta, Mercearia Gomes is a family grocery like no other, offering everything from regional foodie specialities to wicker baskets for picnics, while at nearby Lavanda, espadrilles, pottery and boho-chic clothing are eclectically piled under a simple thatched roof. But all of Alentejo brims with small artisanal shops and ateliers. Every town has its craft, from rugs woven since the twelfth century in Arraiolos to the candied plums of Elvas and in between the towns, olive groves yield an intense fruity oil and vines deliver famously full-bodied reds 첸


W I N A N E XC LUS I V E F OU R- N IG H T S TAY O N M Y KO N O S , WO RT H £3 ,0 0 0 Yo u r c o m p l i m e n t a r y s t a y i n c l u d e s + FOUR NIGHTS BED AND BREAKFAST

+DINNER AT BUDDHA-BAR BEACH

At the Santa Marina Resort & Villas, overlooking Ornos Bay Enjoy dinner for two at Buddha-Bar Beach, which offers and the beautiful Aegean Sea. The hotel has a private beach signature cocktails, seafood and Asian fusion cuisine. and a collection of newly refurbished rooms and suites.

+RETURN FLIGHTS FOR TWO PEOPLE From any UK airport to Mykonos, up to the value of £250 per person. Plus return airport transfers from Mykonos airport to the hotel (a 15-minute drive).

+SPA TREATMENT AND SPEEDBOAT Indulge in a 50-minute spa treatment per person in the new Ginkgo spa, which boasts a state-of-the-art gym overlooking the infinity pool. Plus, take a private trip around the bay on Santa Marina’s speedboat.

T o e n t e r, g o t o h o u s e a n d g a r d e n . c o . u k / a r t i c l e / w i n - a - h o l i d a y - t o - m y k o n o s ALL ENTRIE S MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE THE CLOSING DATE OF MAY 2, 2018

TERMS AND CONDITIONS Reservations must be made in advance | All requests are subject to availability | Prize is valid until October 10, 2019 | The hotel is seasonal and is open May 11–October 14, 2018. It will reopen mid-May 2019 to mid-October 2019 | Prize cannot be taken in July or August 2018 & 2019 | Open to guests aged 18+ | Prize includes 2 x flights up to the value of £250 per person from any UK airport to Mykonos Prize based on two people sharing a twin or double room | There is no cash alternative to this prize and there is no alternative prize if the winner is unable to travel for any reason | The prize is nontransferable and is to be used by the registered prize winner | The winner is responsible for travel insurance | Speedboat ride is weather dependent | More information and full T&Cs are on the website

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 157


TEXT CHARLOTTE SINCLAIR | PHOTOGRAPHS PAUL MASSEY

BACK TO THE FUTURE IN A UNIQUE LOCATION THAT BRIDGES BEACH AND FOREST, THE STRIKING PODS OF WILD COAST TENTED LODGE IN SRI LANKA PROVIDE A BASE FOR A PIONEERING TAKE ON THE SAFARI

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HOTELS BY DESIGN

(OPPOSITE) The teak-shingled dining room and bar area are seen in the distance. Their shapes reflect the smooth lozenges of rock that are scattered over the landscape around the lodge

(THIS PAGE) The roof of the dining room was constructed from a web of bamboo and steel. The chandelier repurposes bamboo offcuts


HOTELS BY DESIGN

The interiors continue the organic-industrialcolonial explorer theme. The official aesthetic is ‘Jules Verne meets Steampunk’

(THIS PAGE) The dining room was built by a team of retrained local fishermen 160 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

(OPPOSITE) One of the 28 PVC-tented cocoon rooms, which has an angled glass wall at one end as well as its own swimming pool


(THIS PAGE) The wraparound infinity pool adjoins the dining room, which has been furnished in earthy tones to reflect the surrounding terrain

(OPPOSITE LEFT) An urchin tent with a pale PVC skin stretched over a steel exoskeleton, with porthole windows

(OPPOSITE RIGHT) The beach aspect of the resort gives guests a unique safari experience, enabling boat voyages out to sea to watch blue whales


HOTELS BY DESIGN

t the south-eastern corner of Sri Lanka, spreading inland from a coastline where waves crash upon the sand with a ferocity rarely seen in the Indian Ocean, green hills rise from jungled interiors at such regular intervals that the horizon resembles a cardiograph. Each hillock is stacked with smooth lozenges of rock, upon which ancient stupas decay and leopards climb to survey the panorama. Much of this land is dedicated to Yala National Park – hence the leopards, numbering 200 at last count – and it is within the park’s adjacent buffer zone that Sri Lankan hotelier Malik Fernando has sited his latest opening, Wild Coast Tented Lodge, under his Resplendent Ceylon label. The property, five-and-a-half hours’ drive or a 30-minute seaplane flight from Colombo, occupies a thickly wooded acreage of jungle, fronted by high, wind-sculpted dunes and wave-bashed inlets. It is the beach, a rarely encountered facet of safari, that lends this spot its unique aspect: guests can voyage by boat to nearby deep water channels where blue whales can be seen. If this is safari with a twist, then the largest surprise comes by way of the lodge’s rooms. Working

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with Netherlands-based architects Nomadic Resorts, Malik conceived the idea of 28 tented ‘cocoons’ positioned around water holes or facing the beach. Each cocoon comprises a pale PVC skin stretched over steel exoskeletons with angled glass walls at each end, which give the structures a uniquely futuristic appearance. The resulting whole – set with porthole windows – resembles part butterfly chrysalis, part Zeppelin, part UFO. The interiors continue the organic-industrialcolonial explorer theme, with copper piping washstands and bathtubs from Jaipur contrasting with teak floorboards, Turkish rugs and leather campaign chairs. Particularly beautiful is the effect of the internal canvas shell, which is laced together over the structure’s steel braces, creating elegant lines that arch high above the four-poster beds. The official aesthetic, as described by Malik and Dutch interior designers Bo Reudler Studio is ‘Jules Verne meets Steampunk’. And there are eight ‘urchin’ tents, too, designed with families in mind, which are tapered and teardrop-shape, their metal-framed pods overstretched with PVC and similarly spacecraft-like in appearance. For all the fun of the design, there is sophistication at work here, too, and an abiding attempt to HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 163


merge with and respond to the lodge’s setting. This idea is articulated not only in the reliance on solar power, greywater recycling and locally sourced food, but also in the bones of the architecture itself. The dining room, with its bar, library and wraparound infinity pool, is like a vaulted cathedral created from a web of bamboo and steel and topped by teak shingles, the silhouette evoking the soft planes of the area’s rock formations. It is a feat of construction and engineering performed by a team of local fishermen, retrained in carpentry after an overseas contractor dropped out. A clay nook houses the library, and the same hand-smoothed clay has been used to carve dining booths, seating areas and a bridge that connects the bar and the restaurant over the pool. Copper lights, ochre cushions, and winecoloured leather chairs echo the sun-scorched palette of the surrounding terrain. Safari here is accessed by liveried vehicle in a matter of minutes. Oven-hot afternoons are spent cruising the lakes and forest tracks of the park in the company of expert guides, spotting crocodiles and elephants and the main draw, leopards. It is important to note, however, that this is not safari as practised in Africa. Yala is a bustling, busy park, 164 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

with Tarmac roads and trucks packed with schoolchildren. There are holidaying locals, backpackers and tourists, and multiple vehicles per sighting, but the guides are experts in timing guests’ visits to avoid the crowds and offering unique privileges such as afternoon tea on a bend in the river. Then there are the lodge’s further enticements: the blue whales, the important Hindu pilgrimage site of the temple of Kataragama, not to mention the lazy pleasures of an afternoon spent by the pool. Malik recently secured permission to create a conservancy in the buffer zone, to allow for private wildlife encounters by foot or bicycle. Not that the animals are aware of any limits to their movement. Elephants regularly enter the camp to investigate the kitchen block, or to seek out the lodge’s watering holes. And leopard pawprints are often found in the sand – proof not only of these predators’ presence but also, perhaps, of their approval of this new arrival on their patch 첸 Charlotte Sinclair stayed as a guest of Wild Coast Tented Lodge (resplendentceylon.com). Scott Dunn (020-8682 5060; scottdunn.com) offers seven nights in Sri Lanka from £2,900pp, including two nights at Wild Coast Tented Lodge, B&B*

*INCLUDES INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS, TRANSFERS, AND A CINNAMON AIR SCHEDULED AIR TAXI FLIGHT FROM COLOMBO TO HAMBANTOTA

HOTELS BY DESIGN


(OPPOSITE LEFT) The copper bath was sourced from Jaipur, with teak floorboards setting a warm tone for the interior

(OPPOSITE RIGHT) Copper piping has been fashioned into washstands for an industrial feel

(THIS PAGE) The beds have also been made from piping. The internal canvas shell has been laced together over the steel structure


HOTELS BY DESIGN


TAKING THE STAGE IN THE HEART OF COPENHAGEN’S CULTURAL DISTRICT, EX-BALLET DANCER ALEXANDER KØLPIN HAS DRAWN ON HIS THEATRICAL BACKGROUND TO CREATE A RICH AND STYLISH NARRATIVE FOR HIS NEW HOTEL TEXT EMILY TOBIN | PHOTOGRAPHS ANDERS SCHØNNEMANN

(OPPOSITE) Sanders Kitchen, the restaurant (THIS PAGE) Hotel owner Alexander Kølpin HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 167


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HOTELS BY DESIGN

(OPPOSITE) A bedroom with a tactile wicker headboard, a lamp from Marshall Phillips and art curated by Dais Contemporary

(THIS PAGE TOP ROW) Sixties pieces, including an Italian glass and brass coffee table and a smoked glass chandelier, dress the sitting area in one of the suites. The sofa is by Alter London and the table lamps are from The Lamp Factory

(THIS PAGE BOTTOM LEFT) The stained timber and Italian marble kitchen in the same suite was designed by Lind + Almond, with a table and chairs from Klassik Copenhagen

(THIS PAGE BOTTOM RIGHT) A velvet-covered armchair and footstool in the suite’s bathroom was another of Lind + Almond’s designs

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(THIS PAGE) The reception area is furnished with velvet chairs, with leather-bound books lining the shelves (OPPOSITE) A waitress in a uniform by Older Paris


HOTELS BY DESIGN

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otel Sanders is achingly chic; founded by the celebrated exballet dancer Alexander Kølpin, and located in the hear t of Copenhagen’s cultural district, it couldn’t really be anything but. The leap from dancer to hotelier is not quite as far-fetched as it sounds. Alexander is the son of a fashion designer and an architect, his family already owns two hotels on the northern coast of Denmark and he joined the business in 2008. ‘I’m a storyteller,’ he says. ‘It is the fabric I am made from. I have spent my life focusing on narrative and a hotel is no different to a performance. The guest is the audience and the hotel is the stage.’ Once upon a time, Hotel Sanders was Hotel Opera – three neoclassical town houses dating from 1869 frequented by a starry roster of actors, singers and artists, but latterly somewhat down at heel. However, what it lacked in mod cons, it more than made up for in location – not only does Alexander live in the neighbourhood, but his old place of work, the Royal Danish Theatre, is just around the corner, as is contemporary art gallery Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the Amalienborg Palace and Nyhavn – the famous confection of kaleidoscopic coloured houses. Alexander bought the place in 2016 and work began straight away. London design studio Lind + Almond was brought on board to oversee the interiors. Pernille Lind and Richy Almond, the founders, who had previously worked with Soho House, Tom Dixon and Terence Conran, collaborated closely with Alexander to achieve his vision. ‘It was a dynamic dialogue between the three of us,’ he explains. ‘I see myself as an art director or a creative producer who needs to work with skilled designers who can translate my ideas into concrete plans.’ The result is a space that blurs the lines between a hotel, private club and very glamorous house. In addition to 54 bedrooms, there is the TATA cocktail bar – a suitably lavish spot for hunkering down, Sanders Kitchen, which spills into an external courtyard, and a rooftop conservatory kitted out with elegant bamboo screens and squashy sofas. With nods to Ett Hem in Stockholm and Chiltern Firehouse in London, the reception area at Sanders is decked out with velvet armchairs, leather-bound books, real fires and a vast Murano chandelier by Carlo Scarpa. Much of the furniture is bespoke and the attention to detail is exacting – there are hessian walls on the top floor, rattan ceilings on the floor below, and the staff uniforms are designed by Older Paris. Banish thoughts of sensible black blazers and pencil skirts – the look here is much more theatrical. When I arrive, I am met by Julie von Sperling, head of guest relations, who is sporting a full-length silk dress, while the waitresses in the restaurant wear fine-knit jerseys in a shade of rust most likely found on a Farrow & Ball colour card. Sanders is not of the Scandinavian school of minimalism; the palette here is refined and earthy, with bedrooms painted in shades of ochre, sage and tobacco. Much of the furniture is bespoke and the artwork, largely by emerging artists, was curated by Dais Contemporary – an art consultancy based in London. The hotel exudes comfort and glamour without being remotely stuffy or pretentious. Alexander has played his role as director impeccably, conjuring up a decadent and stylish world while simultaneously making his guests feel entirely at ease 첸

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Hotel Sanders: 00-45-46 40 00 40; hotelsanders.com. Double rooms start at £366 a night, B&B HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 171


ALCHEMY IN ACTION TEXT KENDALL HILL | PHOTOGRAPHS SHARYN CAIRNS

The hotel’s 30-metre infinity pool and deck area 172 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


HOTELS BY DESIGN

COMBINING DARKLY DRAMATIC DECORATION AND CULT INDUSTRIAL DESIGN WITH THE MAGICAL SETTING OF AUSTRALIA’S MORNINGTON PENINSULA, JACKALOPE IS BRINGING A DOSE OF THE AVANT-GARDE TO MELBOURNE


HOTELS BY DESIGN

rom the gravel driveway fringed with Chardonnay vines, guests arriving at Jackalope see only a trim homestead crowned with chimney cowls shaped like fat hens. Not until they crest a low rise does this daring new Australian hotel reveal its dark sides. To the left of the 1876 farmhouse, a gleaming bunker clad in inky zinc and charred timber dominates the ridgetop. To the right, a glossy black sculpture looms seven metres above a small piazza, giving dramatic form to the hotel’s mythical namesake. Jackalope is the most avant-garde Australian hotel to open in years, making its debut on the prosperous, rather staid Mornington Peninsula seem all the more radical. Melbourne’s answer to The Hamptons, the peninsula is a patchwork of vineyards and orchards, pasturelands and eucalypt forest distinguished by some of the continent’s priciest real estate. Long renowned for its superior wines, some exceptional dining and around 200 kilometres of beaches, until now there has been nowhere decent to stay – in part because it is only an hour’s drive from the city, but also because many regular visitors already own beach houses here. It took an outsider to shake up the established order. Chinese Louis Li (pictured above) arrived in Melbourne nine years ago to study film and, in April last year, revealed this most cinematic of hotels. That nineteenth-century homestead now houses a sleek reception flanked by a 1,500-bottle wine vault and a cocktail bar called Flaggerdoot, apparently inspired by the psychoactive visuals of David Lynch. Neon ceiling tubes run like neurons between rows of laboratory vessels and Rolf Sachs’ chemistry-set-inspired light,

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(OPPOSITE TOP) A glossy black sculpture of a jackalope by Emily Floyd stands in the centre of a piazza in front of the hotel

(OPPOSITE BOTTOM) Asymmetrical windows frame views of the adjoining vineyard from the Geode, a spa and bar pavilion beside the pool. The wall design is inspired by the formation of crystals


HOTELS BY DESIGN

(OPPOSITE) Doot Doot Doot restaurant, where a 10,000-bulb ceiling installation by Jan Flook is suspended above terrazzo tabletops. (THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) A dish created by chef Guy Stanaway (also bottom right). Rare Hare, the cellar-door bistro. A neon sign at the entrance. The Flaggerdoot bar. The vineyards to the west of the hotel. Guest rooms signage in the corridor. Doot Doot Doot. Neon ceiling tubes line a dark corridor HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 177


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illuminating a gallery of cult industrial design. This spans gold leather armchairs by Edra’s Fernando and Humberto Campana to a striking ‘Stag Bench’ by Rick Owens. (The hotel as art gallery phenomenon is well established in Australia, but Jackalope’s elite eclecticism feels utterly original.) Beside the bar lies Doot Doot Doot, the hotel’s signature restaurant where ex-Aman Resorts chef Guy Stanaway creates five-course menus that have already earned his dining room the antipodean equivalent of a Michelin star (known as a Chef Hat). Seated at gold-flecked terrazzo tabletops beneath a pulsating, 10,000-bulb ceiling installation by Jan Flook, from Victoria, and savouring the first mouthful of Stanaway’s smoked vanilla ice cream with Yarra Valley salmon roe, is enough to convince any epicure this is an experience deserving of their full attention. Beyond, in a dark, duplex corridor lit by neon alchemical symbols and astrological signs, are the hotel’s 46 rooms and suites. More understated than public areas, they are imbued with moody monochrome hues accented with sheer metallic drapes and bathroom tiling in gold, silver and copper. Top suites, known as ‘Lairs’, feature nest chairs by Istanbul design studio Autoban, tables by Moooi and toiletries by Melbourne natural skincare brand Hunter Lab, touted as the new Aesop. The broad terraces of west-facing smaller ‘Dens’ capture vineyard views reflected in the 30-metre black infinity

The hotel as art gallery phenomenon is well established in Australia, but Jackalope’s elite eclecticism feels utterly original pool, vivid sunsets and, if you are as lucky as I was, a double rainbow over the vines just after dawn. It is a magical setting. A word about the wording is probably in order. The jackalope is a North American mythical beast – part jackrabbit, part antelope – that first caught Louis’ eye at a Berlin antique shop. His spirit animal has been given sculptural form in Emily Floyd’s monumental figure guarding the hotel entrance. Doot Doot Doot is the name of the head of the pack. A flaggerdoot is the collective noun for jackalopes. Yes, it is an offbeat theme. But so is alchemy, the ambient design reference that informs every aspect of the hotel – from the Sachs installation to gilded garden tools in the landscaped grounds. ‘You have to take risks,’ Louis says. ‘I always think the guest doesn’t know what they want until they see it.’ It seems Louis, whose family has hotel interests (Hyatt, Banyan Tree) in Yunnan Province, might be on the money. Less than a year after opening, the hotel’s cellar-door bistro Rare Hare, an agreeably rustic space of brick and timber with open fires and glass-walled panoramas, has been such a hit that weekend diners now routinely wait two hours for a table. On the menu: Negroni-cured trout with horseradish cream; beef tartare spiked with chipotle; and Willow Creek winemaker Geraldine McFaul’s exceptional wines. Likewise, Saturday nights at the hotel are booked out five months in advance, with a minimum two-night stay at weekends 첸 Kendall Hill travelled as a guest of Jackalope (00-61-3-5931 2500; jackalopehotels.com). Rooms start at AU$650 (£370) a night, B&B 178 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

(OPPOSITE TOP) The lounge and event space, which converts into a private dining room, opening onto a tasting terrace

(OPPOSITE BOTTOM) A ‘Lair’ room, one of the hotel’s top-tier suites. The rooms and suites are more understated than the public areas, with monochrome colours accented by sheer metallic drapes


HOTELS BY DESIGN

WHO GOES WHERE DESIGN INSIDERS REVEAL THE HOTELS THEY RETURN TO TIME AND AGAIN

WHO Patrick Frey, president and creative director of fabric house Pierre Frey WHERE Number Sixteen, Sumner Place, London SW7 ( firmdalehotels.com) WHY ‘Kit Kemp’s sense of eclecticism and fantasy, and the way she mixes colour and texture are unique. I love the Crosby Street Hotel in New York, but Number Sixteen, an elegant, white stucco town house in London’s South Kensington, is, for me, the perfect stylish bolthole. At the back is a beautiful tree-filled garden.’ 180 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

WHO Natalia Miyar, architect and interior designer WHERE L’Ôtel Chiquitos, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico (l-otelgroup.com) WHY ‘With just four guest rooms, this hotel, which I’ve been going to since I was a child, feels more like the gracious, supremely comfortable home of a friend. A perfectly curated collection of art and antiques blends with terracotta tiled floors, open fireplaces and a rooftop terrace with exquisite views of the colonial city.’

WHO Australian-born, London-based interior designer Peter Mikic WHERE Villa TreVille, Positano, Italy (villatreville.com) WHY ‘Once home to director and producer Franco Zeffirelli, and with a roll call of famous visitors, this small hotel is a gem. Throughout there are exquisite Majolica tiles from nearby Vietri, but the Moorish-inspired Salone Bianco bar, with its cosy terrace overlooking the Amalfi Coast, is my favourite room beyond doubt.’

WHO Textile and accessory designer Neisha Crosland WHERE Jnane Tamsna, Marrakech, Morocco (jnanetamsna.com) WHY ‘Chic, colourful and relaxed is how I’d best describe this beautiful hotel in the Palmeraie of Marrakech, which has been my go-to place for years. Not only does the hotel look good, it also smells good – the scent of jasmine, mint, lavender and rosemary wafting in from exquisite, oasis-style gardens’ 첸

TEXT: PAMELA GOODMAN. PHOTOGRAPHS: DARREN CHUNG; NGOC MINH NGO; FELIX CLAY

ILLUSTRATIONS DAMIEN CUYPERS


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Inspirational INTERIORS, beautiful GARDENS, fascinating people, compelling stories

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200 The seating area in this house in rural Columbia County, New York, has a view of its woodland surroundings

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Distinct presence Designer Ben Pentreath has given each room in this reconfigured Arts and Crafts house its own personality, combining colour and texture with interesting pieces from different periods TEXT ELFREDA POWNALL | PHOTOGRAPHS PAUL MASSEY | LOCATIONS EDITOR GABBY DEEMING

ENTRANCE HALL (both pages) A ‘Sussex’ bench by William Morris and a linocut by Edward Bawden stand out against the panelling, which is painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Shaded White’. Near the doors to the drawing room is a Thirties table from Holly Johnson

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DRAWING ROOM In this room a ‘Nureyev’ brass bar cart from Soane contrasts with a nineteenth-century library table from Max Rollitt, the top of which is covered in a hand-dyed linen by Polly Lyster. A ‘Wardour’ sofa from The Conran Shop is covered in Soane’s ‘Old Flax’ in grey, while the pink sofa is Howard Chairs’ ‘Ivor’. Ben designed the ottoman, which is upholstered in a fabric by Claremont Furnishing. It sits on a Luke Irwin rug

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KITCHEN (both pages) Ben designed the cabinets, which were made by Symm and painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Hague Blue’. In the dining area, a runner by Roger Oates was turned into a rug. The bespoke table was made by Christopher Clark Workshops

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STUDY (opposite) The orange ottoman in this room was designed by Ben and covered in a Pierre Frey fabric with a Samuel & Sons braid. DINING ROOM (this page) The mid-century pendant light was designed by Gaetano Sciolari for Stilnovo

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e call this colour “freshly laid cowpat”,’ says the designer Ben Pentreath of the greenybrown grasscloth used on the bedroom walls of this house in north London. ‘That’s how we sold it to the owner.’ Ben is particularly fond of this colour; he used it in his own house, which was featured in House & Garden in August 2016. She laughs and admits to being totally sold on Ben, who has helped her make some brave decisions. The house, built in 1910, in an area of Arts and Crafts houses, was dark and very tired when she and her husband bought it four years ago. ‘There were lots of small rooms, but no obvious main sitting room,’ says her husband. Chris Pask of Charlton Brown Architects had just begun the task of turning two ground-floor rooms into one big drawing room when Ben came on board. ‘The first thing was restoring the panelling in here to emphasise its Arts and Crafts sensibility,’ says Ben. His office drew the design and it was made by Symm, along with the rest of the joinery. ‘I wanted this room to feel calm and soothing,’ adds Ben, looking round at the neutral tones of the paint, fabrics and rush matting. Ben’s interiors are known for a layered feeling, a mix of objects of different eras and styles, so his rooms appear to have been put together over many years. The layers in the drawing room include a Sixties-style brass cocktail trolley, twentieth-century abstract paintings, vivid Svenskt Tenn cushions, a nineteenthcentury mahogany library table, a Chinese bowl and some mochaware mugs arranged, with bashed-butbeautiful brass candlesticks, on the mantelpiece. There are many other touches of brass throughout the house, but the Seventies-inspired dining room, with its grasscloth walls, is the brassiest of all. A mirrorbrass sideboard, designed for the room by Rupert Bevan, reflects the maze pattern of the rug, and there are chunky brass candlesticks on the table with a Stilnovo mid-century hanging light overhead. If the dining room is perfect for entertaining, the kitchen is a scene of architectural piety. In a handsome new wing, Chris has paid tribute to Edwin Lutyens’ majestic kitchen at Castle Drogo, Devon, finished in 1930. Daylight floods in from the central dome and from curved windows in the arched walls, lighting a vast marble-topped island. Beside the metal doors, made by Clement, that lead to the kitchen garden, there is an oak table in the Arts and Crafts style. The rush-seated Ernest Gimson-inspired chairs were made by the Warwickshire-based craftsman Lawrence Neal. The pendulum swings back to the mid century in the small office space next to the kitchen, with its Danish rosewood desk and orange Hans J Wegner ‘Wishbone’ chair, and continues into an informal sitting room nearby, with walls in a graphic print fabric and a cheery yellow roman blind in Christopher Farr Cloth’s ‘Meander’ linen.

Up the stairs, a William Morris wallpaper is the background for a grid of framed pressed ferns. A spare room, which opens directly off the landing, is papered in Morris & Co’s vivid ‘Fruit’ pattern. ‘I’ve always loved William Morris, but I would never have dared to put those wallpapers so close together,’ says the owner. Things are quieter in the main bedroom, where the grasscloth walls provide a calm background for a yellow sofa in the bay window and a beautiful table at the end of the bed. Its shape looks convincingly midcentury, but it was designed in the Pentreath office and made by Rupert Bevan. Concealed on the underside of the hinged tabletop – with clever springs and no trailing wires – is a television screen. The adjoining dressing room has two walls of cupboards with ikat fabric panels. It leads to a glorious bathroom, papered in Morris & Co’s ‘Willow Boughs’, with brass-framed mirrored cabinets and a brass stand for the twin sinks. In the attic, the husband’s study has views over the red-tiled roofs of other houses of the era and reflects their colouring in its dark panelled walls. These are joined by a claret wing chair, a green sofa and an orange ottoman. ‘The husband especially wanted a dark panelled room. They both have strong tastes and are such good fun,’ says Ben. Both agree working with him has been a joy – for his efficiency, and for a home that is fascinating to look at and easy to live in. It has also introduced them to new things: they now collect, among other things, Arts and Crafts furniture, Edward Bawden paintings and Sixties glassware. It is a house with as many layers as a mille-feuille 첸 (Continued overleaf) HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 189


MAIN BEDROOM (below from let) Beside a Luke Irwin rug is a sofa covered in Manuel Canovas ‘Kansas’ fabric, in the anis colourway, from Colefax and Fowler. DRESSING ROOM (bottom left) The cupboards in this room, which leads into the main bathroom, are lined with a Robert Kime ikat

SPARE ROOM (above right and opposite) Douglas Watson Studio supplied the tiles for the unusual ireplace. On the floor is an antique kilim. The bedside table is from Christopher Hodsoll Ben Pentreath: benpentreath.com Charlton Brown Architects: charltonbrown.com 190 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


AC T I N G ON IMPULSE A spontaneous viewing led to a quick purchase for Miranda Alexander, but her Dorset house, made up of two buildings from different periods, has turned out to be the perfect fit TEXT ROS BYAM SHAW | PHOTOGRAPHS SIMON UPTON | LOCATIONS EDITOR LIZ ELLIOT

EXTERIOR (this page) Ater she bought the house, Miranda discovered that this area has ‘some of the most beautiful countryside in England’. The building at the front, which dates from the 1830s, has a symmetrical façade. Visible behind is the original medieval house HALL (opposite) Above the front door is an arched fanlight. The wallpaper is ‘Adam’s Eden’ from Lewis & Wood


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THERE ARE AS MANY TALES OF FINDING THE IDEAL HOME AS THERE ARE PEOPLE T O T E L L T H E M. Miranda Alexander’s purchase of an old rectory on the edge of a Dorset village must be one of the shortest and sweetest. ‘Pure serendipity,’ she calls it. ‘I saw a picture the size of a postage stamp illustrating an article about unfitted kitchens and underneath it mentioned that the house was for sale. Something happened inside me – some intuition – and I contacted the agent, jumped in the car and hurtled down from London to see it. I knew I wanted to buy it the minute the back door opened.’ Five years later, here she sits, in the kitchen she spotted in that tiny picture, as happily at home as if her ownership of it had been meticulously planned half a lifetime ago. The simplicity and spontaneity of Miranda’s story is due only in part to circumstance: her temperament, she says, is impulsive and intuitive. She knew very little of this area – ‘I was born and bred in London; I have Tarmac in my veins,’ she says. ‘But the countryside has always exerted a pull. My grown-up children and my granddaughter love coming here; it’s a wonderful antidote to city life. I discovered after the event that the village is on the edge of some of the most beautiful countryside in England.’ She also realised that a friend lived nearby, through whom she has since made many more. Miranda still has a house in London, but she now lives here more than half the year. ‘I’ll always be a “blow-in”, but people have been open and welcoming. I feel very lucky.’ She is currently helping to run the Bridport Literary Festival. Friendships and the glories of the Dorset scenery aside, the house proved as attractive as the glimpse of its kitchen promised, accessed up a farm lane, sited on a gentle slope near the church, with cows grazing in a field of buttercups over the garden hedge. It also has the charm of oddity. It is not one house, but two: one medieval; the other dating from the 1830s. The older house comprises the kitchen and next to it four smaller rooms – a larder where once there would have been a staircase, a sitting room, a study and a utility room. The later house

DRAWING ROOM Little Greene’s ‘Pearl Colour’ provides a backdrop for Miranda’s art collection, including Chard by Binny Mathews, who was born in Dorset. The painting over the mirror is by Fred Cuming. The sofa is covered in ‘Olive Sacking’ by Guy Goodfellow Collection HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 195


sits directly in front of its older sibling; it is joined to it by a staircase that fills part of the gap between the two. When you are inside, this peculiarity is not apparent – the only giveaway is a stone mullioned window in the study next to the kitchen, which faces the back wall of the later building. In all other respects, the layout seems perfectly rational. The kitchen is at the back – a big room with a fireplace big enough to house a four-oven Aga and a floor flagged in squares of blue lias stone. Opposite the back door, which leads straight into the kitchen, is another door that opens into a central hall with the staircase rising on the left. Ahead is the front door and on either side are two nicely proportioned rooms: a drawing room and another sitting room. There is a sense of progression from the vernacular informality of the kitchen to the country classicism of these two rooms at the front. Outside, the architectural discrepancy is more obvious. Approaching the house by car, you arrive at the back to see casement windows and the steep pitch of a roof that once supported thatch. Follow the path around the side of the house to its front garden and you are greeted by a façade of Regency symmetry, with sash windows and a door with an arched fanlight. Most of the changes Miranda has made to the house have been to the exterior, including knocking down a modern garage and removing a twentieth-century porch from the back door. Inside, she says, she has done very little structurally. ‘I brought down some favourite bits from London and

KITCHEN (both pages) A photograph of this room is what irst drew Miranda to the house. She inherited the blue lias stone floor, the Aga and much of the furniture from the previous owners, but the Regency dining chairs are a more recent addition 196 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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MAIN BEDROOM Miranda bought the rug in this room from Rare Rugs in Church Street, NW8

SPARE ROOM A spiral staircase, painted white to match the f loorboards in this bedroom, leads to a bathroom on the f loor above

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trawled the amazing antique shops of Bridport to fill the gaps.’ The previous owners were antique dealers and left some of their larger pieces of furniture in place. The unfitted kitchen, with its scrubbed-pine table, is much as it was in that picture. Miranda added some unusual Regency chairs, antique china and a green French garden chair. In the drawing and sitting rooms at the front of the house, the furniture is her own, including the Sean Cooper sofas. The sitting room had lost its fireplace, as had the main bedroom, so she found chimneypieces in architectural salvage shops on Golborne Road, W10. The main bedroom and bathroom sit at the front of the house, with the spare rooms and second bathroom at the back. For her bedroom curtains, Miranda chose ‘Olander’ embroidered linen from Colefax and Fowler in a darker shade of the duck-egg blue on the walls. The main bathroom’s seaweed wallpaper was designed by her aunt, Min Hogg, the founding editor of The World of Interiors. Miranda describes her own taste as ‘English and traditional’, but there is originality in her choices – the Guy Goodfellow stripe on the drawing room sofa, for example, is used horizontally – and ample evidence of her eye for colour and for interesting objects. ‘I was influenced by my grandmother, Polly Hogg, whom I adored,’ she says. ‘She used to take me to see gardens and antiques, and to the Victoria & Albert Museum.’ Nicky Haslam described Polly in his memoir as having ‘humour, taste and understated elegance’. Miranda has inherited them all 첸

BATHROOM The seaweed-inspired ‘Sea Sprigs Large’ wallpaper in the main bathroom was designed by Miranda’s aunt Min Hogg


SPARE ROOM Eye-catching textiles provide visual interest in this light and airy bedroom. The quilt is from Oka and the mirrored curtains were ordered specially from India by Warris Vianni & Co in Golborne Road, W10. On the floor is a dhurrie from Guinevere


TEXT DOMINIC BRADBURY | PHOTOGRAPHS RICHARD POWERS

GREEN DREAMS Hidden among trees in rural Columbia County, New York, is a collection of buildings that provide a welcome sense of escape for its owner and reflect his commitment to sustainability


EXTERIOR The timber-framed cabin is covered in charred cedar boards, which provide a dark contrast with the surrounding woodland HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 201


THE BUILDING READS AS A S PA C I O U S L O F T, W I T H A VIVID SENSE OF CONNECTION TO THE LANDSCAPE

LIVING AREA Much of the space in the house is devoted to this open-plan area, which has a screen wall that rises up to section off the mezzanine bedroom (see picture overleaf). The dining table and chairs are Fifties pieces by Arne Hovmand-Olsen, with a vintage French pendant above. The mezzanine seating area has a Plycrat lounge chair and footstool, and a custom cabinet by Mark Jupiter 202 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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rriving at Fox Hall is an adventure in itself. Set among 75 acres of protected woodland and rolling pasture in Columbia County, New York state, it consists of a small but carefully curated collection of buildings and structures. As you make your way up the long and winding driveway, you are greeted initially by a barn with an 1840s salvaged timber frame found in farmland just outside the nearby town of Ghent. Owner Ian Hague used the barn – along with the studio apartment tucked underneath and the natural swimming pool alongside it – as a base while his new home was being built just up the hill. This sophisticated, graphic timber cabin only reveals itself as you make your way through the trees and find yourself in a clearing in the woods. ‘I first came up here because I wanted to do a countryhouse project and was looking for the most beautiful place I could find at a reasonable price and with a degree of solitude,’ says Ian, a fund manager based in New York, who shares Fox Hall with his two grown-up children. ‘I wanted something country-ish but also something modern that would provide a contrast with the natural environment. I started looking at these beautiful images of barns and cabins from Scandinavia and soon I had all these pictures in my mind. But, at the same time, it was important to me that the house should be light on the land.’ Ian’s ambition for original architecture, a tailored home and a sustainable approach led him to the architectural practice BarlisWedlick, which worked out a programme for the estate and constructed the barn while f inishing off plans for the main house. Modest in scale and tucked into the hillside and among the trees, this building was designed as a retreat for Ian and his close family and friends. A spare bedroom and den are set on a lower level by the entrance, but the majority of the house is devoted to a double-height, open-plan living space, plus a mezzanine main bedroom. The building as a whole reads as a spacious rural loft, with a vivid sense of connection to the landscape, although a dividing screen wall can be lifted out of

DINING AREA (this page top) A Forties portrait of Stalin presides over the dining table. TOWER (this page middle and bottom) A new three-storey tower beside the main house includes a sauna, screened outdoor dining area and lookout level. SEATING AREA AND KITCHEN (opposite both pictures) The concrete kitchen worktops were supplied by Get Real Surfaces in New York, while the bar stools are from Bassam Fellows. The Environment sofa, made of recycled tent fabric and reclaimed wood, sits on a rug from Sacco 204 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


BESPOKE ELEMENTS BLEND W I T H C ON T E M P OR A RY P I E C E S AND MID - CENTURY TREASURE S FROM ANTIQUE STORES


the f loor with a winding mechanism to provide some privacy for the bedroom when it is needed. ‘It is a very private retreat, tailored to Ian’s needs,’ says architect Alan Barlis. ‘Unless you know where it is or you are looking for it, you wouldn’t even see the house. Ian does have guests and parties, but all of that tends to happen down at the barn. The house works well for one person – it’s all about the idea of having a room in the landscape and being at one with nature.’ The exterior of the timber-framed cabin is coated in charred cedar boards, which stand out under the green canopy of the trees. Inside, Ian and the architects opted for simplicity, modernity and warmth, which interior designer Elaine Santos, of BarlisWedlick, describes as ‘neo Shaker’. Bespoke elements blend with contemporary pieces and mid-century treasures sourced in Brooklyn and the antique stores of nearby city Hudson. An oil painting of Stalin is an ironic touch, with his firm gaze keeping order at the dinner table; the choice reflects the fact that Ian has a long-standing interest in twentieth-century Soviet art, having spent many years travelling to Russia for work. Ian’s requests for a screened porch and a sauna were fused with his interest in building a tree house when Alan suggested a three-storey tower a stone’s throw away from the cabin. The concrete base holds the sauna – which is heated by a wood-burning stove – with a screened, fresh-air dining room above this. It is crowned by a lookout level among the treetops, complete with a swinging sofa. Getting the sauna going, particularly in the winter months, is a ritual in itself, but one that Ian takes great pleasure in. The commitment to sustainability shared by Ian and BarlisWedlick is threaded through the design approach. Materials are either recycled or recyclable, while power for the estate and Ian’s Tesla electric car is provided by a solar array on the roof of the barn. Battery storage holds back-up power, with any excess sold back to the grid. Fox Hall has been designed as a passive house, to use very little energy, and has a natural, chemical-free swimming pool. Ian has created a conservancy to protect the trees and the landscape here. His commitment to sustainability is a ref lection of his true passions and his love for a very special parcel of the Hudson Valley countryside. ‘I love the fact that it’s so different here in each and every season,’ says Ian. ‘In the winter, you have the mantle of snow and the warm, cosy feeling of being buttoned up inside. In the spring, when the grass is coming in and the branches are budding, you can feel the activity of nature coming back. In the summer, when it’s hot and lazy, you get that feeling of the abundance of everything. They are wonderful seasonal impressions that change over the months. You begin to feel it the moment you come up the driveway and all your cares melt away’ 첸 BarlisWedlick Architects: barliswedlick.com

BEDROOM (opposite) A macramé wallhanging decorates the wall behind the custom bed, with lights from Schoolhouse Electric on either side. The plywood rocking chair is from Onefortythree, and the ‘Souk Wool Rug’ is from West Elm. BATHROOM (this page top and middle) Tiles from Mosaic House and Daltile cover the walls and floor of the bathroom. The bath is from Signature Hardware, with taps and ittings from Waterworks. GARAGE AND STORE (this page bottom) This grass-topped structure is one of a collection of smaller outbuildings HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 207


KITCHEN (this page) Pendant lights by Michael Anastassiades add a modern twist to this classic kitchen, in contrast with the marble-topped painted cabinets

Bold comfort The owners of this end of terrace in north London called upon designer Suzy Hoodless to help them add colour, pattern and a dose of fun to its restored and extended Victorian bones TEXT EMMA J PAGE | PHOTOGRAPHS ELSA YOUNG | LOCATIONS EDITOR LIZ ELLIOT

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DINING AREA (opposite) The owners added this generous conservatory at the back of the house, featuring three sets of french windows. Muuto ‘Nerd’ chairs expand the palette and a monochrome rug helps tie the look together


SITTING ROOM This silvery grey and dusky pink palette is one that the owner never tires of. Fritz Hansen’s ‘Favn’ sofa is upholstered in a sturdy grey fabric by Kvadrat, while curtains made from Dominique Kiefer ‘Crepe de Lin Démesuré’ linen in rose antique soften the look

t was a desire to add some more vivid brushstrokes to a largely classical canvas that prompted the owners of this four-storey north London town house to turn to designer Suzy Hoodless. A year-long renovation had seen the property’s Victorian bones sensitively restored, but a true revival required some left-field flourishes. ‘I like the contrast between classic architectural features and contemporary interiors,’ says the owner. ‘We had a beautifully traditional backdrop, thanks to the neoclassical approach of our architect Liam O’Connor, but I wanted to mix things up a bit.’ The fact that this is an end terrace gave the couple lots of scope. ‘There aren’t a million and one options when it comes to reconfiguring traditional London houses,’ says the owner. ‘But we benefit here from light on three sides.’ They decided to play to that strength by having a large side extension built, complete with east- and west-facing terraces, adding a conservatory at the rear and comprehensively reworking the internal space. This included returning the kitchen to the basement and introducing an elegant sitting room and library space to the ground f loor. Throughout, cornicing has been reinstated, doorways have been widened and copious integrated storage has been added to manage the demands of a growing family of three young children. The owners have a preference for mid-century pieces, wood, metal, stone and a ‘Nordic colour palette’. By the time the wife met Suzy, she had gathered a few key items, but felt she had run out of steam. ‘We had plenty of design references as common ground, including an appreciation of the works of Giò Ponti and Fornasetti,’ says Suzy. ‘But the owners hadn’t really lived with print, pattern and bolder hues before, so I knew I could add a playful touch.’ Like the bones of the house, the pieces that Suzy inherited provided a solid framework for the ensuing schemes. The owners had a dining table and bench by Valentin Loellmann, defined by their tactile shape, and a pair of geometric rugs in the sitting room and library. Suzy took these prompts and scaled up, adding simple but eyecatching lines, including Fritz Hansen’s classic ‘Favn’ sofa and a vivid chartreuse ‘Papa Bear Chair’ by Hans J Wegner in the sitting room, complemented by leopard print and graphic cushions. Suzy’s robust scheme fulfilled the owners’ brief that fabrics must be ‘indestructible’ to withstand small hands and feet. ‘I love the natural rhythm throughout the house and its surprising spikes in colour,’ says Suzy. ‘Everything here has earned its place.’ The house is studded with statement pieces, yet each is incorporated in an understated way. In the basement dining area, Muuto ‘Nerd’ chairs in an array of hues expand the colour palette, while above a marble-topped kitchen island, a trio of pendants by Michael Anastassiades brings the look up to date. The first-floor children’s bedrooms have plenty of fun touches, including a vivid blue painted mural in the son’s room, as well as bold fabrics and wall hangings. Suzy allayed the owners’ fear that they might tire of these accent colours. ‘Accessories can always be switched to dial down the look,’ she says. ‘The biggest danger lies in not taking a risk at all.’ The second floor, housing the main bedroom, a bathroom, a shower room and two dressing rooms, signals a change of pace with its scheme of soft greys. Here, everything has its place. Shelving in the bedroom and bathroom houses more books from the owners’ collection, while a concealed jib door in the bathroom opens to reveal the wife’s dressing room. The other, belonging to the husband, is connected to the shower room. It was a matter of adding in places and pulling back in others to get the balance just right, explains Suzy, pointing out that walls are painted mostly in Little Greene’s low-key ‘French Grey’. ‘I can always judge the success of a project by how it makes me feel, and I would love all of these pieces in my own home.’ As for the owner, she is enjoying her introduction to colour and pattern. ‘I love living with bold, graphic print – it gives me pleasure every day,’ she says. ‘This house doesn’t have aspirations above its station; the children use every space freely, but utility hasn’t taken over. These are comfortable rooms to be enjoyed and that’s just what we wanted’ 첸

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Suzy Hoodless: 020-7221 8844; suzyhoodless.com | Liam O’Connor: 020-7250 1983; liamoconnor.com 210 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


SITTING ROOM AND LIBRARY The mirrored cofee table was sourced from Mint. A Hans J Wegner ‘Papa Bear Chair’ adds colour, while a cushion in ‘Albert Indigo’ by Sister Parish on the other armchair picks up the sot geometrics of the rug. The library beyond has bespoke shelving


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SECOND-FLOOR LANDING (opposite top let) Two lamps from Blanchard Collective stand on a sideboard with a sculpture by Arne Lindaas STUDY (top right) Ib Kofod-Larsen chairs add to this room’s pared-back aesthetic MAIN BEDROOM (bottom left) This grey, blue and silver scheme features a bespoke nailed headboard covered in Dedar ‘Adamo & Eva’ velvet SHOWER ROOM (bottom right) An arched mirror reflects the shape of a window in the adjacent dressing room CHILD’S ROOM (this page) A painted mural disguises floor-to-ceiling storage. Curtains in Christopher Farr Cloth’s ‘Breakwater’ in lemon add a playful zing


K NOW L E D G E Distinct presence

P O T T E RY

Designer Ben Pentreath has given each room in this reconfigured Arts and Crafts house its own personality, combining colour and texture with interesting pieces from different periods

DISTINCT PRESENCE Pages 182–191

W A L L C OV E R I N G S ‘I love the richness that grasscloth brings; it has so much more depth than a flat paint,’ says designer Ben Pentreath. He has used grasscloths in a number of rooms in this London house, including, from top left: Altfield’s ‘Minka’ (bamboo), 91cm wide, £58 a metre, and Phillip Jeffries’ ‘Manila Hemp’ (truffle brown), 94cm wide, £44 a metre. ‘You do have to warn clients that the joins between panels are visible, but I’ve never minded the effect,’ adds Ben. Elsewhere, he has used beautiful patterned wallpapers by Morris & Co. From bottom left: in a spare room is ‘Fruit’ (lime green/tan) and in the main bathroom is the classic ‘Willow Boughs’ (green). These are sold in 10-metre rolls and cost £73 and £68 respectively, from Style Library. altfield.com | phillipjeffries.com | stylelibrary.com

Decorative mochaware cups are displayed in a line on the mantelpiece in the drawing room. Traditional mochaware – pottery decorated with coloured slip bands and tree-like markings – dates back to the late eighteenth century. Specialist dealer Martyn Edgell provided the mugs in this house. This pearlware mocha mug, circa 1820, is 14.6cm tall and costs £780. martynedgell.com

CHAIR The CHAIRS in the kitchen are by Lawrence Neal, who crafts chairs using rushes from local rivers. This is the ‘Ledbury’, which measures 89 x 56 x 41cm and costs from £391. lawrenceneal chairs.co.uk

CABINET There are touches of brass dotted throughout the house, not least the striking sideboard in the dining room, which is a bespoke design by Rupert Bevan. It is made of American black walnut wrapped in brass, with a nano-lacquer coating to prevent oxidation. The company recently developed a smaller version of the piece, the ‘Polished Brass Cabinet’, which measures 80 x 120 x 60cm and costs from £10,560. rupertbevan.com 214 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

FLOORING To add texture to the hall and drawing room, Ben chose rush matting from Waveney Rush. Its handwoven and hand-sewn ‘Traditional Rush Matting’ costs from £258.21 a square metre. It needs to be sprayed with water once every four to six weeks to prevent it drying out and becoming brittle. waveneyrush.co.uk

PAUL MASSEY; SIMON UPTON; RICHARD POWERS; PIXELATE IMAGING; GARY O’KANE/ELLE DUNN/WALKER GREENBANK; CARLOS TEIXEIRA PHOTOGRAPHY

The


Inspired by the houses in this issue, BETHAN HYATT gives directions on how to achieve similar style

BENCH

STONE FLOOR

AC T I N G ON IMPULSE

Reclaimed Blue Lias Flagstones sells salvaged stone flooring similar to that in Miranda Alexander’s Dorset kitchen; from £150 a square metre. reclaimed blueliasflagstones.com

A spontaneous viewing led to a quick purchase for Miranda Alexander, but her Dorset house, made up of two buildings from different periods, has turned out to be the perfect fit

AC TING ON IMPULSE Pages 192–199

GREEN DREAMS Hidden among trees in rural Columbia County, New York, is a collection of buildings that provide a welcome sense of escape for its owner and reflect his commitment to sustainability

GREEN DREAMS Pages 200 –207

Ilse Crawford’s ‘Settle’ for De La Espada sits well with the minimal furniture in the dining area of this New York state newbuild. In Danish oiled oak, pictured, it measures 131 x 204.8 x 54.5cm and costs £3,096. twentytwentyone.com

PAINT

LIGHT Above her kitchen table, Miranda has hung a white pendant light. The ‘Cobb Rise & Fall Small Pendant’ from Original BTC is similar. It has a shade diameter of 22.5cm and costs £195. originalbtc.com

TABLE Matthew Cox’s oak ‘SAWBUCK TABLE’, £2,640, is very like the one in the kitchen. It measures 74 x 160 x 70cm. matthewcox.com

FABRICS Indulging her ‘very English and traditional’ taste in interior decoration, Miranda has used a selection of pretty printed cottons from UK-based fabric houses. Among them are, from left: cushions in the spare room in ‘Chalvington’ (putty), £120 a metre, from Nicholas Herbert, and an ottoman in the drawing room in ‘Marden’ (275), £110 a metre, from Fermoie. nicholasherbert.com | fermoie.com

Adding a hit of colour to the living space, the banister has been painted in a bright yellow semi-gloss. It is ‘Citrus’ from SherwinWilliams in the US. Little Greene’s ‘Trumpet’ is a good alternative; 1 litre of intelligent gloss costs £29. littlegreene.com

LIGHTING Two circular sconces sit discreetly alongside a piece of abstract art in the bedroom. They are the ‘Radient Sconce’ from Rich Brilliant Willing, which has no obvious wall fastening or light source. Pictured from left are the ebonised oak and white versions, 30cm diameter; $1,060. richbrilliantwilling.com

HEADBOARD The macramé headboard in the main bedroom was created by fibre artist Sally England, who is based in California. ‘The slow and repetitive process of craft has always been very meditative and therapeutic to me,’ says Sally of her large-scale modern macramé work. ‘In an age of mass production and immediate gratification, it is more important than ever to keep craft-based traditions alive.’ You could commission something similar to this piece from $100 a square foot. sallyengland.com 첸 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 215


WALLS ‘Bianco’ paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Fired Earth. Slip-decorated earthenware plates, by Dylan Bowen, from £70, from Contemporary Applied Arts. FURNITURE Late-nineteenth-century stained pine chest of drawers, £425, from Hand of Glory. ACCESSORIES Leather iPad case, by House Doctor, £78; brass and copper ‘Desktop Fountain Pen’ (centre), by Y Studio, £165; both from Quill London. Hand-bound leather-covered notebook (black), £145, from Bespoke & Bound. Earthenware ‘Small Black Vase’, by Kenta Anzai, £290; stoneware ‘Tall Textured Vase with Contrasting Interior’, by Yoko Komae, £580; both from Maud & Mabel. Stoneware ‘Wide Rounded Vessel’, by Iva Polachova, £550, from The New Craftsmen. ‘Ribbed Beeswax Candles’, £35 for 6, from Matilda Goad

calm and collected RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME combines neutral and monochrome Korean-inspired textiles with English furniture for stripped-back schemes PHOTOGRAPHS LINE T KLEIN

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WALLS‘Bianco’ paint, as before. Hanging fabric panels in ‘Pennant’ (from left: ocean mist, moonshine), linen, £90 a metre, from Mark Alexander. Walnut dowelling, £7.60 a metre, from G & S Specialist Timber. FLOOR Reclaimed oak parquet flooring, from £50 a square metre, from Eco Flooring UK. FURNITURE Anglo-Indian rosewood centre table, £4,500, from Guinevere. Ceramic canister-shape stools, £950 for a pair, from Guinevere. George II oak hall chair, £3,400 for a pair, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES ‘Serenity’ porcelain cup and saucer (beige on white), €45, from Themis Z. Stoneware ‘Pink Snow Vessel’, £600; ‘Joyous Candlestick’, £155; and ‘Wide Flared Vessel’, £600; all by Iva Polachova, from The New Craftsmen. Porcelain ‘White Vase’, by Enriqueta Cepeda, £275; burnt oak bowl, by Gary Allson, £175; both from Maud & Mabel


Combine the elegance of antique seating with the comfort of upholstered pieces for a pleasing contrast

WALLS ‘Bianco’ paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Fired Earth. Curtain panels in ‘Alcyon’ (23), silk, £170 a metre, from Nobilis. George III mahogany chair splats, £395 for set of 3, from McWhirter Antiques. FLOOR Reclaimed oak parquet flooring, from £50 a square metre, from Eco Flooring UK. FURNITURE Regency mahogany and cane bergère, £4,800, from Hawker Antiques. ‘Lavenham’ two-seater sofa covered in linen (chalk), £3,500 including fabric, from The Conran Shop. Anglo-Indian rosewood and cane settee, £3,200, from Guinevere; with ‘Naiad’ cotton sofa cover (ombre), £253, from Caravane. ‘Bloomsbury Library Chair’, £1,350, from Pentreath & Hall; covered in ‘Prism’ (original), by Clarence House, linen/cotton, £271.40 a metre, from Turnell & Gigon. ‘Atoll’ iron coffee table, £1,078; ‘Yomi’ oak and iron coffee table, £715; both from Caravane. ‘My Grandfather’s Tree’ ash side tables, by Max Lamb, from £360 each, from Gallery Fumi. ACCESSORIES Linen and cotton handwoven throw (red stripe), by Catarina Riccabona, £675; ‘Square Brutrach Wool Cushion’ (brown and white), by The Good Shepherd, £325; both from The New Craftsmen. ‘Kilim’ jute cushion (daim), £49, from Caravane. Stoneware ceramic cup and saucer (on side table), £24, from Native & Co. Hand-bound leather-covered album (brown), £480; notebook, £145 (tan), £375; both from Bespoke & Bound. Brass rollerball pen, by Y Studio, £88, from Quill London. ‘Kyma’ porcelain dinner plate, €40, from Themis Z. Eighties steel and aluminium floor lamp, £850, from Béton Brut 218 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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OPPOSITE WALLS ‘Debutantes Gown’ paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Fired Earth. Wallhanging in ‘Offset’ (from top: parchment, gunmetal), linen mix, £125 a metre, from Mark Alexander. Walnut dowelling, £7.60 a metre, from G & S Specialist Timber. FURNITURE Nineteenth-century Anglo-Indian temple chair, £5,000, from Howe. ACCESSORIES Tote bag, £40 for similar, from Larusi. THIS PAGE WALLS ‘Bianco’ paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Fired Earth. Curtains in ‘Linette’ (sable), wool mix, £122.40 a metre, from Pierre Frey. FLOOR Reclaimed oak parquet flooring, from £50 a square metre, from Eco Flooring UK. ‘Feroe’ wool rug, £572, from Caravane. FURNITURE Anglo-Indian ebony side table, £3,500, from Howe. ‘Hana’ oak four-poster bed, £1,030, from Habitat. ACCESSORIES ‘Olympe’ Seventies metal and plastic table lamp, by Harvey Guzzini, £1,650 for a pair, from Béton Brut. Stoneware ‘Small Bowl 7’ (white and grey glaze), by Kasper Würtz, £45, from Sigmar. Bedhangings in ‘Tulio Mat’ (cyclone), by Fadini Borghi, cotton mix, £220.80 a metre, from Pierre Frey; trimmed in wool ‘Tufted Braid’ (spruce/black), £21 a metre, from Jessica Light. ‘Selena’ linen bed linen (neige), from £121 for a set of 2 pillowcases, from Caravane. Cushions in ‘Junction’ (mercury), linen mix, £165 a metre; bedspread in ‘Woodgrain’ (from left: jasper white, cement), linen mix, £160 a metre; both from Mark Alexander. Silk and cotton Mashru cloth ‘Black Star Quilt’, £655, from Stitch by Stitch. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸


The cactus garden was irst planted in the Seventies. A recent renovation by a team of specialists has highlighted the dramatic shapes of the various cacti and succulents, which include yuccas, aloes, euphorbias, aeoniums and cereus

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Legacy planting At San Giuliano, the 800-year-old estate of a Sicilian marquis, evolving displays of succulents and tropical flowers ensure the garden always feels beguiling and alive TEXT HELENA ATTLEE | PHOTOGRAPHS MARIANNE MAJERUS

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OPPOSITE FROM TOP The cacti stand guard in front of the family chapel. A stone irrigation channel runs along the edge of a swathe of heat-loving aromatic plants in the giardinetto. THIS PAGE FROM TOP Rosa gigantea clambers up an agricultural silo that dates back to the Thirties. The path through the giardinetto was tiled in an intricate pattern by artisans from northern Italy

hen a house shares a name with its inhabitants, you can be sure they have lived there a long time. Take San Giuliano in Sicily, the rose-coloured home of Marquis Giuseppe Paternò Castello di San Giuliano, which was built in the fifteenth century on land that has belonged to his family for over 800 years. It is hard to believe San Giuliano had no garden when the marquis inherited it in 1976. Today, it is one of Sicily’s most exciting gardens, for although mature trees and plants convey a sense of permanence, it is regularly reinvigorated with new ideas and planting schemes. The marquis and his late wife Fiamma Ferragamo (best known as principal designer of the Ferragamo shoe label) spent 25 years creating the garden. Although it has continued to develop, its structure remains largely unchanged. There is a terrace in front of the house, a collection of ornamental trees, a swimming pool and a cactus bed by the front gate. In the Nineties, the couple commissioned landscape architect Oliva di Collobiano to transform a walled orchard and vegetable plot into a lower garden known as the giardinetto. The entire site covers seven acres. Heavily armed cacti and succulents make an appropriate welcoming committee at the gate, for the house was originally a masseria, or semi-fortified farmhouse. A first glance across the lawn reveals at least eight different species of palms, as well as Norfolk Island pines, Australian grass trees (Xanthorrhoea australis) with charred black trunks and a massive cedar. Explore a little and you might find dragon trees, Nepalese bamboo, a special collection of African encephalartos, aromatic California pepper trees and many other treasures. Beyond the upper garden, orange groves spread like a green sea towards Mount Etna. Ever since she became head gardener in 2002, Rachel Lamb has worked closely with the marquis. He is always excited to discover new plants, so she regularly rethinks planting schemes throughout the garden. Some recent innovations have been in the giardinetto, which she works hard to fill with heady perfumes and rich colours in all seasons. Despite ferocious winter winds and searing summer heat, Mediterranean plants thrive there, and thanks to a system of raised stone water tanks and irrigation channels, she can grow subtropical and tropical plants as well. Tropical water plants were among Rachel’s new introductions last year, when she found that Victoria cruziana, a South American water lily with huge pads and dramatic white flowers, would enjoy life in the largest of the giardinetto’s water tanks. Equally happy in the smaller tank is blue-flowered Nymphaea ‘King of Siam’, another novelty in this entertaining part of the garden. Last year, Rachel also began to make ‘a very timid trial’ of Caladium bicolor ‘Angel Wings’, or elephant ears, in damper,

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OPPOSITE FROM TOP Raised stone tanks are part of the traditional irrigation system in the giardinetto. The ornamental fountain is attributed to Baroque architect Giovanni Battista Vaccarini. THIS PAGE FROM TOP A larger water tank in the giardinetto. A view from the garden over the orange groves to Mount Etna

shadier areas of the giardinetto. She experimented with red and green leaves in part of the tropical garden known as the ‘equatorial’ area, with white-and-green-leaved caladium under the pergola that divides the giardinetto in two. According to Rachel, these were a hit with the marquis: ‘He liked their white and marble-green elephant ears so much he wanted carpets of them.’ The house at San Giuliano is either rented out or filled with family and friends throughout the year. The marquis likes to have flowers in every room, and producing blooms to cut all year round is one of the challenges of Rachel’s job. This year, she has upped the stocks of allium, narcissi, Dutch iris and tulip bulbs in various parts of the garden, as well as adding more roses and asters to ensure a steady supply. The marquis’s mother used to grow dahlias in the vegetable garden and now Rachel is staging their return with ‘a collection of big, bright, dinner-plate varieties’. She believes that any garden becomes ‘stodgy’ if left too long to its own devices. Take the cactus garden at the entrance to San Giuliano, which was first planted in the Seventies. It has always been a haunting and sculptural combination of agaves and aloes, thrusting spires of cereus cacti, yuccas, cycads and prickly pear. However, as time passed, larger specimens had begun to screen smaller ones, and everything overlapped so that the plants’ wonderful architectural shapes were lost and it was almost impossible to get in among them. It takes bravery, expertise and brute strength to work with mature cacti, and when you consider the prickliness of the prickly pear and the spines on the agaves, it is no surprise that the plants had been left to do as they pleased. But last year Rachel called in a team from Vivai Cuba, near Syracuse, one of Italy’s most important cactus nurseries, to strip everything out and replant the finest specimens. ‘They came with all the necessary courage,’ she says. Now Rachel talks of the cactus bed as an ongoing performance. ‘We reinstated the main protagonists and added more layers to the drama by making the bed deeper and using the buttressed wall of the chapel as a backdrop,’ she says. The result resembles a complex play unfolding. The marquis might easily have abandoned the garden after the loss of his wife in 1998. Instead, he employed Rachel to take it forward and as a result of their cooperation, San Giuliano’s garden continues to be beautiful, entertaining and vividly alive 첸

Explore a little and you might find dragon trees, Nepalese bamboo, aromatic California pepper trees and many other treasures

Marchesi di San Giuliano: marchesidisangiuliano.it HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 227


Show and sell With the help of designer Simon Irvine, curator and potter Joanna Bird has turned her garden into an exhibition space, where modern sculpted ceramics meet calming evergreens TEXT FRANCESCA RYAN | PHOTOGRAPHS RACHEL WARNE

THIS PAGE Charcoal Blade Form by the Yorkshire-based artist James Oughtibridge is displayed on the deck by the house, under a grapevine planted by Joanna. OPPOSITE A 50-year-old lilac tree is a focal point in the garden. In the foreground is a bed of blue and mauve plants, including alliums and perovskia

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estled under a spreading lilac, terracotta chimney pots made by Mick Pinner poke their heads from a bed of ferns, wood anemones, Solomon’s seal and Euphorbia amygdaloides. ‘We wanted to have some sculptures with nice height in that woodland area, and the chimney pots worked well there,’ explains gallerist and potter Joanna Bird. When Joanna first decided to open a contemporary ceramics gallery at her home in Chiswick, west London, in the early Nineties, she seized the opportunity to redesign her garden. Now she uses it to showcase her exhibits to their best advantage. ‘The garden was a really boring shape – it went in straight lines and was very angular,’ she says. Her starting point was the magnificent, spreading lilac tree. Over 50 years old, the lilac was in the garden when Joanna and her husband bought the house in 1986. ‘It’s a focal point, because it’s a sculpture in itself,’ she says. ‘It has the most fantastic arrangement of branches; we built the garden around it.’ Today, Joanna opens her house and garden for exhibitions twice a year, in spring and autumn, so her garden has been designed to look good all year round. And for each show, which typically features 20 artists across a range of disciplines, she tries to find new, up-and-coming talent to show alongside the more established names. Originally trained by the Cornish potter Michael Cardew (who studied under Bernard Leach), Joanna describes herself as drawn towards a Shaker aesthetic: to pieces that combine beauty and function. ‘Because I’m a Cardew pupil, I’m quite vessel based,’ she says. ‘And I don’t like anything that’s too convoluted, contrived or fussy.’ With the help of Simon Irvine (who designed the garden at Läckö Castle in Sweden), Joanna came up with a plan ‘to burst the walls open’. In a radical departure from the garden’s existing rigid shape, every line is flowing. (‘The eye wants to follow a curving line,’ she explains.) The design leads you on a journey through several distinct areas. ‘It’s beautifully balanced. From the deck, you can’t quite see what’s going on and it’s a metaphorical search for the holy grail; no matter which path you take, you keep going round and round,’ she says. Curves will be a theme of the upcoming selling exhibition Convex, Concave, which opens this month. Fergus Garrett of Great Dixter has supplied extra bedding plants to complement the ceramics that will be on display. The south-east-facing garden has a wonderfully timeless atmosphere. Its host of secret corners gives

N

the sculptures a real sense of place, and makes the 33 x 12-metre space seem significantly bigger. Last spring, the works dotted throughout the garden for Joanna’s show Necessities of Life included Svend Bayer’s wood-fired stoneware pots and Adam Buick’s luminous moon jars, which catch the light at different times throughout the day. ‘I think vessels work particularly well in the garden,’ Joanna says. ‘There’s some synergy in both the materials and form that feels very organic.’ One particular grouping of moon jars has a seductive rhythm that catches the eye. Set against a large clipped box mound, it features a jar decorated with a shino glaze made from seaweed. ‘Adam throws the pot and then he likes to play around with materials,’ Joanna says. ‘So he’ll brush on china clay and sometimes he throws grit – there’s another pot here that has a spiral of grit on it. He’s very into texture.’ When it comes to the placement of sculptures in a garden, Joanna makes it sound easy. ‘It’s all done by eye – I choose what I think will go well together,’ she says. ‘However, you do need to find the right plant palette, one that doesn’t overshadow or dominate.’ Joanna selected the palette with the help of Tom Freeth, Michal Dvorak and Bradley Gangadeen of Kew Gardens, who recommended plants that would work with the sculptures. Throughout the space, evergreens such as box, Euphorbia mellifera and myrtle create a calm, neutral backdrop. Joanna is also a fan of architectural plants such as ferns, the black grass Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’, white foxgloves and Rosa ‘Complicata’, which complement the pots. To add height to the garden, Simon came up with the clever idea of a raised grassy mound as a focal point. A gently sloping box hedge creates a feeling of enclosure. ‘The mound was a favourite of our children when they were young,’ Joanna says. ‘All the grass areas in the garden are puffed up like a patchwork quilt. The Aran stones bordering the paths act as stitches holding the grass down.’ Within the curve of the box hedge is a teardrop-shape bed of blue and mauve naturalistic planting, featuring alliums, Alchemilla mollis, hardy geraniums and perovskia. Displayed prominently on the deck by the house is Charcoal Blade Form, a dramatic stoneware sculpture by James Oughtibridge, whom she describes as an upand-coming artist. ‘I like abstract work,’ she says. ‘A sculpture has to have a meaning for me – it has to come from somewhere and speak to me in some way’ 첸 The show ‘Convex, Concave’ runs from April 18 to May 5 at Joanna Bird gallery, Grove Park Terrace, W4; visit joannabird.com. Simon Irvine: simonirvine.net

OPPOSITE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Extra Large Moon Jar by Adam Buick beside a shed inspired by a Japanese tea hut. Salvia, hydrangea and tiarella plants. A Svend Bayer amphora in front of a box hedge. A close-up of the amphora. Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’ with three pots by Adam Buick. Arum lilies in front of the house. Another amphora by Svend Bayer. The raised grassy mound. Works in the gallery include a moon jar, sake bottles and cups by Akiko Hirai (centre)

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PA R T 2 M AY


THE KITCHEN G A R D E N D I A RY

SOWING THE SEEDS In the second part of the series, CLARE FOSTER reflects on a busy month in her garden, planting and weeding in anticipation of an abundant summer PHOTOGRAPH SIGNE BAY

May 4

May 13

May 25

If I am lucky, I will get one long, uninterrupted day of gardening a week, usually at the weekend, but otherwise my gardening is done in snatched intervals in between work, walking dogs and picking up children. In fact, it is these short bursts of concentrated effort that yield the most reward, with the pressure of time focusing the mind and increasing efficiency. Today, I managed to ignore the sun streaming in through my study window until lunchtime, when I dashed out to plant some beetroot seedlings that had been languishing in modules in the greenhouse. If you leave seedlings for too long, they will start to get leggy and weak, so planting them out as soon as they are big enough is important. You can also sow beetroot direct, as it has large, tactile seeds that are easy to space, reducing the need to thin the row out. As with all crops sown straight into the ground, though, you have to be all the more wary of slugs, which can completely annihilate tiny seedlings before they have had a chance to get going. For this reason, I sow most things in modules first, with successional sowings direct into the ground as the season goes on if time allows. The beetroot varieties I am trying this year are ‘Boston’ (an improved form of the well known ‘Boltardy’) and ‘Burpees Golden’. I like having two colours together, both in the garden, with their contrasting stems, and in the kitchen, where their rich colours look fantastic together in salads or roasts.

I did a long charity walk this weekend, so gardening time was yet again concentrated to a couple of hours on Saturday. The first task was to plant out my baby leeks, which I had sown in one of the large cold frames attached to my greenhouse. A lot of spring gardening is to do with juggling space and moving plants around – a tactical dance that ends when it is warm enough not to worry about frosts any more – and I needed to free up some cold-frame space to harden off other more tender things. The leek seedlings were possibly still on the small side to plant out – the received wisdom is that they should be the width of a pencil – but they looked sturdy, so I decided to give it a go.

A panic burst of gardening before half term. The weeds have appeared overnight, so I hoed manically for half an hour to neaten things up before I go away. The carrot seedlings I planted a couple of weeks ago needed thinning, the potatoes needed earthing up (to keep the tubers well underground so they do not go green) and the strawberries had to be netted. Most years, I forget to do this, giving the birds a free banquet, but this year, I am determined not to be so kind. I managed to find a few old bits of netting that I tacked together haphazardly to throw over the strawberries while I am away, and a bed of straw will be added when I get back to prevent the fruit rotting or being eaten by slugs. I left the carrot thinning until last because it is best to do it just before dusk to lessen the risk of carrot fly, the larvae of which burrow into the roots as they develop, devastating the crop. The flies can smell the carrots from up to half a mile away, and pulling up the seedlings releases the scent that attracts them. Doing it in the evening, when they are not going to be active, is therefore recommended – it also helps to water the seedlings beforehand so that the roots come out without breaking, as this is what releases the carroty scent. Everything done, I finally went inside at about 10pm feeling happy that the garden was in reasonably good shape before I go away. It may seem like a bit of a treadmill at this time of year, when all you are doing is sowing and weeding, but it is all worth it for the rich pickings later on.

May 22 I often go back outside after supper at this time of year to potter around until the light fades. Everything is taking off: rows of salad leaves and radishes are growing quickly and the broad beans are almost ready to harvest. At least they have not succumbed to blackfly like last year. If you spot it early enough, you can keep blackfly under control just by pinching out the growing tips on the beans, which is where they start to colonise. But if you fail to notice them, an entire crop can be ruined. The first bean pods are getting bigger by the day and I picked one as a test. They are so beautiful when you open them, the tiny beans pale and smooth in their cushioned emerald pod. Delicious, too, eaten straight from the pod.

M AY C H E C K L I S T Sow as much as you can, both in modules and outside… Sow courgettes, pumpkins and squash under cover… Plant out leeks, Brussels sprouts, celery, celeriac and summer cabbages… Plant out tomatoes, peppers and chillies in the greenhouse… Hoe off annual weeds and pull out perennial weeds… Harvest salad leaves, rhubarb and asparagus… Earth up potatoes as the foliage develops… Sow companion plants such as marigolds and parsley as edging… Watch out for slugs and blackf ly and take appropriate measures 첸 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 233


In next month’s

B E AU T I F U L E N G L I S H H O US E S From a C otswold manor to a modern newbuild in rural Surrey THE P OWER OF PLANT S Ideas for bringing the outside in

PLUS... WE REVEAL THE TOP 100 INTERIOR DESIGNERS 2018 JUNE ISSUE O N S A L E M AY 3

SIMON WATSON; MICHAEL SINCLAIR; LUCAS ALLEN; ISSY CROKER; ANDREW MONTGOMERY; RACHEL WHITING; NGOC MINH NGO

SOFT TOUCHES Shopping for bed linen and outdoor fabrics, plus armchairs under £850


E N T E R T A I N I NG

White asparagus is in season now. It is grown away from the light, so does not produce a green colour, giving it a more delicate flavour

Nordic soul DANISH CHEF AND FOOD WRITER TRINE HAHNEMANN DEVISES A SELECTION OF DISHES FOR A CASUAL SEASONAL SUPPER. ALL RECIPES SERVE 6, UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED PHOTOGRAPHS LINE T KLEIN | FOOD STYLING JULIA AZZARELLO | PROP STYLING TABITHA HAWKINS

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ENTERTAINING | RECIPES

CARPACCIO OF SEA BASS WITH ASPARAGUS, LEMON VERBENA AND RYE BREAD The asparagus season is short, so it is all about enjoying it when it is available. The texture should be crunchy and juicy, and I love eating it raw.

INGREDIENTS X6 white asparagus spears X6 green asparagus spears X4 sea bass fillets, about 600g XJuice of 1 lime X4tbsp extra-virgin olive oil X1 slice rye bread X12 verbena leaves (if you cannot find verbena, use lemon balm, mint, coriander or dill) XDill, to serve

1 To remove the tough, woody base of the asparagus, gently grasp a spear at each end and bend until it naturally snaps. Discard the end and repeat with the rest. Peel the skin of the white asparagus. Cut all the spears into very thin slices, on an angle, and keep them in iced water until needed. 2 Remove the skin from the sea bass and discard. Cut the fish into very thin slices, about 2mm thick, on an angle.

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3 In a bowl, whisk the lime juice and olive oil with a little salt and pepper to season, then drip this mixture over the fish using a teaspoon. 4 Toast the bread and chop it into very fine crumbs. 5 Place the fish around the edge of a round plate, place the asparagus in the middle and sprinkle with the breadcrumbs, verbena leaves and some dill. Serve at once.


ENTERTAINING | RECIPES

COURGETTE AND POTATO FRITTERS WITH SALMON ROE You can make the batter 2–3 hours in advance if you do not add salt, which will make it wet. Add salt before cooking instead. Makes about 18 (3 per person)

INGREDIENTS For the fritters X200g courgettes X150g waxy potatoes, peeled X50g rolled oats X2tbsp sesame seeds X1/2tsp freshly grated nutmeg (or 1/4tsp powdered nutmeg) X2 large eggs X15g butter and 1tbsp oil for frying For the cream X3tbsp crème fraîche X4tbsp Greek yogurt X2tbsp each of chives, dill and chervil, finely chopped X1tbsp capers, finely chopped X1/2tsp lemon zest, finely grated X100g salmon roe

1 Grate the courgettes and potatoes, then squeeze in a cloth to remove excess water. Mix in a bowl with all the other fritter ingredients, except the butter and oil. Season with salt and pepper. 2 Heat the butter and oil in a frying pan on a high heat. Place spoonfuls of the mixture in the pan and cook for about 3 minutes on each side, until crisp

and golden brown. Keep warm in a low oven while you prepare the cream. 3 Mix the crème fraîche and yogurt in a bowl. Add the chopped herbs and capers and lemon zest, and season to taste with salt and pepper. 4 Place the fritters on a plate, put a spoonful of cream on each one and top with the salmon roe. Serve at once. 컄

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ENTERTAINING | RECIPES

PORK ROAST WITH THYME, TARRAGON AND PARSLEY You will need to remove the skin from the pork and score it for the crackling. This is easy to do at home, but you could ask your butcher to prepare it for you.

INGREDIENTS X5 sprigs of thyme X 5 sprigs of tarragon X 2 large sprigs of flat-leaf parsley X 5 bay leaves X 1 unwaxed lemon X 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped X 2kg pork sirloin, on the bone, with the skin still on X 5 onions, skin on, cut into quarters X 350g carrots

1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan oven 180°C/mark 6. Gently rinse and drain the herbs. Grate the zest of the lemon and then cut the fruit into thin slices. In a bowl, combine the zest and herbs, then season with salt and freshly ground pepper. 2 Remove the pork rind in one piece from the top of the roast, making sure the fat underneath stays attached. Score using a very thin, sharp knife or Stanley knife, in 1cm strips, cutting halfway through the fat under the skin. Evenly spread the herbs, garlic and lemon zest on top of the meat. Then spread the lemon slices on top and sprinkle with salt and plenty of pepper. 3 Put the piece of rind back on top. Tie all the way along the joint with a long piece of kitchen string, then place it in a roasting tin and roast for 15 minutes. 238 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Carefully rinse the onions. Peel the carrots and then cut them into quarters. 4 After 15 minutes, remove the pork from the oven, add 300ml warm water and the onions. Return the tin to the oven and roast for 1 more hour. 5 Add the carrots to the tin – making sure they are in the juice – and roast for further 15–20 minutes, or until the pork is no longer pink. A meat thermometer through the thickest part of the meat should read 58°C. Alternatively, a skewer inserted in the thickest part of the meat should feel hot along its whole length. 6 Remove the pork from the oven and rest for 15 minutes. Then remove the string and carve into slices, making sure there is a piece of crisp rind with every portion. Serve with the onions (skin on), carrots and the juices from the meat.


ENTERTAINING | RECIPES

BUTTER-FRIED CABBAGE WITH ROASTED NUTS AND CRE SS Cabbage is eaten a lot in the Nordic countries. I love the flavour of the caramelised, almost burnt edge combined with sweet and fresh tasting inside leaves.

INGREDIENTS X1 large pointed cabbage X30g almonds, skin on X30g butter XSalad cress or watercress

1 Cut the cabbage into 6–8 wedges and roughly chop the almonds. 2 Heat 10g of the butter in a pan, add the almonds and fry until they are golden brown in colour. Remove with a slotted spoon. Add a little more

butter and fry the cabbage on all sides until the edges begin to caramelise. 3 Arrange the cabbage in a bowl and sprinkle over the almonds and cress. Serve this with the roast pork (opposite) 컄

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ENTERTAINING | RECIPES

NAPOLEON CAKE S This is light, sweet and fresh and with a nice crunch. I believe the name was inspired by the cream cakes popular in Copenhagen konditori in the 1800s.

INGREDIENTS XFlour, for dusting X500g all-butter puff pastry X2 vanilla pods X400ml double cream X100ml single cream X8tbsp redcurrant jelly X200g icing sugar

1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan oven 170°C/mark 5. On a floured surface, roll out the pastry to a 60 x 30cm rectangle and cut it into 4 pieces widthways with a sharp knife. Put them on baking trays lined with baking parchment, cover with more baking parchment, then put a baking tray on top to stop them rising too much. Bake for 10 minutes. 2 Remove the baking tray on top, reduce the heat to 180°C/fan oven 160°C/ mark 4 and bake for another 10 minutes, or until golden. Then remove from the oven and leave to cool on a wire rack. 3 Meanwhile, split the vanilla pods and scrape out the seeds with the tip

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of a sharp knife. In a bowl, whisk the double and single creams together with the vanilla seeds until light and fluffy. 4 Place the 2 least attractive puff pastry layers on a serving plate, spread 2tbsp redcurrant jelly over each, then cover this with a 3cm thick layer of vanilla cream. 5 For the icing, heat the remaining redcurrant jelly in a pan over a low heat. As soon as it melts, pour it into a bowl and whisk in the icing sugar. Drizzle the icing over the other 2 puff pastry layers, let it set, then place them on top of the cream. Chill until serving time and slice to serve 첸


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ENTERTAINING | NEWS

Taste Notes BLANCHE VAUGHAN SHARES HER NEWS, REVIEWS AND TIPS FOR COOKS AND FOOD LOVERS

in season WILD GARLIC At this time of year, the woods become pungent with the scent of wild garlic. I love to use its lush green leaves to make this Indian-spiced marinated chicken. Serves 4

STOCKFOOD/SABINE STEFFENS

X4 cardamom pods XPinch of saffron X1tsp cumin seeds X1tsp ground turmeric X2 large handfuls of wild garlic leaves, washed X100ml plain yogurt X4 chicken breasts, skin on XOlive oil

1 Lightly crush the cardamom pods to release the little black seeds inside and discard the green husky outer layer. In a dry, hot pan, lightly toast the saffron and cumin seeds, then crush in a pestle and mortar with the cardamom seeds. Add the ground turmeric and mix well. 2 In a food processor, finely chop the wild garlic leaves. Add the spices and yogurt, and blend well. Season with salt and pepper, then smear all over the chicken. Cover and leave in the fridge to marinate for at least an hour. 3 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan oven 180°C/mark 6. Pour a little olive oil over the skin and roast the chicken, skin side up, for 10–15 minutes until it is just cooked through. Serve sliced with rice or potatoes. 컄

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 243


ENTERTAINING | NEWS

MORE IS MORE HEALTHY The new book by New York-based natural food chef Jodi Moreno, More With Less (Penguin Random House, £26), is an easy introduction to cooking with seasonal, nutritious foods. With inspiring ideas for day-to-day eating – aubergine salad with rice noodles and green herb tahini; roasted cauliflower steaks with ginger and spring onion sauce; sesame salmon with crispy rice cakes – this gently embraces the healthy cooking habits many of us aspire to, without being punishingly virtuous.

SPECIAL DELIVERY

Splashes of colour

Herb lessons

Certain kitchen items stand the test of time. FALCON ENAMELWARE remains a popular choice and it is so hard-wearing, it lasts a lifetime. The new range of tumblers, sauce dishes and serving trays will add a pop of colour to the table and the smaller items make excellent unbreakable tableware for children. Tumblers cost £6 each, while utensil pots (below) are £22 each. falconenamelware.com

On a Hann’s Herbs course, you can learn about the magical qualities of herbs and acquire essential growing knowledge: when to sow, make cuttings, harvest and store. The full-day and half-day courses begin in June and run through the summer (from £90 for a half day). Judith Hann’s Cotswold garden contains over 150 varieties of herbs and salads, as well as woodland and water gardens. If you cannot get to a course, Judith’s book Herbs: Delicious Recipes and Growing Tips to Transform Your Food (Nourish Books, £25) will inspire you at home. hannsherbs.co.uk

Often I am asked where to get exotic or luxury ingredients and I have found that Fine Food Specialist is the answer. It offers nationwide delivery of a huge range of fresh and preserved goods. Look no further for Japanese wagyu, sashimigrade sea trout and tuna and specialist mushrooms, among other delicious items. finefood specialist.co.uk Wild asparagus costs £7.50 for 20g

Oyster leaves cost £5.95 for 30g

Sea kale costs £7.85 for 80g

FARM FRESH

244 MAY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Gulls’ eggs cost £8 each

ISTOCKPHOTO

For a taste of the West Country, TREWITHEN DAIRY’S Cornish milk, clotted cream, butter and yogurt transport you to the lush pastures of Glynn Valley (pictured). Made from the organic milk of grass-fed, happy, healthy herds sourced within 25 miles of the dairy, this rich produce represents the best of Cornwall. Available from supermarkets and specialist shops, from £1.60 for 114g clotted cream. To order, call 01208-872214 첸


STOCKISTS Merchandise from these companies is featured editorially in this issue. Information is checked at the time of going to press, but House & Garden cannot guarantee that prices will not change or items will be in stock at the time of publication A

ALESSI 020-7518 9091; alessi.com ALICE LILY INTERIORS 07908-788837; alicelilyinteriors.com ARTEMEST artemest.com ATELIER VIME ateliervime.com

B

BALINEUM 020-7431 9364; balineum.co.uk BESPOKE & BOUND 020-7407 7771; bespokeandbound.com BÉTON BRUT 020-7018 1890; betonbrut.co.uk BLOOMINGDALE’S bloomingdales.com BLUEBELLGRAY 0808-164 0130; bluebellgray.com BOBBY RABBIT 0114-321 7000; bobbyrabbit.co.uk

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CARAVANE 020-7486 5233; caravane.fr COLE & SON 020-7376 4628; cole-and-son.com COLOGNE & COTTON 0845-262 2212; cologneandcotton.com THE CONRAN SHOP 0344-848 4000; conranshop.co.uk CONTEMPORARY APPLIED ARTS 020-7620 0086; caa.org.uk

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DAY TRUE 020-7788 9229; daytrue.com DEDAR 020-7351 9939; dedar.com DIMORE STUDIO 00-39-02-3653 7088; dimorestudio.eu DINOSAUR DESIGNS 020-7287 2254; dinosaurdesigns.co.uk DMITRIY & CO 00-1-212 243 4800; dmitriyco.com

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ECO FLOORING 01757-700170; ecoflooringuk.com

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FIRED EARTH 0845-293 8798; firedearth.com FRENCH CONNECTION 0333-400 3285; frenchconnection.com

HAND OF GLORY 01249-447478; handofgloryantiques.com HAWKER ANTIQUES 020-7730 2122; hawkerantiques.com HOUSE OF FRASER 0345-602 1073; houseoffraser.co.uk HOWE 020-7730 7987; howelondon.com

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IKEA 020-3645 0000; ikea.com

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G & S SPECIALIST TIMBER 01768-891445; toolsandtimber.co.uk GALLERY FUMI 020-7490 2366; galleryfumi.com GEBRÜDER THONET VIENNA 00-39-011 0133330; gebruederthonetvienna.com GUINEVERE ANTIQUES 020-7736 2917; guinevere.co.uk

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H&M HOME 0344-736 9000; hm.com HABITAT 0344-499 1111; habitat.co.uk

KETTAL 00-34-93 487 9090; kettal.com

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LA REDOUTE 0844-842 2222; laredoute.co.uk LARUSI 020-7428 0256; larusi.com LRNCE lrnce.com

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MCWHIRTER ANTIQUES 020-7351 5399; jamesmcwhirter.com

ROSE UNIACKE 020-7730 7050; roseuniacke.com

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NATIVE & CO 020-7243 0418; nativeandco.com THE NEW CRAFTSMEN 020-7148 3190; thenewcraftsmen.com NOBILIS 00-33-01 4329 1271; nobilis.fr

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OKA 03330-042042; oka.com OLIVER BONAS 020-8974 0110; oliverbonas.com

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PAPERMINT paper-mint.fr PENTREATH & HALL 020-7430 2526; pentreath-hall.com PIERRE FREY 020-7376 5599; pierrefrey.com POOKY 020-7351 3003; pooky.com PORTA ROMANA 020-7352 0440; portaromana.com PUCKHABER 020-3304 7327; puckhaber decorativeantiques.com

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QUILL LONDON 020-7833 8562; quilllondon.com

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RE 01434-634567; re-foundobjects.com RITA KONIG 020-3735 7280; ritakonig.com

SAMUEL & SONS 020-7351 5153; samuelandsons.com SANDBERG WALLPAPER 00-46-321 53 16 60; sandbergwallpaper.com SERVOMUTO 00-39-0291 668674; servomuto.com SIBYL COLEFAX & JOHN FOWLER 020-7493 2231; sibylcolefax.com SIGMAR 020-7751 5801; sigmarlondon.com SOANE 020-7730 6400; soane.co.uk SOPHIE CONRAN 020-7603 1522; sophieconran.com STEPHEN ANTONSON stephenantonson.com STITCH BY STITCH 07715-169194; stitchbystitch.eu STYLE LIBRARY 020-3457 5862; stylelibrary.com

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THEMIS Z 00-30-210 7250442; themisz.com TINA FREY DESIGNS 00-1-41 52 23 47 10; tinafreydesigns.com TISSUS D’HÉLÈNE 020-7352 9977; tissusdhelene.co.uk TURNELL & GIGON 020-7259 7280; turnellandgigon.com

W

WILLIAM YEOWARD 020-7349 7828; williamyeoward.com 첸

Below are The List members who have appeared in this issue. Go to houseandgarden.co.uk/the-list to see their complete profiles

BEN PENTREATH | CATCHPOLE & RYE | CHARLES EDWARDS | DAVID SEYFRIED | DRUMMONDS GUY GOODFELLOW | JAMB | JVW – JULIA VON WERZ | OK A | PAOLO MOSCHINO FOR NICHOLAS HASLAM RITA KONIG | SUZY HOODLESS | VANDERHURD | VEERE GRENNEY ASSOCIATES

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2018 245


Simple pleasures CATERING COMPANY SOCIAL PANTRY TAKES THE FUSS OUT OF ENTERTAINING WITH FRESH, SEASONAL DISHES THAT WILL BE THE TALK OF THE PARTY As we move into the warmer months and embrace the great outdoors, thoughts of long lunches on the terrace and cocktail parties in the garden come to mind. But the stress of hosting can put these plans on hold. Alex Head, CEO and founder of the events and catering company Social Pantry, knows all about the art of outdoor entertaining. Since 2011 when it was first launched, her aim has been to provide no-fear entertaining by placing emphasis on seasonal and accessible ingredients, which are sourced sustainably, to create mouth-watering recipes. It’s all about jumping into the kitchen and making social entertaining look simple and fuss-free, even when cooking up a feast for a crowd. Part of her initiative is also to work with a carefully selected roster of charities such as Key 4 Life and Bad Boys Bakery. For the former, she employs young ex-offenders as part of her kitchen team in order to help young men learn how to reintegrate into society. Alex’s passion for the food business began when she was 15 years old and selling sandwiches off the back of her bicycle in Saudi Arabia. Her entrepreneurial spirit only grew over the years until she launched Social Pantry, followed two years later by Social Pantry Café, a favoured local haunt in Battersea. Since then, Social Pantry has expanded to encompass five sites across London, providing the catering for such brands as Harvey Nichols, Alexander McQueen and Louis Vuitton. So no matter how big or small your next party this season, put your feet up and call in the experts at Social Pantry. 020 8871 1949; socialpantry.co.uk


PROMOTION

GRILLED PEACHES WITH COCONUT Don’t leave the desserts out of the barbecue fun this summer. Try Alex’s simple grilled peaches with coconut yogurt recipe for a sweet end to your meal. Cooking peaches over a hot flame brings out their natural juiciness and intensifies the flavour – grill them on the outer edges of your barbecue to avoid scorching them. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS X 4 fresh peaches X 2 tbsp light brown sugar X 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon X 50g flaked almonds X Vegetable oil, for brushing

To serve X 4 tbsp coconut yoghurt X A good drizzle of honey

1 Toast the flaked almonds in a dry saucepan on a low heat until lightly browned; this can be done in advance and set aside until serving. Tip: do a big batch as they are also great for sprinkling over porridge and salads. 2 In a small bowl, combine the sugar and cinnamon. 3 Cut the peaches in half and remove the stone. 4 Brush the peaches with oil, ensuring the cut sides are well coated. 5 Place the peaches cut-side down on your barbecue, until grill marks

form. Turn the halves over and sprinkle with the sugar and cinnamon. This will melt onto the peaches. 6 Grill until softened and well-marked. If you need to finish them off in the oven, cook them at 150°C for an additional 5 to 10 minutes or until cooked through. 7 Serve on a plate with a spoonful of coconut yogurt, a drizzle of honey and a sprinkle of toasted almonds. Enjoy hot or cold 첸


+ƨƼƼƲ/ƨĆ?Ć Ćž 6287+.(16,1*7216:ơƜ

Holly Lodge is discreetly positioned moments from the Fulham Road in a quiet and secluded location, with tranquil green views over the communal gardens of Evelyn Gardens. Dating EDFN WR WKH V WKLV VSHFLĆŒF neighbourhood was a small village called Old Brompton with Thistle Grove originally being the name for Drayton Gardens. Nowadays Little Chelsea and Old Brompton have merged into a bustling metropolis with a multitude of fantastic restaurants and shops within walking distance. With its own private entrance on Thistle Grove, Holly Lodge EHQHĆŒWV IURP SULYDF\ DQG D grand entrance hall leading LQWR WKH UDLVHG JURXQG Ć?RRU entertainment rooms. Created and designed for the current RZQHU WKH UDLVHG JURXQG Ć?RRU is made up of a large open plan kitchen dining room with elegant Victorian features and a bay fronted window to the rear.

This double fronted building enables the owner to live with fabulous lateral space; a grand living room and secret study ĆŒWWHG ZLWK FOHYHU SRFNHW GRRUV enables you to have the entire rare opportunity to own a turn-key home, situated in a discreet and quiet position Leo Russell Ć?RRUSODWHRSHQSODQRUVHFWLRQHG RĆ‹IRUSHUVRQDOXVH Every inch of the apartment has EHHQ ĆŒWWHG DQG GHVLJQHG ZLWK the best quality in mind and the attention to detail makes for an exquisite home. A large master bedroom suite is followed by two further good sized bedrooms and bathrooms. For sale ÂŁ4,250,000 Joint Sole Agents – Savills

020 7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk


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Harley Gardens is set within the highly desirable Boltons Conservation Area – one of the most historic parts of Chelsea. The Boltons was built, along with St. Mary’s Church, during the 1840s, which was soon followed by the terrace of houses at Harley Gardens starting in 1851. 7KHVHPDJQLĆŒFHQWO\ZLGHVHPL GHWDFKHG KRXVHV ZLWK RĆ‹ VWUHHW PDJQLĆŒFHQWO\SURSRUWLRQHG VHPLGHWDFKHGIDPLO\KRXVH Lara Askew parking and front gardens, still to this day carry an air of elegance with the beautifully JUDQG URRPV DQG ĆŒQH 9LFWRULDQ period features throughout. Harley Gardens is a quiet and secluded enclave moments from the Fulham Road where there is a multitude of buzzing cafĂŠs, restaurants, shops and bars. The current family have enjoyed the house for the past ten years

taking advantage of a large rear garden, fantastic raised ground Ć?RRU GUDZLQJ URRP DQG ĆŒYH bedrooms. Combining the JUDQGHXU RI D ODUJH 9LFWRULDQ house with the modern way of living, this home enables you to live in an open plan manner on the garden level with a kitchen, dining room and conservatory leading directly to the fabulously tropical garden. This house is sold with the added EHQHĆŒW RI SODQQLQJ SHUPLVVLRQ granted to extend via a basement level increasing the size of the house by over 1,000 square feet, approximately 30% growth in size should an incoming family feel the necessity for more room at a later stage. For sale, asking a price of ÂŁ9,700,000

020 7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk


S U P E R YAC H T C H A R T E R

cecilwright.com


FIVE 2-3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS & THE 4 BEDROOM PENTHOUSE AVAILABLE

A COLLECTION OF SEVEN LUXURY RESIDENCES

For more information please contact Joint Sole Agents:

Oceanic House presents the rare opportunity to purchase a unique apartment at the heart of London’s West End, in an exclusive new development steeped in history. The imposing former White Star Line headquarters (the booking office of iconic ocean liner RMS Titanic) has been sensitively redeveloped to provide six apartments and a triple aspect duplex penthouse for private sale.

Paul Finch paul@beauchamp.com +44 (0)20 7022 9831

Simon Fernandes simon.fernandes@struttandparker.com +44 (0) 20 7318 4677

LOCATED IN ST JAMES’S, LONDON


Views from rooftop terraces

Nine grandly proportioned townhouses with stunning Georgian facades, Octagon’s latest London launch incorporates the highest specification and finishes as befitting the developer’s name. Offering views towards the River Thames and Barnes Wetland Centre from private roof terraces and balconies, these unique new homes range between 4,375 – 6,150 sq ft. With 4/5 bedrooms, an impressive kitchen/breakfast room and 4 formal reception rooms across 5 storeys, the lower ground floor is dedicated to leisure - including a gym, cinema/TV den and a covered courtyard garden. Each property features a private west backing walled garden with rear pedestrian access to the Thames towpath. Located within the Bishop’s Park Conservation Area, Bishops Row is just a short walk from Fulham’s vibrant centre, tube stations, bus services, and an excellent choice of local schooling.

SHOWHOUSE OPEN THURSDAY TO MONDAY 10AM – 4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT

GUIDE PRICES From £4.995m BISHOPS ROW STEVENAGE ROAD, FULHAM, LONDON SW6 6PB

020 8481 7500 | OCTAGON.CO.UK

020 7731 7100


FROGNAL END HAMP S T EAD V ILLAGE, N W 3

ONE OF THE FINEST VILLAGE HOUSES TO COME TO THE MARKET IN MANY YEARS ON A PLOT APPROACHING HALF AN ACRE

On the market for the first time in over 75 years, ‘Frognal End’ is a magnificent double-fronted detached, Victorian house, currently arranged as two separate apartments, now in need of modernisation. Discretely located at the end of a long gated private driveway, the property comprising almost 6000 square feet (556 sq. m.) arranged predominantly over three floors, occupying an elevated site approaching half an acre. The extensive gardens encompass the house on three sides and in addition there is off street parking for numerous vehicles. The property offers the opportunity for a discerning family to acquire this rare and exquisite home, which could be restored to its original state as a single dwelling, or alternatively, there is the possibility that the existing property could be replaced with a new bespoke home, subject to the usual local authority consents.

TERMS Tenure: Freehold | Sole Selling Agents Guide Price Upon Application


0203 3930 4510 GOODLUCKHOPE.COM

SUITES FROM £392,500 1 BEDROOMS FROM £493,000 2 BEDROOMS FROM £670,500

COMPUTER GENERATED IMAGE. PRICES CORRECT AS AT TIME OF PRINT.

A NE W ISL A ND DE S T IN AT ION. INDUS T R I A L INSPIR ED L I V ING S P A C E S B A T H E D I N S T U N N I N G R I V E R S I D E L I G H T.


SELF PORTRAIT Four years ago, I enrolled on a course at the HEATHERLEY SCHOOL OF FINE ART, where I put charcoal to paper and, later, mixed media on canvas. This has become my outlet to express my passion about life. My work is available to buy from Arte Mea (artemeaadvisory.com). This month, I am supporting the TERRENCE HIGGINS TRUST, the charity for people living with HIV, by donating my painting Two Worlds (left) to The Auction, an annual fundraising event held at Christie’s on April 16.

I am very superstitious. I would never walk under a ladder or step on a crack in the pavement, so it can take me ages to walk 500 metres down the street. If you watched me from a drone you would think I’m crazy, weaving back and forth.

George Khachfe

JEAN-MARIE MASSAUD is a star of furniture design now (his ‘Tribeca Tavolini’ for Poliform are pictured). He is also an architect, so looks at things in real detail.

THE CEO OF POLIFORM UK PAINTS A PICTURE OF HIS LIFE, WORK AND INSPIRATIONS My favourite book is Before They Pass Away by JIMMY NELSON

(TeNeues, £65). It is a collection of his photographs of people from tribal cultures round the world. (Shown here are members of the Drokpa tribe on the IndiaPakistan border.)

I love London and wouldn’t live anywhere else. But I also have a house in SAINTE-MAXIME in the South of France. I’ve planted fig and pomegranate trees in the garden and every year I cannot wait for them to bear fruit 첸

AS TOLD TO DAVID NICHOLLS. BIG DIANA WITH POEM (2007), BY JIM DINE. COURTESY JIM DINE AND ALAN CRISTEA GALLERY © JIM DINE 2018

I started work as an apprentice draughtsman at an interior design practice in Beirut, and 18 months later I was appointed head designer for the new 22-floor PHOENICIA hotel. I was 21 and at that age you believe you can do anything.

I do not have the drive to collect things in my DNA, but I love art, particularly JIM DINE’s work (pictured is Big Diana with Poem, 2007). I have a piece by him that I bought 40 years ago. The face is so intense you almost feel as though you know him.


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House and garden uk may 2018  
House and garden uk may 2018  
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