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OCTOBER 2017 Style 138 Event Find out how you can join the latest Trend Talk with Editorin-Chief Michelle Ogundehin at The Residence, John Lewis Oxford Street 143 Design We chat to renowned chef and restaurateur Yotam Ottolenghi, and discover the story behind Italian furniture brand Meridiani. Plus, discover how you can get the exclusive Soho House look at home – and a free gift worth £51!* 153 Architecture We reveal our contenders for RIBA House of the Year, and peek inside the Pump Station by Johnson Naylor Architects 164 Technology The best Brit-designed speakers and a high-tech upgrade to the art of making the nation’s favourite drink: tea

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DECOR ATING

SPECIAL

The latest interior trends, the fabrics, wallpapers and paints to buy now, plus loads of inspiration to help you make it all work in your home

166 Colour Discover the surprising origins of British Racing Green, the most patriotic of shades

MAIN COVER IMAGE: NOTE DESIGN STUDIO SUBS COVER IMAGE: SANDBERG WALLPAPER *WHEN YOU SPEND OVER £125 AT SOHOHOME.COM. SEE P146 FOR FULL DETAILS

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ON THE COVER Our newsstand cover introduces our new obsession with power pastels – one of the five big interiors trends revealed in our Decorating Special.

This month’s special subscribers’ cover is a celebration of pattern – specifically the ‘Lo Watercolour Floral’ print by Sandberg Wallpaper.

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All that’s great in British design right now, including the winners of the ELLE Decoration British Design Awards 2017

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MO D E R N

BR ITIS H 170 Life through a lens At the newly renovated London abode of ELLE Decoration’s Photography Director, family-friendly comfort meets impeccable design 184 Industrial evolution Original factory features have been updated with cutting-edge steel designs at this east London loft 194 The collectibles We reveal the most beautiful pieces from new British craftspeople and big-name designers that you should be collecting now 204 London soul Fashion label Talitha’s ‘lifestyle apartment’ in Notting Hill is a trove of eccentric designs, mixed together with flamboyant flair 214 No small feat British designer Ilse Crawford has an ability to work her interiors magic on small spaces with even smaller budgets 218 Inner calm The British do stylish simplicity just as eloquently as the Scandinavians, as this London home’s pared-back interior shows 224 Comfort zone This apartment nails the ‘lived-in’ London look – a combination of reclaimed materials and vintage finds 232 Suite success At London’s latest boutique address, the Henrietta Hotel, British chic is served with an insouciant French twist 244 Suffolk sanctuary British country style can be cool, eco-aware and cutting edge, as demonstrated by this brilliantly Modernist home

170 Escape 257 News Stay in a stylish Scottish farmhouse, see a modern art show or visit one of the UK’s finest farmers markets 265 Gardens Meet the avant-garde plantswomen championing British blooms. Plus, the best botanical gardens to see in autumn 269 London Design Festival Your guide to what to see and do in the capital during the big event 281 Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour Discover why this decorators’ paradise is the place to be

204 Finally 26 Subscribe Fantastic offers for our most loyal readers 284 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it

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298 The story of the teacup Get a handle on this most British of household objects


PICTURES: WIREIMAGE, EMMA WEBSTER

Clockwise, from above Matthew Williamson and I at a posh party; we bonded as we were both born in Manchester. Filming Grand Designs: House of the Year (see me in the new series, p155, this November!). My first and last covers. Sir Terence Conran, a great mentor, and I at the 2009 ELLE Decoration British Design Awards. Ilse and I when I first joined her team in 1997. Me with Ettore Sottsass; I’d gone to interview him and he insisted on a snap – I’m so happy to have this picture as he died a year or so later.

After 157 issues and over 13 years spent building this incredible brand to awardwinning creative, consumer and commercial success, this is my last issue as Editor-in-Chief. And what a fabulous ride it’s been! But, as those that know me well are oft used to hearing me say (or possibly bellow), ‘onwards and upwards, people!’ When our iconic founding editor Ilse Crawford first invited me to be her Features Director back in 1997, little did I imagine I would still be so passionately involved with the magazine some 20 years later – a gazillion shoots, covers, houses and hairstyles on – and still so excited by the very concept of home. Ilse’s definition of the Sensual Home, and her evolution after she left in 1998, were a constant inspiration, and they certainly played a part in my decision to now step aside. However, I will be staying closely connected to this glorious title as its Editor-at-Large and Special Strategic Advisor. The thing is, I’m eternally fascinated by the seemingly mysterious winds of change that blow through design, style and trends, and the way they affect almost everything, from the popularity of certain colours to the must-watch TV shows. My desire has always been to decode these worlds, putting them into context, joining the cultural dots, and re-presenting them as stories that are relevant to as many people as possible. And that will continue! I believe that anyone can make their home a more wonderful and supportive place to live, and it doesn’t have to cost a lot of money. Thus, the first thing I’ll be doing on the other side will be finishing my How to Have a Happy Home book – as I first mentioned it on this very page some four years ago, it’s definitely overdue (more info to come through all the usual social media channels). And so I invite you to join me on the next leg of my journey.

Follow me on Instagram: @michelleogundehin

I’ll sign off then with my personal top ten highlights from my time at the helm…

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My incredible team and our family of genius writers, photographers and stylists, without whom none of this would have been possible. Our Fight the Fakes campaign, which resulted in a change to UK copyright laws such that rip-offs of classic designs are now officially illegal. My first, and this, my last, cover – although I really loved October 2005 and August 2016, too! Our exclusive subscriber covers, with which we’ve had more licence to play. The launch of ELLE Decoration Country, expanding our unique ethos to rural homes. The launch of the ELLE Decoration Style Consultancy, extending our sophisticated styling touch to commercial property developers. That we’re one of the most syndicated editions within our global family of 28 international titles, influencing the template for new launches as far afield as ELLE Decoration Philippines. Fully embracing the multi-platform nature of contemporary editorship – blogging, tweeting and Instagramming with abandon! I especially love composing Instagram colourscape moodboards for you all, and will cheerfully continue to do so – it’s a passion project. The integrity, beauty, elegance and truth with which I have sought to imbue each and every one of the 30,000 or so editorial pages I have overseen during my tenure. But most of all, you, my wonderful readers, for your loyalty, enduring support and enthusiastic engagement with all of the above.

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Thank you for making the last 13 years so enjoyable, challenging and worthwhile!

Editor-in-Chief

Twitter: @ELLEDecoMO

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M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

E DI T OR I A L Art Director Tony Peters (020 7534 2521) Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs (020 7439 5027) Photography Director Flora Bathurst (020 7534 2503) Homes Director Jackie Daly (020 7534 2512) Deputy Art Director Philippe Blanchin (020 7534 2518) Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin (020 7534 2519) Features Editor Amy Moorea Wong (020 7534 2524) Decorating Editor Kiera Buckley-Jones (020 7439 5337) Photography Editor James Williams (020 7534 2513) Features Writer Charlotte Brook (020 7534 2522) Junior Designer Jack Melrose (020 7534 2581) Sub Editor Rebecca Hastings (020 7439 5343) Managing Editor Debbie Black (020 7534 2558) Workflow Director Christina Simone (020 7439 5273) Contributing Editors Amy Bradford Eliza Honey Emma Love Sarah Slade Editor-at-Large Talib Choudhry Contributing Stylists Hannah Bort Sania Pell Amanda Smith-Corston Suzanne Stankus Thanks to Natalie Egling

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H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S U K Chief Executive Officer James Wildman Chief Operating Officer Claire J Blunt Chief Revenue Officer Duncan Chater Chief Operations Director Clare Gorman Director of Communications Lisa Quinn HR Director Surinder Simmons ELLE Decoration is published by Hearst Magazines UK, a trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd.

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ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse and General Manager Simon Horne ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Senior Vice President/International Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to Publishing Director upholding the highest standards of journalism. Jeannette Chang If you think that we have not met those standards Senior Vice President/Editorial Director and want to make a complaint, contact Kim St Clair Bodden complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ Executive Editor hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we Eleonore Marchand are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, Executive Creative Director contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk Peter Yates LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Fashion and Entertainment Director Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active Kristen Ingersoll Denis Olivennes B ACK I S SU E S & CEO ELLE France & International SU B S CR I P T IONS Constance Benqué Hearst Magazines UK, Tower House, CEO ELLE International Media Licenses Sovereign Park, Market Harborough, François Coruzzi Leicestershire LE16 9EF Brand Management of To order or renew a subscription, telephone ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée 01858 438846 or fax 01858 461739 SVP/International Director of For any other subscription enquiries, telephone ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero 01858 438880 or email elledecoration@ SVP/Director of International Media subscription.co.uk. Lines open Mon–Fri Licenses, Digital Development & 8am–9pm; Sat 8am–4pm. Standard rates Syndication Mickaël Berret for 12 issues: UK £52.80; Eire & Europe Airmail Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration £55; USA £65; Rest Of The World £75 PRINTED BY Wyndeham Roche Ltd, St Austell Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration COVER PRINTED BY Westdale, Cardiff Flora Régibier Paper supplied by Burgo Group DISTRIBUTION Comag, Tavistock Road, Syndication Coordinator West Drayton, UB7 7QE Audrey Schneuwly 01895 433600 (comag.co.uk) INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: JEAN MARIE DEL MORAL

The very best of British design, from the latest launches to the names to watch. Plus, we reveal this year’s ELLE Decoration British Design Award winners – the new stars in craft, textiles, furniture, ceramics and accessories!

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BRIT ABROAD

Exuberant British designer Matthew Williamson has taken his flamboyant interior design style overseas, jazzing up new cocktail bar Nama, located in the small Mallorcan village of Deià. Williamson, who lives locally, has combined his own opulent wallpaper and fabric patterns with vintage and contemporary Spanish pieces to inject some signature wow factor into quiet village life (@namabar_deia).


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A PINCH OF PERFECTION Step into the new Pinch showroom in London’s Pimlico to see British furniture at its finest

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: ANDREW F WOOD

Pinch’s elegantly understated new furniture shop presents only a few of the brand’s instant classics at one time (they rotate designs every six weeks), but husband-and-wife team Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon’s clean, traditionally inspired aesthetic is always clear. When the duo founded Pinch in 2004, they sat down together at their kitchen table and drew up a manifesto. They wanted to ‘make good use of resources, both in terms of materials and in terms of makers and manufacturers,’ and to design furniture with ‘proper integrity’. Recently, they found that crumpled piece of paper tucked away at the back of a drawer, and the words still ring true. ‘We should frame it,’ says Oona, though there’s no real need: Pinch’s designs, from the ‘Frey’ sideboard (right, from £5,025) to the ‘Achilles’ dining table (above right, £4,250) all convey these principles with an understated elegance and simplicity. Stop by the new showroom on Bourne Street in Pimlico during London Design Festival to marvel at Pinch’s first collaboration with fifth generation Stoke-on-Trent pottery, 1882 Ltd. The ‘Flare’ collection of pitchers, jugs, mugs and bowls (inset above, from £45 for a mug or bowl) is modern and sculptural, with a tactile quality. The Pinch design signature is evident even on the smallest of objects. As Oona explains, the range ‘makes a virtue of its materials and the expert craftspeople who produce it’ (pinchdesign.com).

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T H E E M B R O I D E RY E X P E R T S HUNT & HOPE

Needlepoint’s slightly fusty image is about to have a major overhaul, thanks to London duo Izzy Hunt and Emmie Hope. Their bespoke patterns – think tiger stripes, camouflage motifs and eye-popping geometrics – can be applied to anything from headboards to cushions, or the back of an antique chair. The only limit is their clients’ imagination – and patience, as projects are made by hand and can take weeks to finish. Prior to setting up business together in 2015, Hunt and Hope had been friends for years. They still work out of a studio located at the bottom of Izzy’s garden in Kensal Rise, north London. Head online to pick an existing design or commission your own piece (huntandhope.com).

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C A P I T A L W E AV E While it might seem a classically British endeavour, weaving is a diminishing craft. In fact, there hasn’t been a weaving industry in London since the interwar years – until now. Daniel Harris of The London Cloth Company scoured Hackney (the capital’s traditional cloth-trading district) for looms, rescuing and rebuilding them by hand. Now, they are being used to produce cushions and throws for his new collaboration with homeware brand Lane. £76 for a cushion (lanebypost.com).

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M A K I N G WAV E S It’s almost as if the blue waves that wash across Cornwall’s bays and coves decorated Rick Stein’s tableware collection themselves. It was, in fact, University of Falmouth students, responding to the seafood-loving chef’s brief of capturing the Cornish landscape. From £10 for a mug, available at Unique & Unity (uniqueandunity.co.uk).

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Try this The White Company has partnered with British Airways to make your next long-haul flight a more luxurious affair. Its soft woven blankets, luxury bedding, eye masks and selected products from the ‘Restore & Relax Spa’ collection will be available to all Club World customers (britishairways.com).

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N A M E T O WAT C H J O N AT H A N M I Z Z I

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: GREG FONNE

Who is he?

A British-Maltese designer who studied set design and visual effects throughout Europe and America, Mizzi qualified as an architect at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL in 2008. He worked for Foster + Partners and design studio Cinimod before founding Mizzi Studio in 2011. What’s his style? He calls it ‘neo-futuristic’, which we’re translating as buildings and products

defined by modern, gravity-defying shapes and slick materials. Mizzi is a huge sci-fi fan, which comes through in his studio’s technological designs – they strive to ‘transform ideas and fantasy into reality’. Where can I see his designs? Head to Westfield Stratford City to admire the copper curves of the studio’s design for Colicci cafe (right). You’ll also find Mizzi at this year’s Decorex design fair, where he’s exhibiting the ‘Awkward Table’ series (right; mizzi.co).

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2017 W IN NE R

BEST IN CRAFT JO ELBOURNE 42 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

Elbourne transforms secondhand furniture into pieces of practical art. Describing herself as ‘a sort of weaver’, Elbourne worked in menswear after graduating with a textiles degree in 2000, before moving back into making in 2015, salvaging furniture frames and adding new seats. ‘I like blocks and geometry, uninterrupted areas that traditional weaving didn’t lend itself to,’ she explains. Based in Margate, Elbourne works from a shared studio, an environment that fosters artistic freedom. ‘I’m inspired by painting more than furniture,’ she says. ‘I like minimal artists, such as Donald Judd

and Ellsworth Kelly. But my pieces are functional rather than art objects – although quite a few people don’t want to sit on them. I work to suit the frame that I’ve got, which at the moment includes a lot of mid-century pieces,’ she says. Elbourne also hopes to work with a furniture maker to create a collection from scratch. After exhibiting in the British Craft Pavilion at London Design Fair, Elbourne’s working on an interior design project and new products. On winning, she says: ‘I’m delighted and a little stunned; it’s humbling and encouraging.’ (@j.elbourne; cumulodesign.co.uk).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

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THE BRIT READ BARBER & OSGERBY

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We talk to the designers as new book ‘Barber Osgerby, Projects’ hits shelves and coffee tables

FRONT ROW FLORALS Give your home some fashion cred. British label Preen, by designers Thea Bregazzi and Justin Thornton, has debuted Preen Home, a new collection featuring cushions and eiderdown blankets sprinkled with chintzy flowers that appear to have waltzed straight off of the catwalks. The pieces are printed onto the same ruffle-edged, 100 per cent Italian silk as the brand’s stylish clothes. Cushion, £175; throw, £595, both available October (preenbythorntonbregazzi.com).

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WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: GERHARDT KELLERMANN

Shop here New concept store Britain Can Make It carries a torch for post-war British design, selling pieces by iconic UK brands such as Anglepoise, Royal Doulton, Dartington Crystal and G Plan, as well as smaller names from its new retail spot in London’s Elephant and Castle (britaincanmakeit.com).

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Why was now the time for a new book? ‘We wanted to see all of our pieces in one place, a definitive publication that catalogues our work from the beginning,’ says Osgerby. ’Most of our best work’s happened since our last book six years ago, and it’s approaching the 20th anniversary of our first product, so it was about time.’ Tell us about Barber Osgerby, Projects… ‘The front part of the book is very visual, and is punctuated by six essays in which we talk about our most significant projects, such as the Olympic torch, the “Tip Ton” chair for Vitra and our “In The Making” exhibition at the Design Museum,’ says Barber. ‘We realised that there are three themes that our work can be grouped into – Frameworks, which goes from the “Double Space” installation we did at the V&A to our “Piton” stool for Knoll; Volumes, which includes sculpted forms; and Folded Structures, which is a lot of our early work,’ adds Osgerby. ‘We weren’t aware of these categories, so it was funny when everything fell into them.’ Where do you find inspiration? ‘We try not to pay too much attention to contemporary design,’ says Barber. ‘We went to a vintage kitchen suppliers in LA recently and there were these contraptions that were made for juicing, grinding, and making mayonnaise. No design, just basic cast aluminium to do the job – that always looks better.’ What’s your favourite part of the design process? ‘When you have an idea,’ say the duo in unison. ‘You can spend days or even weeks on something and you know it’s not right, then suddenly one day you get it,’ adds Barber. ‘It’s like with the ”Tip Ton“ chair, when we realised that we could have a rocking chair but with two bits instead of the curve. The best moment is when you realise you’ve got it.’ Is there a standout moment from your career so far? ‘We did an installation at the Eames house in Los Angeles, on the lawn and inside in the Eames’s actual old studio,’ says Barber. ‘As a designer, Charles and Ray Eames and their whole world is incredibly important, and the fact that we were invited to do that installation there… you look back and think, ”Wow, that was actually really good“.’ What’s next for Barber & Osgerby? ‘Loads of new things,’ says Osgerby. ‘The ”Bellhop“ lighting range we unveiled at Milan with Flos is ready to go on sale in the new year, and we’re doing more work with Galerie Kreo [a Parisian gallery that displays and sells limited edition contemporary designs]. We must have 30 projects on the go.’ ‘The list is at 58,’ corrects Barber. ‘Barber Osgerby, Projects’ is on sale 4 September (Phaidon, £59.95)

SHINE BRIGHT

The utter simplicity of Minimalux’s ‘O’ and ‘A’ candleholders is key to their charm. The solid aluminium cones and spheres, with their satisfying weight and polished mirror finish, are designed in the brand’s east London studio before being precision machined in the Home Counties. £175 each (minimalux.com).

Above Cover of new book Barber Osgerby, Projects Right Inside the design duo’s busy studio in Shoreditch, east London

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N A M E T O WAT C H ACCORDING TO I L S E C R AW F O R D SIMON JONES STUDIO

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: CARLOS TEIXEIRA, LESLIE WILLIAMSON

Ilse Crawford (founder of Studioilse) was awarded an MBE for services to interior design in 2014. Here, she tells us why Simon Jones and Jack Neville – aka Simon Jones Studio (below) – are names to watch (studioilse.com). ‘The beauty of Simon Jones Studio’s furniture lies in its intelligent simplicity,’ says Crawford. ‘The practice is built on the creative use of everyday materials, with a strong focus on quality workmanship and careful detail. Its pieces are thoughtful and well produced.’ Working out of its Kentish Town workshop, the brand combines furniture design (‘RK’ table, below) with architectural projects. It has worked on seating for Ikea’s collaboration with Hay, created a display system for the Design Museum, and tables for Sebastian Wrong at Established & Sons. Its new range for Hay will launch this autumn (simonjonesstudio.co.uk).

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REFINED TASTES Legendary furniture designer Matthew Hilton talks about his latest project for SCP and his belief in that most British of character traits: persistence ‘I’m not very interested in minimalism – really stripping things down – but I am interested in refinement,’ says British designer Matthew Hilton when describing the thought process behind his latest design: the ‘Miles’ modular sofa system for SCP (above, from £4,868). In fact, that’s a design ethos that has characterised Hilton’s work since he began his career in the 1980s, designing for companies such as Driade, XO and SCP, and making a name for himself creating now iconic pieces such as the ‘Balzac’ armchair, a curvaceous take on the classic club chair that’s still in production today. Hilton describes himself as persistent: ‘If I want to make something work, I find it difficult to give up on it,’ he says. It’s a quality that has served him well. One of his most successful designs, the ‘Light’ table (below) created for Portuguese furniture brand De La Espada, is a feat of engineering which required perseverence. ‘I know the interest of this piece is that you think it shouldn’t stand up, because it looks impossible – it looks as if, structurally, it shouldn’t work,’ he says. Today, enter Hilton’s Brixton studio, which he shares with his two long-time assistants, Harry and David, and there’s a peaceful sense of productivity: rock music is playing on the radio and, on the walls, there are drawings and renders of all the new projects in development for Hilton’s fleet of faithful clients – including Case Furniture, Linley and more. ‘I enjoy work more than I ever have,’ he says. ‘I work much harder... I’m taking it far more seriously and really trying to make the most of the working time I’ve got left.’ At the pace Hilton is going, there’s a lot more to come from this Brit (matthewhilton.com).

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S T AY I N G POWER

The name Ercol is synonymous with British craftsmanship, and its new ‘Amelia’ range, the brand’s first stained collection, is no exception. Consisting of an extending dining table, dining chairs, a console and side table in whitewashed pale ash, the range makes a light addition to Ercol’s catalogue of modern classics. From £199 for a side table (ercol.com). OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


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2017 W IN NE R

TEXTILE DESIGN VICKY COWIN 48 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

We were enchanted by the delicacy of Cowin’s handmade silk wallhangings. Weaver Vicky Cowin creates exquisite wallhangings from her home studio in southeast London. She started her business last year, hand-dyeing pure silk in her garden, before affixing it to her loom and seeing where the yarns took her. ‘I find weaving incredibly stimulating, but therapeutic at the same time,’ she says. Her designs feature light, geometric patterns interspersed with dramatic tufts, on a complicated woven base. ‘I’m inspired by signs and symbols, alchemy and traditional costume. I mix up ideas,

creating a drawing effect with warps and wefts,’ she explains. ‘I’m always learning – the more complicated things are, the more interesting I find them.’ It looks as though Cowin will be at her loom for the foreseeable future. Her sights are set on creating larger pieces: she’s produced a rug sample to be woven in wool, is in talks with stockists and is thinking about developing upholstery and accessories. Describing herself as ‘totally delighted’ to win an ELLE Decoration British Design Award, she continues: ‘It’s lovely to know that people appreciate my work.’ (@vickycowin; vickycowin.co.uk).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

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CUT A RUG

The Rug Company is throwing an all-star celebration for its 20th anniversary this year, launching a collection of new pieces by its most exalted designers. Vivienne Westwood, Paul Smith, Alexander McQueen, Kelly Wearstler and co-founder of the brand Suzanne Sharp’s unmistakable styles have been translated though weaving and hand-knotted wool and silk. Pictured, from left: ‘Chiaroscuro’ by Alexander McQueen, £6,385; ‘Bonavita’ by Suzanne Sharp, from £1,619; ‘Channels’ by Kelly Wearstler, from £2,612 (therugcompany.com).

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SITTING COMFORTABLY?

Cocktail hour’s taken a cosy twist with the meeting of English furniture marker George Smith and designer Martin Brudnizki. The ‘Cocktail’ collection comprises three armchairs and two sofas, all curves and thoughtful detailing. Each piece is hand constructed and everything, from the colour of the stain on the ash legs to the fabric itself, can be customised. ‘Martin has perfectly captured the glamour of cocktail hour,’ says Ben Norris, CEO of George Smith. We’ll drink to that. Pictured, from left: ‘Hogarth’ chair, £3,205; ‘Almack’ chair, £4,694 (georgesmith.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: RICHARD GOODING

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H I G H LY S T R U N G

If you’re looking for a statement piece of furniture, we recommend the ‘Aegis 001’ tables by new London-based creative Ziad Alonaizy. He graduated from his Architectural Interior Design diploma at Inchbald school of design only two years ago (after a career as an orthopaedic surgeon), and his debut collection demonstrates fresh ideas executed with complex elegance. It marries just four elements – emerald marble, blackened steel, solid brass plates and steel wire – and is all handmade in Italy. Alonaizy is currently working on furniture and accessories for a major brand to be released next year. ‘Aegis 001’ tables, £4,950 for a set of three (alonaizy.com).

BLIGHTY BORN Soane Britain has long been a haven for pieces made in the UK, and champions the use of traditional crafts such as iron forging and saddlery. Its latest collection is full of classic shapes with playful modern twists, including sofas covered in gentle prints, and this charming ‘Weymouth’ lamp with its stitched red leather base and antiqued brass hat. £1,425 (soane.com).

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N A M E T O WAT C H ACCORDING TO S I R D AV I D A D J AY E YINKA ILORI

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: ED REEVE, VEERLE EVANS

Architect Sir David Adjaye was awarded the Panerai London Design Medal for his ‘outstanding contribution to design’ at last year’s London Design Festival and was knighted for services to architecture in the new year. He tells us why designer Yinka Ilori (below) is one to watch (adjaye.com). ‘Yinka’s work tells a playful, humorous story,’ says Adjaye, ‘but look beneath and there’s a real richness and depth.’ Londonbased designer Ilori’s work is inspired by the African prints and the tales that he grew up with. Whether he’s working on furniture or installations, Ilori’s work sings with colour, energy and a tongue-in-cheek narrative on Nigerian traditions and modern day culture. During London Design Festival (16–24 September) visit his patternfilled playground (below) outside of Citizen M hotel in Shoreditch and the ‘A Large Chair Doesn’t Make a King’ installation at The Africa Centre (yinkailori.com).

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THE DARKER SIDE OF DIXON

British designer Tom Dixon could perhaps be credited for the now ubiquitous trend of coating objects in high-shine copper, but his latest tabletop collection has taken a darker turn. Sculptural coffee range ‘Brew’ (above, from £35 for a coffee scoop) has been given a mirror-like black covering. ‘Black strips an object down to its essence, allowing us to focus on enjoying the shape and the function,’ says Dixon. Meanwhile, the brand has also dipped its toe into weaving, with its first collection of textiles. Living up to its title of ‘Super-Texture’, it’s made up of six fabrics, including bouclé, velvet and mohair (right, from £75 for a cushion) – note the signature copper zip. To fully immerse yourself in the Dixon style, head to Le Drugstore, a Parisian brasserie that’s been transformed with the designer’s flair (tomdixon.net).

23 LIGHTNESS OF TOUCH To celebrate 15 years of collaboration with Austrian crystal powerhouse Swarovski, London-based designer Tord Boontje’s new collection, ‘Luminous Reflections’, is his most boundary-pushing yet. It’s part of the newly revived ‘Crystal Palace’ project, in which Swarovski asks designers to reimagine the chandelier. Inspired by everything from the soft light captured in landscapes by artist JMW Turner to the way light reflects on water, Boontje worked with the team to create crystal forms that are sold individually, meaning the piece can be given a bespoke look. From £1,325 for one component (swarovski.com). OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 53


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B AT T E R S E A P OW E R

Sebastian Mann’s brand Mann Made produces urban furniture from its Battersea workshop. These surroundings have inspired its new ‘Battersea’ collection. Each design in the 13-piece range, from the ‘Rozel’ vanity (left, £885) to the ‘Howie’ (right, £685) and ‘Alexandra’ (far right, £1,475) storage units, is handmade to order using natural materials, compressed fibre panels and sharp lines of blackened steel (mannmade london.com).

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THE TEXTILE ARTIST CHARLOTTE JADE

The British print scene is flourishing, but Charlotte Jade won’t have trouble standing out from the crowd. Charlotte O’Reilly co-founded the brand, which sells wallpapers and cushions, with her sister Kate in 2015 after studying illustration at Camberwell College of Arts. ‘I draw our patterns of flowers, foliage and animals by hand, then apply colour digitally,’ says Charlotte. The duo’s new ‘Tropical Flora’ range combines local influences (their studio is in Hertfordshire) with ideas from a recent trip to the Caribbean. From £75 for a cushion (charlotte-jade.co.uk).

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27 KITCHENS WITH CLASS The name Linley conjures up images of intricate marquetry, but there’s more to discover from this now classic brand, launched by Viscount David Linley – son of famed photographer Lord Snowdon – in 1985. In its 30 years of business, the company has developed the skills to create not just fabulous furnishings, but entire interiors – including kitchens like the one above – that include immaculate cabinetry, walnut, rosewood and Makassar ebony veneers, and customisable storage (davidlinley.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY, AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: SARAH HOGAN, GRAHAM ATKINS-HUGHES

Buy this The ‘Geo’ coat rack by ByAlex is playful and functional. The ash pegs, all crafted in British designer Alex Swain’s Surrey workshop, evolve from a circle into a square via a series of lovingly formed polygons. Affordable and beautifully crafted, it’s a talking point as well as a place to hang your jackets and bags. £49 (byalex.co.uk).


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WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: EMIL BENDIXEN

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BEST IN CERAMICS VICKY LINDO

Pottery duo Vicky Lindo’s take on folk ceramics is completely charming. Vicky Lindo and her partner Bill Brookes work out of a Victorian pigeon club in Bideford, Devon, producing pieces for their brand, Vicky Lindo. Lindo is focused on creating colourful sgraffito ceramics, making relief illustrations on painted plates and vessels by scratching the unfired clay. Meanwhile, Brookes is the chief mould maker and clay master, mixing Devon ball clay and Cornish china clay. The tale of the evening-courseturned-lifelong-passion applies here: in 2009, while on maternity leave from

her job at the Burton Art Gallery, Lindo signed up for a 12-week pottery course and ‘caught the bug’. From there, the pottery practice – inspired by folk art, from American quilts to the traditional North Devon slipware collection at the Burton – rolled into her home kitchen. Brookes was working as a cabinetmaker at the time, but offered to make her plaster moulds (on the living room table). Fast-forward to today, and Lindo and Brookes remain dedicated to enjoying the process of their craft, as they believe it shows when ‘things are made with thought’(@vickylindo; vickylindo.co.uk). OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 57


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INSIDE THE HOME OF BRITISH FURNITURE This September marks 40 years since the start of the first term at Parnham College. We sit down with founder John Makepeace OBE to discuss his book ‘Beyond Parnham’ Parnham College has trained generations of furniture makers, which means new book Beyond Parnham reads like a who’s who of the British – and indeed, international – furniture-making scene. Curated by celebrated furniture maker John Makepeace, who founded Parnham College in 1977, the book tells the tale of the educational phenomenon that ignited the careers of many. Featuring contributions from over 100 alumni, including David Linley, Konstantin Grcic and Benchmark’s Sean Sutcliffe, it’s a volume filled with reflections and work from ex-students, as well as a source of reference for designers working today. Passionate about making furniture from a young age (he started carpentry lessons aged six), Makepeace was a founder of the Crafts Council in the 1970s,

Beyond Parnham tells the tale of the educational phenomenon that ignited hundreds of careers which aimed to support craftspeople. He became increasingly aware of the inadequacies in training in these areas: ‘It’s no good just being very skilled at woodwork, or being skilled in business; putting them together is what gives you the entrepreneurial ability,’ he explains. Following his vision to help young designers, after a bout of heavy fundraising in 1976, Makepeace bought Parnham House, an 80-room Tudor manor buried within the Dorset countryside. It became his home and workshop, as well as a residential teaching facility. To mark the 40th anniversary of the college, alongside producing the book, Makepeace also called a reunion, inviting his 200 or so alumni to gather at London’s Design Museum. ‘It was such a joyous day,’ he recalls. ‘And I could remember everybody’s name!’ When asked if he felt proud to see a room full of protégés, after a long pause, he replies: ‘I tend to think of it more from the other side – what a marvellous lot they are.’ Beyond Parnham, £30 (beyondparnham.com).

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THE RUG DESIGNER AMY KENT

Amy Kent set up her own rug company in 2005 after she spotted a gap in the market while working in interior design. ‘By far the hardest item to source for clients was rugs,’ she explains. ‘I couldn’t find any inspiring designs that were reasonably priced and good quality.’ Now, she works from a studio at her home in Wiltshire. The surrounding meadows are a rich source of inspiration. ‘My patterns are often inspired by leaves, stones, flowers and trees, but the geometric designs come from architectural features I see every day, such as iron railings in London.’ Kent’s latest collection, ‘Art on Rugs’, is a collaboration with her sister Lucy Kent, a painter. ‘I asked her to make 11 abstract artworks that I could translate onto rugs,’ she explains. The designs, made from a mix of wool and silk, are made completely by hand in India and Nepal. £850 per square metre (amykent.co.uk).

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CONSTRUCTED BEAUTY

We’ve fallen for Belfast-based ceramicist Derek Wilson’s ‘Constructed Vessels’ collection. These stoneware and porcelain sculptures take inspiration from the abstracted forms of the British Constructivist movement. Assembled over several firings, they have a bold angularity that’s tempered by their soft matt finish and earthy palette. From £378 (derekwilsonceramics.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG, AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: ROBERT GOLDEN

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JOIN THE CRAFT CROWD

For an update on the state of craft and design in the UK today, head over to the Mecca of craft fairs that is Made London. Look out for painterly porcelain plates by ceramicist Jo Heckett (below), oak furnishings by Alan Meredith Studio (bottom right), glassware by Michèle Oberdieck (bottom left) and more, all on show amid the grandeur of Sir John Soane’s former church at One Marylebone (19–22 October; madelondon-marylebone.co.uk).

N A M E T O WAT C H ACCORDING TO SIR TERENCE CONRAN DANIEL SCHOFIELD

‘Daniel is a bright young designer whose work and approach to design I admire a great deal,’ says Conran of Schofield, who creates elegant pieces that focus on beautiful materials and understated shapes. ‘He’s a hands-on problem solver who looks for simple solutions to create clean and beautiful products. He also happens to be an amiable chap, with the strength of character to become one of the leading figures in the British design industry.’ Schofield has just collaborated with The Conran Shop to produce a furniture collection. The ‘Summit’ side table (right, £395) has a base made from British marble quarried in Plymouth and the Isle of Man (daniel schofield.co.uk).

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See this We’re entranced by the work of young London-based artist Zuza Mengham. Her temptingly tactile and colourful jagged resin casts are seriously covetable. Check out her style at the London Design Fair, 21–24 September (zuzamengham.com).

35 TRANSATLANTIC STYLE Quintessentially British emporium William & Son has teamed up with hip US brand Anna New York to create this new collection, which includes shapely vessels crafted from gleaming stainless steel, topped with bright, beautifully veined scoops of alabaster. The ‘Amare’ sugar bowl and spoon (£325), creamer (£300) and salt and pepper shakers (£238) will add glamour to any table setting (williamandson.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: JOHN MUGGENBORG, YESHEN VENEMA, SYLVAIN DELEU PHOTOGRAPHER

Sir Terence Conran is the man we have to thank for The Conran Shop, Habitat and The Design Museum, as well as the over 50 books he’s authored. Here, he recommends the work of young furniture designer Daniel Schofield (below; conranshop.co.uk).


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WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

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FURNITURE DESIGN W I L L E LW O R T H Y

Elworthy wowed us with his modern take on traditional woodworking. Having ‘always been quite handy’, Will Elworthy’s decision to quit his career in TV production and turn to furniture making was a natural one. In 2012, he enrolled in the ‘Fine Woodwork’ course at the Building Crafts College in Stratford, a two-year endeavour during which he was ‘at the bench five days a week’. While there, he used to ‘knock about’ on a lathe. ‘With furniture making, everything is so precise,’ he says, so he found wood turning, which is all about feeling the shape of a design, a real relief.

It’s no surprise that turned elements feature in many of his designs, from chairs to desks to wooden bowls – some of which are stocked at London store The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Just two years out of the course, the commissions keep rolling in for his intricate works in ash, oak, walnut, sycamore and more. This ‘one-man band’ enjoys the challenges of working with clients, no matter what the request. In fact, he’s currently working on a deskcum-table-tennis-table. Clearly, there’s no end to this designer’s creativity (@will elworthyfurniture; willelworthy.co.uk). OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 63


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INTO THE WOODS British designers have always had an affinity with wood, creating pieces that heighten its natural beauty. Here, we pick the five timber-loving brands to watch right now

ANOTHER COUNTRY

JOINED + JOINTED

This brand has once again teamed up with designer David Irwin, who took inspiration from the life and times of Thomas Hardy for his curvaceous ‘Hardy’ range. Armchair (right), £595 (anothercountry.com).

Helmed by Samuel Chan, this collective works with craftspeople at its Shropshire workshop to produce charming pieces such as Simon Pengelly’s new Arts & Crafts-inspired ‘Talland’ cabinet (left). £295 (joinedandjointed.com).

OUT OF THE WOODWORK Bristol-based Alex Fitter and Louis Eastman are known for their handcrafted designs for bars and restaurants. ‘Birch’ is the duo’s first home furniture range (media unit, left, £675). Each piece can be customised with fronts, handles and legs. Available September (ootw.co).

SEBASTIAN COX

KENT & LONDON

Based in east London, Cox focuses on using British woods down to the last offcut – he does much of his own milling, too. This new console table (right) has a top made out of English chestnut shakes. £11,250 (sebastiancox.co.uk).

British hardwoods are a focus for this Whitstable-, Kent- and London-based furniture brand. Its trestle-like ‘Luca’ leg can be added to any of its tables (coffee table, above, £530) and painted a range of shades (kentandlondon.co.uk).

THE MASTER POTTER PA U L M O S S M A N

Unlikely as it may seem for a potter to get their big career break in a Cumbrian service station, that’s what happened to Paul Mossman. He credits Tebay Services – the UK’s only family-run service station, opened in the 1970s – with kickstarting his business. It was here that chef Simon Rogan first spotted Mossman’s robust, beautifully organic stoneware. The potter now supplies the restaurant at Rogan’s picturesque riverside hotel L’Enclume, as well as Fera at Claridge’s and department store Harvey Nichols. Mossman opened his studio on the site of an old coalmine in Staveley, Chesterfield, in 1994. The speckled glazes, irregular shapes and rough edges characteristic of his work are influenced by ‘my beloved Derbyshire gritstone edges [craggy cliffs] and Lakeland hills on frosty moonlit walks’. He favours local materials, personalising his glazes with limestone from the Peak District, clay from nearby rivers and ash from his own kiln fires. Paul takes commissions and, in his words, ‘if it can be eaten off or drunk from’, he’s ‘probably made it’ (paulmossman pottery.co.uk). 64 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

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ANOTHER HIT

Designer Theo Williams has made a quick success of Another Brand, which launched in 2015. This season sees the launch of the company’s very first sofa (below, £2,995) – part of the ‘Legna’ range – the ‘Infinito’ storage collection, and a collaboration with Stockholm- and Londonbased Studiomama, which resulted in reimagined trestle tables (anotherbrand.co.uk).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: BEN ANDERS

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BRITAIN’S POT TALENT

Our nation has already produced ceramic greats – from Josiah Wedgwood’s china teacups to Edmund de Waal’s porcelain vessels. But behind closed studio doors, the nation’s pottery wheels keep turning. We celebrate the state of the craft today The British Ceramics Biennial is returning to Stoke-on-Trent, the home of British ceramic manufacturing, for its fifth edition this month. The Staffordshire town’s brick bottle kilns have been producing iconic designs – including Wedgwood’s jasperware, Portmeirion’s chunky mugs and, more recently, Emma Bridgewater’s charming country-style bowls – since the 17th century, and the former factory of stoneware company Spode is the heart of this festival held in the craft’s honour. Its airy warehouse will display work submitted to Award – a competition with a £5,000 prize – by ten artists, including Matthew Raw, whose collaboration with architectural collective Assemble is soon to appear at Seven Sisters tube station in London. Visit makers at their wheels during the six weeks of open studios, have a go at raku firing (an ancient Japanese technique in which pots are taken from the kiln still red hot, then placed in a flammable material), or building your own bowl in The Clay Pit. Plus, don’t miss a re-imagining of the ‘Brown Betty’, Britain’s archetypal teapot. Young creative Ian McIntyre – an installation artist who also makes homeware for craft furniture brand Another Country – has been tasked with re-engineering the iconic design to fit the aesthetic of the contemporary British kitchen (23 September –5 November; britishceramicsbiennial.com). 66 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

KILN FOLK THREE YOUNG POTTERS TA K I N G T H E C R A F T T O N E W H E I G H T S The architectural potter Emma Payne Since returning from an apprenticeship in Copenhagen, 29-year-old Payne has been producing work for architect Simon Astridge’s workshop as well has her own pieces. We love ‘Tilt’ (right), her witty tea set – the cups stand upright when full, tilting as they empty, to show your host you’re due a refill (emmalouisepayne.com). The tableware maker Elliott Denny Perusing 27-year-old Elliott Denny’s thrown tableware is a soothing experience. His collection of utilitarian porcelain plates, bowls and carafes is soon to be joined by similarly minimalist mugs with chalky exteriors. Keen to spread the word of the wheel, Denny holds classes at his Thames-side studio (elliottceramics.com). The porcelain origamist Toby Gascoyne At shared studio The Kiln Rooms in Peckham, London, Gascoyne of Meiro Ceramics uses slivers of porcelain like pieces of paper, slicing and folding them to construct delicate vases and bowls, finished with a glossy glaze, that merge crockery with art (meiro ceramics.com; thekilnrooms.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

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A C C E S S O RY D E S I G N LOUIS JOBST 68 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

This architect-trained maker’s lamps are sculptural works of art. After seven years spent training to be an architect, 30-year-old, Bristol-born Jobst found himself working with his hands. He became a sculpture fabricator at Mike Smith Studio, a workshop that turns artists and architects’ designs into reality. ‘As an architect, I always wanted to get my hands dirty and build things,’ says Jobst. ‘And I got to learn on the job at Mike Smith Studio.’ It was there, building a brass pavilion for architect Jamie Fobert, that he grew interested in experimenting with patinating metals.

For the past 12 months, Jobst has been busy in his workshop in Acton, west London, developing the techniques needed to create the patinated steel base on the ‘Monument’ lamp and the spun brass shade atop the ‘V’ lamp (both above). Unsurprisingly, architecture inspires his designs. The lamps’ silhouettes and materials are so striking that they remain things of beauty even when the lights are switched off. ‘Winning this award is a great catalyst,’ he says. ‘I look forward to producing more pieces that bridge architecture and lighting.’ (@louisjobst; louisjobst.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

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PRIMA DONNA

Enter Donna Wilson’s world of knitted woodland creatures, cloud cushions and characterful ceramics. Fourteen years after launching her successful brand, she’s expanding her reach with her first bedding and bath collection How it all began At the Royal College of Art as a textile design student, Aberdeenshire native Wilson started knitting and sewing a cast of colourful and quirky creatures out of lambswool, including ‘Cyril the Squirrel Fox’ and ‘Wolfie’ the shy spoon collector. After graduating, she started selling them in small boutiques across London. As she puts it: ‘they’re something that I’ll probably always do because they’re really close to my heart. I love having the control over designing the fabrics, and the craft of making them’. Her big break A distributor invited Wilson on a trip to Japan to present her wares. She returned to London to a swirl of orders and hasn’t looked back since. There was never time for a business plan. Over the years, the brand has expanded organically, with Wilson’s east London studio remaining a hub of creativity, along with a network of craftspeople across the UK – there’s an elderly woman in Orkney who has knitted thousands of ‘Cyrils’. Her latest adventures Wilson’s first bath and bedding collection, produced and distributed by Portuguese textiles group Texnorte Industrial Ltd, is hitting the shelves. It features reversible duvets, bath towels, cushions and pillowcases, all sporting the designer’s signature geometric patterns, trees, sausage dogs, doves and rainclouds, with her trademark quirk and charm (£75 for a single duvet set). That’s not all Wilson’s been working on, though. She has also launched her own bi-annual magazine on crafts and creativity activities for kids, MYO (Make Your Own) – subscribe now at myocreate.com – and continued to focus on pushing the boundaries of her knitted wares. In fact, she is becoming a bit of a homeware empire (donnawilson.com). 70 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

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BACK TO THE FUTURE

London-based designer Christopher Jenner’s work is the perfect marriage of technology and heritage. Just this year, he spent time in Yixing, the eastern province of Jiangsu, China, learning all about the special properties of the area’s purple Zisha clay. Impressed by its porous, heat-retaining nature, he created a modern range of homewares, ‘Yixing’ (above, from £40 for a small plate; yixing.com), using the province’s time-honoured techniques. The tea set absorbs flavours and oils over time, producing brews that only intensify with age and use. At the same time, Jenner has also been helping to revive historic English silver manufacturer Elkington & Co. He spent time in Sheffield to understand the brand’s ethos, and has since produced a collection of tableware (below, from £120; elkingtonandco.com) blending traditional manufacturing methods with his own minimal style. In fact, if there’s heritage at the heart of a design project, then Christopher Jenner is the designer to know (christopher-jenner.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: MICHAEL FRANKE, GARETH HACKER

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PASSION FOR PATTERN

London-based brand 17 Patterns may have only been founded in 2014, but its designs are making waves. The company commissions artworks, evolving them into repeat designs that are then printed onto wallpaper and fabric in the UK. For London Design Festival, 17 Patterns is collaborating with Ligne Roset, covering pieces of the French brand’s furniture in the petrol blue tones of its ‘Beyond Nebulous’ pattern (background) – the dreamy design can also be found on fabric (£145 per metre) and a range of cushions (from £75 each). Also look out for stools, lighting and mirrors, launching soon (17patterns.com).

With an archive full of fashionable patterns to choose from, picking just three pieces to base her first rug collection on must have been a difficult task for British designer Zandra Rhodes. Made in collaboration with rug company Floor Story, the new handcrafted designs include ‘Mexican’ (right), another taken from the 1978 collection ‘Wiggle’, and one using the intricate ‘Star Wars’ from 1976. See them all at London Design Fair. From £350 (floorstory.co.uk).

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THE NEW BENCHMARK

English-crafted-furniture powerhouse Benchmark is always on the lookout for new design talent, and has recently added Liverpool-based Hugh Miller to its star-studded list of collaborators. Like much of Miller’s work, the ‘Norio’ coffee table (£2,200) and ‘Nishi’ side table (£725) are inspired by the quiet simplicity central to Japanese design (benchmarkfurniture.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: CLIVE ARROWSMITH

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R U N W AY TO RUGS


DECOR ATING

SPECIAL PART ONE

EVERYTHING

YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GET YOUR

HOME ON TREND Where to shop What to buy How to put it all together

W O N D E R WA L L S Manufactured in Britain since 1877, wallcovering brand Lincrusta’s designs still impress today. Deeply embossed to create a 3D effect (which, in Victorian Britain, replaced the need for artisan plasterwork) they can be painted any colour. The designs have decorated iconic spaces – from the Titanic to the White House – but now, Lincrusta is looking to the future, with new, modern patterns. From £265 per roll (lincrusta.com).


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IMPERFECT BEAUTY Ilse Crawford has released her first collection of wallpapers, made in conjunction with Swedish brand Engblad & Co. The ‘Atmospheres’ wallcoverings come in five patterns – ‘Line’, ‘Brush’, ‘Canvas’, ‘Knit’ and ‘Weft’ – all celebrations of human mark making. Key to the collection is the notion of embracing the imperfect: ‘we looked at how wallpaper could bring that feeling of imperfection to an interior in a beautiful and accessible way,’ explains Crawford. It’s an exploration that has resulted in welcoming pieces that create a sense of home. £54 per ten-metre roll (wallpaperdirect.com).

CHILD-SAFE PAINT

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: PHOTOPIA PHOTOGRAPHY, BJARNI B. JACOBSEN FOTOGRAFI, JONAS BERG PHOTOGRAPHY

The leafy green, buttercup yellow and cotton white-filled palette of paint from Edward Bulmer’s new ‘Nursery Collection’ is made using completely natural materials, and is reassuringly hypoallergenic, odourless and chemical-free. The paint’s chalky finish is ready to go in two coats and your little ones can sleep in the room that same night. From £45 for 2.5 litres of emulsion (edwardbulmer.co.uk).

SHOW YOUR STRIPES Sandberg Wallpaper’s ‘Rand’ collection is all about stripes. From pencil-thin lines to bold, wide columns, all are a lesson in Scandinavian simplicity. Choose from the brand’s palette of 64 considered colours – including hyacinth purple and gentler putty tones – or specify your own unique shade to be paired with a sharp white that’s sure to keep you in line. £194 per ten-metre roll for a bespoke stripe (sandbergwallpaper.com).

BREAK THE MOULD With their patterns created using coloured clays rather than glazes, encaustic tiles are having a real design moment. Here are three of our favourite finds 1 Emery & Cie’s pretty hexagonal tile is available in two sizes and comes in 48 bold colours. ‘Pattern N°179’ tile, from £108 per square metre (emeryetcie.com). 2 Swedish brand Marrakech Design combines traditional materials with a slick, modern approach. ‘Moonrise’ tiles, £145 per square metre (marrakechdesign.se). 3 The ‘Dandy Star III’ tile is made in Mexico – find it in Milagros, a shop on east London’s Columbia Road filled with colourful products from the North American country. £90 per square metre (milagros.co.uk).

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NEW BRAND JUPITER 10 We catch up with fashion designers Bruno Basso and Christopher Brooke as they get ready to launch the contemporary interiors label that all pattern lovers should know

SEW NOW Craft gets an injection of cool at Liberty London’s newly expanded haberdashery department, The Makery. Liberty London’s own legendary art fabrics will be accompanied by over 600 more options, including traditional (yet perennially hip) brands such as Nottinghamshire’s classic Leavers lace workshop Cluny Lace and ribbon purveyors VV Rouleaux. There are inspiring tools and extras on sale, too. Pictured, from left: pin badge by Hemleva, £15; ‘Cactus’ patch by Macon & Lesquoy, £38.95; ‘Large Roosters’ embroidery scissors by Studio Carta, £45 (libertylondon.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: RAKICN, MIHALIS_A

GREEK GEOMETRICS It’s a classic ancient Greek pattern that’s travelled through millennia on architecture, textiles and artefacts. Now, the mazelike interlocking right angles of the Greek key design have been given a pretty update by trimming specialists Samuel & Son. It is woven onto its ‘Artistole Greek Key’ border, which comes in 14 new shades. Try pairing the pink ‘Petal’ and grey ‘Granite’ versions on curtains, cushions and anything that needs an eureka moment. £62 per metre (samuelandsons.com).

Tell us about your fashion careers? We started working together in 2003 as Basso & Brooke, and were the first designers to show a fully digitally printed collection of clothing. We exhibited at London Fashion Week, as well as at various events around the world, for over a decade together. Why the move into interiors? We’ve always loved interiors, and have done several projects for brands such as Harrods, The Shop at Bluebird, Habitat and Graham & Brown, as well as private commissions. In interiors, pattern and prints have more longevity than they do in fashion – they’re not as restricted to seasons. What’s your design ethos? Maximalism! As with our fashion label, there’s a joyous narrative to our work. We question everything through pattern and colour. Why did you choose to focus on wallcoverings? With wallpaper, you can dramatically transform any type of space and give it personality. We’ve seen clients using our designs in lots of different ways – fully wallpapered rooms are our favourites, but we’ve also seen them on walls and ceilings, as well as inside bookcases. What’s next for Jupiter 10? We’ll be launching a collection of fabrics to coordinate with the wallpapers, and also rugs and tiles with the same designs. Pictured, from top ‘Nairobi’, ‘Tallinn’, ‘Prague’ and ‘Doha’ wallpaper designs, all £145 per roll (jupiter10.com)

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A CUT ABOVE British artist Nicholas Hughes has become known for his intriguing ‘inky drawings’ since graduating from the prestigious Chelsea School of Art in 2005. No longer do you need to go to the trouble of ordering a bespoke commission to get your hands on his extraordinary work, though – Hughes is bringing out his first collection of wallpaper designs. Huge squares of cut lino translate his world into an accessible product – ‘I wanted to make things you can live with, rather than collectors’ pieces,’ explains the artist. The two designs in Hughes’ new collection are covered with quirky, playful characters and expressive lines that are full of life (cargocollective. com/diddletron).

Visit this In need of traditional hardware, fittings, radiators or ironmongery? Head straight to Holloways Period House Shop. A sister store to Holloways of Ludlow’s Home shop, which is housed next door to the original branch in the Shropshire town of Ludlow, Period House Shop is a treasure trove of classic finishing touches for the home. It also has a dedicated lighting gallery (hollowaysofludlow.com).

Introducing the new neutrals: a mix of greys and putty tones with a hint of striking black. These shaded feature on some of our favourite new designs: the painted pots and plants on Pierre Frey’s ‘Esquisse’ fabric (far left, £156 per metre; pierrefrey.com) are highlighted with inky black lines ranging from thick to ultra-fine, lending attitude to the otherwise soft palette. Meanwhile, Morris & Co’s ‘Acanthus’ wallpaper (left, £80 per ten-metre roll; william-morris.co.uk) is also detailed with black, making its iconic leaves stand out.

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: ANDY GORE LTD

GET IN LINE


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TOP SHELF Nifty attachments and elegant supports are reinventing the floating shelf. Here are our top five – perfect for storage and style statements 1 ‘The Round Dorm’, £129, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) 2 ‘Jet’ shelves, from £129.90, Normann Copenhagen (normann-copenhagen.com)

3 ‘Surface’ shelf by Ferréol Babin for Bibelo, from £78.30, Made In Design (madeindesign.co.uk)

4 ‘No.015 Shelf and Key Holder’ by Design Project at John Lewis, £22 ( johnlewis.com)

5 ‘Stedge’ shelf by Woud, £249, Nest (nest.co.uk)

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: JONAS BJERRE-POULSEN

DISPLAY YOUR BOOKS There’s only so much room on the average coffee table, but consigning a beautiful volume to the bookshelf to make way for the next is inevitably a painful affair. Enter the picture shelf, which can exhibit your books in a much more creative way than simply showing their spines. Ikea’s ‘Mosslanda’ shelves (£8.95; ikea.com) are painted to match the wall in the home of interior designer Nina Holst (above), letting her books and prints do the talking. Norm Architects’ version in Kinfolk’s Copenhagen headquarters (right) is set back in a plaster alcove, creating room for other objects underneath the shelves. OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 83


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ZOOTOPIA

PAINT BY NUMBERS You know which colours you like, but do you know how to put them together? Help is at hand with new book Paint Box (Quadrille, £25) by Tricia Guild, CEO of fabric and paint brand Designers Guild, which features 45 palettes of colour combinations, artfully mixed with different textures and patterns. It’s a helpful recipe book for home decorating.

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COLOURS BY LE CORBUSIER The ‘Le Corbusier LCS Ceramics Collection’ of tiles is based on the architect’s Polychromie Architecturale system, his famous palette based on the principle that colour is a key aspect of design. Available exclusively from Domus, it comprises 12 shades from the system, as well as an engraved line pattern on porcelain. Each piece comes in a 120x30cm format (above), or a smaller 30x15cm size. From £81.48 per tile (domustiles.co.uk).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

Tigers prowl atop ivy-covered walls, giraffes nibble at hard-to-reach leaves and flamingoes frolic through de Gournay’s ‘Madame’s Magical Menagerie’ wallpaper. The design is the work of American designer Ken Fulk, who collaborated with the brand for the collection, musing over what would happen if the inhabitants of New York’s Central Park Zoo were to break free. The narrative unravels across 30 exquisitely detailed panels, all hand painted by de Gournay’s artisans, with each taking up to 150 hours to perfect. From £1,712 per panel (degournay.com).


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NATURAL LUXE Mark Alexander is our go-to brand for simple textiles with elegant, modern twists. Focusing on yarns such as linen, silk, cashmere and wool, the pieces are made at traditional mills in a palette of subtle, natural tones. The latest designs have a slightly glamorous feel, with softly reflective finishes and luxurious undertones. In the ‘Tate’ collection, linen satin is given a natural lustre, and the pieces in ‘Tailored’ are made from fine pure wool. Meanwhile, ‘Jazz II’ features decorative silks and sheers in sumptuous tones and the ‘Mezzo’ designs are dyed linen velvets with a lustrous sheen (both pictured above). From £95 per metre (markalexander.com).

For Hermès’ latest collection of fabrics and wallpapers, Italian illustrator Gianpaolo Pagni worked with stamp effects. The result is a mix of squares, lines and crosses (as in the ‘Briques’ wallpaper, right, and the ‘Tartan Frieze’ border, above) along with references to horses (in the ‘Mille Jeux’ wallpaper, top). The ultimate children’s range, these brilliantly bright patterns make us want to be kids again. From £173 per roll (hermes.com).

Alan Oliver, a new name on the rug scene, is someone to keep on your radar. His story is an inspiring one: after a career in finance, followed by five years in his own self-launched upholstery practice, his passion for craft led him to focus on weaving rugs, such as the popular ‘Geometric Patterned Rug’ (left). ‘Most of my work is about movement through colour and pattern,’ says Oliver. His process is hands-on – he dyes the wool himself for a perfect gradation of colour. £385 (alanoliver.co.uk). 86 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

WOVEN WONDERS


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FIVE OF THE BEST BRIGHT YELLOW PRINTS Bring some joy to your home with punchy, sunshine yellow, whether you favour geometric designs or traditional patterns

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WATCH THE BIRDIE Starting out as sketches and paintings, the characters in Belynda Sharples’ wallpapers and textiles are artfully arranged to create balanced surface designs before being printed in the UK. We’re rather enamoured with this charming ‘Budgies’ wallpaper – the design also comes on cushions and lampshades. £70 per ten-metre roll (belyndasharples.co.uk).

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1 ‘Ceramic M1 Citron’ fabric, £100.50 per metre, Lelievre (lelievreparis.com) 2 ‘À Contre-Jour’ fabric, £228 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) 3 ‘Floriental’ fabric, £144 per metre, Jim Thompson (jimthompsonfabrics.com) 4 ‘Boomtown’ fabric in ‘Showgirl’ by Brentano, £172 per metre, Altfield (altfield.com) 5 ‘Movida’ wallpaper by Étilis, £139.80 per roll, Abbott + Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk)

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: DELFINO SISTO LEGNANI, ERICK SAILLET

P I C K ’ N ’ M I X FA B R I C S Can’t decide on the perfect material to suit your interior? Why choose one when you can layer up a whole collection? Zimmer + Rohde’s fabrics work beautifully when mixed and matched in the same space. From the tiny geometric patterns across the ‘Delta’ and ‘Tivoli’ ranges to the rich tones of the ‘Pogo’ collection, use them to upholster big pieces of furniture or create cool cushions. From £80 per metre (zimmer-rohde.com).


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TIME TRAVELLERS St Jude’s design collective is going back to its roots, with the release of two of English painter and illustrator Edward Bawden’s original, detailed designs

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COME RAIN OR SHINE An expert in functional and beautiful fabrics, US brand Sunbrella’s textiles work as well indoors as they do out in the elements. Engineered with performance capabilities that prevent fading and protect them from sunlight and water damage, the fabrics are easy to clean, ultra-durable and on trend – the brand’s new collection (above) is full of punchy pastels. From £49 per metre (sunbrella.com).

LINEN LOVE

Our go-to brand for quality neutrals, De Le Cuona’s linens are, frankly, nothing short of exquisite. Its new ‘Cobbles’ collection (right) features the subtle texture of stonewashed raw linen in a refined palette of creams, greys and the palest of blues. £230 per metre (delecuona.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: ALUN CALLENDER, OLIVIER-RIBARRDIERE, JON DAY

Founded by husbandand-wife team Simon and Angie (pictured) Lewin in 2005, the St Jude’s of today has grown organically into a true collective, with artists such as Emily Sutton, Mark Hearld, Jonny Hannah and Ed Kluz in its fold. As Simon explains, though all of their works are unique, one of the strong unifying threads is Edward Bawden’s influence in his delightful depictions of daily life, both in the city and the countryside. Lewin wagers that if you asked any of the collective for their top ten creative inspirations, the artist and illustrator would pop up on every list. The brand’s admiration for the 20th century’s greatest artists-turneddesigners led it to become an engine, in that same vein, for a new generation – Emily Sutton won the ELLE Decoration British Design Award for her whimsical ‘Curiosity Shop’ fabric in 2011, and Mark Hearld won in 2012 for his wallpaper design ‘Harvest Hare’ – but it made sense that the next step be, well, backward. Last year, the brand launched ‘St Jude’s Studio Archive’, the Lewins’ first foray into reprinting the work of their heroes. They worked with artist Chloe Cheese on the production of her mother, Sheila Robinson’s ‘Monkeys and Birds’ (centre) – a wallpaper she had printed in her home in Great Bardfield, Essex. The next natural move was to reproduce the work of Edward Bawden, also from Great Bardfield. This September, St Jude’s will launch ‘Seaweed’ (top), with three other designs, including ‘Tree and Cow’ (bottom), launching in 2018. They all perfectly capture the simple beauty of the British countryside (stjudesfabrics.co.uk).


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O F F T H E WA L L

Get creative with modular buys that are made to be ‘hacked’ If there’s one company that’s spawned a generation of hackers – furniture hackers, that is – it’s Ikea. For years, customers have tailored many of the brand’s basic offerings to their own personal needs and aesthetics, taking to social media and sites like Ikea Hackers (ikeahackers.net) to share their creations. Suddenly, finished pieces of furniture became catalysts for custom projects, signalling a sea change for the design community. Now, both independent and established retailers – Ikea included – are responding with new, highly customisable modular products. One label catching on to the need for flexible furnishings is Australian brand Les Basic, founded by up-and-coming designer Alexander Lotersztain. He’s developed a pared down, brightly hued collection, offering plenty of add-ons and ways for customers to alter the designs. As Lotersztain explains it, the collection is ‘stripped of any unnecessary “styling” to provide longevity and adaptability’.

The new wave of modular furniture has extras and attachments to help you make it your own For example, the ‘Homework’ modular sofa system (above, from £1,533) comes with optional table attachments and power outlets, facilitating both working at home and making the commercial office a more inviting space. The same can be said for the scalable ‘Troika’ shelving and desk unit (above, from £381), which can expand according to your needs – there’s always the option of extra storage space. Other hackable products include the ‘Login’, a wooden cylinder that serves both as a mobile charging dock and a lamp when you switch on your phone’s torch function (£38), and the ‘Valet’, which can be used as a chair, side table or even a mini desk with a built-in wheel base for full mobility (£482; lesbasic.com). Meanwhile, Ikea itself is capitalising on its own trend by collaborating with Tom Dixon on its first purpose-built hackable piece: the ‘Delaktig’ bed (below). It’s due to hit shop floors in February 2018, and both Tom Dixon and Ikea are currently busy developing its many variations. While Dixon’s own studio designs the high-end components, such as a sheepskin cover and a marble headboard, Ikea is creating a plethora of affordable add-ons, including special lamps and tables. The modular unit could become a bunk bed, an office or a daybed – the options are almost limitless (ikea.com).

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CORNISH CHARM

The designs on Epping Smith’s cushions and lampshades celebrate the joy of simple patterns and colours. The brand, formed by artist Emma McClure and interior decorator Catherine Cumming, uses only eco-friendly materials – unbleached cotton/linen fabrics and water-based inks. All of the designs are hand-printed by McClure in Cornwall and then cut and finished by Cumming in London. Cushions from £74 (eppingsmith.co.uk).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: LUCIE AVERILL, PAUL CUMMING

CUSTOMISABLEFURNITURE

Scandinavian brand Feathr is a community of artists who design wallpapers that are works of art. Now, its patterns are coming off the wall and onto furniture. Its new collaboration with Nordic seating brand RBM sees classic ‘Noor’ chairs covered in designs from the Feathr library, including pieces by American painter Kiki Slaughter, graphic artist Peter Judson and Helsinki-based fine artist Reeta Ek (‘English Rose’ print, right). Made for mixing, there are 12 seat colours, four leg options and more than 100 patterns to pick from. Chair, £350; wallpaper, £129 per roll (feathr.com).


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FIVE OF THE BEST STOVE BRANDS Best for streamlined style Contura This Swedish brand specialises in woodburning stoves in modern shapes. Its new ‘320A’ model is a sleek cube, which looks great either freestanding or set into a fireplace. From £1,795 (contura.eu). Best for suspended stoves Focus Founded in 1967 by French sculptor Dominique Imbert, Focus makes stoves that resemble works of art, such as the ‘Ergofocus’ wood-burner, which rotates 360 degrees to direct heat wherever you want it. It comes in a range of colours and metallic finishes. From £6,500 (focus-fireplaces.com).

STOVES You may not be thinking about a stove in early autumn, but you should be – it’s time to buy one so you’re sorted for the colder months ahead Is my property suitable for a stove? If you are thinking of opening up a sealed chimney breast in an old house, you will need to check that the chimney stack has not been removed or the chimney capped. The flue – the inner part of the chimney that conveys smoke to the atmosphere – must be in good working order. ‘In older properties, it’s often necessary to reline the chimney with a flexible stainless-steel flue,’ says Dennis Milligan, head of communications at the Stove Industry Alliance. If you want a suspended design, it will need to be hung from a beam that supports the weight of both stove and flue. It’s also important to check whether or not you live in a smoke-control area before you buy your stove: if you do, you won’t be able to burn wood unless you’ve bought a DEFRA-exempt model. How can I get it installed? Installation should be carried out by a HETAS registered professional (hetas.co.uk), or for gas stoves, a Gas Safe registered engineer. You should also inform your building control office, who may need to inspect your stove. How do I pick a stove? When it comes to deciding your stove’s size and output, a survey that calculates room size can help you. The age of your home and the level of insulation it has can also affect how efficiently a stove works – however, in spring and autumn, you often won’t need your central heating. ‘This is where a stove can save you a lot of money,’ explains Milligan. If you decide to install a boiler stove, this can also be used to heat your radiators and supply you with hot water. How do I maintain my stove? ‘Remove dust with a lint-free cloth, not polish – and if the finish gets dull in time, it can be resprayed with the manufacturer’s paint,’ says Tony Ingram, technical services manager at Morsø. ‘Have your stove serviced annually and get the chimney swept once a year, too,’ adds Huw Williams, sales director at Chesney’s. 94 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

Best for classic style Chesney’s This British brand started out restoring antique fireplaces – origins that are reflected in its timeless stove collection. We like the ‘Beaumont 6’ design, available in wood or multi-fuel versions. From £1,980 (chesneys.co.uk). Best for awkward spaces Morsø Morsø has been keeping Danes warm since 1853, and today it has some great models for small spaces, including the ‘6643’ woodburner, which slots neatly into tight corners. The wide window gives a good view of the flames from all angles. From £1,990 (morsoe.com).

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

D E S I G N D E TA I L S

Best for boiler stoves Charnwood This Isle of Wight brand has a range of boiler stoves, which not only burn logs but also heat radiators and water. The ‘Island IIIB’ is a case in point – there’s also a version with a hotplate for cooking. From £2,694 (charnwood.com).


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D E C O R AT O R I N D E X DANIEL HOPWOOD

We talk to our favourite interior designers about their work and ask them to share their styling tips

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: ANDREW BEASLEY

Who is he? Anyone who has watched Daniel Hopwood as a judge on BBC 2’s The Great Interior Design Challenge will know that he has an affinity for colour. Growing up, he was instinctively drawn to the world of interiors. ‘I was one of the lucky few – I always knew that I wanted to go into interior architecture, but that definition didn’t exist when I started,’ recalls Hopwood, who set up his London studio nearly 15 years ago. He trained as an architect at the Polytechnic of Central London (now the University of Westminster) – ‘but focused on the inside of buildings’. He also studied the crafts of gilding and carving, and spent several months at the Prince of Wales’ Institute of Architecture learning about classical architecture, which led to his first commission: designing a house for Colin Amery, an advisor to the Prince of Wales at the time. What’s his style? His projects differ wildly – from a bold bachelor pad to a grand stucco terraced house with a muted colour palette – but what unites them is his collaborative way of working. ‘I’m there to celebrate someone’s personality through their home, and I want them to be a part of the process,’ says Hopwood, who often asks clients to make a Pinterest board of interior images that they like and dislike. ‘My job is to encourage people to be self-expressive in their homes, but also practical.’ Any recent projects? Hopwood’s work is usually residential, but earlier this year, he completed a penthouse

‘I’m there to celebrate someone’s personality through their home, and I want them to be a part of the process’ showroom apartment at the new Dollar Bay development in Canary Wharf. ‘Commercial projects don’t have a personality to push against, so I often invent one belonging to the sort of person who might buy that home,’ he says. This year, Hopwood also updated his own home in Marylebone (above and near left) and injected some tropical pattern into the home of a newly married couple in London (far left). What is he currently working on? The interior of Alimentum, a top restaurant in Cambridge. ‘It’s going to be classy with a little cheekiness,’ he promises. He says: ‘Always remember – it’s only paint. If you try purple in the hallway and hate it, you can paint over it.’ (danielhopwood.com). Turn over for Daniel Hopwood’s guide to using colour at home ➤ OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 97


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D E C O R AT O R I N D E X : E X P E R T A D V I C E DANIEL HOPW OOD’S GUIDE TO USING COLOUR

Now’s the time to pump up your home’s personality with bright hues and punchy patterns. Here’s how to get it right 1 How to choose colour Colour is a powerful mood enhancer – so when you’re picking one, think carefully about it. Analyse why you’re using a particular shade in a specific room, and the mood that you want it to convey. For instance, yellow is energetic and uplifting (as in this London home, right), while purple is warm and confident. The hallway is a great place to be more daring with colour: you’re not in it often, and it’s the first impression visitors have of your home.

I N KY D E P T H S Do you see a butterfly or a face? Once confined to the psychiatrist’s office, ink blot designs are now being appreciated for their decorative traits, rather than determining personality types. Murals Wallpaper’s ‘Rorschach’ pattern by Naomi Cleaver takes the enigmatic daubs and recreates them in made-to-order wall sizes. £25 per square metre (muralswallpaper.co.uk).

A LT E R N AT I V E S T O T I M B E R

3 Small spaces People often think that these should be painted white to make them feel bigger. Instead, work with a lack of light and make them richer and darker. The old adage that the eye needs to travel through a room is true, and colour is a great way to ensure this happens. 4 Layering Create a mood by building up colour in a range of different mediums – whether that’s glass, carpet, wallpaper or light. For the bathroom of my Bayswater project (left), I asked designer Emma Peascod to make églomisé (glass gilded with metal) panels – they create a soft glow when the lights are dimmed – but layering can be as easy as adding new cushions. 98 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

Thanks to new printing technology, wood grains can now be replicated on porcelain, creating wood-effect tiles that are almost indistinguishable from natural timber. They don’t warp, stain or need sealing, and they’re easier to clean than wooden floorboards. ‘They’re also frostproof, so you can continue the same flooring outside to create decking,’ explains 1 Jamie Robb, owner and managing director of Marlborough 2 Tiles Makers. Here are our top three. 1 ‘Visions White Wood’ tiles, £72 per square metre, Marlborough Tile Makers (marlborough tiles.com) 2 ‘Studland Bay’ porcelain tiles in ‘Swanage’, £59.93 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 3 ‘Melange’ tiles, £25.24 per square metre, Gayafores (gayafores.es)

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WORDS: EMMA LOVE, AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: ANDREW BEASLEY

2 Colour consistency Use colour as a thread that runs all the way through the house. For example, at a comedian’s house in Bayswater (left), I used different shades of orange and teal. In some rooms, the orange has yellowish tones, while in others it’s more golden – but it’s always there, subtly linking the rooms together.


LINES OF BEAUTY

Main image ‘Radical’ sofa, from £10,962. ‘Light Ring’ chandelier, from £1,904 Opposite, clockwise from top ‘Tape’ light, from £3,018. ‘Mushroom’ coffee table in sandblasted brass finish, from £3,025. ‘Galaxy’ coffee table in burnished brass, from £7,017. ‘Be Mine’ polished brass side table, from £3,329*

*ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO VAT

Italian furniture brand Henge has built its name on a commitment to excellence in all things. Discover its latest collection, courtesy of Global Luxury London


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H E N G E ’ S TA L E N T L I N E - U P T H E A RT I S T I C V I S I O N

Excellence is the level at which Henge begins the pursuit of its craft. Excellence in form and in function, excellence in making and in the selection of materials used – these are the touchstones the Italian luxury furniture and design brand has adhered to since its establishment in 2008. It’s a vision that was encapsulated in the very first ‘Home Collection’ created under the direction of architect and designer Massimo Castagna (above right) three years later, which continues to evolve today. Born from a desire to ‘create a house entirely designed by Henge’, the collection has had three major catalogues since its 2011 launch. It offers everything from furniture and lighting to storage and ornamentation, drawing on nature’s finest materials – wood, metal, stone and leather – to bring warmth, impact and lustre into homes. A very specific philosophy lies at the core of each ‘Home Collection’: that at its best a home is a place of contrasts within which a balance of more formal, ‘solemn presences’ live alongside pieces with multiple functionality – of which the tables Yabu Pushelberg, (right) designed for the collection are a case in point. Marrying the finest Italian craftsmanship with leading design technology, every piece can be customised to suit an individual’s specific requirements – yet one more example of Henge’s desire to create a connection between us and the objects that fill our homes.

FIND OUT MORE Henge is exclusively available from Global Luxury London, 87–89 Wigmore St, London W1; globalluxurylondon.com

Massimo Castagna, architect and artistic director, Henge ‘Home Collection’ An architect by training (he famously designed Everest’s ‘Piramide’ laboratory, built at an altitude of 5,050 metres in Nepal in 1991), these days Castagna’s CV is considerably broader, encompassing everything from furniture and product design to artistic direction and interior design. His collaboration with Henge began in 2011 with the launch of the first ‘Home Collection’. The scope of Castagna’s professional achievements ensures a fully committed ‘360-degree’ approach to design and functionality. ‘What do we want to have around us in our own homes?’ was the question that formed the basis of the latest ‘Home Collection’ designs. ‘What we decide to live with is much more than a piece of furniture, it’s a companion,’ he has noted, ‘as, once it is inside our homes, it keeps us company on our journey through life.’ It is a commitment to creating ‘companion’ pieces that go beyond simple form and function that bring Castagna’s vision for Henge to life.

THE GUEST DESIGNERS Glenn Pushelberg and George Yabu, founders Yabu Pushelberg ‘Good hotels are an emotional experience,’ the Canadian design duo have said of their approach to work that includes a redesign for The Miami Beach Edition among a host of others. The same ‘emotional experience’ does, of course, apply to our homes, which perhaps explains what made Yabu Pushelberg and Henge such a natural fit in collaborative terms. The ‘Mushroom’ tables (below), designed exclusively for Henge, share the same commitment to form, finish and material. ‘Like us their work is beyond minimalism,’ Pushelberg said at the time, noting that Henge’s ‘earthier approach’ to furniture design suited their own aesthetic. The result – a pair of metal coffee tables in two sizes and a variety of finishes – is both elegant and unexpected; organic in form yet highly stylised. A perfect match. OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 101


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BRAND TO KNOW

OSBORNE & LITTLE As Osborne & Little approaches its 50th anniversary, we sit down with CEO Sir Peter Osborne to discuss the history of this iconic British brand Try as he might to describe it as ‘a little wallpaper and fabric company’, Sir Peter Osborne’s eponymous brand is anything but. Revolutionising the decorating scene when it first launched in 1968, Osborne & Little now produces hundreds of thousands of metres of fabric and wallpaper per year. After a year-long banking career, a then 25-year-old Osborne (right) teamed up with graphic designer and brother-in-law Antony Little (who retired in 2005), having noticed a distinct lack of colourful, patterned wallpaper on the market. ‘The world was crying out for something exciting,’ says Osborne. ‘There was no designer wallpaper back then – just a lot of awful, porridge-coloured stuff. The boldest thing you could get was a William Morris print.’ They opened a small space in London’s Brompton Cross in 1968 and moved to the

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

‘There was no designer wallpaper back then – just a lot of porridge-coloured stuff’ brand’s current plot on King’s Road in 1972 – where they got down to the business of hand-printing wallpapers. The first collection, ‘Handprints’, consisted of big, geometric patterns in a bold 1970s palette, and set customers back £6 a roll. It turned out to be a seminal launch, winning a Council of Industrial Design Award – being presented with the accolade by the Duke of Edinburgh (below right) is one of Osborne’s proudest moments. Now aged 74 and still producing around 20 collections a year (the company introduced fabrics in 1976), Osborne directs an in-house design team of ten from the brand’s riverside headquarters in Putney, which doubles as an ever-changing gallery of pattern. ‘Our meetings get very lively and things are always changing,’ he says. ‘I’m in the studio for a third of my time.’ The rest is spent travelling to the six Osborne & Little stores in the US, as well as seeking out new talent. ‘I go to shows such as New Designers in Islington and the Royal College of Art’s end-of-year exhibition,’ says Osborne. ‘It’s a nice idea to work with up-and-coming designers, and it’s stimulating for the studio to bring new people in.’ The brand’s first collaboration was with fashion designer Dame Zandra Rhodes. ‘She did these zany prints, which were quite difficult to translate onto fabrics and wallpapers, but it was fun to do,’ remembers Osborne. Next followed an ongoing partnership with Nina Campbell, starting in 1989 – and later, another long-term collaboration with Matthew Williamson. ➤

Patterns, clockwise from top left ‘Rain Forest’ wallpaper by Kit Miles, £180 per roll; ‘Painted Lady’ heritage print wallpaper; ‘Duchess Garden’ fabric by Matthew Williamson, £70 per metre; ‘Marguerite’ fabric by Nina Campbell, £60 per metre, all Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com)

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OSBORNE & LITTLE

Patterns, from top ‘Dragonfly Dance’ wallpaper in ‘04’, £70 per roll; ‘Orangery’ fabric, £70 per metre, both by Matthew Williamson at Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com)

H O W T O D E C O R AT E W I T H PAT T E R N

We share the expert tips and tricks that will help you mix and match prints with absolute confidence What’s the best way to get pattern into a space? ‘There are two ways,’ says Frieda Gormley, co-founder of pattern-loving clothing and interiors label House of Hackney. ‘You could update your living space with wallpapered walls or curtains, which are really transformative. Alternatively, use cushions to layer prints – it should feel like it’s been delicately built up.’ What are the pattern rules for decorating? ‘Don’t put up wallpaper from a corner – start in the middle,’ advise Alistair McAuley and Paul Simmons of textile and wallpaper studio Timorous Beasties. ‘Don’t use the same pattern scale for curtains and wallpaper – curtain patterns should be larger – and never use more than three prints in a room.’ Is anywhere out of bounds for pattern? ‘I love it everywhere, even on ceilings,’ says Gormley, ‘but I am a fan of crisp, white bedlinen – it really sets off pattern.’ Do pattern clashes ever really work? ‘They require ultimate confidence, courage and co-ordination,’ say Timorous Beasties’ McAuley and Simmons. ‘But when they work, it’s amazing.’ Gormley advises some caution: ‘I love layering prints and pattern, but there should probably be some harmony in the overall colour palettes or textures’. What are the pattern trends right now? ‘The mood’s very much about detailed prints that almost become art,’ says Gormley. ‘The choice is really great at the moment.’ Above ‘Tropical Clouded Leopard’ wallpaper, £126 per metre, Timorous Beasties (timorousbeasties.com). ‘Mey Meh’ cushion, £120, House of Hackney (houseofhackney.com)

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: ADRIAN CHEESEMAN

‘Nina brings us an “English country house” look, whereas Matthew’s collections come straight from his couture designs – I jumped at the chance of working with both of them,’ says Osborne. His alliance with the two designers is still going strong – the brand’s releases for autumn/winter 2017 include a mixture of Campbell’s hand-printed linens, which are made in India, with Williamson’s intricate, colour-filled creations. Unsurprisingly, Osborne’s own home in Notting Hill mirrors the vivacious designs that comprise the brand’s pattern books. ‘My house is decorated exclusively in Osborne & Little,’ he admits. ‘Most recently, I put in Matthew Williamson’s ‘Dragonfly Dance’ – with the bronze background – going up the stairs, and I had a door made to match. I also have a very eclectic mixture of furniture. I love Fornasetti and Memphis Group pieces – it’s all quite busy, and I keep changing it.’ Osborne seems a little surprised at his company’s longevity. ‘Sometimes I think it’s a miracle to have survived from those times at all,’ he muses, thumbing through press cuttings from the brand’s launch. Yet, while times may have changed, digital printing has allowed the collections to become increasingly intricate and experimental – cue Kit Miles’ hyper-detailed ‘Rain Forest’ pattern, which is decorated with exotic birds. Osborne’s ethos has remained the same throughout it all: ‘To be cutting edge, adventurous and at the forefront of design’. It’s this attitude that has carried the brand through five decades, seemingly without having aged a day.


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

BRAND TO KNOW

GP & J BAKER With an incredible archive and a fascinating family history, British fabric brand GP & J Baker makes heritage designs to love forever The GP & J Baker story is one that spans continents and centuries, and centres around an extraordinary family. George Baker, a passionate horticulturalist, travelled to Istanbul (then Constantinople) from London to design the gardens for the British Embassy in 1847. A natural entrepreneur, Baker began importing Belgian linen – a favourite among the ladies at the embassy – and at the same time, started to export the handmade textiles produced in the nearby Turkish villages. Baker married and fathered nine children – two of whom were George Percival and James, who developed their own love of flowers, nature and exotic fabrics. In 1874, aged 18, George Percival (right) was sent to London to manage the British side of his father’s business, and James followed him shortly afterwards. The brothers bought a print works in Kent, which came with the added bonus of a collection of English printed textiles dating back to 1750 – a key addition to the family’s ever-growing archive. In 1893, the brand began designing its own prints. ‘GP Baker was a leading light in the Royal Horticultural Society in the 1920s and 30s, and so our archive has a lot

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

‘The GP & J Baker archive is a great commentary on interior design through the late 1800s to the 1900s’

Background patterns, from left ‘Hydrangea Bird’ fabric from 1967 (left) and 1931 (right). Below The original, hand-painted versions of ‘Exotic Pheasant’ (left) and ‘Hydrangea Bird’ (right). See next page for the evolution of ‘Hydrangea Bird’

of flora, fauna and beautiful bird designs,’ says Ann Grafton, creative and managing director of the brand today. The archive currently contains around 3,000 pieces from 1560 and onwards – as well as two Peruvian textiles that date back to around 100BC! An eclectic mix, it includes Chinese wallpapers, Italian velvets, Indonesian batiks and very early English toiles, reflecting industrial printing from its origins to the present day. ‘We have a record of everything we’ve printed through the years, so the archive is a great commentary on interior design through the late 1800s to the 1900s,’ explains Grafton. The collection makes for astounding viewing. It’s so alive with vibrant colour that it’s a struggle to believe the designs are often hundreds of years old – update the aged pages and it could be a new pattern book from this season. Carefully preserved in hundreds of enormous bound volumes, most of the family’s collection is presided over by two archivists at the brand’s headquarters in ➤

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Poole, Dorset, while the V&A museum houses around 500 pieces that George Percival donated before his death in 1951. ‘We refer to the archive constantly to inspire our designs,’ explains Grafton. ‘When researching for collections, the team often find that pieces in the archive fit current colour and design trends. We take a fabric pattern, recolour it and make it relevant to how people are using print or textiles today.’ The brand’s ability to update heritage designs to suit the modern palette means that GP & J Baker fabrics are used to decorate spaces ranging from Buckingham Palace (the brand was awarded a Royal Warrant in 1982) and National Trust properties to modern boutique hotels. A testament to how you can retain integrity while still moving with the times, today’s GP & J Baker is a brand that looks forward and back simultaneously.

‘Hydrangea Bird’ fabric in ‘Ochre’, £98 per metre, GP & J Baker (gpjbaker.com)

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GREENE AND PLEASANT LAND It’s no surprise that Little Greene’s new collection, ‘The Colours of England’, is extensive. Spanning 300 years of interior design history, the 128-strong range travels through Georgian, Regency, Victorian and 20th-century tones. These include true historic shades authenticated by English Heritage, as well as new hues befitting the modern day and reflecting current trends. ‘The collection has been designed to meet a growing appetite for timeless colour that’s both easy to choose and a pleasure to live with,’ says Little Greene’s Ruth Mottershead. Choose from shades such as (from top) ‘Tuscan Red’, ‘Aquamarine’ and ‘Carys’ yellow. £42 for 2.5 litres (littlegreene.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

GP & J BAKER


DECOR ATING

SPECIAL PART TWO

THE FIVE

B I G COLOUR TRENDS

Which fabrics to use The papers that match How to get the look

The painterly colour-washes of the new ‘Atmosphere’ wallpapers by Graham & Brown recall dreamy landscapes partially obscured by mist. £50 per roll (grahambrown.com) ➤


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1 POW ER

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Pale is definitely interesting, as the elegant muted colour scheme created by Stockholm-based design studio Note proves (notedesignstudio.se) ➤

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Although we’ve seen these shades used individually before, the idea now is to employ them in glorious combinations to maximise the impact


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1 ‘Rainforest Rabble’ wallpaper in ‘Powder Blue’, £129 per metre, Linwood (linwoodfabric.com) 2 ‘Cityscape’ linen in pink by Jane Churchill, £75 per metre, Colefax and Fowler (janechurchill.com) 3 ‘Miami’ wallpaper, £325 per roll, Cole & Son (cole-and-son.com) 4 ‘Composition no. 2’ wallpaper, £165 per roll, Ottoline (ottoline.nl) 5 ‘Collioure NCW4300-01’ wallpaper by Nina Campbell, £72 per roll, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) 6 ‘Briar Rose’ cotton-mix fabric collection (on sofa and cushions), from £70 per metre, Romo (romo.com) 7 ‘Angelica’ linen; ‘Bell’ linen; ‘Joy’ linen, all £115 per metre, Mimi Pickard (mimipickard.com) 8 ‘Winona’ linen, £118 per metre, Casamance (casamance.com) 9 Encaustic tiles in ‘Estremoz’, £225 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 10 Cushions (from top) covered in ‘Reflection’ cotton in grey, £210 per metre; ‘Riverside’ cotton in grey, £234 per metre; ‘Reflection’ cotton in pink, £210 per metre; ‘Alley Cat’ cotton, £218 per metre; ‘Cocktails’ cotton, £218 per metre; ‘Riverside’ cotton in blue, £234 per metre, all Rubelli (rubelli.com) ➤

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’ ’N

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Go for duskier tones, as seen in this bedroom by Paint & Paper Library. We love the ‘Rouge II’ shade on the back wall. £46.50 for 2.5 litres (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ➤

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PINKS’N’BLUES

Pale pink has always been a potent colour, but team it with blue and it packs an even bigger punch

1 ‘Lo Watercolour Floral’ wallpaper, £68 per roll, Sandberg Wallpaper (sandbergwallpaper.com) 2 ‘DJE’ armchair by Christophe Delcourt; ‘Visioni’ rug by Patricia Urquiola for CC-Tapis; ‘RZ6’ bookcase by Paolo Rizzi, all from Spotti Milano (spotti.com) 3 ‘Artemis Ivory’ wallpaper, £145 per roll, House of Hackney X William Morris (houseofhackney.com) ➤

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PINKS’N’BLUES

The decorating base note has to be a pale rose pink for this look to work, but be daring and layer more vivacious tones and patterns on top 2

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1 ‘Charleston Grey’ wallpaper from the ‘Ndebele’ range, £116 per metre, Lisa Todd Designs (lisatodddesigns.com) 2 ‘Sulis’ cotton-mix fabrics (on bed), from £55 per metre, Romo (romo.com) 3 ‘Prism’ wallpaper, £99 per roll, Cole & Son (cole-and-son.com) 4 Wall painted in (from top) ‘Carrie’, £14 for 2.5 litres; ‘Duchess’, £18 for 2.5 litres; ‘Lavender Cupcake’, £14 for 2.5 litres, all Crown (crownpaints.co.uk) 5 ‘Midori’ sheer in ‘Rose’, £31 per metre, Clarke & Clarke (clarke-clarke.com) ➤

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EDS R T E

like a f lash of s Just car let lip s k, tic

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The red carpet in this Spotti Milano showroom, curated by Studiopepe, adds drama to the ‘Febo’ chairs by Antonio Citterio for Maxalto and ‘Silver’ table by Finn Juhl (spotti.com) ➤

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3

RUSSET REDS

One wall, one chair, or one statement print: all you need to add a touch of ruby luxe to your home

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1 ‘Arcus’ wallpaper, £169 per roll, Arte (arte-international.com) 2 ‘Womb’ armchair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, Spotti Milano (spotti.com) 3 ‘Tessere’ textural cotton jacquard in ‘Plum Carrot’, £116.50 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) ➤

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e hu d un uplifting backgro

The pattern of Zoffany’s ‘Villandry’ wallpaper is given a modern boost by the brand’s turquoise ‘Serpentine’ hue. £88 per roll (zoffany.com) ➤

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Often relegated to accessories, this shade is making a hearty comeback on walls and statement upholstery. Pair with grey for extra sophistication

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1 ‘Teal’ pure flat emulsion (on wall), £46.50 for 2.5 litres; ‘Acqua Viva’ architects eggshell paint (on woodwork), £65.50 for 2.5 litres, both Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) 2 ‘Ice teal’ cotton velvet (on chair), £80 per metre, Kirkby Design (kirkbydesign.com) 3 ‘Marjorelle’ velvet by Jim Thompson, £188 per metre, Fox Linton (foxlinton.com) 4 ‘Orchestra Encore’ cotton-mix fabric in ‘Peacock’, £60.99 per metre, Prestigious Textiles (prestigious.co.uk) 5 ‘FJ’ sideboard by Finn Juhl for Bovirke, Spotti Milano (spotti.com) 6 ‘Richmond’ velvet sofa, £1,999, Heal’s (heals.com) 7 ‘Obsidian’ wallpaper in ‘Snowflake’ by Anthology, £225 for a 130x400cm panel, Style Library (stylelibrary.com) 8 ‘Yerba’ viscose-mix fabric, £120 per metre, Margo Selby (margoselby.com) ➤

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TURQUOISE

This colour is particularly forgiving and flexible. Layer it up with shades from its own family, from green to the palest blues

1 Cotton-mix fabrics (from top) ‘Alston’ in ‘Lagoon’, £79 per metre; ‘Mendel’ in ‘Glacier’, £87 per metre; ‘Hasley’, £73 per metre; ‘Mendel’ in ‘Steel Blue’, £87 per metre; ‘Roden’ in ‘French Blue’ and ‘Dragonfly’, both £70 per metre; ‘Olavi’ in ‘Atlantic’, £75 per metre, all Romo (romo.com) 2 Cotton-mix fabrics by Romo (see above) used on sofa and cushions 3 ‘Cocoa’ fabric (on wall); ‘Vulcain’ green fabric and ‘Ceramic’ patterned fabric (on cushions); ‘Maracas’ fabric (on chairs), all £120 per metre, Lelievre (lelievreparis.com) 4 ‘Midori’ fabric in ‘Mineral’, £31 per metre, Clarke & Clarke (clarke-clarke.com) ➤

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on’s favourite col nati our e ,b Th lu e m confid e n ol, cal c e– s co bu ote t al nn s co

5TR

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! fun w, no o, Trust designer Matthew Williamson to interpret the modern oriental trend in vibrant blues with the ‘Fanfare’ wallpaper. £65 per roll, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) ➤

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1 ‘La Alameda Floral’ outdoor polyester in ‘Ocean’, £128 per metre; 2 Cushions covered in fabrics from the ‘Artisan Loft’ collection, from £89 per metre, all Ralph Lauren Home (ralphlaurenhome.com) 3 ‘Esquisse’ wallpaper in ‘Bleu’, £156 per metre, Pierre Frey (pierrefrey.com) 4 ‘Frith’ velvet in ‘Sky’, £70 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.co.uk) 5 Cotton-mix swatches (from left) ‘Erin’, £25 per metre; ‘Dwell’, £40 per metre; ‘Doran’, £33 per metre; ‘Talia’, £31 per metre, all Villa Nova (villanova.co.uk) 6 ‘Forest’ wallpaper in ‘Borage’ by Custhom and 2LG Studio, £395 per roll, Custhom (custhom.co.uk) 7 ‘Morris Bellflowers’ wallpaper in ‘Indigo’ by Morris & Co, £70 per roll, Style Library (stylelibrary.com) 8 ‘Corrigan Blue’ linen-mix fabric, £89 per metre, Colefax and Fowler (colefax.com) 9 Chairs upholstered in ‘Frith’ velvet (see 4) 10 ‘Camille’ cotton, £60 per metre, Nina Campbell (ninacampbell.com) ➤

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TRUE BLUES

Previous iterations of blue for the home were quiet, more backdrop than main event. No more! Today, blues are hitting all the top notes in print and pattern 9

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TRUE BLUES

Never let it be said that blue and green should never be seen. In fact, we believe that these shades of green are the perfect partners for blue

5 1 ‘Rocco’ wallpaper, £269 per roll, Lincrusta (lincrusta.com) 2 ‘Amazone COS140’ wallpaper, £238 per roll, Nobilis (nobilis.fr) 3 ‘Atacama’ wallpaper, £86 per roll, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) 4 ‘Atlas’ wallpaper, £120 per roll, Flock (flock.org.uk) 5 Walls covered in (from left) ‘Kelambu’ wallpaper; ‘Chaconia’ wallpaper, both £59 per metre; sofa upholstered in ‘Kelambu’ polyester, £89 per metre, all Harlequin (harlequin.uk.com) E D

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ELLE Decoration | E V E N T

TA L K T R E N D S W I T H E L L E D E C O R AT I O N AT J O H N L E W I S

Find out how you can join ELLE Decoration at John Lewis, Oxford Street for the inside track on the latest design trends The Residence at John Lewis, Oxford Street, is a beautiful full-sized apartment situated inside the department store – the first of its kind for the high-street retailer – that brings the brand’s autumn/winter products to life. To celebrate its opening, ELLE Decoration’s Michelle Ogundehin is hosting a talk with John Lewis’s head of design, Philippa Prinsloo, on Thursday 28 September to discuss this season’s most influential trends – and we’d love for you to join us! Plus, The Residence at John Lewis is filled with new furniture, accessories and fabrics rich in pattern and colour from John Lewis’s ‘Collector’s House’ edit. Get to know the products as you would in your own home – move them around, sit on them, and test them out for the ultimate try-before-you-buy experience. Everything in The Residence at John Lewis is available as part of the ‘Only Here’ campaign, which celebrates new-season collections and brands stocked exclusively at John Lewis. Tickets are £20 each and can be redeemed against purchases. For details and to book, visit elledecoration.co.uk/shopping/johnlewis 138 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

Main image ‘Fusion Tapio’ vase, £60; ‘Johannes Vermeer Girl with a Pearl Earring’ framed canvas, £100; ‘Pleat Storm’ lantern by LSA, £60; ‘Boutique Hotel’ ribbed tealight holder, £8; ‘Polka Vase’ gift set (one of two shown), £24; ‘Boutique Hotel’ vase, £20; ‘Form’ jug by Tom Dixon, £95; ‘Fusion Patina Cylinder’, £45; ‘Scandi Stone’ tall vase, £50; ‘Montserrat’ table lamp, £95 Top ‘Toucan’ framed print by George Edwards, £95; ‘Huxley’ ceiling light, £195; rug, £1,500; West Elm side table, £399; ‘Carnaby’ chair by Duresta, £1,249 Above ‘Montserrat’ ceiling pendant, £450; ‘Collector’s House Mary’ chair, £899; ‘Weaver Green Taurus Atlas’ washable outdoor kelim, £255; ‘V&A Fitzhenry Collectors’ cabinet, £999; ‘Pleat Storm’ lantern by LSA, £60; ‘Warp’ bowl by Tom Dixon, £240; ‘Pleat’ tealight holder by LSA, £20; ‘Royal Heritage Pazyrk’, £160, all available at John Lewis (johnlewis.com)


DESIGNED TO LAST Long acknowledged as an international leader in luxury outdoor furniture and fabrics, Sutherland Perennials invites you to the official launch of its first UK showroom Outdoor furniture presents a unique challenge: it’s not enough for it to be beautifully designed, it must also perform at the highest level. It’s a challenge US outdoor furniture brand Sutherland has been rising to since it was first established in 1991. Collaborations with some of the world’s leading design names – including Philippe Starck and Bonetti/Kozerski – combine with a commitment to ensuring each piece is crafted not only to look good, but also to

The showroom offers the best from the Sutherland range alongside Perennials’ luxury performance fabrics and rugs TAKE THE PERENNIALS CHALLENGE The annual London Design Festival is an opportunity to discover all that’s new and best in the world of design. What better time, then, to mark the official launch of the first UK Sutherland Perennials Studio? Visit between 17–22 September to take the ‘Perennials Challenge’ – your chance to make a mess on its high-performance fabrics – and discover their durability first-hand. Unit 217, Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, 201 Chelsea Harbour Drive, London, SW10; 020 3904 6904

*SEE PERENNIALSFABRICS.COM FOR DETAILS

last. Today, Sutherland has a world-wide reputation for designing, developing and producing design-led outdoor furniture that utilises the finest materials – including sustainably-sourced teak and new fabric technologies developed by textiles brand and stablemate, Perennials – to ensure function and style go hand in hand. The opening of the UK’s first Sutherland Perennials Studio in London’s Design Centre Chelsea Harbour allows you to discover this first-hand. The showroom offers a curated selection of the best from the Sutherland outdoor furniture range and accessories alongside Perennials’ luxury performance fabric and rugs. Look no further for everything you need to furnish any outdoor space to suit you and your lifestyle – whatever the weather throws at it. Find out more at sutherlandfurniture.com; perennialsfabrics.com


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

PICK AND MIX FĂŞted as a leader in the design and execution of luxury, performance fabrics by both interior designers and high-end retail customers, every single fabric in the Perennials range is expertly crafted to last. These technically superior fabrics are guaranteed fade-resistant* and easy to maintain for quality with conďŹ dence.

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Style | D E S I G N

SOHO HOUSE STYLE

WORDS: MICHELLE OGUNDEHIN PICTURE: ADAM VON

This private members’ club’s properties have a global, yet homely style – now, you can get the look in your own abode The private members’ club Soho House is probably one of the most internationally successful British exports around. With 18 outposts so far – from Malibu to Barcelona via Istanbul, and with houses in both Mumbai and Amsterdam to come next year – it’s made its name providing people in the creative industries with homes from home around the globe. And cleverly, that sense of home is tailored to reflect each locale. In other words, Soho House Barcelona is not only recognisable as belonging to the Soho House brand (by way of its easy comfort, velvet upholstery and button-backed sofas), but it has a Spanish flavour, too – think coffered ceilings, wood panelling and patterned fabrics and tiles. Similarly, Soho House Chicago is – in the words of the brand’s design director Linda Boronkay (above) – ‘very glamorous’, Soho Farmhouse in Oxfordshire is ‘rustic, cosy and comfortable’ and Soho House New York is ‘contemporary and fresh’. Now, fans of the brand’s aesthetic can get the look in their own homes with the launch of its homeware range, Soho Home, which occupies a large physical shop space in Liberty London and can also be bought on the department store’s website. The collection is in response, says Linda, to members constantly asking where to buy pieces they’d loved in the various houses. We asked Linda to share her favourite products and her tips for making our homes our own, as well as the secret to the Soho House formula (sohohouse.com). ➤

From top A room in Soho Farmhouse. ‘Reade’ brushed brass wall light, £275. ‘Betsy’ armchair in ‘Navy Velvet’, £1,300. ‘Logan’ rug, from £545. ‘Murcott’ jute square floor cushion, £140. ‘Simcoe’ throw in ‘Oatmeal’, £95

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SOHO HOUSE STYLE So, what are the key ingredients of the Soho House look? It’s all about casual comfort and intimacy, tactility, warmth, and generous proportions for the furniture. Around 30–40 per cent of our pieces are vintage finds from markets all over the world. We’re also careful about the way we light each house, so that we can create different moods throughout the day. It has to be warm, with everything on dimmer switches. There are no strict standards or rules, though – it keeps evolving. How do you achieve a balance between traditional and contemporary? We design a lot of our own furniture in-house, so we can give it a modern spin with the finishes, fabrics and colours we choose. Then we pick the most successful pieces to be part of our Soho Home collection. Which are your personal favourite pieces? I love the ‘Spoon’ armchairs from our Soho Farmhouse collection and the ‘Sofia’ footstool from Barcelona, and I think our iconic ‘Chesterfield’ sofas are a great starting point for any home. My own home is quite eclectic and filled with antiques, but I also have a lot of the bedlinens, made for us by Frette – and, of course, our bath robes! And your personal tips for making home your own? Layers! Furniture might make up the key components of a room, but you have to add in meaningful objects, too – books, art and accessories, the things that make your home a personal experience. It also helps to have a focal point to hang a scheme together. This could be an amazing wallpaper, a feature light, or anything that gives structure and meaning to a space – think of it as the jewel of your room. 144 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

From top A room in Babington House in Somerset (one of Soho House’s properties). ‘Chesterfield’ sofa in ‘Burgundy Mohair’, £3,895. ‘Ernest’ ottoman in ‘Chestnut Leather’, £495. ‘Halsted’ floor lamp, £195. Soho Farmhouse robe, £60. ‘1960s’ rattan chair, £495 ➤


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SOHO HOUSE STYLE Exclusive offer! Give your home the Soho House luxury treatment ELLE Decoration readers will receive a free Cowshed ‘Dirty Cow’ handwash, ‘Cow Pat’ moisturising hand cream and amenities dish (worth a total of £51) when they spend over £125 online. Simply shop the full Soho Home range at sohohome.com and enter code ELLEGIFT at the checkout.

Clockwise from top A room in Soho House Barcelona. The interior of a cabin at Soho Farmhouse. ‘La Merce’ square cushion, £165. ‘Dayton’ square cushion, £60. ‘Serra’ bedside table, £1,195 E D

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Style | D E S I G N

H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D M E R I D I A N I

Just one designer and a dedicated husband-and-wife team of founders are behind the enduring look of this sophisticated Italian brand Italian brand Meridiani, which celebrated its 20th anniversary last year, is the vision of Renato Crosti and his wife Laura. In the early 1990s, they spent an extensive period researching and testing products at their family factory in Brianza, northern Italy, with the aim of creating a home collection that would interpret classic styles in a modern way. They launched Meridiani in 1996, opening a store in Milan, before expanding on an international scale in 2000. Renato Crosti is an expert in upholstery, which is one of the

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

Meridiani has a consistency of vision which shines through in every piece, from sofas to side tables brand’s main strengths. All of the company’s products are created by art director Andrea Parisio, who has been the company’s sole designer since its inception. His discerning eye oversees everything from furniture collections to brand image and store design. Working in this way has given a consistency to Meridiani’s style that shines through. Textiles are also a key focus – customers can choose from two fabric collections, each with a different feel. ‘Departures’ features menswear-inspired natural fibres, while the ‘Travel Memories’ range includes bolder designs. Trends don’t go unremarked: the new ‘Hector’ sofa (above) comes in a fashionable bottle-green velvet. As well as its main collections, Meridiani also has a luxury range called ‘Editions’, distinguished by its handmade quality and precious finishes. A prime example is the ‘Wolfang’ wall unit (right), clad in panels of golden-bronze mirror, part of the appropriately named ‘Shine’ collection. From timeless everyday furniture to big statement pieces, Meridiani has it covered (meridiani.it). Top of page (from left) ‘Hector’ sofa, ‘Pek’ side tables, ‘Isabelle’ chairs Right ‘Claud’ outdoor chair Far right ‘Wolfgang’ unit from the ‘Shine’ range

F O U R K E Y FA C T S ABOUT MERIDIANI

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Meridiani designs feature in the recently opened Hotel Milano Scala, near the famous La Scala opera house, and Barcelona’s Hilton Hotel, designed by Matteo Thun, as well as luxury residential developments.

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The brand’s three top-selling designs are the ‘Plinto’ dining table (below), the ‘Louis’ modular sofa and the ‘Tuyo’ bed, which has a range of statement headboards.

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Meridiani’s sofa beds, often one of the more prosaic items in the home, are every bit as luxurious as you would expect an Italian sofa to be. We love the ‘Scott’ design.

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The ‘Open Air’ outdoor furniture collection sports innovative all-weather upholstery that resists the elements, but is as soft as indoor fabrics. It comes in a range of colours and designs.

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Style | D E S I G N

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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E Y O TA M O T T O L E N G H I

We ask a style icon to share what they are reading, watching, listening to and more We can thank Yotam Ottolenghi for bringing colour and Middle Eastern verve to British cuisine. The Israeli-British chef and writer’s first eponymous deli/diner opened in Notting Hill in 2002. Three more delis, a restaurant and several food and travel documentaries later, his new cookbook Sweet (7, Ebury Press, £27), written with Helen Goh, is out this month (@ottolenghi; ottolenghi.co.uk). My all-time favourite piece of music is Nina Simone’s (4) Here Comes the Sun. It’s a song that manages to speak both to all the good days to come and all that has passed. It makes me miss my brother, who was killed before his time, but it also makes me excited for my kids and all the fun we’re going to have. I’m currently obsessed with the soundtrack to Jill Soloway’s television adaptation of I Love Dick. Two songs that stand out are Meshell Ndegeocello’s Either Way I Lose and Laura Mvula’s Father, Father. The record that makes me feel instantly happy is Prince’s Paisley Park. It’s cheeky, 3 exciting and a little bit anarchic, which I love. Prince (2) was a genius: always pushing boundaries. The chorus to the title track makes me happy: ‘Admission is easy, just say you believe and come to this place in your heart.’  The book that influenced me the most is The Book of Jewish 4 Food (5) by Claudia Roden. It made me realise that a passion for food and a passion for words are not mutually exclusive. My favourite film is Fargo, the 1996 classic by the Coen brothers. I must have watched it at least ten times and I am still mesmerised – and often driven to tears – by William H Macy’s hapless car salesman character, and by the incredible Frances McDormand. 6

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The famous quote that makes me think is ‘Culture tends to argue that it forbids only that which is unnatural. But 5 from a biological perspective, nothing is unnatural. Whatever is possible is by definition also natural.’ It’s just one of many great quotes from Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari. Radio and podcast-wise, I like The Splendid Table, Food Programme, Gastropod, The Dinner Party Download and The Food Chain – can you spot the theme?! The last theatre production I saw was This House at the National Theatre. It is a clever and very funny production of a play by James Graham depicting life behind the scenes at the House of Commons in the 1970s. It’s House of Cards without the big egos. If I had a free day in London I’d start it with a run around Regent’s Park (6) followed by breakfast at Fernandez & Wells (3) in Soho. Lunch would be dumplings at Imperial China in Chinatown (1). In the evening, I’d cook for friends, informally, at home. Next stop? I’m travelling to America next month with my co-writer Helen Goh to promote our new cookbook, Sweet (7).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY, PEDEN+MUNK

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Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

THREE OF THE BEST BOOKS TO SUIT ALL STYLES Decadent Architecture Fin-de-Siècle (Taschen, £250) is a feast for the eyes. The three volume tome includes lavish works by architects Antoni Gaudi, Josef Hoffman and Charles Rennie Mackintosh, all captured in atmospheric detail by late Japanese architectural photographer Keiichi Tahara.

A R C H I T E C T S T O K N O W PA P E R H O U S E P R O J E C T

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: RORY GARDINER

Set up in 2012 by young architect James Davies, east London-based Paper House Project focuses on creating unique, contemporary living spaces, reworking the industrial warehouse trend with beautiful hard-wearing materials and original, eye-catching architectural features. Last year, the practice reworked a home and office on east London’s Florida Street, creating a doubleheight internal atrium with an industrial black staircase (right). To get an even better feel for the firm’s style, you need to look at the once-dilapidated warehouse in Hackney (above) that Davies recently transformed into a two-bedroom home for himself. It was given a complete overhaul, with Crittall black powder-coated windows and door frames honouring the building’s industrial past. Meanwhile, the interior was kept minimal – a polished concrete floor was matched with sleek black marble details and dark-stained oak furniture in the kitchen, a brilliant contrast to the spruce panelled staircase at the heart of the home. The practice is now moving onto even bigger things, with two large London redevelopment projects in the pipeline: ‘Eton Grove’, a derelict Victorian warehouse which will be transformed into apartments, and ‘Bateman Street’, a redesign of a 1960s building in bustling Soho (paperhouseproject.co.uk).

Minimalist Founders of real estate agency The Modern House, Matt Gibberd and Albert Hill, have used their expert eyes to compile a catalogue of the finest modernist buildings, from Le Corbusier designs to John Pawson’s masterpieces, in Ornament is Crime (Phaidon, £29.95). Revolutionist Pioneering and futuristic, the stunning homes in Inside Utopia (Gestalten, £45) range from architect Pierre Koenig’s 1960s steel Stahl House, which seems to almost float above the Hollywood Hills, to the playful interior of Karl Lagerfeld’s Monaco apartment, designed by Memphis Milano.

LANDMARK DESIGNS British model-maker Chisel & Mouse is known for its handmade plaster replicas of the world’s most beloved buildings and cityscapes, all reproduced at a scale of 1:5000. Now, the company is bringing Pop Art-style colour to its creations with the new ‘Poparch’ sculptural artworks. Each model is framed and given an eye-catchingly bright backdrop. Choose from icons including London’s Centre Point tower and Westminster Abbey. From £125 each (chiselandmouse.com).

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Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

GRAND DESIGNS: HOUSE OF THE YEAR The RIBA House of the Year longlist celebrates the best of contemporary British home designs, and it even has its own TV programme! Every year, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) scours the UK in search of its House of the Year to celebrate architectural excellence in British housing design. This year’s 20-strong longlist showcases a wide range of projects. ELLE Decoration’s Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin has been travelling across the UK to take an exclusive peek inside some of them as a co-presenter – alongside Kevin McCloud and architect Damion Burrows – on Grand Designs: House of the Year, a four-part series on Channel 4 dedicated to the award. The first show airs on 8 November and the winner is announced during the final episode. Here, we explore Michelle’s top six contenders. View the full longlist at architecture.com.

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WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: JAMES MORRIS, NICK GUTTRIDGE

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SIX CONTENDERS FOR HOUSE OF THE YEAR… 1 The Cooperage, London Chris Dyson Architects has given this former industrial building a smart update, using concrete, black steel and exposed brickwork with a fantastic lightness of touch. 2 Caring Wood, near Maidstone A modern vision of the English country house, this family home by Macdonald Wright and Niall Maxwell is a grand yet intimate space for three generations. 3 Ness Point, Dover This building’s thick, undulating walls mimic the beautiful white cliffs of Dover. Indeed, the intent of architect Tonkin Liu was to bring the landscape into the design. ➤ OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 155


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

GRAND DESIGNS: HOUSE OF THE YEAR

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5 Hidden House, London Coffey Architects has maximised the appeal of this one-storey home on the site of an old caretaker’s shed. Vaulted roof lights ensure that the small building feels light and airy. 6 Peacock House, Aldeburgh, Suffolk Built facing a central courtyard, this home is made up of three independent blocks connected by the great outdoors. The simple exterior by BHSF Architekten and Studio-P belies the complexity within. E D

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WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: TIMOTHY SOAR, BENEDICT REDMANN

4 Woodman’s Treehouse, Dorset Built around the branches of a proud English oak tree, this woodland home, accessed via a suspension bridge, is the work of architects Brownlie Ernst and Marks, as well as furniture makers and specialists in green wood.


OPEN HOUSE P U M P S TAT I O N B Y J O H N S O N N AY L O R A R C H I T E C T S

Don’t be fooled by its simple exterior. This remote pump house in the wilds of Dungeness, Kent conceals a slick, stylish home This enigmatic, single-storey concrete-framed former Coastguard Tower was built in 1941 as one of a number of simple structures used to house equipment for Operation Pluto – the World War II mission to pump fuel under the sea to support the D-Day landings. The Pump Station, along with neighbouring buildings, was built to look like a house or fisherman’s shed to avoid attention. Later, it was used as a Sunday School and Mission Church, as well as forming a home for a masonic lodge known as The Buffaloes.

Naylor’s design respects the special setting and the unique history of this building, which retains its austere utilitarian façade After it fell into disuse, interior architect Fiona Naylor (left) and her late husband, renowned photographer Peter Marlow, spotted the potential of The Pump Station and purchased it with the ambitious aim of converting it to residential use. Naylor’s design respects the special setting and unique history of this building, which retains its utilitarian façade, concealing the comfortable interior within. Here, the raw feel of the concrete coffered ceiling and concrete walls is tempered by warmer elements, including the timber floors. The fireplace forms a key focal point for the largely openplan living space, complete with seating and dining areas, and a kitchen. Two bedrooms and bathrooms are situated at the other end of the house, which is now shared with renting guests, who are regularly drawn to this mesmerising seaside spot on the South Coast. johnsonnaylor.co.uk ➤


WORDS: DOMINIC BRADBURY PICTURES: RACHAEL SMITH

Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

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Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

OPEN HOUSE: PUMP STATION

PICTURES: RACHAEL SMITH

The original ribbed concrete ceiling is supported by steel beams, and the walls are also made of concrete. These remnants of the building’s past blend perfectly with the home’s slick, modern furnishings in tones of industrial grey E D

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NEXT GENERATION We look at Swiss watchmaker Rado as its annual emerging talent award makes its UK debut If one of the tenets of design is a commitment to detail, then watch design takes that to a whole new level – as industrial designer Konstantin Grcic quickly realised when he was tasked with redesigning Rado’s classic ‘Ceramica’ watch. ‘We’re talking about radiuses of 0.2 or 0.25mm,’ he said upon its release last year. ‘It’s very difficult to comprehend the difference, but it matters a lot.’ It is, of course, this very attention to detail – in both design and function – that has made the Swiss brand a go-to for both watch- and designenthusiasts alike. The ‘Ceramica’ is a case in point. The brand’s first high-tech ceramic watch (Rado’s signature material is harder than metal, scratch-resistant and both light and comfortable to wear), with a completely integrated watch case and bracelet, it was groundbreaking upon its initial release in 1990: Grcic has described its design as ‘absolutely iconic and pure’. Now, his expert redesign – in which the case itself is subtly enlarged to become ‘visually distinguished’ from the bracelet – honours that legacy, while evolving the ‘Ceramica’ for a new generation of watch wearers. Find out more at rado.com

DESIGNER PROFILE Rado has a long history of seeking inspiration from designers in fields as diverse as fashion, architecture and graphic design. Notable collaborations include Jasper Morrison’s ‘r5.5’ design in 2009 and this year’s limitededition Rado ‘True’ watches, of which interior designer Sam Amoia (above) was one of six renowned designers to apply his vision. ‘I wanted to create an innovative piece that reflects my aesthetic and personal design philosophy,’ Amoia said. His statement timepiece features a plasma high-tech ceramic case and what looks like a layer of silvery metallic slivers on the watchface to create an effect that has been compared to a ‘disco ball’. Another bold first for Rado. Left and top Industrial designer Konstantin Grcic with his ‘Chair One’ and at work on his redesign of Rado’s iconic ‘Ceramica’ watch Above Interior designer Sam Amoia wearing his limited-edition take on the Rado ‘True’ watch, which has a face that has been compared to a disco ball


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

UK RADO STAR PRIZE AT DESIGNJUNCTION

‘ We live and breathe fearless design and we want to promote this mindset in the next generation of creative minds through the Rado Star Prize’

Clockwise from above ‘Glow’ chairs by Kimberly Markel, RSP USA, 2017. ‘Stack’ printer by Mugi Yamamoto, RSP Switzerland, 2015. ‘The Once Liquid Plastic’ by Julien Manaira, RSP France, 2017. ‘Dancers’ chair by Aurélie Hoegy, RSP France, 2015

AN EYE TO THE FUTURE Established in 2008 to showcase and support the work of a new generation of creative talent, the annual Rado Star Prize offers unestablished designers a platform to show their work to experts from the design field and general public alike. Held in the context of larger design events, such as Paris Design Week or Design Prize Switzerland, the competition is awarded across Europe, Asia and the US, and is coming to the UK for the first time this year. Previous winners include a compact printer that ‘eats’ through the paper stack it sits on (above), chairs crafted from recycled plastic (left) and a set of chairs designed to evoke the movement of a dancer’s choreography (right). ‘We live and breathe fearless design,’ says Rado CEO Matthias Breschan, ‘and we want to promote this mindset in the next generation of creative minds’.

2017 sees global design competition the Rado Star Prize land in the UK. Ten finalists have been selected for the shortlist by a judging panel that includes Konstantin Grcic and Rado’s Hakim El Kadiri, and will be showcased at Designjunction (21–24 September) in London, during which the winner will be announced. The shortlisted entries will also be open to a public vote – with the winner taking home a Rado ‘Ceramica’. Visit and have your say on the UK’s new creative talent. radostarprize.rado.com/uk

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Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

ON THE BOIL British tech start-up Smarter’s third-generation ‘iKettle 3.0’ allows tea connoisseurs to achieve precise boiling temperatures (green tea, for instance, should be brewed at slightly below boiling point). Have Amazon’s Alexa voice service? You can ask the kettle to boil itself. Or, use the ‘Wake Up’ feature and it will turn on when your alarm does. £100 (smarter.am).

G O O D A I R D AY According to Dyson, the air in the average home can be up to five times more polluted than outside on the street. Enter the brand’s ‘Pure Hot + Cool Link’ bladeless air purifying fan. The device heats, cools and monitors air quality, as well as trapping over 99 per cent of nasty pollutants. It can then report your air quality to the free ‘Dyson Link’ app, so that you can keep track of how it improves over time. £500 (dyson.co.uk).

See this Ever run out of battery on the way to an important presentation? Or felt overwhelmed by the clutter of all your gadgets? Benjamin Hubert of design agency Layer has co-founded a new tech lifestyle brand, Nolii, to face these modern predicaments. Check out its five products that combine sleek design and technical know-how at Design Frontiers (18–24 September), Somerset House (nolii.co.uk).

SPEAKERS CORNER

We shine a spotlight on the Brit-designed speakers that deserve to take centre stage ‘T7 GOLD EDITION’ BY BOWERS & WILKINS

If you like raw, industrial design, you’ll love this monolithic speaker that resembles a Brutalist sculpture. Made from hand-finished concrete, it’s the work of visionary British architect Sir David Adjaye. Part speaker, part work of art, it boasts top sound quality and a removable grille that exposes handcrafted components. £1,600 (master dynamic. co.uk).

This sleek, portable Bluetooth speaker features a stylish honeycomb structure – it not only looks great, but cancels out vibrations that could negatively affect the sound quality. Despite being no bigger than a hardback book, the speaker delivers 18 hours of playback per charge – making it perfect for alfresco parties. £300 (bowers-wilkins.co.uk).

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‘SERIES 5’ BY LINN Engineered in Scotland, this speaker is guaranteed to deliver high fidelity aural pleasure – and thanks to a collaboration with Glasgow-based textile designers Timorous Beasties, it also packs a (slightly surreal) visual punch. Choose from ten hand-printed ‘Fabrik’ covers or opt for a plain colour. They can be switched as and when you update your interior. From £9,600 (linn.co.uk).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY

‘MA770’ BY MASTER & DYNAMIC


Style | C O L O U R

BRITISH RACING GREEN PANTONE 342

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This most patriotic of hues has racy, but surprisingly transatlantic, origins

WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR

Had he not been quite so wealthy, James Gordon to mind the smell of sun-baked car leather, the throaty Bennett, the American publisher of the New York Herald, cacophony of engines and the cheers of those celebrating would likely have been called a bounder. He left America a patriotic victory. It was, after all, the memorable livery rather hurriedly in 1877 after a scandal – he mistook the of the British Bentleys that sped to so many successes grand piano at his fiancée’s family home for a urinal. in the Le Mans races in the 1920s and 30s. He sometimes tore around the countryside in a coachIf you yearn to bring this colour in from the garage, and-four in the nude and once burned a fat roll of money now is a wonderful time to do so. ‘Morris Green’ from because it was ruining the cut of his the V&A’s ‘Classic’ paint collection The colour should call is the darkest incarnation of the trousers. Nevertheless, it is he we have to thank – indirectly – for one shade; ‘Hunter Dunn’ by the Paint to mind the cheers of the most classic and patriotic & Paper Library, is richer and of those celebrating colours ever created. He founded warmer. If you would prefer more the Gordon Bennett Cup, which drama, consider a high-gloss finish a patriotic victory pitted nations against each other that will reflect the light like a car in annual automobile races. Before 1902, Britain didn’t bonnet. For those looking for a milder update, Fermoie have its own national racing colour. It didn’t even have has two fabrics (‘L-061’ and ‘L-057’) in this colourway, much of a racing tradition to speak of – the speed limit while Polish company 366 Concept has re-imagined its was 12mph. In 1902, however, a British car unexpectedly ‘Fox Easy Chair’ by H Lim in ‘Bottle Green’. It’s not quite won, meaning that Britain would host the Cup the in the taking-life-on-two-wheels spirit – but even James following year. To bypass speed regulations in the UK, Gordon Bennett enjoyed relaxing in style occasionally. the race was held in Ireland, and in appreciation of the Paints to try ‘Morris Green’ by V&A Paint, £36 for 2.5 litres, venue, the olive green of the original winning car was Home of Paint (homeofpaint.com). ‘Hunter Dunn’, £65 for 2.5 darkened to a deep shamrock shade. This colour was litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Hobby known thereafter as British Racing Green. Wood’, £38 for 2.5 litres, Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk) There is no standard hue of British Racing Green: manufacturers have always mixed their own versions, ranging from the paler, yellower Napiers to the rich jungle of the Jaguars. Today, however, the colour is generally accepted to be somewhere between Brunswick green and forest hues. And it is really the context that makes it: British Racing Green should call

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MODERN BRITISH

THE WORLD’S MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K


Kitchen The floorboards are made from reclaimed pitch pine, washed with soap and lye and sealed with matt varnish. The worktop is a mix of iroko – salvaged from an old school laboratory – and concrete. The simple, linear brass pendant light is by Danish company Anour Dining area This walnut table was made by the homeowner’s sister, Bella Bathurst. The cushions are by another sister, Lucy Bathurst of Nest. The artwork is from Surface View and the vintage ‘Semi’ pendant light is a 1960s Danish design, now produced by Gubi Stockist details on p284 ➤


MODERN BRITISH

What home could be a better exemplar of the best of British interiors than the newly renovated abode of ELLE Decoration’s Photography Director Flora Bathurst? Here, family-friendly style meets impeccable design Words AMY BRADFORD Photography BEN ANDERS Styling SANIA PELL


STYLING ASSISTANT: ENRICO DONADELLO

lora Bathurst’s experience as Photography Director of ELLE Decoration stood her in good stead when it came to renovating her own home. ‘I spend all day looking at the most beautiful houses in the world,’ she says. ‘There’s constant inspiration.’ The four-bedroom terraced property in Kensal Rise, northwest London, which she shares with husband Andrew, five-year-old son Eli and two-year-old daughter Isobel put all her style skills to the test. The 1890s house was ‘in a very sorry state’ before they moved in two years ago. ‘There were rotten joists and holes in the floor,’ Flora recalls. ‘It was the ultimate doer-upper.’ On the outside, the building was painted a lurid shade of mint green. The couple approached the project with all guns blazing, gutting the house and starting again from scratch. They seized the chance to reorganise the building’s layout, creating a double dormer in the loft to house a main bedroom and bathroom, and moving all of the walls on the first floor to produce better-proportioned rooms. The ground level was extended. ‘We added a lot of rolled steel joists,’ says Flora. ‘This allowed us to open up the middle of the house, box in the stairs with storage and link the front to the back seamlessly – not easy in a Victorian terrace.’ Help came from her interior architect, Anthi Grapsa of Arch Memories and Martin Starlet, an expert in building with reclaimed materials. It was Anthi who had the idea for the bank of cupboards that runs between the living room and kitchen hides all family clutter. ‘She’s really good with storage solutions,’ says Flora. Anthi is also an expert in using reclaimed materials, which are without doubt the most important aspect of the house’s decoration. The salvaged pitch-pine panelling and iroko surfaces used in many of the rooms were chosen for their resilience and character, with much of the wood sourced from London-based reclamation experts Retrouvius. ‘I love things that have integrity and history,’ says Flora. ‘Also, with old buildings, I think you need to honour their past. In the original rooms, such as the sitting room, we put back the cornicing and opened up the old fireplace. In the newer parts of the house we felt we could be more modern.’ The project also benefited from the creativity of the Bathurst family at large. Flora’s late mother was an interior designer; her elder sister Bella is a furniture maker (as well as a successful author); middle sister Lucy is an interior designer and textile specialist with her own studio, Nest; and cousin Rupert is a painter. All made their contributions to the space, notably Lucy’s handmade curtains and cushions, Bella’s sturdy black walnut kitchen table and Rupert’s paintings and charcoal drawings in the sitting room and study. Flora describes her style as ‘reclaimed meets classical modern’ and cites her inspirations as ‘Scandinavian simplicity, mid-century shapes and all things natural’. In two years, this house has seen a remarkable transformation and, stripped of its mint green masonry, is its best self again. nestdesign.co.uk; bellabathurst.com; rupertbathurst.com; arch-memories.co.uk; starletbuilding.co.uk Seating area This vintage Eero Saarinen table was a gift from the homeowner’s sisters. The Saarinen chair is from her late mother and the Ercol chair was discovered in a flea market. The curtains are by Nest – a sheer linen with lace panels and a wool fabric with velvet sections and metallic threads. The wall lights are by Cox & Cox Bathroom Fornasetti’s ‘Nuvole’ wallpaper from Cole & Son decorates the walls. The mirror is from Retrouvius Stockist details on p284 ➤

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D E S I G N D E TA I L S A RT I S T I C F O C U S

Flora Bathurst shares her top decorating decisions 1 Art and photography I have built up my collection with time and patience. I inherited a few lovely things and I’m surrounded by photography at work, so I have managed to collect a decent amount of primarily black and white portraiture. I’m getting more into landscape photography now, but you have to save up, so that’s what I’m doing. 2 Marble mantelpiece I found the perfect slab of marble in a garage at my Mum’s house in Scotland and, after discussing ideas with my builder, he said that he could install it as a floating shelf with the struts underneath. 3 Utility room I’ve always wanted one. As I spend more time in there than I would like, it had to be a nice space. Everything is functional but looks good, from the paint-splattered reclaimed iroko worktop to the Welsh slate splashback and the hidden washing machine and dryer. 4 Kitchen worktop We used a mix of concrete and iroko wood; the latter was reclaimed from a school laboratory. I love their practicality, as well as the slim brass trim that separates the two materials. It already has small signs of damage, but our kitchen is effectively bombproof. 5 Creative curtains I believe that curtains are the most underestimated element of a home and can make a huge impact. When you draw them, you are effectively creating a huge wall panel, so it’s essential that they look great.


Hallway A sliding pocket door, bought from The French House, separates the sitting room from the entrance. The chandelier in the hallway was a vintage ďŹ nd and the wall light is by Utah-based Greg Domm Stockist details on p284 ➤


Utility room The paint-splattered iroko worktop is from Retrouvius and the splashback is made from reclaimed Welsh slate. The sink is another reclaimed piece, from English Salvage, and the copper taps were made by the homeowner’s plumber. The tongue-and-groove panelling is painted in Paint & Paper Library’s ‘Slate 2’ Stockist details on p284 ➤

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Recclaimeed matterials, chosen for theeir ressiliencce and d charractter, are keey to th his hom me’s warrmth an nd beau uty


‘Myy style iss reclaimed d meeets cla asssical modern. I find in nspirattio on in Scan ndina avian n simplicityy, mid--ceentury sha apes and alll thing gs naturall’

Study The chair in front of the floating oak desk (above) is the ‘Colonial’ by Ole Wanscher for Carl Hansen & Søn and the ‘Cone’ wall lights are by Atelier Areti. The artworks are a mix of family pieces Fireplace This marble was found in the garage at the homeowner’s mum’s house. The main photograph is from Joseph Szabo’s ‘Teenage’ series Stockist details on p284 ➤

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‘I sp pend alll day lookin ng at the most beautifful hou usees in the world.. Therre’’s constant insp pirattio on’

Sitting room The sofas are both heirlooms, as are the vintage wall lights above the mantelpiece. A black leather ‘D.153.1’ armchair by Giò Ponti, produced by Molteni & C, sits in front of bespoke bookcases Stockist details on p284 ➤


‘I lo ovee thing gs that ha ave integritty an nd histo ory. Witth old buildiings, I thin nk th hatt you neeed to ho onour their pastt’

Bathroom The ‘Zelliges’ tiles in ‘Tilleul Gris’ around the bath are from Emery & Cie and the walls are painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Pink Ground’. The image of a shipwreck is by The Gibsons of Scilly, a 19th-century family who photographed hundreds of shipwrecks. The miniature ship’s wall light beside it is from Original BTC Bedroom ‘Inchyra Blue’ paint by Farrow & Ball sets an atmospheric scene. The bedlinen is by Larusi, as is the rug. The headboard is by Nest, and is made from a mix of wool, velvet and vintage Indian saris. The bed was handmade by Foamtec. The bedside table is a salvaged collectors’ drawer from Retrouvius and the ‘Colonial’ chair is by Ole Wanscher for Carl Hansen & Søn Stockist details on p284 E D

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MODERN BRITISH

INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION The fusion of past and present is key to the British aesthetic. Take this east London loft, where original factory features have been updated with cutting-edge steel designs

Words TRISH LORENZ Photography RORY GARDINER


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ocated in the now-trendy area of Clapton, London, in a former toy factory dating from 1907, is the apartment of photographer Dean Rogers and his girlfriend Molly Wansell. Today, their home is a shining example of British style’s edgy, urban side. When Dean first set eyes on the building, though, it was its six-metre-high ceilings and light-filled rooms, with windows on three sides, that sold it to him. ‘The space needed work, but I knew it had the potential to be amazing,’ he says. Dean already had a penchant for loft living. ‘Most of the apartments I’ve called home have been industrial spaces – I lived in Nottingham’s Lace Market for a long time. I like their feel and character,’ he says. After buying the warehouse in 2011, Dean spent the next two and a half years living there, working with space planner Jayne Furniss and architect Sadie Snelson to come up with a design that made the most of the building’s unique and intriguing history. A 12-month renovation project followed, and it was 2015 before the loft was complete. Visiting now, you enter into a small hallway with a wall of storage units (these house the couple’s bikes). From here, you walk downstairs into the main kitchen and the open-plan living area. On the right is a bedroom and an office. The highlight of the interior, however, is the new mezzanine level, clad in acid-washed steel. It doubles the usable floor space in this 250-square-metre apartment, allowing Dean to add a further two bedrooms, another living area and a bathroom. The use of steel is a theme in this home, with it also used to make the deceptively simple staircase leading up to the mezzanine. Created by east London-based designer John Horton, this looks like one single folded piece of metal. The large internal windows, which are intended to distribute light into even the smallest rooms, were also commissioned by Dean and made by Horton. ‘It’s much easier to buy bespoke pieces these days, because steel is often laser cut and can easily be made to order,’ says Dean. As well as local craftspeople, Dean has also chosen British materials where possible. The floors and kitchen units are all made of UK-sourced oak. It is this sense of place and history that gives this modern London home its soul. furnissandmay.com; ssarchitects.co.uk Kitchen The kitchen is bespoke, with oak cabinets and concrete worktops. Topps Tiles has similar tiles, and the stools are from Rockett St George Dining area The table and bench are vintage, and the chairs were rescued from a skip by the homeowner (try Metroretro for similar). Skinflint Design sells lights like these Stockist details on p284 ➤

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Living area The black leather sofa was bought at Habitat ‘a long time ago’, says Dean. British oak floorboards add warmth and texture, as do the unpainted polished plaster walls from The Plaster Collective. The two green 1970s chairs under the stairs were found at Newark Antiques Fair Stockist details on p284 ➤


The deceptively simple staircase leading up to the mezzanine level looks like one single, folded piece of metal


D E S I G N D E TA I L S INDUSTRIAL STYLE

Homeowner Dean shares his five tips for designing a loft apartment 1 Take your time Get to know the space – and how you naturally use it – before you start to design. 2 Keep the layout simple Let the original character of the building be the real star of the show. 3 Use a simple palette Employ just a few different finishes, and make sure that they all complement each other. 4 Use reclaimed pieces Salvaged industrial light fittings, door handles and furniture will pay homage to the past of your building and add character. 5 Create smaller areas within an open-plan space The areas above and below the mezzanine level in my home are more intimate. They provide me with a cosy place of escape.

Stairs The staircase, which looks like one piece of folded steel, is actually welded at each tread and riser. Created by east London-based designer and manufacturer John Horton, who also designed the internal doors and windows in the house, it is made of acid wash steel Stockist details on p284 ➤


Bathroom The plaster on the shower walls is from The Plaster Collective Bedroom The windows were designed by John Horton. The bedding is from Heal’s. Try Original BTC’s ‘Hector’ table lamp for a similar bedside light Stockist details on p284 E D


The apartment is a shining example of British style’s edgy, urban side


The collectibles MODERN BRITISH

British craft is having a renaissance. Here, we reveal the most beautiful pieces from new makers and big-name designers that you should be collecting now, all photographed at ceramics studio Turning Earth

From left Black sculpture from the ‘What the Thunder Said’ series by BASK Collective, £1,500, India Dickinson Gallery (indiadickinson.com). ‘Cloud’ pot by Lisa Stockham, £1,775, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Flock Series1’ wall light by Craig Bamford, £3,800, SASA Works (sasaworks.co.uk). ‘Thread’ rug by Faye Toogood, £6,743, CC-Tapis (cc-tapis.com). ‘Day Bed Four’ daybed, £3,305, Another Country (anothercountry.com). ‘Palmira’ fabric (as throw and on bolster cushion), £89 per metre, Lindsay Alker (lindsayalker.com ). ‘Mended Tweed’ cushion in ‘Monochrome V’, £145, Mourne Textiles (mournetextiles.com). ‘Alalpardo’ rectangular cushion in ‘Rust’, £65, Bert & May (bertandmay.com). Black and White (Composition II) and Black and Grey (Composition II) prints, £650 each, David Hardy (davidhardy.co.uk). Round black oak sculpture, £1,080, Alison Crowther (alisoncrowther.com). ‘Maiden’ stool by Russell Pinch, £575, Benchmark (benchmarkfurniture.com). 11 white marble sculpture by Dominic McHenry, £1,500 for a set of three, India Dickinson Gallery (indiadickinson.com). ‘Rodan’

FOLIAGE THROUGHOUT: SWEET PEA FLOWERS (SWEETPEAFLOWERS.CO.UK) STYLING ASSISTANT: ENRICO DONADELLO

Photography MICHAEL SINCLAR Styling SANIA PELL


coffee table in black stained oak, £1,055, Pinch (pinchdesign.com). Leaning vessel, £870, Derek Wilson (derekwilsonceramics.com). Tray, £150; vase, £180 from the ‘Tarnish’ collection by Daniel Schofield (danielschofield.co.uk). ‘Jesmonite ’ bowl in ‘Flint’ by Malgorzata Bany, £170, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Pink marble side table, £1,900, Lola Lely (lolalely.com). Bog oak vessel, £925, Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com). ‘Planks’ wooden table, from £2,660; ‘Planks’ wooden bench, from £1,250, both by Max Lamb for Benchmark (benchmarkfurniture.com) ➤


THE COLLECTIBLES Opposite page, from left ‘Planks’ table by Max Lamb, from £2,660, Benchmark (benchmarkfurniture.com). ‘Now & Then’ vessel by Natascha Madeiski and Linnie Mclarty, £180, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). Leaning vessel, £1,470, Derek Wilson (derekwilsonceramics.com). ‘Eadie’ vase in ‘Natural White Stone’, £35, Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). Jug by Nicola Tassie, £200, Standpoint (standpointlondon.co.uk) This page, from left Medium constructed container, £155, Derek Wilson (derekwilsonceramics.com). Horam clay faceted tea bowl,£90, Elaine Bolt (elainebolt.com). Notched jug by Nicola Tassie, £200, Standpoint (standpointlondon.co.uk) ➤


THE COLLECTIBLES This page, from left Red faceted jug by Nicola Tassie, £200, Standpoint (standpointlondon.co.uk). Teacup in ‘Metallic Black’ glaze by Keiko Hasegawa, £55, Margaret Howell (margarethowell.co.uk). Black porcelain vessel, from £155, Elaine Bolt and Annemarie O’Sullivan (elainebolt.com; annemarieosullivan.co.uk). Teacup in ‘Snowflake’ glaze by Keiko Hasegawa, £45, Margaret Howell (margarethowell.co.uk) Opposite, clockwise from top left Black beaker, £27; oval platter, £70, both Silvia K Ceramics (silviakceramics.co.uk). Etched porcelain jugs by Nicola Tassie, £200 each, Maud & Mabel (maudandmabel.com). ‘Atro-city’ jug in ‘Dark Grey’, £40; small ‘Atro-city’ cup in ‘White’, £52; ‘Atro-city’ sugar container in ‘Blue-Grey’, £56; saucers in ‘Forest Green’, ‘White’ and ‘Dusty Pink’, £19 each; medium ‘Habitual’ cup in ‘White’, £40, all Emma Johnson (emmajohnsonceramics.com). ‘Cloud’ pot by Lisa Stockham, £235, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). Ebonised oak spoon, £175, Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com). ‘Betty’ vase in ‘Indigo’, £70, Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). Tall cup, £80, Kate Bergin (katebergin.weebly.com). Plate, £50, Janneke de Jong (jan.ne.ke). ‘Keystone’ wall relief by Nicola Tassie, £1,200, Standpoint (standpointlondon.co.uk) ➤


THE COLLECTIBLES On shelves, from left White jug by Nicola Tassie, £200, Standpoint (standpointlondon.co.uk). ‘Betty’ vase in ‘Indigo’, £7, Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). Spalted sycamore vessel, £495, Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com). Plate, £50, Janneke de Jong (jan.ne.ke). ‘Mr & Mrs’ water carafes in ‘Natural White Stone’ and ‘Pale Grey’, £48 each; ‘Eadie’ small vase in ‘Dark Grey’, £35; ‘Vera’ large vase in ‘Dark Grey’, £70; new bone china white side plates, £10 each; new bone china white dinner plates, £12 each; ‘Mr & Mrs’ teapot, £120; all by Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). Jar, £45, Grace McCarthy (instagram @gracemccarthy_design). Black and Grey (Composition I) print, £350, David Hardy (davidhardy.co.uk). Plate, £22, Puzzle of Nature (puzzleofnature.co.uk). Beakers, £27 each; deep bowl, £35, both Silvia K Ceramics (silviakceramics.co.uk). Pepper and salt mills, £42 each, Margaret Howell (margarethowell.co.uk). Grey platter, £80, Silvia K Ceramics (silviakceramics.co.uk). White cups, £14 each; white vase, £82, Ned Davies (Instagram @e.f.davies.clay). Grey jug, £120, Silvia K Ceramics (silviakceramics.co.uk)


On island, from left ‘C1’ casserole dish, £135; ‘C3’ frying pan, £85, both by Crane, Another Country (anothercountry.com). Sycamore offering bowl, £725; sycamore spoon, £110; ebonised oak spoon, £175; ebonised oak vessel, £210; ‘Knotted Pear’ vessel, £375, all Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com). ‘Touch’ wooden tray by Ilse Crawford, £266, Zanat (zanat.org) Furniture, from left ‘Stool Four’ low wooden stool in ‘Dutch Monument Green’, £225, Another Country (anothercountry.com). ‘Caribou’ 80cm-high bar stools (two pictured), £2,100 each; ‘Caribou’ 90cm-high bar stool, £2,124, all Ochre (ochre.net). ‘Float’ side table, £770, Pinch (pinchdesign.com). Metallic black teacup by Keiko Hasegawa, £55, Margaret Howell (margarethowell.co.uk). ‘Cross Leg’ lounge chair in ‘Stonewash Black Leather’ by Magnus Long, £2,295, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Blake’ border cushion in black, £76.67, Bert & May (bertandmay.com). ‘Perching ’ foot stool by Ilse Crawford, £388, Artifort (artifort.com). ‘St. Clement’ fabric (on curtain), £90 per metre, Lindsay Alker (lindsayalker.com ) ➤


THE COLLECTIBLES Opposite, from left ‘Touch’ bench by Ilse Crawford, £1,636.80, Zanat (zanat.org). ‘Antumbra’ lamp, £530, Magnus Long (magnuslong.com). Black and Blue print, £290, David Hardy (davidhardy.co.uk). ‘Holocene’ oil lamp by Ilse Crawford for Wästberg, £165, SCP (scp.co.uk) This page, from left ‘Cotton IV’ Pure Flat Emulsion paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). Etching artworks (on wall), £380 each, Jeffrey James (jeffreyjames.org). Black and Grey (Composition I) print, £350; Black and Blue print (both on floor), £290, David Hardy (davidhardy.co.uk). ‘Roman’ console table by Terence Conran, £2,380, Benchmark (benchmarkfurniture.com). 04 oak sculpture by Dominic McHenry, £350, India Dickinson Gallery (indiadickinson.com). Limited edition concrete sculptures, from £250, Jeffrey James (jeffreyjames.org). Horam clay faceted tea bowl, £90, Elaine Bolt (elainebolt.com). Large constructed container, £195, Derek Wilson (derekwilsonceramics.com). ‘Jesmonite’ trinket dish in ‘Chalk’ by Malgorzata Bany, £60, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Ghost’ bowl, £1,800, Ane Christensen (anechristensen.com). Round black oak sculpture, £1,080, Alison Crowther (alisoncrowther.com). Round Flow porcelain wall art, £8,500, Fenella Elms (fenellaelms.com). Kindling basket, £375, Annemarie O’Sullivan (annemarieosullivan.co.uk). ‘Borders’ rug, £2,300, Helen Yardley (helenyardley.com) E D


d n o Ln o soul MODERN BRITISH

This Notting Hill apartment is a trove of eccentric designs, mixed together with flamboyant British flair – and every hand-picked piece could be yours Words KERRYN FISCHER Photography INGRID RASMUSSEN/FRANK FEATURES


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his bohemian apartment in London’s Notting Hill is not what it appears to be. Furnished with collections of pieces that leave traces of its owners’ unique sense of style, the space is cool and comfortable – and yet, no one actually lives here. It is, in fact, the ‘lifestyle apartment’ of contemporary British fashion label Talitha – one of the new breed of showrooms arranged in the style of real homes that allow customers to envisage living the spirit of the brand. The concept was born out of the friendship between Talitha’s co-founders – fashion editor Kim Hersov and fashion entrepreneur Shon Randhawa – and London-based South African interior designer Hubert Zandberg. The trio’s idea was to transform the two-room space above Kim and Shon’s studio to showcase a new homeware collection alongside pieces from the womenswear label, which was established in 2013. ‘We wanted to create a destination that would resemble a living room and bedroom of the same sizes as those in a typical London home, and fill it with one-ofa-kind objects that Hubert and I have spent our lives collecting from around the world,’ says Kim. ‘Here, you can shop for clothes and homeware under one roof – everything is for sale.’ Kim and Hubert’s treasure hunts take them from Paris to Marrakech, and Barcelona to Rio. ‘We’re interested in the provenance and shared visual history of objects,’ says Kim. Hubert, who

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has designed homes for both Kim and Shon, shares their aesthetic, which could be casually described as ‘eclectic’ were it not for the artful way in which the pieces are arranged and the skilful blend of cultural influences (including a nod to British eccentricism). ‘When you put together a considered combination of objects, however diverse, your home will automatically feel more authentic and soulful,’ says Hubert. No structural changes were needed to transform the commercial shell into a stylish home – a trick that is all down to the clever decoration. Rich shades of teal set the jewel-like tone in each room, which is tempered by coir and sisal matting and layered with collections of carpets unearthed in the kasbahs and workshops of exotic shores. ‘I custom-mixed the paint colour on the walls,’ says Hubert. ‘It complements lots of other hues and just works, whatever you lay over it.’ The striking backdrop highlights collections of African objects, colourful artworks and idiosyncratic pieces that are arranged with embroidered jackets, kaftans and Indian scarves in considered vignettes. ‘Essentially, it’s design that respects longevity over trends,’ Hubert says. ‘These are pieces that will travel with you from your first flat to your own house, and will still be relevant and appropriate years from now. The apartment speaks to those people who want to fill their homes and lives with nothing more than the things that they truly love.’ talithacollection.com; hzinteriors.com


Detail, left An elaborate 1970s pineapple lamp sits on a drinks trolley beside the sofa Living room Behind the velvet sofa by Hubert Zandberg Interiors stands a cane screen by Madwa – a craft project working in Madagascar, Swaziland and South Africa. It complements cane blinds and a raffia stool. The cushions are covered in fabrics from Claremont and Tibor Stockist details on p284 ➤


Dining area The table is made of bronze trestle legs topped with plywood decorated by Hubert Zandberg Interiors. A vintage Italian floor lamp sits in the corner beside industrial shelving topped with ceramic pineapples. The pendant light is a repurposed African fishing basket and the dining chairs are all 1950s finds. The screen is inlaid with wallpaper by German artist Thomas Demand Stockist details on p284 ➤


Details ‘Collections are best displayed en masse,’ says Hubert Zandberg of the boxes that he has amassed from all over the world, which are gathered on this French industrial shelving unit – Lassco is a good source for these – with a selection of mid-century ceramics Stockist details on p284 ➤


Bedroom A marble-topped console table with red legs serves as a display area for CloisonnĂŠ enamelware and a 1950s brass palm tree light, all sourced from France. The four-poster bed was designed by Hubert Zandberg Interiors. Above the headboard hangs a 1960s rattan wall light. Other vintage pieces include a ďŹ breglass Eames-style chair and a delicate zebra stool from the 1940s Stockist details on p284 E D


‘ When you put together a considered combination of objects, however diverse, your home will automatically feel more authentic and soulful’


MODERN BRITISH

No small feat

British designer Ilse Crawford has an ability to work her magic on small spaces with even smaller budgets


Words AMY MOOREA WONG Photography NATHALIE KRAG

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f there’s one person who has the skill and the vision to transform a 40-square-metre garage-and-laundry room into a calming, zen-like apartment, it’s British designer Ilse Crawford. She’s worked her magic on the home of Costanza Cecchini in Milan’s Porta Venezia district, accepting the challenge of the limited floorplan – and similar-sized budget – with enthusiasm. ‘Taking on small spaces is a stimulating exercise – it demands maximum attention,’ she explains. ‘It’s absolutely essential to make precise choices, without sacrificing aesthetics or losing sight of the needs and wishes of the user. When I work on a project, I always imagine a space made for people, whether that’s in a private setting or a public one.’ The result, as with all of Crawford’s projects, is an inviting collection of rooms filled with tactile, natural materials that are functional as well as visually pleasing. Climbing greenery flanks the entrance, mirrored in the gleaming emerald Moroccan tiles that cover the walls of the breakfast corner and bathroom. Crawford has scattered pieces from her ‘Sinnerlig’ collection for Ikea around the pied-à-terre: the cork-topped table, bench and stools contrast the hardness of the tiles and floor, and her woven bamboo pendant lights hang from beams throughout. The Ikea kitchen is customised with an elegant Carrara marble worktop and simple brass handles, while the Crittall-style metalframed door and windows allow daylight to brighten every corner of this former utility space. studioilse.com; ikea.com The dining table, bench, stools (previous page) and hanging lampshades (throughout) are all from the ‘Sinnerlig’ range from Ikea, designed by Crawford. For similar deep green Moroccan tiles, try Emery & Cie. The kitchen is also from Ikea, topped with a slab of Carrara marble Stockist details on p284 E D

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Crawford has scattered a selection of pieces from her ‘Sinnerlig’ collection for Ikea around, bringing warmth and life to this small but inviting space


MODERN BRITISH

Inner calm

The British do simplicity just as eloquently as the Scandinavians, as this London home’s interior shows Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography SIMONE BOSSI


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his west London home, once an ordinary Victorian terrace, has been transformed thanks to a strong architectural vision. ‘The view of the magnificent magnolia tree in the garden was the starting point for the project,’ says architect Rob Excell of the architectural practice McLaren Excell, who added an extension to the rear of the property and converted the warren of poky rooms into one space. Two vast picture windows, both set onto angled external concrete plinths, frame this garden view: one slides open to form a window seat, while the other (beside the dining table) is fixed. The ceiling above is angled to form a series of wedge-like blocks, and daylight pours in through a pair of rooflights. ‘The owners, Susan Usher and Abeni Akindele, wanted to avoid creating something that looked like a large, square air hangar tacked onto the property,’ says Rob. As such, the effect – as seen from the garden – is of two pitched roofs that interlock, one leaning into the other. Inside, two materials dominate the space: all of the flooring on the ground floor is concrete, while the walls are panelled in oak. These finishes extend to the main

‘A contemporary scheme like this could feel stark, but the unpolished concrete and the timber tone that down. They will age well and become more interesting with time’ features of the house – both the large kitchen island and the bathroom vanity area appear to rise up from the poured concrete floor. ‘We chose both materials for their warmth,’ says Rob. ‘A contemporary scheme like this could feel stark, but the unpolished concrete and the timber tone that down. They will age well and become more interesting with time.’ The oak cladding is treated with white oil – a clear coating that tempers the wood finish – and features tapered battens at regular intervals. ‘These break up the expanse of timber,’ explains Rob. Much of the cladding conceals storage, and extends in an unbroken line through the house to the living area at the front. As this room features traditional cornicing and high ceilings, the design helps to blur the lines between old and new. Where the panelling reaches the bay window, it transforms into an elegant series of shutters, which provide privacy and fold back completely when not in use. A simple oak staircase, mounted on a concrete plinth, continues the scheme to the second floor, where the same materials are celebrated. ‘The concrete lends the entire house a solidity from the ground up,’ says Rob. mclarenexcell.com Details The house’s oak panelling transforms into screening around the large bay window. The dining table was imported from Bali (find similar at Heal’s), while the chairs are by Naoto Fukasawa for Maruni, available at Twentytwentyone. A ‘CH25’ chair by Hans J Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn is placed beside the window Stockist details on p284 ➤

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The large kitchen island and the bathroom vanity area appear to rise up from the poured concrete oor

Kitchen The island is made from concrete (to match the oor), while the cupboards are a mix of grey Valchromat (a type of MDF) and oiled oak Bathroom The walls and shower area are coated in Tadelakt plaster that mimics the look of the concrete vanity area Stockist details on p284 E D


MODERN BRITISH

Get the ‘lived-in’ London look – a considered combination of reclaimed materials, vintage market finds and artworks. This Notting Hill apartment shows you how Words JACKIE DALY Photography MADS MOGENSEN Styling MARTINA HUNGLINGER


Living area The coffee table is the ‘Free-Range’ by Blu Dot (available at Heal’s). Michael Anastassiades’ ‘IC’ lamp is placed on the floor. The cat painting is by Tom Howse, and the painting of the man in the hat is by Natacha Mankowski. The rug and the pink pouf are both from Ebay Stockist details on p284 ➤


Dining area The custom-made bench is upholstered in fabric by William Fountain. The cat cushion is by Donna Wilson (available at SCP) and the pendant light is by Gantlights (available from Limelace). The dining table is from Golborne Market – ďŹ nd similar at Maisons du Monde Stockist details on p284


ondon is a city in architectural flux. Industrial cranes hang over the skyline like giant mechanical arachnids as its streets are spun with scaffolding. It’s boom time for building in the capital, but a symptom of frenetic development is the proliferation of boxy, bland spaces destined for faceless investors. The owner of this Notting Hill home had no desire to live in such a place when she purchased her two-storey top-floor apartment in 2015. Dating back to 1840, this building had history – but in recent years, it had been divided into residential flats, with commercial premises on the ground floor. The homeowner commissioned Swedish-born, Notting Hill-based interior architect Annika Stödberg to create a home that was both individual and welcoming – she calls the look ‘liveable London style’. ‘I was asked to create a comfortable and casual space that felt fresh and young,’ Annika says. ‘The key to this was to use a toneddown colour palette so that the artworks could convey the character and personality of the apartment. The idea was to have a genuine and homely atmosphere that did not feel new or luxury.’ As is typical of London residences, spatial challenges shaped the layout of the apartment. ‘We wanted to fit an open-plan kitchen into a modest living space, without the kitchen feeling like part of the living room,’ Annika recalls. ‘We managed this by building bookshelves either side of the entrance. The kitchen is located

beside this, beneath a window that filters light into the hallway beyond, and we built similar shelving into the open-ended kitchen island to help blur the lines between the living and cooking spaces.’ The adjoining living room is visually divided into a dining and a seating area. ‘I was asked to incorporate a table large enough to seat ten people, in addition to a lounge and TV area, which was challenging,’ Annika says. Her solution was to custom-design a banquette, running the entire length of the end wall that also conceals storage. A large wooden table stands before it, along with a bench that can be stashed beneath to free up floor space when required. The open shelves enhance the spacious feel and display artworks (mostly pieces exchanged with other artists) gallery-style – the many cat portraits and cushions dotted throughout allude to the apartment’s other resident, the homeowner’s beloved pet. The reclaimed floorboards that flow throughout were carefully considered. ‘They play a big part in making the space feel loved and lived-in,’ says Annika, ‘as do the many copper details: the switches, sockets and the door handles that contribute to the reclaimed look. The challenge was getting it all to match.’ Simplicity underpins the entire scheme. To this end, the TV is hidden behind the mirror above the fireplace, while the windows are unadorned. ‘I really love the sense of openness that makes everything feel harmonious,’ says Annika. studiostodberg.com ➤

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‘I WAS ASKED D TO CREATE A COMFORTABLE SPACE THAT FELT FRESH AND YOUNG’


Kitchen Pendant lights from NUD Collection are strung above the kitchen island. The cabinetry is bespoke and is topped with worktops by Caesarstone. Similar ooring is available at Ecora Staircase Gallery-style white walls allow the homeowner to display prized artworks Stockist details on p284 ➤

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Home office The pendant lights are from House Doctor. The desk was custom-made and the chair is vintage Bedroom The ‘Free-Range’ side table by Blu Dot is available at Heal’s and the painting is by Ian Bruce. For similar bedding, try The White Company Stockist details on p284 E D

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‘THE E IDEA A WAS TO HAVE A GENUINE AND HOMELY SPHE ERE THAT DID NOT FEEL NEW OR LUXURY’ ATTMOS


MODERN BRITISH

SUITE

SUCCESS British style is served with an insouciant French twist at London’s latest boutique address, the Henrietta Hotel

Words JACKIE DALY Photography KAREL BALAS/VEGA Production KARINE MONIÉ


Lobby-bar area The pale grey backdrop is elevated by walls of handmade terracotta tiles


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here is something distinctly ‘London’ about the Henrietta Hotel, the boutique address that opened its doors in Covent Garden earlier this year. Perhaps it’s the clink of glasses and hum of chatter at the bar that draws you into the space; or maybe it’s the black tie sported by its staff, with their hipster beards and wide smiles. Yet it was French designer Dorothée Meilichzon (above) of Paris-based studio Chzon (the creative behind Paris’s Hotel Paradis, Grand Pigalle, Hotel Bachaumont and Hotel Panache) that conceived its aesthetic. The 18-room Henrietta Hotel, owned by Experimental Group, is Dorothée’s first hotel in London, and an homage to her love of the capital. It occupies the footprint of two 19th-century townhouses – one a slender sandstone building that famously housed the offices of Victor Gollancz (which published the works of George Orwell, Kingsley Amis and John Le Carre), and the other resplendent in red brick and terracotta. ‘The colour of the buildings along Henrietta Street, where the hotel resides, influenced the interior palette,’ says Dorothée. ‘As we are very close to the Covent Garden Market [once home to bustling flower stalls], I also added lots of flora and fauna detailing, such as the hand-painted tigers on the ceiling and the herbarium framed on the walls.’ Indeed, the palette inside the hotel is a bouquet of unexpected shades that all work well in combination: pale pink and light blue,

dark navy, faded blue, emerald green, military green, washed-out red and a very light grey. Noticeably absent is any kind of white. There are also flashes of wallpaper from British heritage brand Cole & Son. The restaurant, managed by renowned British chef Ollie Dabbous, sits beneath a glazed roof, while a wall of terracotta tiles and jewel-toned velvet seating is teamed with 40 individually selected ‘Carimate’ chairs, designed by Vico Magistretti. The choice of materials elevates the aesthetic: brass, Carrara marble, wool, lime wood, silk, velvet, brushed aluminium and terracotta. ‘They are precious, but also simple,’ says Dorothée. ‘I designed four different headboards that reference the Victorian architecture and unusual roof shapes of local buildings,’ she says. ‘They are made of wood, bevelled mirrors and fabric panels.’ Three principles dictated the design of the suites: function, elegance and warmth. This translates as brass bedside lighting, terrazzo-patterned carpets and 1970s-style armchairs with aluminium bases inspired by French furniture designer Pierre Paulin. In the pink bathrooms, the octagonal floor tiles by French brand Winckelmans were produced to Dorothée’s specification. A British connection reappears in the form of nickel-finished taps by Lefroy Brooks. ‘I wanted to create a British atmosphere, but with a mix of elements from different eras, something a little different from the norm in London,’ says Dorothée. chzon.com ➤ OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 235


The colour palette in the Henrietta Hotel is a bouquet of unexpected shades that all work in combination – noticeably absent is any kind of white

Above Rich blue feature walls create a calming backdrop in the suites. Here, the colour is enlivened by this red ‘Blink’ sofa by Stellar Works. The terrazzo-pattern carpet was designed by Chzon and made by EGE Stockist details on p284 ➤

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In the pink bathrooms, the floor tiles were produced to Dorothée’s exact specification. A British connection reappears in the form of nickel-finished taps by Lefroy Brooks

Bathroom ‘Pink Ground’ by Farrow & Ball is a good match for the colour of these walls. The curved shape of the marble vanity unit, designed by Chzon, echoes the soft geometry used throughout the hotel. The wall-mounted crosshead taps are by Lefroy Brooks. The floor tiles are by Winckelmans Stockist details on p284 ➤


DESIGN TRICKS TO STEAL Designer Dorothée Meilichzon reveals the Henrietta Hotel’s secrets M AT E R I A L D E TA I L S Each

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room has white Carrara marble skirting and a brass trim borders the carpet, which features a terrazzo-inspired pattern. I’ve enjoyed experimenting with materials and shapes.

AHEAD OF THE C U RV E There is

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S E AT I N G P L A N

The angled tables in the restaurant lend a sense of intimacy to the space – at these tables, people are seated next to each other for a different dining experience.

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a crescent-shaped window above the bathroom door in each room, helping to keep the space light. The shape is echoed on the headboards above the beds.

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RAISE IT UP HIGH ART

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Four painters worked for three weeks on the hand-painted ceiling in the hotel’s public space. I wanted to surprise people when they looked up, but also to create a link with Covent Garden and themes of nature. We drew friezes with leaves and classical ornamentations. In the centre of the ceiling, there is a faded pale sky and, in another area, a giant tiger presented as a reversed carpet.

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I have suspended the furniture in the rooms from the walls – including desks and cupboards – which helps to clear the floor, creating a spacious ambience.

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MIRROR IMAGE

The TV in each room is concealed behind a mirror. We had to incorporate televisions, but they are definitely not my favourite thing; hiding them helps to maintain the clean lines of the interiors.


Above The wall-hung tables and brass bedside lamps were designed by Chzon especially for the hotel Stockist details on p284 ➤


The choice of materials elevates the aesthetic – brass, Carrara marble, wool, lime wood, silk, velvet, brushed aluminium and terracotta


Above The influence for the design of the headboards is clear in this suite: the sloping roofs and historic architectural details of London’s cityscape. Here, the pale grey hue was used in preference to a white paint (Dulux’s ‘Rock Salt’ is similar) Stockist details on p284 E D

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MODERN BRITISH

SUFFOLK SANCTUARY British country style may conjure up images of chocolate box cottages – but it can also be cool, eco-aware and cutting edge, like this Modernist home Words JACKIE DALY Photography DIRK LINDNER


n unusual combination of existing farm buildings and new Modernist enclosures, Wood Farm in Suffolk is situated in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty that stretches as far as the eye can see. It is the country home of Richard Hywel Evans, founder of London architectural practice Studio RHE, and his wife, the artist Rachel Shaw Ashton. It took two decades to complete the house, which is not only rigorously contemporary but sustainable and sympathetic to its surroundings. As such, the new glass-walled barns that have been added to the original agricultural buildings are raised above the floodplain and built using local materials. The property faces south to make the most of the uninterrupted views, while shielding the open courtyards on either side of the building from the strong prevailing winds that whip across the landscape. Consequently, the space adapts effortlessly to indoor/outdoor living. Inside, a series of new oak-clad rooms connect to an old galvanised zinc barn, which provides further accommodation. The terraces are furnished as beautifully as the interior, with comfortable, curated pieces: the Rodolfo Dordoni ‘Boma’ sofas invite guests to recline and enjoy the views, while Jasper Morrison ‘Park Life’ chairs await summer soirees in the dining areas. The furniture is by Spanish company Kettal and is designed for outdoor use. The materials used in the construction of the house strengthen its connection to the natural surroundings: reclaimed handmade Suffolk bricks and terracotta tiles, galvanised steel, flint and green oak are fused with modern laminated timber and steel, oversized frameless glass and black zinc – the striking porcelain cladding is a fittingly luxurious finishing touch. This, surely, is the epitome of contemporary country living. studiorhe.com; kettal.com This house features in our ELLE Decoration Country book – the place to find the world’s most beautiful homes in the country. For more inspiration and to buy it now, go to elledecoration.co.uk/country Kitchen The open-plan kitchen is framed by oak ceiling beams, highlighted by ‘Aim’ pendant lighting by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Flos. The handleless kitchen cabinetry is by Bulthaup Stockist details on p284 ➤

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FEATURING SLIDING GLASS DOORS AND SHELTERED COURTYARDS, THE HOUSE ADAPTS EFFORTLESSLY TO INDOOR/OUTDOOR LIVING

Seating area At the heart of the space is a pre-cast solid concrete hearth and a huge corner sofa that can accommodate the couple’s many guests. Camerich’s large corner sofas are similar to this design. The quirky pieces on display include an aircraft propeller Stockist details on p284 ➤

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Outdoor dining area The 18-metre pool runs the length of the main living area and is framed by glass and porcelain walls. The table and chairs are by Kettal and can be used indoors and out Stockist details on p284 ➤


THE TERRACES ARE FURNISHED AS BEAUTIFULLY AS THE INTERIOR, WITH MODERN FURNITURE BY KETTAL


INSIDE, THE OPEN-PLAN LAYOUT CONNECTS THREE OAK-CLAD, GLASS-WALLED LIVING SPACES

Dining area This space leads directly off of the kitchen and is perfect for intimate family meals. The table is a vintage find Stockist details on p284 ➤

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Terrace This area is designed as an outdoor living room and offers all the comforts that one would expect inside the house. The furniture is by Kettal and includes its ‘Bomo’ sofas by Rodolfo Dordoni and ‘Park Life’ chairs by Jasper Morrison Stockist details on p284 E D


SPENDING TIME OUTDOORS IS ENCOURAGED, WITH GUESTS ABLE TO RECLINE BY THE POOL AND ENJOY THE VIEWS


HOTELS • R ESTAUR A NTS • GA R DENS • GETAWAYS

ESCAPE

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: MARTIN KAUFMANN

HIGHLANDS HYGGE Behold, the most stylish Scottish farmhouses we’ve ever laid eyes on. Danish businessman Anders Holch Povlsen holidayed in the Highlands as a boy and fell in love with the landscapes – and so, having made millions in the clothing industry, he is philanthropically investing in the area to safeguard both its ecosystems and the future of its economy. He founded WildLand, a conservation company with a 200-year plan to restore, preserve and run the whopping 220,000 acres it owns to date. ➤

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Escape | N E W S LAST CHANCE TO SEE THREE OF THE YEAR’S BIG M O D E R N A RT S H O W S A trio of triumphant exhibitions showcasing some of the most colourful 20th-century art to visit now!

HIGHLANDS HYGGE

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: MARTIN KAUFAMNN

Povlesen’s partner Anne Storm Pedersen and Danish interior designer Ruth Kramer are restoring and refurbishing WildLand’s farmhouses, lodges and bothies, sprinkling some Nordic cool as they go. The interiors of the two farmhouses – Killiehuntly (above and below) and Kinloch (previous page) – manage to marry traditional Celtic and modern Scandinavian: Hans J Wegner’s ‘Wishbone’ chairs sit next to a bench carved in Orkney, and original fireplaces are flanked by lamps from Swedish brand Wästberg. The pared-back palette reflects the surrounding landscape – moorland greens and stormy grey-blues – with an occasional hint of chintz in the form of toile de joie wallpaper. You can either self-cater or opt for full board. The menus include eggs from the hens on-site, bread peppered with oats and ceviche of fresh mackerel from the west coast. Help yourself to one of the complementary bicycles to go mountain biking – alternatively, guests can hike and swim in the River Tromie at Killiehuntly or around atmospheric coastal coves at Kinloch (from £2,000 for a week for 8 people; kinloch.scot, and £120 per person per night; killiehuntly.scot).

‘Howard Hodgkin: Painting India’ at The Hepworth Wakefield ‘India: I couldn’t work without it,’ Hodgkin once said. This show exhibits over 35 of his canvases – such as In the Garden of the Bombay Museum (above) – daubed over 50 years’ worth of return visits to the country (until 8 October; hepworthwakefield.org). ‘Styled by Design’ at Gallery 8 In a modest-sized private gallery on a quiet street off Piccadilly, you will find – for four days only – printed textiles by the biggest names in 20th-century art. From a dove-printed handkerchief by Picasso (above) to an abstract landscape on silk twill by Barbara Hepworth, all are available to buy (until 7 October; 8dukestreet.co.uk). ‘Matisse in the Studio’ at The Royal Academy A genius format for a retrospective: gather (from private collections and major museums around the world) the personal belongings, curios and humble objects that the worldrenowned painter kept in his home and studio, and display them next to his – now priceless – depictions of them. We love the teal Andalusian glass vase standing next to a 1925 oil painting of it filled with roses by an open window (above), and the wooden Qing dynasty calligraphy panel above the technicolour cutouts that we’d never have guessed it inspired (until 12 November; royalacademy.org.uk).

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LONDON LODGING The capital has two new hotels with suites to suit all tastes 1 The hotel for… maximalists The Mandrake, Fitzrovia The mandrake plant is known to have both medicinal and dreamprovoking properties, two qualities that this uber-luxe hotel hopes to embody in a multi-sensory way. Perfume specialist Azzi Glasser, who creates Bella Freud’s colognes, has designed fragrances to scent different spaces, and French electronic music producer PierreArnaud Alunni has put together transportative playlists. But the limelight-grabber here is the decor: the 34 bedrooms are replete with rich velvets, and in some suites, beds are raised on Carrara marble pedestals, with a roll top bath in the room alongside a drinks trolley. There is also a cinema and a courtyard bearing jasmine and passion fruit (standard double from £300 per night; themandrake.com). 2 The hotel for… aspiring Americans The Curtain, Shoreditch American hotelier supremo Michael Achenbaum has brought his pedigree breed of New York luxe to his first London outpost. The purpose-built red brick building houses 120 bedrooms, a 24-hour gym and the first offshoot of Harlem’s beloved Red Rooster restaurant – which serves street-style chicken dishes along with live funk and soul music – with a tequila bar next door. The look is very industrial-NYC – factory-style steel windows, artwork by 1970s photographer Mick Rock and exposed brickwork. The best bit? The rooftop ‘lido’ – a Moroccan riad-style swimming pool topped with a retractable glass roof, meaning you can enjoy the Côte d’Azurinspired dishes at the poolside brasserie almost alfresco, whatever the weather (standard double from £240 per night; thecurtain.com).

Read this Ever dreamed of binding your own book? The founders of the London Centre for Book Arts, Simon Goode and Ira Yonemura, have produced a bible to show us the ropes. ‘Making Books’ (Pavilion, £20) includes guides to producing every kind of publication – from pamphlets to hardbacks – and lists of tools, materials and techniques, as well as a who’s-who of the duo’s recommended UK suppliers. IN ART WE TRUST Continuing the legacy of many of the National Trust’s historical houses – several of which were built with an art collection at their hearts – is the organisation’s Trust New Art programme, which commissions boundary-pushing creatives to dream up site-specific art installations for the houses it manages. This month, you can catch a pink abstract pineapple in Hertfordshire’s Berrington Hall’s Georgian garden (reflecting the 18th century’s fondness for exotic fruit), French sculptor Bernar Venet’s rusted steel pieces beyond the Versaillesinspired Parterre Terrace at Cliveden, and Dutch, London-based ceramicist Bouke de Vries’ space-age mirrored box inspired by the gilt lustreware at Worcestershire’s Croome Court ( left; nationaltrust.org).


Escape | N E W S

F O U R N E W R E S TA U R A N T S I M P E C C A B L E S T Y L E A N D E V E N B E T T E R C U I S I N E

The annual Restaurant and Bar Design Awards’ winners are announced on 5 October. Book a table or buy a bun at one of these shortlisted few before the word gets out (restaurantandbardesignawards.com)

Martello Hall, London British practice Red Deer Architects let this former factory in Hackney set the tone for the restaurant: retaining its industriousness, the bar distils its own gin, brews the beer and fires up its pizza oven every night. Cafe curtains, frilly vintage glass lights and little sprigs of rosemary in bottles spruce up the three pared-back, chalk-painted floors – we especially love the long marble bar (martellohall.com).

Badger & Co, Edinburgh Birmingham-based practice Tibbatts Abel was inspired by The Wind in the Willows stories for the interior of this brasserie – yes, there is wildlife-printed wallpaper, but it is offset by a beautiful powder-pink, cerulean and pale green palette and swathes of natural light streaming in through the floor-to-ceiling Georgian sash windows. Try the Scottish brown crab with lime and baby gem lettuce (badgerandco.com).

Lost and Found, Knutsford This Grade II listed red-brick Victorian town hall might look familiar from the outside – it was designed by Neo-Gothic genius Alfred Waterhouse, who also dreamed up the Natural History Museum – but the inside may surprise. Design-and-build group Concorde BGW carefully repurposed the building, leaving the space undivided: the single room is split only by existing pillars and citrus trees (the-lostandfound.co.uk).

Pinkmans, Bristol This bakery’s interior is as wholesome as its handkneaded bread, with a neutral palette and rustic timber beams. Ferns and dracaena plants overflow from green walls in the listed building that has been redesigned by east London partnership Holland Harvey Architects. Danish pastries and oven-hot loaves of ‘Bristol brown’ (rye and wholemeal sourdough) sit behind a gleaming copper counter (pinkmans.co.uk).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: JACK NELSON, ADRIAN LAMBERT, TOM MANNION

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Who better to banish memories of the traditional soup kitchen – tired canteen, bland broth – than the cheerfully Michelin-starred, Modena-based chef Massimo Buttura and queen of colourful conviviality, ELLE Decoration favourite Ilse Crawford. With an ambition to ‘transform lives through great food and design’, they have created Refettorio Felix, a canteen serving delicious homemade meals to the homeless in a beautifully converted church in west London’s Kensington. Bottura’s charity, Food For Soul, started life as a pop-up diner during Milan’s Expo 2015, as an antidote to the fine dining industry, before becoming a permanent fixture in a disused theatre in the city’s struggling Greco district. Chefs and friends were lined up to take it in turns to cook evening meals for refugees, and the same premise was rolled out to Rio for the 2016 Olympics as Refettorio Gastromotivo. Now, Refettorio has come to Britain – it’s working in collaboration with The Felix Project, a food waste organisation that supplies it with leftover produce from supermarkets and wholesalers every other day. This might result in a splendid pappardelle pasta with wonky heritage tomatoes and offcuts of Parmigiano Reggiano, or stewed plums from New Covent Garden Market’s surplus. Mylands contributed the pistachio paint for the dining room walls, while brands such as Vitra and Artemide donated furniture and lighting. Studioilse designed the space pro bono – as Crawford said of the project, ‘beauty has no boundaries and is a universal human right’. The kitchen is so smart and the dining space so beautiful that Refettorio earns its keep by being available to hire. Weekday lunch is served every day from 12.30 until 2pm – visit the venue to volunteer, or head to the website to donate to the cause (refettoriofelix.com). OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 261


RENTALS REINVENTED Looking for a British hideaway that’s beautiful yet affordable? Try one of these new properties TOWN Hackney-based interior designer Marta Nowicka has curated a collection of architecturally engaging houses available to rent and gathered them on a new website named after the Polish word for house, ‘dom’. Our favourite is ‘St John’s’ (right) in the Sussex riverside town of Rye, which Nowicka designed herself. The converted 1950s St John ambulance station sleeps ten: light floods in, but it’s the beams and woodburning stove that appeal in autumn (from £500 per night; domstayandlive.com). COUNTRY The calibre of estate agent The Modern House’s properties is famous – it cherry-picks only the crème de la crème of contemporary homes to sell – but did you know that it also organises short-term holiday rentals? As it says, ‘when we go on holiday, we don’t like to leave good design behind’. Its best British listings include ‘Mill House’ (right) in West Sussex, ‘The Cattle Sheds’ in Norfolk by architect Carl Turner and ‘The Cob’ and ‘The Red Barn’ in Devon (properties from £800 per week; themodernhouse.com).

MAKE-AND-DO MUSEUM Messums Wiltshire, situated in the idyllic setting of Place Farm in Salisbury, is a new museum and multi-purpose facility in a medieval tithe barn devoted to modern-day art, design, craft and making. It’s a rural – but perhaps more cutting-edge – sibling to Messums London, a selling gallery. In its first year alone, the beautiful, vast stone and timber space – the biggest thatched building in the UK – has hosted talks by boat builders and topiary designers, a racing car show, drawing masterclasses, a 90-bulb lighting installation and a summer woodworking school with British brand Linley. Coming up this autumn are printmaking and wood-engraving workshops, as well as a Stonehenge-inspired installation made of chalk, stone and beech trees by American artist Judy Pfaff (until 26 November). Arrive with an appetite – there are homemade pastries and a ‘barn blend’ coffee (messumswiltshire.com).


Escape | N E W S

B O O K- B O U N D B R I T A I N Two new coffee-table tomes that take you to the UK’s best landmarks. City Go under the red velvet curtain into 45 of the most extravagant edifices in the capital: its theatres. Published this month, London Theatres (Quarto, £30) takes you from gilt West End wonders to subterranean playhouses and, of course, the Brutalist concrete jungle that is the National Theatre. Country The mistily atmospheric These Islands: A Portrait of the British Isles (Francis, £45), produced by the makers of travel magazine Cereal, captures the landscapes of the British Isles via beautifully shot photographs, alongside essays, poems and artworks, all printed on tactile G.F Smith paper. Nature-inspired architect Spencer Fung’s landscape paintings are a highlight, as is the longer read on ‘the romance of rain’.

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It’s the season of the squash, the apple and the cobnut – bought directly from the producer, of course. Here are our five favourite farmers’ markets in British cities

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: MILLIE PILKINGTON, WOJCIECH KETZ, ALAMY

Stockbridge, Edinburgh This weekly farmer’s market (1) offers everything from leather goods and The Edinburgh Natural Skincare Company’s famous nettle soap to smoked scallops at the Caithness Smokehouse stand and punnets of sloes from Tay Valley Fruits – ideal for brewing your own berry-infused liqueur over the winter (every Sunday; stockbridgemarket.com).

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Altrincham, Manchester Closed on Monday and Wednesday, each other day at this covered market (2) has a different focus: Thursdays are for thrift and antiques, as well as fresh fish, while Fridays focus on local produce – with the exception of the first Friday of each month, which is Flower Friday and sees florists descend on the vast Market House (altrinchammarket.co.uk). Aberdeen Belmont Street Farmers’ Market (3), which closed after 17 years, has returned after the cause was taken up by the team behind the Thistle Street Market in the city’s West End. The revival will see new names join old favourites such as Inverness fudge and Isle of Arran cheese (first Saturday of every month; northeastscotlandfinestfood.co.uk).

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Cardiff Riverside Real Food now runs three weekly events in the Welsh capital, with the aim of supporting local businesses – be sure to check out Dragon Chilli (4), the hottest stall in town. Many of the stalls reimagine Welsh produce in a European way – Casa del Cymru sells pasta, while Charcutier cures pork French-style (for dates and locations see riversidemarket.org.uk). Clapham, London Venn Street Market (5) is a sight for sore urban eyes: on a cobbled alleyway by Clapham Common, you’ll find The Portland Scallop Co bringing seafood from Dorset; organic Suffolk mushroom pâtés at Pâté Moi and Venn Street Flowers selling blooms. Vivienne Westwood buys honey here, so it must be good (Saturday mornings; vennstreetmarket.co.uk). OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 263


Escape | G A R D E N S

WORLD’S COOLEST HOTHOUSE Pure Greenhouse showcased its ‘frameless’ glass model at Chelsea Flower Show this summer and was greeted with a rapturous response: at last, a portable, modern greenhouse that looks beautiful to boot. It’s also extremely user-friendly: no planning permission is required (it can be dismantled in 30 minutes, and so falls into the ‘temporary construction’ category), and the 10mm reinforced glass means the panes can’t be smashed by a neighbour’s football. Plus, the polymer coating allows dirt and grubby rainwater to slide off, so the glass stays shiny and unclouded. Now is a good time to invest – October is the month to sow sweet pea, mangetout and salad leaf seeds in trays, keep them inside for a couple of weeks to germinate and then leave them to grow in the greenhouse. From £1,999 (puregreenhouse.co.uk).

URBAN JUNGLE Published this month, ‘Garden City: Supergreen Buildings, Urban Skyscapes and the New Planted Space’ (Thames & Hudson, £40) looks at how the global population is starting to re-green our homes, streets, cities and planet. Seventy residences that are resplendent with green, making them as close to ecologically autonomous (selfsufficient and therefore with a zero-carbon footprint) as possible, are featured as case studies.

T H R E E B O TA N I C G A R D E N S T O V I S I T T H I S A U T U M N

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

The russet hues, ripening apples and re-blooming azaleas of autumn make it an excellent time to take a trip to your local botanical garden. Here’s our pick of Britain’s best to visit this month – cameras at the ready

1 Benmore Botanic Garden On Scotland’s west coast, surrounded by lochs, lies this extensive garden housing a restored 142-square-metre Victorian fernery, waterfall, ponds and a towering avenue of evergreen giant sequioa and redwood trees. Horticultural highlight in autumn? The witch hazel turning yellow-gold and cotoneaster shrubs laden with new red berries (rbge.org.uk).

2 Cambridge University Botanic Garden Apple Day on 22 October gives visitors a chance to taste, harvest and learn how to cultivate the fruit. Plus, October sees the American sweetgum trees and acer shrubs turn crimson and the smoke bush segue from orange to pink to claret. Autumn crocuses also pop up, while lofty pampas grasses shelter sedum flowers in the dedicated ‘autumn garden’ (botanic.cam.ac.uk).

3 Ventnor Botanic Garden Britain’s hottest botanical garden – thanks to its southerly position on the Isle of Wight – has a subtropical climate. This means that, up until the end of October, you can find spiky purple echinops, dahlias and white agapanthus in full throttle, rhododendrons galore and bees buzzing around the lavender. Plus: sprouting mushrooms, funghi and toadstools in every shape and size (botanic.co.uk).

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G A R D E N E R S T O WAT C H P Y R U S

Meet the avant-garde Edinburgh plantswomen bridging the gap between producing fine art and working the land

S AV E T H E T R E E S Did you know that some waterlilies came dangerously close to extinction in recent years? Or that at one point in the 1990s, there was only one café marron plant left in the world? We didn’t, but a new autobiography by Kew Gardens’ botanical horticulturalist Carlos Magdalena is here to update us. Magdalena has been described by David Attenborough as ‘The Plant Messiah’ – a moniker that he thinks was partly inspired by his ‘post-biblical, but pre-hipster beard’, and which also serves as the book’s title. ‘The Plant Messiah: Adventures in Search of the World’s Rarest Species’ (Viking, £16.99) chronicles Magdalena’s adventures trawling the banks of the Amazon to find rare breeds and bring them back to Kew. Along with its light-hearted stories and beautiful tropical photography, Magdalena hopes the book will raise awareness of plants that are within a hair’s breadth of extinction. 266 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GABRIELA SILVEIRA, NIC RUE

The gardeners Natalya Ayers and Fiona Inglis studied fine art and ceramics respectively, but met after graduating while working in a flower shop in Edinburgh. ‘We became really enthusiastic about British, as opposed to Holland-grown, flowers. But we found they were a fairly rare commodity,’ says Natalya. ‘So, we decided to grow our own to work with.’ They founded Pyrus, a cut flower garden and botanical design studio, in 2011. ‘We have grown both parts of the business deliberately slowly – each year, we’ve taken on one or two more people, and 18 months ago we moved to a three-acre, derelict Victorian walled garden to restore and upsize our flower growing business.’ The garden After hours spent on Google Earth scouring Scotland for abandoned walled gardens, they came across this space in East Lothian, which Pyrus now rents from the estate owners. Fiona had previous experience working on an organic flower farm, and they both took a short course at Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Garden to understand the basics – but, they happily confess: ‘We have very little official training between us – we’re learning through doing’. The design studio The potting shed is where the pair brainstorm and hatch plans for projects. These range from wedding bouquets and set design to gallery installations (they wrapped the Scottish National Gallery’s iconic columns in poppies for the recent ‘Inspiring Impressionism’ exhibition) and brand collaborations. The latest This month, the duo launch a collaboration with London scent specialists Laboratory Perfumes, as well as an installation in Edinburgh Castle – a pair of projects exemplifying Pyrus’s aesthetic range, from historic to contemporary. Pyrus is also focusing on upping its flower-growing output (pyrusbotanicals.com).


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LONDON DESIGN FESTIVAL This September, the capital will come alive with design shows, workshops and installations. With so much going on, it’s hard to decide what to see first. But don’t worry, we’re making it easy for you. Here’s our essential guide to the must-see events

LANDMARK ATTRACTIONS From grand department stores to historic museums, London’s iconic buildings are getting in on the London Design Festival action HARRODS (13–27 SEPTEMBER)

Welcome to Harrods – also known this week as the House of Design – where a toy-town version of the Knightsbridge neighbourhood has been installed, with each townhouse re-imagined by a brand stocked at the store. Bethan Gray’s terrace is inlaid with brass and ombre marquetry, while teacups are found on the walls of young British designer Richard Brendon’s micro-abode (harrods.com).

V&A MUSEUM (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

The brainchild of bold British designer Ross Lovegrove, the V&A’s new installation is inspired by its tapestry galleries. Visitors are surrounded on all sides by woven cloth that tells stories. Titled ‘Transmission’, Lovegrove’s work uses 115 metres of digitally printed suede-like Alcantara fabric shot through with gold and silver thread, wound to form a 25-metre walk-through experience (vam.ac.uk).

T H E G E F F RY E M U S E U M O F T H E H O M E (21–24 SEPTEMBER)

Meet the makers (over 50 of them) at the ‘Ceramics In The City’ fair, and pick up one of Japanese maker Ikuko Iwamoto’s spiky jugs, or Devon-based Alex McCarthy’s vases garnished with gold (both right; geffrye-museum.org.uk). SIR JOHN SOANE’S MUSEUM (16 SEPTEMBER–10 DECEMBER)

The 19th-century Neo-Classical designer’s home has invited similarly avant-garde architect, Adam Nathaniel Furman to install a model of Rome – that also aims to be a physical representation of the internet – in its gallery space (soane.org). ART WORKERS’ GUILD HEADQUARTERS (16–23 SEPTEMBER)

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: JULIET SHEATH, LUKE HAYES

Drop in to the Grade II-listed Bloomsbury headquarters of the Art Workers’ Guild for a selling exhibition of works on paper from 1900 to today, organised by Jennings Fine Art. We love the work of Marthe Armitage (below; artworkersguild.org).

SKETCH (12 SEPTEMBER–15 NOVEMBER)

The opulent Mayfair restaurant-bar-gallery is once again rolling out the red carpet for all things design. Here, creative collective Matter of Stuff will present ‘Cocktail Atmospheres’, an exhibition that will unveil ‘Luminarie’ – a spectacular copper-and-LED lighting installation by young Italian creative Sabina Belfiore Lucovich. There will be a flight of three inventive cocktails to complement the show (sketch.london). THE DESIGN MUSEUM (19 SEPTEMBER)

Head to the Design Museum to hear a talk by wonderful Dutch designer Hella Jongerius, whose eye-popping exhibition, ‘Breathing Colour’ (right), runs at the Kensington showstopper until 24 September. She will discuss her work and her theories on how colour changes shapes, spaces and the way we react to them (designmuseum.org). SELFRIDGES (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

London’s iconic department store is celebrating design in all its forms, across its entire lower ground floor: Danish furniture brand Hay is rigging up a ‘Kitchen Market’ filled with fresh produce, Muji is constructing an in-house concept store, and there will be a walk-through space devoted to home fragrance. State-of-the-art technology, including a juicer created by Japanese brand Nendo and fine silverware company Christofle, will also be unveiled (selfridges.com). ➤ OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 269


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THE MAIN EVENTS The world of design is coming together at these key exhibitions for one week only – don’t miss out DESIGN JUNCTION (21–24 SEPTEMBER)

If you’re looking for variety, this should be top of your list. Its five destinations in King’s Cross will feature international brands, up-and-coming designers, and a giant pop-up shop. Bonus: ELLE Decoration readers get a discount on advanced tickets. Book online using the code ‘elledeco’ to get yours for just £7.50 – that’s a 50 per cent saving* (thedesignjunction.co.uk).

100% DESIGN (20–23 SEPTEMBER)

A haven for architects and designers, 100% Design will fill Kensington’s Olympia with the latest creations, including this large, structural ‘Mozaik’ lamp by Designheure (above). The theme is ‘Elements’, so get ready for interesting uses of materials (100percentdesign.co.uk). DECOREX (17–20 SEPTEMBER)

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG *TERMS & CONDITIONS: ADVANCED TICKETS CLOSE WHEN THE DESIGN JUNCTION OPENS (21 SEPTEMBER). MAXIMUM NUMBER OF TICKETS PER PERSON IS TEN

FOCUS (20–22 SEPTEMBER)

Celebrating its 40th year, Decorex transforms Syon Park into a one-stop shop of interior design joy. Established brands such as Crucial Trading, Cole & Son and Tom Faulkner mix with newcomers, including pattern company Witch and Watchman and painterly designer Susi Bellamy (tickets £30; decorex.com).

With 120 showrooms and over 600 brands specialising in fabrics, wallpapers, kitchens, bathrooms and flooring, the Focus event (above), taking place under the Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour’s iconic domes, will be unmissable. Expect workshops, demonstrations and tours, as well as the on-stage ‘Conversations in Design’ talks. See p281 for where to visit first (dcch.co.uk). L O N D O N D E S I G N FA I R ( 2 3 – 2 4 S E P T E M B E R )

Brands, designers and galleries from around the world will descend on the Old Truman Brewery for this celebration of creativity. Travel through iconic designs from 28 countries – including glassware by Wik & Walsøe from Norway (below) – alongside the Independent Studio and British Craft section (tickets £10 in advance; london designfair.co.uk).

DESIGN FRONTIERS (18–24 SEPTEMBER)

This new exhibition at Somerset House gathers the work of 30 leading international designers, each pushing innovation within the modern marketplace. Don’t miss new work by Benjamin Hubert and his studio Layer, Tord Boontje for Swarovski, and Danish brand Kvadrat (above), who asked 19 up-and-coming designers to make a new creation in any discipline using its ‘Canvas’ fabric (designfrontiers.co.uk). ➤ OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 271


VISIT THE DISTRICTS Give yourself time between 16 and 24 September to soak up what’s happening at each of these areas BANKSIDE DESIGN DISTRICT

Typography fans should see ‘Graphic Design Process’ by San Francisco’s Letterform Archive at Devonshire House, which will feature the work of Eric Gill and Piet Zwart (20–24 September). Want to get involved? Join one of Better Letters’ hand-lettering workshops (16–24 September; banksidedesigndistrict.co.uk).

CLERKENWELL DESIGN QUARTER

Clerkenwell’s showrooms are a bag of treats for design lovers. Head to Viaduct for the ‘Punctuating Space’ exhibition to see work by the likes of E15, Child Studio and Muller Van Severen; catch an exhibition on the classic ‘Eames’ chair (below) at Vitra; and don’t miss the best of ceramic design at the Milliken Carpet showroom – its ‘Creativity in the City’ show is based on Katie Treggiden’s book, Urban Potters: Makers in the City (clerkenwelldesignquarter.com).

ISLINGTON DESIGN DISTRICT

BRIXTON DESIGN TRAIL

Brixton brings the best of urban design to its streets again, with a number of temporary public installations exploring this year’s theme: ‘Love is Power’. Spatial design company Dolman Bowles has collaborated with Eley Kishimoto to create zingy new patterns for pedestrian crossings, and Windrush Square will be populated by ‘Love Stops’ (above), kitted out with ideas to boost your wellbeing (16–24 September; brixtondesigntrail.com).

BROMPTON DESIGN DISTRICT

V&A curator Jane Withers set the theme, ‘Other Stories: Alternative Perspectives in Design’, for nearby shops and showrooms to interpret. Designers Martino Gamper and Martyn Thompson are both presenting new work (‘Square’ chair by Gamper, left), Faye Toogood celebrates her studio’s 10th anniversary, and fashion designer Peter Pilotto takes over a townhouse to display his AW17 collection. All are dispersed among works by the likes of designers Max Lamb, Bethan Laura Wood, Jochen Holz and many more (bromptondesigndistrict.com). CHEL SEA DESIG N QU A R TER

Head down to the upscale shops and showrooms of London’s New King’s Road and its surroundings for a varied series of exhibitions and latest launches. We can’t wait to see Talisman London’s new ‘Crackle’ furniture collection (right) and a collaboration between antiques dealer Guinevere and wallpaper specialist De Gournay, which will explore Chinoiserie through the ages (chelseadesignquarter.co.uk).

A shopper’s paradise, Islington’s cluster of design stores all have surprises up their sleeves. Start off with a coffee at Smug, Lizzie Evans’ cafe-shop selling cool homewares, then head to the CTO Lighting showroom for an exhibition of cutting-edge designs by Belgian Michaël Verheyden. Finally, pop in to design shop Twentytwentyone to see its latest additions, including Danish brand Hay’s revival of Wim Rietveld’s furniture designs (islingtondesigndistrict.com). M AY FA I R D E S I G N D I S T R I C T

Making its debut this year as a design district, Mayfair packs a punch. At Galerie Kreo – the famous French gallery’s London offshoot – Dutch designer Hella Jongerius will present many of her works through the years, along with her new ‘Tile’ side table, covered in ceramic tiles. Meanwhile, the Carpenter’s Workshop Gallery will give trend forecaster Lidewij Edelkoort the floor to select the most exciting emerging talent, and Dimore Studio will be showcasing a site-specific installation at Mazzoleni London (londondesignfestival.com). PIMLICO DESIGN DISTRICT

Also in its inaugural year as a district, Pimlico celebrates some of the best in British design at its many shops and showrooms, including Ochre (new ‘Sungaya’ light, right), Soane, Linley and more. It’s also the perfect chance to visit two new showrooms: Pinch – read more about its new work on p39 – and Cox London, which offers bespoke, sculptural furnishings and lighting designs (thepimlicoroad.com). SHOREDITCH DESIGN TRIANGLE

With so many of the city’s most creative brands, agencies and designers based in the east end, it’s no wonder that Shoreditch has become an annual hub for some of the most conceptual shows in town. The Ace Hotel is always a good place to start: check out its ‘Ready Made Go 3’ exhibition in collaboration with Modern Design Review magazine, which features specially commissioned new products (shoreditchdesigntriangle.com).


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SKANDIUM

Nordic design Mecca Skandium is breaking retail boundaries with its new concept stores in south west London. Having closed its iconic space on Brompton Road, the brand’s move (a few blocks down the road to Thurloe Place) is no downgrade, with the launch of not one, but two new outlets. On one side of the street is a traditional shop – stocking Skandium’s soft furnishings, accessories and extensive lighting collection – with the new ‘Skandium Townhouse’ directly opposite. Decked out in furnishings from a bevy of Scandinavian brands, as well as those by in-house design team Studio Skandium and Modernist favourites from Knoll and Vitra, the ‘Townhouse’ will be the place for lovers of a modern, minimalist aesthetic to find inspiration and direction (skandium.com).

SHOP UNTIL YOU DROP We explore the hottest shops and showrooms on the design scene for the best retail-based days out

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: BEN ANDERS, MARC EGGIMAN, DAVID STJERNHOLM

MINOTTI

Minotti has broken into the basement beneath its original Fitzrovia locale, more than doubling its floor space to present several decades of the brand’s elegant collections. Pop in to check out the 2017 designs, including French designer Christophe Delcourt’s 1970s-inspired ‘Collette’ chair (above). With the new space organised into room-like vignettes, dotted with vintage lamps, books and other curios, it will be easy to imagine these designs in your own home (minottilondon.com). S I LV E R A LOAF

Loaf, the online purveyor of upholstered comfort, has opened its third retail space in London’s Spitalfields (right). The title ‘shack’ – as the brand’s shops are named – is misleading: there is 297 square metres in which to test out mattresses, sofas and its growing lighting, blinds and fabric collections. Decked out in subway tiles and with an industrial feel, it fits in with this hip neighbourhood (loaf.com).

Silvera is a contemporary French furniture brand whose ten branches in Paris are finally joined by an outpost in our capital. Nestled among the antique specialists of King’s Road, the chic showroom forms part of the Chelsea promenade’s aesthetic evolution from old-school grandeur towards global modern design. Overseen by French architecture practice Jouin Manku, the 500-square-metre, two-storey space makes a point of showcasing its original features in a bid to make it feel different to the Parisian outlets: the designers have kept the basement vaults and the traditional façade, painting it ultramarine, and retained much of the exposed brickwork. The pared-back interior (above) was designed to let the pieces of furniture that Silvera curates and sells speak for themselves. For accessories and fantastic gift ideas, head to the ‘concept store’ room, where you’ll find outstanding objects at smaller prices, designed by big names such as the late Zaha Hadid (silveraltd.co.uk). ➤ OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 273


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GLOBAL INFLUENCERS London Design Festival is a celebration of design from around the world, so we take a closer look at what our favourite international brands are up to KARTELL (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

To mark the design’s 50th anniversary, Italian brand Kartell has invited a host of designers to re-interpret its ‘Componibili’ storage unit (right). The likes of Ron Arad, Missoni, Nendo, Piero Lissoni, Antonio Citterio and Philippe Starck have turned their hands to the bestselling piece. It’s been transformed into plant pots, a console table and even pop art soup cans. See the exhibition at Kartell’s flagship store on Brompton Road (kartell.com).

CAPPELLINI (FROM 18 SEPTEMBER)

Contemporary Italian furniture brand Cappellini is opening its first space in the UK in time for LDF. ‘Cappellini Point’ on St John’s Street will act as a stylish place to meet (think natural wood floors and alfresco areas) as well as a product showcase. It’s also where the brand will debut the ‘Telo Lounge’ seating by Sebastian Herkner (above), characterised by light metal frames and circular forms (cappellini.it). POGGENPOHL (21 SEPTEMBER)

Italian furniture brand Molteni & C is collaborating with Danish textile house Kvadrat to present Amare Giò Ponti, a documentary film honouring the legendary architect and designer. It’s also launching contemporary interpretations of some of Ponti’s greatest pieces (above), presented as part of an in-store installation by Vincent Van Duysen (molteni.it). ANTHROPOLOGIE X LIBERTY LONDON (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

British institution Liberty London is lending its classic floral patterns to American import Anthropologie’s designs. Furniture will be upholstered in various prints, including an updated version of William Morris’s ‘Strawberry Thief’, while tableware, textiles and stationery will be covered in re-imagined heritage patterns (right). The collection is launching in Anthropologie’s Regent Street store – catch the floristry workshop on 16 September (anthropologie.com). 274 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

STELLAR WORKS (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

The Shanghai-based brand’s ‘Indigo: A Cultural Iconography’ exhibition at the Design Museum will be based around the ‘Ming’ chair (below) by Chinese firm Neri&Hu. It will present the seat in a variety of iterations, showing how traditional craft techniques can be combined with modern ones (stellarworks.com). ➤

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

M O LT E N I & C ( 1 6 – 2 4 S E P T E M B E R )

Trekking the LDF trail is hungry work, so book in to German kitchen brand Poggenpohl’s chef’s evening to refuel. There will be live cooking demos using the latest Miele appliances and plenty of dishes to taste in the brand’s newly refurbished showroom on Pimlico Road (poggenpohl.com).


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

DECOREX INTERNATIONAL The annual Decorex International trade event is a must for anyone with an interest in contemporary design, and this – its 40th anniversary year – is no exception. Celebrating the theme of ‘Collaborations’, the show will host a series of brand-new launches alongside memorable showcases and installations. Future Heritage, for example, has selected 14 names in British craft earmarked for future collectibility, while this year’s main entrance installation, Disruptive Dining, and the Decorex Champagne Bar will offer new twists on familiar favourites. 17–20 September (public day, Tuesday 19), Syon Park, London TW8; decorex.com

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THE BEST OF BRITISH 1

1 Cole & Son Decorex will see the launch of the new ‘Icons Collection’ celebrating some of this premium wallpaper brand’s most iconic designs, including ‘Palm Leaves’ (left). 2 Bert Frank ELLE Decoration’s Best Lighting Designer of 2016 will be showcasing an as-yet-unnamed new range at this year’s show, alongside its current and signature collections.

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3 The Paint & Paper Library Known for paints that create balance, light and colour in contemporary interiors, its stand will feature the launch of the new ‘Tresco Collection’ of wallpapers, a unique collaboration with artist Hugo Dalton.

LIMITED EDITION COVERS ELLE Decoration has joined in the celebrations for Decorex International’s 40th anniversary year by commissioning a series of collectible bespoke covers showcasing the design and style of the three British design brands featured on this page. Available exclusively at the four-day event, be sure to get yours when you visit The Paint & Paper Library, Cole & Son and Bert Frank stands at this year’s event at Syon Park.

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FINALLY, DON’T MISS… You’ll find something inspiring at every turn during the London Design Festival, but these are must-sees DESIGN CIRCUS (23 AND 24 SEPTEMBER)

The nomadic Crafty Fox Market lands in Brixton this LDF with Design Circus, its shopping extravaganza co-curated with local shop Brixi (right). It brings together a crop of craftspeople – expect ceramics and other homeware from Mister Berwyn, illustrations by Jacqueline Colley, and homewares from Beggars’ Velvet (248 Ferndale Road, SW9; craftyfoxmarket.co.uk). LEE BROOM ‘ON REFLECTION’ (20–24 SEPTEMBER) FA R R O W & B A L L TA X I S ( 1 6 – 2 4 S E P T E M B E R )

Cancel the Uber! During LDF, you need to flag down one of the best turned-out taxis on the streets of London: a fleet of traditional black cabs covered from bonnet to boot in Farrow & Ball’s wallpaper prints (farrow-ball.com).

Always one to make a statement during LDF, British product designer Lee Broom is launching a capsule collection of his most iconic designs from the past decade, reinterpreted in black (‘Hanging Hoop’ chair, above). The entirety of his Shoreditch store will also be turning black for the ‘On Reflection’ exhibition (leebroom.com).

THE TRADE SHOW (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

V I L L A WA L A L A ( 1 6 – 2 4 S E P T E M B E R )

Exuberant designer Camille Walala is decorating Broadgate’s Exchange Square with her eye-popping geometric patterns and colours, creating a playful installation that will dominate your Instagram feed. Dubbed Villa Walala, the building block castle will be constructed from giant inflatable shapes and will be big enough to walk through, making for an energising stop on the design trail (Exchange Square, EC2; camillewalala.com).

D I E T E R R A M S AT V I TSOE ( 1 5 – 2 4 S E P T E M B E R )

An archive of pieces by Dieter Rams for German electrical company Braun is being showcased at Vitsœ’s Marylebone store. It will be displayed on Rams’ classic example of functional design: the ‘606 Universal Shelving System’ (vitsoe.com). ‘ C L I P T O M A N I A’ (16–24 SEPTEMBER)

Stationery brand Present & Correct has created ‘Cliptomania’ (right), a wall of 150 clips that’s ‘a gripping celebration of form and function’ (23 Arlington Way, EC1R; presentandcorrect.com). F U T U R E FA C T O RY (20 SEPTEMBER)

Social enterprise Goldfinger Factory (located in the legendary Trellick Tower) will be debuting Future Factory – a new metalwork and digital fabrication workshop (goldfingerfactory.com). ‘ T H E H O U S E O F WA L L PA P E R ’ (18 SEPTEMBER–4 OCTOBER)

Classic English wallpaper brand Graham & Brown is relocating to Soho for ‘The House of Wallpaper’, an exhibition revealing the history of the brand along with its modern innovations. Don’t miss talks with Kelly Hoppen, 2 Lovely Gays and Barbara Hulanicki (19 Greek Street, W1D; grahamandbrown.com). 278 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, CHARLOTTE BROOK, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: ARTHUR WOODCROFT, YESHEN VENEMA

A collaborative project spearheaded by designer Faye Toogood, The Trade Show gave 50 designers – from disciplines spanning furniture, painting and photography – one of Toogood’s ‘Spade’ chairs (right) and asked them to donate an equivalent piece of their own work. The objects given in return will make up an exhibition that will showcase British design talent at its most raw and unedited (The Garage, 71 Redchurch Street, SW3; fayetoogood.com).


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DESIGN CENTRE, CHELSEA HARBOUR A decorator’s paradise, the largest design destination in Europe is also the most vibrant, dynamic and welcoming Home to over 600 brands and 120 showrooms, Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is the place to discover world-class talent and engage with emerging innovators, established makers and luxury brands. Nowhere else will you find such a high concentration of the biggest names shaping interiors today, with everything from carpets to tiles, fabrics to furniture, kitchens and bathrooms, all at one address. And, with a reputation for providing imaginative solutions to any design challenge, it is pretty matchless when it comes to choice. Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour has long been a catalyst for creative connections, but now an exciting new chapter is unfolding. With expansion on the horizon, some influential names moving in and a landmark building project underway, the sense of community that already exists there is set to get stronger. The spotlight is on Design Centre East, which boasts 40 showrooms and includes new arrivals such as Arteriors, Villeroy & Boch and George Spencer Designs. Plus, work has started on the Design Avenue,

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: BEN QUINTON, PAUL RAESIDE

SUTHERLAND PERENNIALS STUDIO Why visit? This venue showcases the work of two American luxury brands – Sutherland’s outdoor furniture, lighting and accessories, along with Perennials’ fabrics and rugs. Look out for ‘Here, There & Everywhere’ – a brand-new fashion-inspired fabric range that’s hardy and stylish enough to be used indoors and out. The details Second floor, North Dome (perennials andsutherland.com).

a permanent atrium linking it with the centre’s iconic domes. Meanwhile, its cafes, bookshop and private members’ club, Design Club, offer even more opportunities to connect with the design world’s most influential figures. Head over during Focus/17: Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour’s annual six-day event includes an impressive line-up of talks, demonstrations, workshops and tours. 17–22 September (dcch.co.uk).

DEDAR

ROMO

S T Y L E L I B R A RY

Why visit? A library of beautiful fabrics, wallpaper and trimmings from this Italian brand, its showroom is a sensory black box in which to touch, feel and choose from its collection. Did you know? Dedar produces and distributes all of French brand Hermès’ home fabric and wallpaper collections, which are also housed at the showroom. The details Ground floor, Design Centre East (dedar.com).

Why visit? The Romo Group now comprises six textile and wallcovering brands, including Kirkby Design, Zinc Textile and, of course, Romo. This year, it’s expanding its space under the watch of hospitality and interior designers DeSallesFlint. Look out for The new ‘Soraya’ upholstery range, inspired by traditional Navajo and Berber rugs. The details First floor, North Dome (romo.com).

Why visit? Style Library is the home of Zoffany, Harlequin, Sanderson, Morris & Co., Scion and Anthology, a mix of British textile and wallcovering brands. Look out for Morris & Co.’s new Arts & Crafts-inspired range,‘The Collector’. The details First floor, South Dome (stylelibrary.com). ➤

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DESIGN CENTRE, CHELSEA HARBOUR JULIAN CHICHESTER Why visit? This month is the British brand’s debut at the Design Centre, bringing a mix of its handcrafted contemporary classics to this venue. Did you know? Julian Chichester, known for its admiration of innovation, is responsible for bringing many of the materials we now take for granted in the home decorating arena to popularity – think verre eglomisé, faux shagreen, gesso and nickel-plated brass. This brand offers furniture that boasts both quality craftsmanship and unique personality. The details Ground floor, Centre Dome ( julianchichester.com).

SAMUEL & SONS

ARTE

PA S S E R I N I

Why visit? Need a tieback, tassel, border, braid or fringe? This New York specialist is unrivalled, with over 15,000 designs of its own. Some of its collections are embellished with precious gems and exotic woods. Look out for The ‘Oberon’ range – its fringes, tiebacks and tassels are woven in metallic yarns to create an opulent touch. The details Third floor, Centre Dome (samuelandsons.com).

Why visit? Jute, moiré and hand-woven sisal are just a few of the materials that this Belgian company uses to create its contemporary wallcoverings. View the collection at its showroom, which is custom-built around its library walls and interactive display system. Look out for The new ‘Flavor Paper for Arte’ range – the result of the brand’s collaboration with hip Brooklyn wallpaper brand Flavor Paper on an exclusive collection of funky patterns. The details Second floor, Design Centre East (arte-international.com).

Why visit? At this opulent showroom, furnishings, lighting and accessories are contextualised in home-like vignettes. Sky’s-the-limit customisation is the name of the game. Did you know? Italian super-luxe lighting brand Terzani’s chandeliers and pendant lights are on display here – it’s worth a trip down to the showroom just for a peek at these. The details Fourth floor, Design Centre East (passerini.com).

W H AT N O T T O M I S S AT F O C U S / 1 7 DESIGN DISCOVERY TOUR With a glass of fizz in hand, take a guided tour of the festival’s highlights. You’ll be shown everything from the top installations to the most exciting showroom launches.

CONVERSATIONS IN DESIGN An impressive line-up of international design luminaries such as Patricia Urquiola, Nipa Doshi, Audrey Carden and Madeline Weinrib will take the main stage to share their expertise.

ELLE DECORATION AT SUTHERLAND PERENNIALS STUDIO Join the ELLE Decoration team for drinks and canapés with the brand’s founders, David and Ann Sutherland (18 September, 4–6 pm).

CUTTURE INSTALLATION Stop by the Centre Dome to take in the aerial installation by London-based event stationery and accessories brand Cutture, best known for its intricate laser-cut designs.

WORKSHOPS You could walk away from Focus/17 with several new skills learned at workshops throughout the event. For example, at the Artisans of Devizes showroom, you’ll learn how to carve a relief into a raw clay tile.

For more information on any of these events Visit dcch.co.uk or call 020 7225 9166 Event location: Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, Lots Road, London SW10 E D

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WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour’s six-day event during London Design Festival includes talks, demonstrations and workshops


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Stockists


Advertising feature

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection BRITISH MADE SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS Autumn has arrived, so it's the perfect time to update your home with Willow & Hall's handmade furniture. Explore their space-saving sofa beds with 14cm deep mattresses, beautiful upholstered beds, chaises with handy storage and more. All furniture is made to order by skilled craftsmen in Britain with over 35 years' experience. Designs are available in over 100 fabrics and delivered for free to most of the UK Mainland within around 4-5 weeks. Plus, they offer 14-day free returns on all orders. To explore their range visit their London showroom, shop online at www.willowandhall.co.uk or call 020 8939 3800. Use code ELLE261017 by 26th October to save an extra 5% off prices already 30% lower than the high street.

Product featured: The Appledoe sofa/sofa bed shown in Broad Weave Linen Silver from £1,105 or £1,295

WOOLLY MAMMOTH FABRICS Woolly Mammoth uniquely combines innovative design and contemporary weaving techniques with sustainable natural yarns of the finest quality. Our designs are woven by hand and in mills local to our Cardiff, UK base. The new collection of soft furnishings is now available online, along with information about our bespoke commission service. Visit www.woollymammothfabrics.com or email emma@woollymammothfabrics.com

BUTTON AND SPRUNG Button and Sprung’s stylish, handmade beds can be made in any fabric, alongside their superior pocket sprung mattresses, with 100% natural fillings. All products have a 10-year guarantee and 100 nights free returns, so you can sleep easy. Explore their range at www.buttonandsprung.com or call their showroom on 03333 201801.


Advertising feature

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection

EDWARD BULMER NATURAL PAINT CLOTH & CLAY Cloth & Clay explores the limits of creative expression on bedlinen. Our intention is to create art – simply the most beautiful designs. The Nyoka design is inspired by the poetic beauty of mountain ranges. The photograph captures dawn rising, evoking a sense of serenity and peace. The imagery and subtle graduating shades provide both beauty and mystery. Powerful mountains inspiring security and calm. Visit www.clothnclay.com

DAVID STUDWELL FREE TREE STUDIO Free Tree Studio hand makes live edge tables, reclaimed wood furniture and tree stump tables. The soul of each creation is a piece of solid wood exhibited in the frames of modern materials. The basic premise of each project is maintaining the natural form of the wood and underlining its beauty. We customise size and colour of our furniture. www.freetreestudio.com

David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Steve McQueen and Elizabeth Taylor all feature in his work evoking a strong sense of nostalgia and bringing elements of the past into the present. He has exhibited in London and also the USA, and been published. Featured here is David Bowie, a limited edition silk screen (56 x 45cm, £300). Visit www.davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@gmail.com

Hailed as a top 50 British brand for your home. Their natural paint is as healthy and eco-friendly as it is beautiful – offering unrivalled coverage in just two coats and a soft, chalky matt finish. Choose from 72 stunning colours for both modern and period interiors. Call 01544 388535 or visit www.edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk for your complimentary colour chart. Why compromise?

AQUADART Aquadart is a stylish range of shower enclosures combining the latest premium design features together with exceptional quality and functionality. The extensive Aquadart range not only boasts a number of sizes and configurations but offers contemporary products for the most stylish of homes – a lifetime of luxurious showering. Shown here is the Inline recess sliding door, for your nearest stockist visit: www.aquadart.co.uk contact@aquadart.co.uk


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z LIGHTING

Brokis, now available at David Village Lighting. BESPOKE MODERN CHANDELIERS & LIGHTING

www.davidvillagelighting.co.uk 0114 2634266

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 287


Classifieds | A – Z

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INTERIORS

MASCULINE GLAMOUR

Interiors & Bespoke Furniture casabotelho.com

288 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017


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Classifieds | A – Z

FLOORING & LUXURY FURNITURE

RUGS

Vibrant Contemporary Rugs

79 Margaret Street, London, W1W 8TA 02074956 706

NEW LONDON DESIGN CENTRE NOW OPEN The finest new, antique and reclaimed wood floors

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

www. sonyawinner. com

OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 289


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

John, Erin & Noah. Camberwell, London.

John chose the size, Erin chose the style and Noah (aged 5) picked his favourite colour.

Up to

4 YEARS

Interest Free Credit

It’s your story. So it’s tailored to you.

Doodle 3 seater sofa in Napoli Cotton Velvet, £1,854 Just £28.96 a month over 4 years. 0% APR. 25% deposit.

Let’s design together

Stores in London & Nationwide Call us on 0808 178 3211 or visit sofasandstuff.com

barnby design

furniture design handmade in HAY.

view the range at: www.barnbydesign.co.uk

290 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

woodstockfurniture.co.uk 020 8876 0131

OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 291


Classifieds | A – Z

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ANTIQUES & DANISH FURNITURE

BLINDS & DOORS

NORTH4.COM DORGLAZE® VISION PANELS FOR DOORS ANTIQUES BESPOKE LIFESTYLE

augustusbrandt.co.uk NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

292 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017


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Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE

OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 293


Classifieds | A – Z

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OUTDOOR ART, HOMEWARE & SHUTTERS

GLASS ROOMS & CERAMICS

Björk Haraldsdóttir Contemporary Handbuilt Ceramics

www.ceramicsbybjork.com Unique and luxurious HOMEWARE AND GIFTS

Authentic vintage finds, handcrafted contemporary pieces, heavenly home scents and bath and body collections. For 20% discount

quote: ELLE1017 (expires 31.12.17)

W W W. C U R AT E D L I V I N G . C O . U K

Unique, organic, ceramic sculptures. Bespoke commissions www.kiramics.com

294 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017


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Classifieds | A – Z FIREPLACES, TILES & HOME INTEREST

These legendary French fireplaces are now available in the UK.

For stockists and to see the full range of fireplaces and contemporary stoves please visit:

www.focus-fireplaces.com COVELLI TENNANT Vintage Textiles & Bespoke Upholstery

07855 256 007

07971 043 916

www.covellitennant.com

OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 295


ClassiďŹ eds | A – Z

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BATHROOMS

Refreshing hygiene with the bidet within the toilet WASHLET™ SG – The comfort shower toilet with added hygiene. WASHLET™ SG offers the ultimate in comfort, including a warm water spray, heated seat, odourABSORBINGÚLTERANDDRYER4HEEWATER FEATUREHAS cleansing and antibacterial properties for additional HYGIENEqANDACLEANFEELINGANYTIME ALLDAYLONG

gb.toto.com

What makes an Albion bath unique? Our exclusive bath materialGVIEXIWEHMÇşIVIRGI ]SYGERJIIP With over 50 models available,[IĆśPPLEZIEWM^I JSVFEXLVSSQWFMKSVWQEPP Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 SVKSXS[[[EPFMSRFEXLGSGSQ

296 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour samuel-heath.co.uk Made in England


Classifieds | A – Z

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COURSES

Launching colourful careers in interior design for over 55 years A history of putting interior design graduates on the road to success

Graduate, part-time or online courses all benefit from the same high quality tutors and disciplined management. So whether you are aiming for a successful career in

Full time, part time and online design courses available.

55 YEARS

CAREERS

interior design or simply looking to develop your own project, you won’t find a better established or more renowned school than Inchbald.

CREATING

A high standard of teaching is central to our interior design school’s success and on which our reputation has been built over more than 55 years.

In partnership with:

E S T A B L I S H E D

1 9 6 0

0203 131 8970 | interiors@inchbald.co.uk | www.inchbald.co.uk OCTOBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 297


THE STORY OF THE TEACUP Next in our series investigating the history of humble household objects, we get a handle on the teacup

Although tea is technically an exotic beverage (grown mostly in China and India), it’s still a part of our nation’s psyche. Because everyone from king to cobbler has always loved a cuppa, tea is one of the great British levelers – and it hasn’t changed for centuries. However, the vessel from which we’ve sipped our brews has known many permutations. Grab a biscuit: here are the highlights.

These raku-fired ceramic bowls were imported from China by Japan. They have seen a recent surge in popularity in the West, thanks to the growing matcha green tea trend.

1 6 0 0 S PORCELAIN CUP AND SAUCER, China During the Stuart era, tea started arriving on British shores via the East India Company. A suitably elegant receptacle was required – this meant a porcelain (imported from China, hence the name chinaware) teacup on a saucer.

1 7 7 4 JASPERWARE CUP AND SAUCER, Staffordshire In 1774, pottery pioneer Josiah Wedgwood invented jasper – a biscuitfinished, ultra-matt unglazed stoneware. The popular crockery was embellished with reliefs of classical or godly figures. 1 9 1 0 SILVER TEA-GLASS HOLDER, Russia Who else could have dreamt up elevating the teacup to a delicate glass flute slotted into a tessellated holder – made from silver, enamel and plique-à-jour – but Fabergé, the Russian design house famous for its bejeweled eggs? 298 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2017

1 9 0 0 S TEA GLASS, Turkey Although relatively late to the tea party (their first tea leaf factory opened in 1947), the Turkish drink their mahogany brew from dawn to dusk. Black tea leaves are steeped in a canister above a simmering kettle, sweetened with beet sugar and served strong in tulip-shaped, gold-edged glasses, held by the rim to avoid scalded fingers. 1 9 6 3 SMOKED GLASS TEACUP, France Although synonymous with UK roadside cafes or village halls, these retro ‘smoked glass’ cups are in fact made by French manufacturer Arc’s tempered glass Arcoroc line. They were met with admiration in the UK at their launch for their on-trend 1960s brown hue.

2 0 1 7 BONE CHINA CUP, Stoke-on-Trent This month, young ceramicist Richard Brendon is releasing his mirrored teacup and saucer created with pattern pioneers Patternity in ‘Marrs Green’ (a hue deemed the world’s favourite in a survey this year). It’s a modern twist on the art of taking tea (richardbrendon.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY

1 5 0 0 S CERAMIC CHAWAN, Japan


16 16

BAT H ROOMS

CONTENTS 10 # E D B AT H R O O M S TA K E O V E R

For the whole of September, we’ll be going bathrooms mad! Find out how to join in the fun on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and the ELLE Decoration website 13 B AT H R O O M S N E W S 39

Our edit of the hottest product launches and the new names to know. Includes original ways to work the biggest trends

13

31 T H E L AT E S T T E C H N O L O G Y

37

From the ultimate at-home spa to the new generation of showers, these gadgets and app-controlled devices will make your life easier and more luxurious

41

37 T H E B I G B AT H R O O M T O - D O L I S T

Discover the joy of bathing with our compilation of the best spas to visit, relaxing treatments to try and workshops to book. Plus, make like the Scandinavians and take a brisk outdoor dip 41 T H E U LT I M AT E G U I D E T O P L A N N I N G Y O U R B AT H R O O M

It’s time to get down to the nuts and bolts of building your dream room. Here, we share tips from the experts on everything from plumbing to lighting 46 S H O P T H E L AT E S T L O O K S

Whatever your style, we have a bathroom scheme to suit. With everything from accessories to the big statement buys covered, there’s something to tempt every pocket

48 52 5


83

63

BAT H ROOMS 118

55 PERSONAL SANCTUARIES

Four of our favourite style insiders invite us into their bathrooms to share the bathing rituals, decorating tips, tricks and items essential to them 65 B AT H R O O M I N S P I R AT I O N

Step inside the world’s most beautiful bathrooms and discover unique, imaginative decorating ideas to help you with your next project. Also: everything you’ll need to steal their style 133 T H E S H O W R O O M D I R E C T O RY

Try before you buy, with our definitive guide to the best brand showrooms across the UK 145 THE ADDRESS BOOK

Love something you’ve seen? Find out where to buy it in our stockist list 146 DESIGN DECODED 102

59

A closer look at the groundbreaking designs of Italian bathroom brand Agape – celebrating over 40 years of shaping bathing trends

146

122

DOWNLOAD NOW!

Do you have our last kitchen and bathroom inspiration books? If not, download them now via the ELLE Decoration app for just £2.99 each Editor-in-Chief M I C H E L L E O G U N D E H I N Junior Designer J A C K M E L R O S E

Deputy Editor B E N S P R I G G S

Chief Sub Editor C L A R E S A R T I N

Photography Editor J A M E S W I L L I A M S

Homes Director J A C K I E D A L Y

Contributing Editor E L I Z A H O N E Y

6

Art Director T O N Y P E T E R S

Sub Editor R E B E C C A H A S T I N G S

Deputy Art Director P H I L I P P E B L A N C H I N Photography Director F L O R A B A T H U R S T

Features Editor A M Y M O O R E A W O N G

Thanks to N A T A L I E E G L I N G M O L L Y H U T C H I N S O N

Features Writer C H A R L O T T E B R O O K

GEORGIA LOVERIDGE


BAT H ROOMS

FRESH THINKING The bathroom is more than a place to refresh the body; it is a place to relax, to become energised or to escape from the world for a short while. It is your home’s sanctuary. It is also, however, a room with many practical demands, and making it the best it can be is a challenge. That’s why we have compiled ELLE Decoration Bathrooms Volume 2 – our latest installment of the magazine that is dedicated to everything you need to create the perfect bathroom. Plus, this time there’s more inspiration than ever! We’ve expanded to a bumper 148 pages, meaning we can bring you more of the latest trends, smartest technology, insider guides to planning your space, essential purchases for every kind of style and loads and loads of ideas to help you make your own bathroom a picture of perfection. And finally, there’s a complete list of the UK’s best brand showrooms, where you can inspect the finest designs first hand.

PICTURE: NORM ARCHITECTS

Supplement Editor

Follow us on Twitter: @ELLEDecoUK

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Find us on Facebook: ELLE Decoration 9


SHOWROOM OPENINGS

YOUR SNAPS

BEST BUYS

P I N T E R E S T B AT H R O O M B O A R D S

I N S TA G R A M S T O R I E S

NEW LAUNCHES

#EDbathrooms TA K E OV E R

For the whole of the month of September, ELLE Decoration is going bathrooms mad. We’ll be celebrating home spas and sanctuaries everywhere, from Instagram to our website, with a daily feast of exclusive #EDbathrooms content. F O L L O W, S I G N U P O R L I K E T O J O I N T H E F U N !

E L L ED E CO R AT I O N .CO.U K @elledecorationuk

ELLE Decoration

ELLE Decoration UK

S PA I N S P I R AT I O N 10

COURSES & WORKSHOPS INSIDE STORIES

#EDFILMS

Q&A SESSIONS

@ELLEDecoUK


NEWS

SHOPPING • DESIGN • NA MES TO KNOW • TECHNOLOGY • BIG IDEA S

P L AY W I T H S C A L E S The ‘Geoform’ tile collection by Mandarin Stone is available in six shapes, including stars and triangles – we’re rather enamoured with the scale-like ‘Scallop’ pattern in ‘Ivory Porcelain’ (above). Produced from Italian coloured clay, each design is available in a choice of five natural tones, and is unglazed, adding a delightfully tactile element to walls and floors. £107.39 per square metre (mandarinstone.com).

F O R M O R E S T Y L I S H B AT H R O O M U P D AT E S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K


Bathrooms | N E W S

BASIN INSTINCT

ANOTHER LEVEL

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: MASSIMO MARCANTE

A saviour for those with small bathrooms that have limited storage space, this washbasin disc mixer tap from the ‘Kartell by Laufen’ collection has a handy plastic shelf fixed on top of it. It’s the perfect pedestal to perch your toothbrush, soap and other bathroom essentials on. The simple disc shelf also comes built onto a bath tap, wall tray and toilet roll holder – an ingenious little space saver in a style that will suit most bathrooms. Disc mixer tap from £633.61 (laufen.co.uk).

Named after a river in northern Italy, the ‘Adda’ bathroom collection by Salvatori is a celebration of natural materials. It combines the cool beauty of stone with a warm, rich walnut exterior, which is given a ribbed finish by Italian woodworkers. As well as this dark Pietra d’Avola limestone, the basins – which can be round or rectangular – also come in a pale limestone and in white and grey marble, all hand-finished in Tuscany. From £1,720 (salvatori.it).

Buy this Modern bathroom brand CEA has made ‘Oak’, ‘Burma Teak’ and ‘American Walnut’ handles for its ‘Giotto’ and ‘Bar’ taps. Waterresistant, the wooden accents add tactile interest to the otherwise sleek stainless steel designs. From £764.40 for the ‘Giotto’ tap (ceadesign.it). I N N O VA T I V E S H O W E R S Brands are thinking outside of the box with their latest shower designs. You can bathe in a rainbow of light with Italian designer Marco Pisati’s ‘Iride’ for Antoniolupi (far left), as the showerhead contains an LED light that colours the water jet (£1,253.18; antoniolupi.it). Equally impressive is the ‘Watercandy’ collection by Ludovica+Roberto Palomba for Zuchetti Kos. With its rounded form, the showerhead gives the impression of bursting with water. Plus, the hand-shower (centre) sits in your palm like a pebble (available December; zucchettikos.it). On the opposite end of the spectrum lies Vola’s ‘T60’ hand shower (left), which boasts a flat, circular showerhead – the ultimate design for lovers of minimal simplicity (from £602.40; vola.com). 15


Bathrooms | N E W S

METRO STOP The reign of the metro tile is at an end. Its industrial lines have been replaced by a longer, thinner style. Here are three top examples

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Domus’s ‘New Terracotta’ tiles are a perfect way to work the look. They’re handmade for an imperfect feel and glazed in a choice of 46 colours. £170 per square metre (domustiles.co.uk).

OUR GUIDE TO B AT H R O O M L I G H T S

Everything you need to know to combine safety and style

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Mandarin Stone’s ‘Gelato’ collection is as sweet as its name. Seen here in ‘Peach Gloss’ its tiles have a pretty, uneven edge. £47 per square metre (mandarinstone.com).

What is an IP rating? The IP code is a standard that rates electronics depending on their ability to withstand contact with solid external elements like dust (indicated by the first number) and water (the second number).

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Fired Earth’s ‘Nordic Glass Voss’ mosaic tiles come in three Norwegian-inspired colourways – ‘Fjord’ (pictured), ‘Snow’ and ‘Geyser’ – and are the essence of cool, calm style. £169.36 per square metre ( firedearth.com).

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Where should I fit my lights? Bathrooms are split into zones that highlight which IP numbers can be used where. Zone 0 is inside a bath or shower (e.g. IP47), Zone 1 is directly above a water source (e.g. IP44 or 45), Zone 2 is a 60cm perimeter around water (e.g. IP44 or 45) and Zone 3 is outside of contact with water, so doesn’t need a rating – unless it’s a pendant light that hangs into Zone 2.

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What should I buy? Our pick of the best includes the ‘Shipyard’ pendant by Davey Lighting (above centre, £519; uk.originalbtc.com), Curiousa & Curiousa’s hand-blown glass light (above left, £745; curiousa.co.uk) and the ‘Kew Drop Light’ in nickel by Porter (above right, £366; portervanities.com). All three designs are IP44 rated – meaning they can withstand water spray.

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY

Sounds scientific, but what about style? Worry not – the range and variety of IP-rated bathroom lights has skyrocketed of late. ‘In the past, IP-rated lighting tended to be very functional and poorly designed,’ says Mark Holloway of lighting stockist Holloways of Ludlow (hollowaysofludlow.com). ‘Now, there is a huge range of fittings, from classic look to ultra-modern.’


Bathrooms | N E W S

TOP OF THE BRASS Tired of plain stainless steel fittings? Brass adds a warming sheen to your bathroom

INDUSTRIAL Try a steam-punk look with the Bauhaus-inspired ‘Landmark’ collection from Samuel Heath, comprising showers and taps in a patinated and restrained ‘Urban Brass’ finish. From £798.60 for the slider rail shower kit (samuel-heath.co.uk).

HOT PROPERTY Crafted by hand from fine-grained volcanic lava, it’s easy to see that Waterworks’ ‘Magma’ tiles are something special. With a similar feel to natural stone, the tiles have a slight shine and come in hexagon, herringbone and brick shapes in tonal collections of whites, blacks and earthy browns, as well as ‘Mariner’, a colourway of mysterious, deep blues. From £470 per square metre (waterworks.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY

R E F L E C T E D G L O RY

Catchpole & Rye’s latest shower tray, ‘The Mayfair’, is unashamedly attention-grabbing. Available in high-shine nickel (right), brass and copper finishes, every one is hand-finished in the brand’s Kent workshop. Think it’s style over practicality? Worry not. Each tray is decorated with criss-crossing indents that work to improve drainage and reduce overflow – plus, they help slippery, wet feet keep a firm grip. From £4,800 (catchpoleandrye.com).

UNIQUE Brooklyn-based Watermark Collection’s ‘Elements’ range features a brass finish and handles that come in a choice of concrete, metal, marble and wood options. From £1,157 for a basin mixer tap (thewatermark collection.eu).

SLEEK Luxury bathroom brand Aston Matthews has embraced this warmer metallic look with its elegant ‘Ambra’ range of taps and shower fittings in shiny, natural brass. From £204 for the ‘Ambra’ basin mixer (astonmatthews.co.uk).

CONTEMPORARY Even a modern and minimal range like Axor’s ‘Uno’ benefits from a brassy gleam – it’s on everything from its angular freestanding washbasin to its bathtub taps and shower mixers. From £197 for a pillar tap, Hansgrohe (hansgrohe.co.uk).

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Bathrooms | N E W S

Shower screen brand The Majestic Shower Company has launched its first new collection since 1993 – and it’s bang up to date. The industrial-style ‘MetalCraft’ range is framed in matt black aluminium, and comes in three variations: ‘Frame’ (a single, surrounded pane of glass), ‘Horizon’ (a frame split into three horizontally), or the 12-paned ‘Trellis’ design (above). All are made by hand in the UK. From £1,800 (majesticshowers.com).

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

IN THE FR AME


Bathrooms | N E W S

DARKER DESIGNS

Black is the must-have hue for walls and floors – soften the look with subtle patterns

Bisazza’s new ‘Mosaico’ collection by Australian interior designer Greg Natale features nature-inspired patterns, such as the timber-look grains on this ‘Moire’ glass tile. £897.60 per square metre (bisazza.com).

TURN A CORNER Forget boxy shower designs – the future is all about fluid, seamless glass. Matki’s ‘EauZone Plus Radius-20’ wetroom panel is leading the charge – comprised of two pieces, this glass shower surround comes with a 90-degree curve in it, doing away with traditional corner supports that can be tricky to clean. It’s a quietly brilliant design, with a minimal door handle and unobtrusive hinges. From £2,966.40 (matki.co.uk).

Quartz surface expert Caesarstone’s latest palette features a bevy of moody, industrial greys, such as this ‘4003 Rugged Concrete’ that’s hard-wearing and stylish. From £300 per square metre (caesarstone.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY

F L O AT Y O U R WAY T O R E L A X AT I O N Toto’s highly anticipated ‘Flotation Tub’ features massage jets and a built-in ergonomic pillow to help you unwind. Even the bath’s form is specially designed to help you switch off – the base of the tub is shaped like a lounge chair, allowing you to feel both supported and weightless. Bliss. Available Spring 2018 (toto.com).

Corian’s new ‘Carbon Concrete’ shade is a near-black with swirling white detailing. The material can be shaped to fit any design – think integrated basins and bespoke cladding. £550 per square metre (corian.uk).

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Bathrooms | N E W S

A G E D G R A C E F U L LY

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

Franco Guerzoni’s ‘Archeologie’ collection is a recreation of time-worn surfaces that have become sites of accidental beauty. Produced by experimental Italian ceramic brand Cedit, these fantastic slabs – perfect for bathroom walls – are layered with powdery pigments and chalky materials to create a distressed effect. From £132 per square metre (ceditceramiche.it).

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Bathrooms | N E W S

FOUR OF THE BEST C R O S S H E A D TA P S

This Victorian style has been given a modern update. Here are our favourite examples

Armani/Roca’s classically-inspired ‘Baia’ bathroom range comes in new matt gold and dark metallic finishes. Available from December (armaniroca.com).

COLOUR WASH With its ‘Zu’ collection, Lefroy Brooks distills the crosshead design down to its simplest form. £1,462.80 for the ‘Zu’ dual-control thermostatic valve (lefroybrooks.com).

Looking for an alternative to tiles? Add some pattern to your bathroom wall with Wall & Decò’s waterproof wallcovering. The ‘Wet System’ is designed to decorate damp environments – it’s resistant to water and can withstand household cleaning products. Pick from a wide range of styles, from subtle and painterly to the abstract colour of ‘Esprit’ (above). £160 per square metre, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY

Men’s grooming brand Czech & Speake’s collaboration with David Chipperfield Architects resulted in these refined taps. £910 for a basin mixer (czechandspeake.com).

EDGE OF BEAUTY

There’s a pleasing softness to Dornbracht’s ‘Vaia’ collection, featuring extra-slim and elegantly contoured crosshead taps. £1,122 for a basin mixer, CP Hart (cphart.com).

Recent advances in production technology mean that ultra-thin materials can now be very durable, resulting in basin rims that resemble delicate bone china. Sottini’s ‘Ellero’ vessels are made from Diamatec, an extremely robust ceramic material developed by the brand itself, which can form very thin, precise lines with incredible strength (above right, available in October, from £306; sottini.co.uk). Meanwhile, the ‘Meina’ washbowl by German brand Kaldewei (above left) is constructed using a single layer of steel enamel to achieve its elegant edge, and comes in ‘Oyster Grey’ (pictured), ‘Lava Black’ and ‘Alpine White’ (from £496.80; kaldewei.co.uk). 27


Bathrooms | N E W S

RAISE THE BATH Designed to look like a freestanding bath, but with all of the practicalities of the wall mounted variety (more compact, hidden pipework), the ‘Eldon’ is the result of a collaboration between bath specialists Victoria + Albert and design studio Conran + Partners. Wrapped in a crisp edge that creates a shelf against the wall, it can be fitted without disturbing your existing floor. From £2,880 (vandabaths.com).

Buy this Clever design duo Joseph Joseph has given the toilet brush a makeover, making the prospect of using one more appealing. ‘Flex’ has an anti-drip head that dries instantly and bends to easily reach every corner. From £25 (josephjoseph.com). TA K E A S TA N D

1 The ‘Lariana’ by Patricia Urquiola contrasts grey marble with a basin that sits slightly off-centre. £2,729, Agape (agapedesign.it). 2 Inbani’s minimal ‘Origin’ basin is by Korean designer Seung-Yong Song. £2,179.20, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com). 3 Jasper Morrison’s ‘Bonola’ basin (from £345) for Ceramica Flaminia atop a tapered column (from £252; ceramicaflaminia.it).

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The ‘Bathroom Collection’ by Danish brand Montana makes styling your space easy and fun. It comprises 12 basin modules, ten storage pieces and nine mirrors, all of which come in the firm’s palette of 42 colours. Mix and match contrasting shades for a unique look – try pairing a dark grey like ‘Coal’ (below right) with a pastel hue such as ‘Peach’ (above right). From £255 for a mirror; from £2,575 for a basin module (montana.dk).

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG, ELIZA HONEY

PICK ’N’ MIX PERFECTION

Three pedestal basins that make a big design statement without taking up much floor space


Bathrooms | T E C H N O L O G Y

SPA AT HOME The top of the range ‘BodyLove SH Front’ by Effegibi fits into any size bathroom, instantly transforming it into a stylish wellness retreat. Designed by Italian architect Rodolfo Dordoni, this modular home spa with digital controls features a sauna, sleek Turkish steam bath and bracing ‘ice bucket’ shower. From £20,000, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk).

Try this At just 12.5mm tall, the wi-fi connected ‘R-Link’ by Terraillon is the world’s thinnest and smartest set of body scales. It connects to a free app and analyses your weight, BMI and body composition, so that you can differentiate between fat and muscle mass. £90 (terraillon.com). MIRROR IMAGE There are already smart mirrors that can tell you how well your jeans fit or order you a cocktail, but Simple Human’s app-controlled ‘Sensor Mirror Pro Wide View’ is designed for everyday life. It automatically lights up when you approach and simulates flattering sunlight to create the perfect environment for applying make-up. £300 (simplehuman.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURE: HEARST STUDIO

MIST DIRECTION Backed by none other than Apple CEO Tim Cook, the ‘Nebia’ is a revolutionary shower system. Producing more of a mist than a spray, its atomisation technology consumes up to 70 per cent less water than a traditional shower – yet it covers ten times the surface area and combines an invigorating wash and a relaxing steam. £379 (nebia.com).

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Bathrooms | T E C H N O L O G Y

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS The ‘Mirror’, created by Singaporean start-up Fred, tracks your health (by linking to devices such as fitness trackers and smart scales), displays the news and uses advanced air purifying technology to deodorise your bathroom. Want to play music or watch videos while you’re in the bath? The ‘Mirror’ lets you do that, too. It connects to your home’s wi-fi or to your phone via Bluetooth, playing media through built-in speakers. Oh, and it’s also a very good mirror – its anti-mist screen means that, whether you’re checking your reflection or the weather forecast, your view will never be obscured. This limited edition gold version is out now. £1,510 ( frednology.com).

Try this Want to know the condition of your hair and how to improve it? Soon, you’ll be able to bypass the hairdresser and follow advice sent to your phone by the world’s first smart hairbrush: ‘Hair Coach’ by Kérastase, L’Oréal and Nokia. Out autumn (health.nokia.com).

Those who would prefer their bathroom to have a classic look needn’t miss out on the latest home innovations. Crosswater’s ‘Belgravia’ digital shower controls combine traditional, nautical styling (choose between crosshead or lever dials) with smart technology that helps you accurately control the water flow. An LED ring glows to indicate when your desired temperature has been reached – no more icy-cold shocks or scorched toes. From £619 (crosswater.co.uk).

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TOP OF THE MOPS Thanks to this dinky gadget, manually mopping the floor could become a task of the past. Let the iRobot ‘Braava Jet 240 Mopping Robot’ loose in your bathroom, where it will carefully map out the space and use its precision jet spray to loosen dirt before mopping it up with disposable damp pads. It will then head back to its dock to charge. £250, John Lewis (johnlewis.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURE: ROB SMALLEY

O L D - FA S H I O N E D SMART THINKING


Bathrooms | T E C H N O L O G Y

BRIGHT SMILES

GET THE GLOW Villeroy & Boch’s award-winning ‘Finion’ luxury bathroom collection consists of modern, innovative bathroom furnishings that can be subtly illuminated with carefully placed lighting elements. In addition to basins and a freestanding bath, the offering includes cabinets that can be tailored with options such as a smartphone charging station, sound system and anti-fog mirrors. From £712 for shelving (villeroy-boch.co.uk).

The ‘Ara’ by Kolibree is smarter than the average smart toothbrush. Aiming to improve your brushing game, it features built-in 3D motion sensors and Bluetooth connectivity that allow it to track your routine, while its deep learning algorithm suggests ways to improve your oral hygiene. The focus is on gum disease prevention and, like a fitness tracker, the ‘Ara’ challenges you to ‘beat’ your brushing best. £115 (koli bree.com).

Try this Amazon’s ‘Dash’ button allows those with an Amazon Prime subscription (£79 for a year) to re-order items from the retailer instantly. Place one of the wi-fi connected buttons in your bathroom to stock up on moisturiser and razor blades when supplies are low. £5 (amazon.co.uk).

If you like the idea of a toilet that cleans itself – and who wouldn’t? – it’s time for an upgrade. ‘Veil’, the intelligent toilet by Kohler, features a host of automated technology that promises a sanitary, hands-free experience – including motion-activated, bidetstyle cleansing wands and a warm air dryer. £3,890, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com).

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TOUCHLESS TAPS Motion-activated taps are ecofriendly (helping you to use less water), convenient and uberhygienic – perfect for sustainable homes. Grohe’s stylish new infra-red ‘Eurocube E’ sensoractivated tap minimises the spread of bacteria and promises to shrink your water bill. Better still, it’ll stay clean for longer because you won’t ever need to touch it. From £839 (grohe.co.uk).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURE: FOTOATELIER VILLEROY & BOCH

R O YA L F L U S H


Y O U R # E D B AT H R O O M S T O - D O L I S T

THINGS TO SEE From plunge pools to potions, here’s your rundown of what to do, visit, make and buy in the world of bathing for autumn/winter 2017

A L F R E S C O B AT H I N G

Start the day showering in the open air, or finish with a soak under the stars at these cool hotels London Lucky guests in the ‘Lear’s Loft’ suite at Marylebone’s quirky Zetter Townhouse can relax in the copper roll-top bath on the rooftop, with tunes playing from Bose speakers and views over central London (thezettertownhouse.com).

H I S T O R I C A L LY H E A LT H Y

Want to prolong that seaside feeling? Head to Britain’s first Victorian-style ‘seabathing sauna’, built and opened by Margate brand Haeckels, whose skincare and scents hark back to the 19th-century Greek use of seawater in health treatments. The space currently resides by the south coast’s chalky cliffs, and will offer traditional seaweed therapies using Haeckels products from autumn onwards (haeckels.co.uk). S U D S ’ L AW A bevy of brands are bringing back the humble hard soap. Our favourite is Soap Co., a new east London-based social enterprise selling sustainable goods: try the black poppy and wild fig soap (right, £7) and switch your loofah for its exfoliating ‘soap pebble’ (£10; thesoapco.org).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY

D E C O D AY T R I P Get your fix of bathroom bling by visiting Warwickshire’s Upton House. Of all the swish design changes Lord and Lady Bearsted made when they bought the mansion in 1927, the Art Deco bathroom (left) is the highlight, with its silver walls and Gothic arched ceilings featuring aluminium leaf, gloss black skirting boards and red pillars (£10.90 per adult; nationaltrust.org.uk).

Jamaica If you’re visiting the Caribbean, book the popular GoldenEye boutique hotel’s Fleming Villa on Oracabessa Bay. Its apple-green claw-foot tub is hard to spot amid the lush foliage in which it’s nestled (goldeneye.com). Spain Near the ochre plains of Bardenas Reales Natural Park lies Aire de Bardenas, an architectural design hotel in which around half of the rooms have striking minimalist outdoor bathrooms (airebardenas.com).

WA X W O R K S Lighting a scented candle with a bath elevates the activity from practicality to pleasure. Go one step further and create your own candle: chandler Rachel Vosper organises day classes for groups at her peaceful workshop in Belgravia, London. Concoct your ultimate handmade candle and take it home in an etched glass vessel (£600 for a group of six people; rachelvosper.com). 37


SEARCH FOR S A LVA G E Everyone will find a gem at Sunbury Antiques, the famous bi-monthly fair held at Kempton Racecourse just outside London. Think vintage French damask hand towels, enamelware mugs or even a sought-after cast-iron tub (10 and 31 October, 14 and 28 November; sunburyantiques.com).

I N H O T WAT E R Find relaxation at Britain’s best-preserved Victorian spa baths, which have just had a restorative refurbishment. Yorkshire town Harrogate has long been famous for the hydrotherapy offered by its Turkish Baths since they opened in 1897, and now their dazzling Moorish-inspired interiors – featuring arabesque painted ceilings and terrazzo floors – have been returned to their original glory. The new look is complemented by modern lighting, parquet flooring and walnut lockers in the changing rooms ( from £15.50; turkishbathsharrogate.co.uk).

B AT H R O O M B O TA N I C S

S A LT Y A N D S W E E T Book a spa day at The Connaught – a classic, with good reason. It’s home to London’s biggest and most beautiful salt-water pool. There’s no pungent chlorine here, either – the water is cleaned and sanitised with a natural ionic solution. You’ll also be able to use the Aman-run steam room (the-connaught.co.uk).

Make cleaning your bathroom a pleasure – no, really. New British brand Kinn is a producer of natural, chemical-free and eco-friendly household products – we love its debut ‘Bathroom Cleaner’ spray, a plant-based, pH-neutral formula that includes lavender essential oil and is free from petrochemicals, phosphates and enzymes (£4.25; kinn-living.com). Meanwhile, Norfolkbased Tincture offers a 100 per cent natural bath-cleaning potion, imbued with antiseptic Siberian pine and eucalyptus (£7.50; tincturelondon.com). Most eco-friendly of them all is the ‘e-cloth’ – a microfibre flannel, available from John Lewis, that removes bacteria from surfaces using only water. It can be re-used up to 300 times (£4.50; johnlewis.com).

R A I S E T H E B A R We all know it’s healthier to make your meals from scratch rather than buy them ready-made – but how about what you wash with? Make this the month you sign up for a crash course in cold process soap making (the traditional technique that mixes a common oil, like olive or coconut, with lye) and make enough to last you a year. There are various courses on offer across the country – Little Soap Company in the Cotswolds encourages adding oats, seeds, herbs and clays, while Devon’s Green Wyse botany school will teach you how to marble colours and prepare petals to mix into your soap – to find a class near you, head to craftcourses.com. 38


Bathrooms | T O - D O

SOAP AS SCULPTURE Is it a slab of quartz, or a shard of marble? Neither, it’s a hand soap that will be on sale this month at The Conran Shop. French brand Les Savons Gemme has been creating jewel-like soaps in Cannes for 20 years, using organic jojoba and almond oil, all dyed using natural pigments (£25; conranshop.co.uk).

LIST

WITH THE GRAIN Liz Earle recommends adding a handful of oats to a warm bath to soothe tired or sensitive skin. You can find more plant-based tips for bathing – including using Manuka honey, lanolin and calendula – at lizearle wellbeing.com.

TRIAL RUN

The brand-new flagship showroom of Bagno Design, the 15-year-old bath and taps specialist with four other stores across the UK, has just opened on Chelsea’s chi-chi King’s Road. Like to try before you buy? Head to the shiny new store to test the all-important water pressure of a chrome rain shower, or trial a new tub for size ( bagnodesignlondon.com). G R E AT L E N G T H S Visit Thames Lido – a superb restoration of the Grade II-listed King’s Meadow open-air swimming pool in Berkshire that opens this autumn. First popular in 1902 as the Ladies’ Swimming Bath, it had sadly fallen into disuse. The refurbishment means the pool will be heated, while the original building will comprise a viewing balcony, restaurant, bar and a spa (thameslido.com).

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS Open House weekend is a chance to peek inside some of London’s most design-forward private homes and discover fresh ideas for updating your own bathroom. Explore spaces such as the bath tucked behind the headboard in the bedroom of the RIBA-winning Tin House (below) by Henning Stummel’s studio and the porcelain wetroom at the Clay House by Simon Astridge Studio (16 and 17 September; openhouselondon.org.uk).

FIND FRILUFTSLIV Find what? Friluftsliv is a 150-year-old Norwegian philosophy that embraces the great outdoors with vigour. This can be anything from a hearty walk or a night camping in the woods, to a ‘wild swim’ in a refreshing river, sea or lake – under safe supervision, of course. See you at the water’s edge.

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T H E U LT I M AT E G U I D E T O

P L A N N I N G YO U R B AT H R O O M Creating your dream bath-shower space is one of the most complex home projects you can undertake. Don’t be overwhelmed, though. We’ve made it easy for you – simply follow our experts’ advice on everything from pipes to lights Words EMMA LOVE Illustration BABETH LAFON

FIRST THINGS FIRST…

The five things to do before you make any big decisions

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Really think about how you use your bathroom and what you need to fit into the space. For instance, do you only ever take showers, or do you prefer a soak in the tub?

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Narrow down the style of bathroom you like by making moodboards of your favourite designs and colours.

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Make an initial floorplan, taking into account existing plumbing and room features, such as radiators.

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Set a budget and a time frame. As a general rule, installation takes around two weeks, but you also need to allow up to six weeks for any pieces with specialist finishes to be delivered.

5

Many bathroom showrooms offer a design service. If you do need advice, it’s a useful place to start. They will also be able to recommend a reputable local builder and plumber – always check reviews of their recent work before committing. ➤


THE PLUMBING

This is the nuts and bolts of any bathroom! Here’s what to know before you make any style choices What’s the key consideration? The location of the waste pipe – or ‘soil stack’, as it is sometimes called (this carries water from the sink, bath, shower and toilet). This detail will determine the location of everything else in your bathroom. ‘It’s really important to plan the layout around the waste pipe,’ explains bathroom brand Samuel Heath’s Gemma Hewick (samuel-heath.co.uk). ‘It needs to be close to the toilet.’ Do I need to think about water pressure? Yes. Before you choose any appliances or fixtures, you need to know whether you have a gravity-fed boiler system (which produces low pressure), a mega-flow system (high pressure), or a combination boiler. Some products (such as overhead showers) will require a minimum water pressure to function properly – check before you invest. Any other essentials to check? ‘Make sure that you have enough storage for hot water,’ says Tony O’Donnell of Catchpole & Rye (catchpoleandrye.com). ‘If you have a combi-boiler, there is hot water on demand, so it will never run out – but otherwise, you need to make sure that your water tank is big enough to house an adequate supply, especially at peak times (such as during the morning shower rush). A qualified installer will be able to advise on the size you need.’ What about installing a shower? For Lefroy Brooks’ Kate Priestley (uk.lefroybrooks.com), the placing of the thermostatic valve (this blends your hot and cold water to prevent scalding) is an important consideration. ‘If you have enough space behind the wall, you can opt for a concealed valve. However, if you choose an exposed valve, make sure your shower enclosure is roomy enough, because the valve sits on the pipes, protruding into your showering space.’ How about a bath? Some bathtubs (such as the ‘Bateau’ range at Catchpole & Rye) sit directly on the floor, which means the plumbing will need to go under the floor rather than in a cavity in the base of the tub. ‘It is important to know where you are going to connect the taps and waste

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‘TAPS THAT HAVE CERAMIC DISC VALVES ARE EASIER TO TURN ON AND OFF’

TONY O’DONNELL, C AT C H P O L E & RY E

pipe in the floor – you can extend the pipes if required,’ says O’Donnell. He does, however, warn that the plumbing needs to be easily accessible, just in case you need to service it at a later stage. And what are my options for taps? It’s a straight choice between mixed water and individual taps. ‘It’s more practical to have mixer taps because it’s easier to control the temperature,’ says O’Donnell. ‘With individual taps, the hot water can often be scalding, which is something to consider, especially if you have children.’ Also, look for taps that have ceramic disc valves. They are easier to turn on and off, and are comparatively more durable than traditional rubber washers.


Bathrooms | P R O J E C T

PLANNING

THE LIGHTING

With more options than ever before, getting your lighting right is essential to setting the mood in your bathroom When do I need to make decisions about lighting? At the early stages of a bathroom project. ‘First, you decide on the layout of the space and select your appliances. You can then fit the lighting around those,’ advises Drummonds’ James Lentaigne (drummonds-uk.com). ‘In practical terms, the wiring happens at the same time as the plumbing, during the first fix phase – this is when everything that needs to be concealed behind the walls or floors is put in place.’ Where do I start? Think about how you use your bathroom at different times of the day and then split the space into different zones. Lentaigne suggests three separate lighting circuits, each operated using dimmer switches: 1 Mood lighting – consider placing under a bath or in alcoves 2 Everyday, functional lighting 3 Specific area lighting – above a mirror, for instance

Is there any new technology I should know about? Furniture with integrated lighting is a key trend. Villeroy & Boch’s ‘Finion’ range, for example, features an LED border around the mirror, illuminated shelving, a vanity unit with rear wall illumination and a bath with an ‘emotion’ feature that makes it appear to float on a pedestal of light. It’s an instant lighting scheme without the hassle. The lightsare dimmable and can be altered using a remote control (villeroy-boch.co.uk). ➤

‘DECIDE ON THE LAYOUT OF THE SPACE AND SELECT YOUR APPLIANCES. THEN FIT THE LIGHTING AROUND THOSE’ J A M E S L E N TA I G N E , D R U M M O N D S

What about safety? Check the Ingress Protection (IP) rating of all lights before fitting them. ‘The higher the rating, the more protected the light is from water,’ says Lentaigne. IP44 is the most common rating for bathroom lighting, but in wet areas, such as the shower, lights should be rated at IP65. What kind of lighting is best? The trick is to mix various types of light so that you can create a range of moods, depending on what you need. Peter Bowles of Davey Lighting (originalbtc.com) recommends a combination of downlights, LEDs and decorative accent lighting. A steplight is a good way to highlight a shower or bathtub – fully recessed into the wall, these LED bulbs provide a soft wash of illumination. Any other tricks? There’s nothing worse than waking up during the night and having to turn on all the bright bathroom lights. One solution is to install pale blue night lights along the floor. ‘They’ll provide just enough glow to help you find your way around, and they run on very low wattage,’ says Bowles. You can keep them on all night without worrying about electricity bills.

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T H E WA L L S A N D F L O O R S

Pick tiles and paints that are durable as well as beautiful, using our experts’ simple tips Which materials work best? Whatever it is you choose for this space, it needs to be able to withstand water and humidity. Marble and slate are great natural stone options that are suited to bathrooms, and work for walls and floors. What should I consider when choosing tiles? If you live in a hard water region, limescale can build up quickly. For ease of maintenance, Daniel Morris at Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) suggests choosing a lighter tile. ‘The darker the material, the more limescale will show up. Also, if you opt for larger tiles or panels, there will be fewer grout joins – which means easier cleaning and maintenance.’

‘EPOXY GROUT IS MORE EXPENSIVE, BUT IT’S A WORTHWHILE INVESTMENT’ DONNA PODGER, BISAZZA

How do I prepare the walls? Before fixing any tiles, give the walls a coat of plaster to make sure that they are smooth. ‘Seventy per cent of any good installation is preparation,’ says Donna Podger from tile expert Bisazza (bisazza.it). ‘If you have small mosaic tiles, you can’t have any undulation on your walls, or else they will end up looking different thicknesses.’ Any other jobs to think about? In wet areas, it’s vitally important to seal the wall with a waterproof membrane that acts as a protective coat (a process that is known as tanking). Podger also recommends using epoxy rather than porous cement grout: ‘Over time, cement grout will draw in moisture and change colour. Epoxy grout is more expensive, but it’s a worthwhile investment.’ What if I’d rather paint or wallpaper the walls? If you’re using paint, choose an emulsion that’s designed to be mould resistant and washable – many brands have special formulas that work in bathrooms and kitchens. Wallpaper is slightly trickier, as humidity and damp can soak the paper or cause peeling. If you avoid areas in direct contact with water, though, it is possible. We suggest covering your paper in Polyvine Decorators Varnish (polyvine.com), which will seal it to limit water damage. Or, try one of the designs from Wall & Decò’s ‘Wet System’ wallpaper range, which is made to be used in damp environments (wallanddeco.com). Any advice on laying floor tiles? One of the main things to consider is where the cut tiles will be – you don’t want them anywhere visible, such as in the middle of the floor. The trick is to dry lay the area first so that you can check where you’ll need to make cuts. It is also advisable to mix and match tiles from several boxes. Even with porcelain, there is some degree of batch variation, so it’s best to open several boxes and select some tiles from each. And what about underfloor heating? Both stone and porcelain are good heat conductors, so they’re perfect choices. ‘In general, a thicker tile will need more time to warm up, but will retain the heat for longer,’ says Morris. ‘Avoid wood: it’s an insulator, not a conductor.’

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Bathrooms | P R O J E C T

PLANNING

THE FURNITURE

Storage is as crucial in the bathroom as anywhere else in the home. Here’s how to get yours right How should I approach storage? First, think about those products you use every day. ‘There is no specific calculation to work out how much storage you need, but bathrooms always look their best when clutter-free,’ says Aston Matthews’ Howard Birch (astonmatthews.co.uk). ‘The key is to include storage as part of the bathroom design right from the start. That way, cabinets and shelves become part of the overall scheme rather than an afterthought.’ What if I have a small bathroom? Wall-hung units will create an illusion of space, but if you do want to include a floorstanding item, consider choosing one that’s tall and thin as it will take up less floor space. A mirror-fronted cabinet is also a good choice, providing the illusion of space. Duravit’s Martin Carroll (duravit.co.uk) also suggests looking for clever space-saving products. ‘Our “OpenSpace B” shower enclosure, for example, folds back against the wall completely when not in use,’ he says.

‘THE KEY IS TO INCLUDE STORAGE AS PART OF THE BATHROOM DESIGN FROM THE START’ H O WA R D B I R C H , A S T O N M AT T H E W S

How important is it for furniture to blend in with your fittings? It depends on the look that you are trying to create. ‘If you want a minimal, hotel-style bathroom, then sticking to one uniform colour will give the desired, streamlined effect,’ says Birch. ‘However, there is no fixed rule: an eclectic mix of fittings and furniture can look equally as impressive.’ What else should I consider? If you have the space, concealed wall cupboards are handy for storing everything from towels to toiletries. ‘Years ago, I decided to replace my bath with a shower, and with the extra space, I created a cupboard no deeper than 13 inches,’ says Waterworks’ Barbara Sallick (waterworks.com). ‘It makes such a big difference to have everything you need to hand in the same room.’ Sallick also suggests using a pedestal sink with a small side table instead of regular vanity units, which can take up a lot of space in a small room. ‘They’re equally as functional, but that bit less bulky,’ she explains.

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D E TA I L S

DAR K R I S I N G Add texture to a moody, black bathroom with matt furnishings, inky accessories and industrial touches 4

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Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

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1 ‘Europlank’ engineered oak flooring in ‘Coffee Rustic’, £68.34 per square metre, Havwoods (havwoods.co.uk) 2 ‘Simple’ towel ring with faux leather strap, £18, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk) 3 ‘Big Waffle’ blue towel by The Organic Company, £68, Skandium (skandium.com) 4 ‘Inox’ absolute matt emulsion paint, £42 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 5 ‘Vogue’ freestanding bath filler, £595, Frontline (frontlinebathrooms.co.uk) 6 ‘Bute’ cast iron bathtub with steel surround, £6,792, Drummonds (drummonds-uk.com) 7 ‘Mystone Lavagna’ tiles, £250 per square metre, Marazzi (marazzitile.co.uk) 8 ‘Hampton’ pendant light, from £359; 9 ‘Point’ pendant light, £479, both by Davey Lighting, Original BTC (uk.originalbtc.com) 10 ‘Lundhs Emerald’ stone worktop, from £680 per square metre, Lundhs (lundhsrealstone.com) 11 ‘Tallanstown Grey’ flat emulsion paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) 12 Wall-mounted mirror, £24.99, H&M (hm.com) 13 ‘Fontane Bianche’ tap by Elisa Ossino, £715; 14 ‘Adda’ freestanding basin by David Lopez Quincoces, £1,720, both Salvatori (salvatori.it) 15 Industrial-style shelving unit, £465, French Connection (frenchconnection.com) 16 Enamel tumbler by Falcon, £6, Future and Found (futureandfound.com) 17 ‘Les Belles Matières’ candle by Cire Trudon, £78, Selfridges (selfridges.com) 18 ‘Bois Sauvage’ bath salts by L’Objet, £125 for two litres, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) ➤

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D E TA I L S

A S N AT U R E I N T E N D E D Raw materials and rough, aged finishes join forces to create a bathroom with a style that transcends trends

2 8 5

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Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

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1 ‘Puzzle’ tiles by Barber & Osgerby, £145 per square metre, Mutina (mutina.it) 2 ‘Giro’ shelving trolley by Be Pure, £450, Next (next.co.uk) 3 ‘Black Fig’ reed diffuser by PF Candle Co., £19.78, Smallable (smallable.com) 4 Quartz box by Aquanova, £32, Amara (amara.com) 5 ‘Toscana’ beige tiles, from £29.99 per square metre, Gemini Tile (geminitile.co.uk) 6 ‘Copper Bateau’ bathtub, from £6,000, Catchpole & Rye (catchpoleandrye.com) 7 ‘Brocklesby’ stool by the Galvin Brothers, £275, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com) 8 ‘Julia Grey’ patterned tiles, £102 per square metre, Stone & Ceramic Warehouse (stoneandceramicwarehouse.co.uk) 9 Industrial-style console table, £325, French Connection (frenchconnection.com) 10 ‘Conroy’ wall lights, £576 each, Jamb (jamb.co.uk) 11 Gold hexagonal mirror, £12, Tesco Home (tesco.com) 12 Wall-mounted taps, from £745.80, Bert & May (bertandmay.com) 13 ‘Rho’ concrete basin, £1,380, Kast Concrete Basins (kastconcretebasins.com) 14 Woven laundry basket, £35; 15 Woven laundry bin, £12, both by Gray & Willow, House of Fraser (houseoffraser.co.uk) 16 ‘Amalfi’ soap dispenser by GioBagnara, £380, William & Son (williamandson.com) 17 ‘Herman’ laundry stand, £109, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) ➤

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D E TA I L S

OA S I S O F C A L M Leafy greens and pearly whites combine to create a bathroom scheme that is both refreshing and relaxing

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Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

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1 ‘Theo’ shelving unit, £199, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com) 2 Arabescato Carrara marble, from £419 per square metre, Lapicida (lapicida.com) 3 ‘Fjord’ candle by Skandinavisk, £29, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 4 ‘Gridy Me’ mirror, £84.95, Menu (menu.as) 5 ‘Forecast’ tiles in ‘Rockall’, £89.76 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 6 Wooden side table by David Irwin, £199, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 7 ‘Lake2’ bathtub, £1,795, Waters Baths of Ashbourne (watersbaths.co.uk) 8 ‘Le Corbusier LCS’ ceramic tiles in ‘X 11’, £81.48 per 30x120cm piece, Domus (domustiles.co.uk) 9 ‘Enchanted Eden’ Bathroom+ Soft Sheen paint, £29.39 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) 10 ‘Prismatics’ hexagonal tiles in ‘Jungle’, £130 per square metre, Johnson Tiles (johnson-tiles.com) 11 ‘Fontane Bianche’ towel ring by Elisa Ossino, £300, Salvatori (salvatori it) 12 ‘Waffle’ linen towel in ‘Mint’, from £18.99, Linen Me (linenme.com) 13 ‘Edwardian’ basin and washstand with fittings, £1,048, Burlington (burlingtonbathrooms.com) 14 ‘Fontane Bianche’ Carrara marble toothbrush holder by Elisa Ossino, £132, Salvatori (salvatori.it) 15 ‘Elgin’ matt emulsion paint, £44 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.com) 16 ‘Odin’ bamboo leaning mirror, £95, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) ➤

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D E TA I L S

SOFT GL AMOUR Dusky blush pinks, luxurious marble and brass make for a bathroom with a serene and ultra-feminine appeal

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Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

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1 ‘Oak Geometric Pattern Parquet’ flooring, £139.85 per square metre, Ecora (ecora.co.uk) 2 ‘Chevron’ sideboard, £699, Atkin and Thyme (atkinandthyme.co.uk) 3 ‘Brina’ lotion dispenser, £35, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk) 4 ‘Tota’ glass jar with gold lid by AYTM, £29.99, Haygen (haygenshop.com) 5 ‘Avillas 54’ countertop basin, £395, Crosswater (crosswater.co.uk) 6 Hexagonal mirror, £149, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com) 7 ‘Unito’ towels, from £30 for a wash cloth, Frette (frette.com) 8 ‘Shades of Blinds’ tiles (pictured twice) in pink by Diesel Living, £50 per square metre, Iris Ceramica (irisceramica.com) 9 ‘Amiral’ brass box set by On Interior, £29.99, Haygen (haygenshop.com) 10 ‘Uno ClearStone’ bathtub, £2,195, Clearwater (clearwaterbaths.com) 11 ‘Whisper’ Intelligent Eggshell paint, £59 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 12 ‘Angui’ shelf in ‘Rose’, from £135, AYTM (aytm.dk) 13 ‘Mimira’ storage tin, £22, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com) 14 ‘Verdant’ candle by SOH Melbourne, £45, Workshop Living (workshopliving.co.uk) 15 ‘ELS04’ tap in aged brass and teak from the ‘Elements’ collection, £1,312, The Watermark Collection (thewatermarkcollection.eu) 16 ‘Garaway’ pendant light, £225; 17 ‘Hereford’ pendant light, £390, both Fritz Fryer (fritzfryer.co.uk) 18 ‘Nordic’ rose gold basket, £10, Sainsbury’s (sainsburys.co.uk)

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PERSONAL SANCTUARIES Take a look inside the bathrooms of four of our favourite design experts to discover their styling tricks, essential buys and morning rituals Words CLAUDIA BAILLIE

ALEX MICHAELIS, ARCHITECT

KATE WATSON-SMYTH, BLOGGER

CECILIE MANZ, INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER

TONE KROKEN, INTERIOR DESIGNER


T H E V I N TA G E B AT H R O O M K AT E WAT S O N - S M Y T H , B L O G G E R

Kate Watson-Smyth has been writing about property, interiors and design for the past 20 years. She is the creator of Mad About The House, one of the UK’s most popular interior design blogs, and her first book, ‘Shades Of Grey’, was published in 2016. Her own bathroom is a continuation of the grey theme My most important morning ritual is coffee. I get up with Radio 4, wake up my sons (aged 13 and 16), then make a pot and take it back upstairs. Most mornings, I dress for a workout, or I shower if I have a meeting. Then it’s back downstairs for more coffee. I make a Stelton potful every day and drink it all by lunchtime as it gradually gets colder. I didn’t want my bathroom to be all white and shiny, so I deliberately included vintage pieces. There’s a small, velvet Victorian chair that I found in Junk N8 Disorderly in Crouch End, and I used reclaimed laboratory tops rescued from schools by Retrouvius to make the basin unit. An expanse of plain mirror makes a space feel a bit like a gym, so instead I chose foxed glass. Plus, I’m all for blurring my reflection in the morning! We never use the bath – except to hang clothes in – but a big shower is a must, because it feels really luxurious. The Carrara marble tiles are from Mandarin Stone, and the shower screen was constructed by our builder from two large pieces of toughened glass sunk into the tiles. Two washbasins are allegedly the secret to a happy marriage. I can’t remember who said that, but it’s certainly one less row to have in the morning – and we’re still here 22 years later, so there must be some truth in it! I have spotlights in the ceiling. I don’t love them, but they’re the most practical solution. One day, I’d like to add wall lights either side of the mirrors. Unlike most people, I’m not a huge fan of candles. Instead, I have a beautiful Plumen lamp hanging in the corner that stays on when the others are dimmed. The walls in the bathroom are painted in ‘Down Pipe’ by Farrow & Ball. It’s the most fabulous colour when lit by both natural and artificial light. It’s also the perfect backdrop for the gold mirror and vintage furniture. The white floorboards, marble and bath help keep things light. I’ve slowly been adding plants to my bathroom. My husband isn’t especially pleased about this, but he’s coming round to the idea. When he came home from work one day to find a six-foot, brass, palm tree-shaped light in the sitting room, I think he realised that accepting a few small green plants was the easy bit.

The best piece of advice I could give someone who is planning their bathroom is to first think about who will use it, and how, before deciding on the aesthetics. If you don’t take baths or have small children, then get rid of the tub and have the biggest shower you can. Always add more storage than you think you’ll need, and keep the floor as clear as possible – a wall-mounted toilet and basin means you’ll see more floor, which makes the room appear larger. madaboutthehouse.com ➤ 56

PICTURE: MICHAEL CHAPMAN

When it comes to accessorising a bathroom, a little bit of vintage is a good contrast to hard edges and white surfaces. A wooden stool to drape your towel over or an antique medicine cabinet on the wall will soften the space and add character.


K AT E ‘ S E S S E N T I A L B AT H R O O M K I T 1 This is a shorter 1,500mm bath,

but it comes as a standard 1,800mm version, too. ‘Trend’ freestanding bath, £749, Bathstore ( bathstore.com)

2 ‘FreeForm 500’

basin, £229, Bathstore ( bathstore.com)

3 ‘Tennis Bat’ fixed-head

shower and arm, £530, Living House (livinghouse.co.uk)

‘I DIDN’T WANT MY BATHROOM TO BE ALL WHITE AND SHINY, SO I DELIBERATELY INCLUDED VINTAGE PIECES’

4 ‘Carrara Honed

Marble’ tiles, £71.98 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) 5 Hardwood worktops,

£145 per square metre, Retrouvius (retrouvius.com) 6 ‘Plumen 003’ dimmable

pendant bulb, £150, Plumen (plumen.com) 7 Antiqued ‘Heavy Fox’

glass tiles (inset left), £200 per square metre, The Antique Mirror Company (antiquedmirror.com) 8 The vanity mirrors ( left)

are made using Ikea mirrors at the top and tiles at the bottom. Try the ‘Horus’ collection of designer tiles at Checkalow (checkalow.co.uk)

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T H E S A LVA G E D B AT H R O O M TONE KROKEN, INTERIOR DESIGNER

Tone Kroken is a stylist and interior designer based in Oslo, Norway. Her style is based around chance flea market finds, which she combines with decidedly more modern designs. She also likes to make and repurpose items – her motto is that good taste has little to do with money The bathroom is the first place I head to when I start the day – and also the last room I see before I go to bed. In the morning, I have a bath, drink coffee and catch up on the news. At night, I have a cup of tea and take some quiet time there, reading a book and enjoying the view. My bathroom is my absolute favourite place to be, and I spend as much time in there as I can, so it’s essential that it has a relaxed and laid-back feel. The one thing I really couldn’t live without is the bathtub. I found it at a French flea market, and I love its aged, rustic feel. Because it’s made of iron, the water stays warm and I can soak for hours. I would always choose to take a bath over a shower – I bathe twice a day. The bath naturally became the centrepiece of the room, and, from there, I decided on the colour of the walls, which are painted in chalk paint from a Dutch company called Pure & Original. The wall colour almost mimics the bath’s wonderful oxidised exterior.

‘THE BATH NATURALLY BECAME THE CENTREPIECE OF THE ROOM, AND, FROM THERE, I DECIDED ON THE COLOUR OF THE WALLS’

On top of the mixed surface materials, I layered accessories such as the knotted driftwood stool and chunky knit, velvet and silk cushions, which are stacked up on the daybed. These bring texture and depth to the overall scheme. I think mixing the old with the new helps to make things feel a bit more exciting. I bought the wooden bust from a Swedish shop called Mo Interior – I love it, it adds a touch of humour. tonekroken.no ➤

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PICTURE: YVONNE WILHELMEN

I wanted to create an atmosphere that’s a little bit bohemian and a little bit luxurious, but also quite Nordic. The dark walls, although minimal, are quite moody, and the swirls in the paint add a touch of movement. In contrast, the white, glossy floorboards and the tongue-and-groove ceiling are pure and simple, and they give the space a clean, fresh feel.


Bathrooms | M O O D B O A R D S

T O N E ’ S E S S E N T I A L B AT H R O O M K I T 1 For a durable,

2 Varnished

3 Classico

4 The wooden

semi-gloss floor, try Little Greene’s floor paint in ‘Loft White’, £30 per litre (littlegreene.com)

driftwood stool, from £124, Déco Nature (deconature.com)

paint in ‘Black Smoke’ by Pure & Original, £34.50 for one litre (pureoriginal.com)

bust is from Swedish shop Mo Interior, but you can find similar at Paul De Grande (pauldegrande.com)

6 For a huge selection

8 ‘Amalfi’ hammam

of reclaimed bathtubs, try English Salvage (englishsalvage.co.uk)

towels, from £8 each, The White Company (thewhite company.com)

5 ‘Hudson Reed Topaz’

7 Moroccan

wall-mounted bath shower mixer in ‘Chrome’, £149.95, Victorian Plumbing (victorianplumbing.co.uk)

leather pouf in ‘Chestnut’, £98, Bohemia ( bohemia design.co.uk)

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T H E E L E G A N T B AT H R O O M ALEX MICHAELIS, ARCHITECT

Alex Michaelis is one half of renowned architectural practice Michaelis Boyd, whose projects include Soho House in Istanbul, London’s recently refurbished Groucho Club and 225 apartments in the soon-to-be regenerated Battersea Power Station. He also designed his own west London home

’MY BATHROOM IS A PLACE TO MEDITATE AND COLLECT MY THOUGHTS AT THE BEGINNING AND END OF EACH DAY‘

PICTURES: ED REEVE

Every morning, I get up and do some gentle stretches as part of my endless quest to touch my toes. I have a quick shower in the morning on weekdays, and a longer bath at weekends.   You can’t rush a bath, but I always feel a bit guilty about using too much water, so I use the tub sparingly. Then sometimes I go swimming, before heading to the kitchen to help with breakfast. My bathroom is a place to meditate and collect my thoughts at the beginning and end of each day. Having the bath visible from the bedroom is ideal, because it means you can talk things over with your partner while you’re soaking. For the perfect bathroom, you need to think every stage through. Layout is really important – plan well so that you optimise the space. Make sure that the bath, basin and toilet that you really love will actually fit, as it should never feel cramped. Have fun with the whole process, and think about materials and shapes that will make the bathroom a joy to use. Close your eyes and imagine how you’ll actually utilise the space. Can you turn the shower on and adjust the temperature without getting your hands wet, for example? These are little things, but they really make a difference. When it comes to surfaces, I really like marble and Corian, and I use them a lot in both residential and commercial projects. They’re hard-wearing and suit all kinds of bathroom schemes. Recently, I’ve also been working with moulded concrete from Forma Studios, which gives a super-modern aesthetic. I don’t think you should have to choose a traditional bathroom just because you live in a period house. A contemporary bathroom in a Georgian terrace can look fantastic. I like mixing things up a bit and including both classic and modern elements. I always make sure that bathroom lighting is dimmable, so that you can change the mood depending on whether you’re having a quick shower or taking time out to soak in the bath. It’s also important to light mirrors well – face-on and never from above. Sally Storey at John Cullen helps us with lighting. I love curved walls – I think they really suit a bathroom. But I have to admit that the tiling in my own bathroom was a challenge. It involved lots of cutting, and it took plenty of trial and error to shape the marble tiles around the curves. The end result definitely made it worthwhile, though. michaelisboyd.com ➤

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Bathrooms | M O O D B O A R D S

A L E X ’ S E S S E N T I A L B AT H R O O M K I T 1 ‘Soho’ double basin

2 ‘Pimlico’ wall light,

3 ‘Soho’ Type G

and frame, from £2,465, The Water Monopoly (thewatermonopoly.com)

£550, Holloways of Ludlow ( holloways ofludlow.com)

wall-mounted shower arm, thermostatic mixer and taps, from £2,109, The Water Monopoly (thewater monopoly.com)

4 ‘Rockwell’ bath, £4,200,

The Water Monopoly (thewatermonopoly.com)

5 ‘Carrara Honed

6 ‘Invigorate’

7 Classic double

Marble’ tiles, £71.98 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarin stone.com)

bath oil by 100 Acres, £20, Liberty London (liberty london.com)

border towels, from £9 for a hand towel, The White Company (thewhite company.com)

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T H E M I N I M A L I S T B AT H R O O M CECILIE MANZ, INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER

Danish designer Cecilie Manz won the Danish Crown Prince Couple’s Culture Award in September 2014 for her contribution to design, and she is considered one of the leading furniture designers of her generation. Her ‘Luv’ collection for Duravit combines Nordic minimalism with delicate beauty My morning routine has to be quick and efficient. I have two teenagers and only one bathroom, so I make sure I’m first in. I spend up to 20 minutes in there – I save the longer baths until the evening, when things are settled, the family is fed and homework is done. Then it is my time to just relax and calm my mind. The bathroom is very important to me – it’s where you prepare for the day by cleansing yourself, and end the day by rinsing it off. It’s crucial that the space works in terms of both functional design and calming influences. Because I design products for interiors, I’m very specific about the activities that I think belong in the bathroom – I’m not a fan of reading in there, for example. Singing in the shower or bath is acceptable, though!

When Duravit asked me to design ‘Luv’, I needed to go back to basics: What is a bathroom? What are its key functions? By asking myself these questions, I discovered that feeling comfortable, relaxed and at home were the most important things for me, so I incorporated those ideas into the design. We start our day in front of a mirror with a bowl of water on a table – that was the key image that I kept coming back to. Duality plays a part when I’m designing. On one hand, I try to minimise and simplify everything, but I’m like a magpie and I enjoy collecting. I collect everything from wrapping paper and postcards to books, and their surfaces, colours and textures inspire my work. For ‘Luv’, I combined Nordic purism with delicate shapes, subtle colour and a combination of textures. I wanted to create a range that can be interpreted in a really individual way, whatever the style of your bathroom. I wish I hadn’t rebuilt my bathroom before I designed ‘Luv’! I’d really love to have that bathtub in my house. duravit.co.uk; ceciliemanz.com

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PICTURES: ALAMY

’THE BATHROOM IS VERY IMPORTANT TO ME – IT’S WHERE YOU PREPARE FOR THE DAY BY CLEANSING YOURSELF‘


Bathrooms | M O O D B O A R D S

CECILIE’S ESSENTIAL BATHROOM KIT 1 ‘Caravaggio

Read’ wall lamp by Cecilie Manz, £209, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) 2 ‘It may be old-school,

but I just love anything scented with lavender,’ says Cecilie 3 ‘Drai New’

towel set, £111, Society Limonta (societylimonta.com) 4 ‘My grandmother always used Pears

soap – I’ve had a soft spot for it ever since,’ says Cecilie. £1.09, Pharmacy First (pharmacyfirst.co.uk) 5 ‘Beolit15’

portable Bluetooth speaker by B&O Play, £399.95, John Lewis ( johnlewis.com)

6 ‘Luv’ washstand,

£3,070, Duravit (duravit.co.uk)

7 ‘I use the white

Bouroullec curtain as both a window and shower curtain,’ says Cecilie. ‘Ready Made Curtain’ by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, from £346, Kvadrat ( kvadrat.dk)

8 ‘Luv’ freestanding bathtub, £2,860, Duravit (duravit.co.uk)

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INSPIRATION KEY TR ENDS TO TRY NOW • THE WOR LD’S MOST BEAUTIFUL BATHROOMS

HOT TREND

POWDER ROOM Take a softer approach to tiling, with pale pink instead of the classic white This dusky shade of pink gives these tiles – a longer, slimmer take on the traditional metro-style – a more serene look. The tiles’ slightly wonky, handmade quality is echoed by the rough-hewn granite sink, which is a delightfully textural touch – try Marble Mosaics’ ‘River Rock’ bathroom sink (£99.99; marble-mosaics.com) for similar.

PICTURE: DERRICK SWALWELL

‘Gelato’ tiles in Rose Gloss’ by Mandarin Stone, £47.47 per square metre (mandarinstone.com)

T O S E E M O R E S T U N N I N G B AT H R O O M S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / I N S P I R AT I O N S


WORDS: JACKIE DALY PICTURES: GREG COX/FRANK FEATURES (PHOTOGRAPHY), JULIA STADLER (PRODUCTION)


CASE STUDY

W I N DOW ONTO THE WO R L D Framed by glass, this modern suite is a treetop oasis that allows its owners to enjoy moments of calm The leafy location of this 1970s cottage, concealed behind a gated entrance at the end of a secluded lane in Newlands Village, Cape Town, means its owners, Michael and Kate Lorentz, enjoy their own peaceful haven. It is this enviable privacy that encouraged the couple, when extending their property, to add an extra floor featuring an open-plan bedroom, bathroom and dressing room with huge windows that frame views of the woods. The only thing screening the owners from sight is the canopy of the trees. The suite’s airy ambience is enhanced by a serene backdrop of white walls and limewashed oak floorboards. The simplicity of the decor is only broken by the dark frames of the windows, which are echoed in the metal surround of the vanity unit, the frames on the artworks that hang on the walls, and the graphic embroidery decorating the large armchair. Dark wood was also used to create the internal dividing door, which folds out across the length of the room and separates the bed and bathroom area from the adjoining dressing room when required. It’s a small nod to privacy in a space that produces an experience akin to bathing in nature. On balmy days, the doors are flung open, the breeze wafts through the room, and Michael and Kate enjoy the relaxing sound of birdsong. Floor For similar oak flooring, try ‘Oak Portobello’ by Ecora (ecora.co.uk) Walls Floor-to-ceiling glass doors and windows Bath Try the ‘IOS’ freestanding bath at Victoria & Albert for similar (vandabaths.co.uk) Shower area The shower is encased in frameless glass. Find similar trays by Bette at CP Hart, which can also design a frameless enclosure (cphart.co.uk) Door A bi-fold door divides the bed-bathroom from the dressing room (see next page). Try Distinctive Doors’ ‘Palermo’ oak bi-fold doors (distinctivedoors.co.uk) Brassware In the UK, Grohe’s ‘Grandera’ floorstanding bath tap and Dornbracht’s ‘Tara’ basins are similar in style (grohe.co.uk; dornbracht.com) ➤

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The bathroom’s oor-to-ceiling windows create an experience akin to bathing in nature

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CASE STUDY

IN THE FR AME At the Missy Lui nail parlour in Victoria, Australia, interior design firm Sasufi has created an eyecatching wash area, framing the washbasin with a panel of circular green mosaic tiles (sasufi.net)

PICTURES: ANNE-SOPHIE POIRIER, CAROLA RIPAMONTI

Tiles Try the ‘Savoy ’ tiles in the ‘Penny’ shape by Ann Sacks, £222 per square metre, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com) Sink For a similar wall-mounted design, opt for the ‘Regine’, from £660, Bathandshower.com (bathandshower.com)

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HOT TREND

BATHE IN COLOUR Forget grey, white and beige: now’s the time for an unabashedly bold bathroom palette Italian design studio MarcanteTesta’s interiors embrace modern colour with a nod to the past. Here, its retro-inspired custom cabinet is topped with a pink Bette washbasin (from £1,146; bette.de), which pops against the creamy green Farrow & Ball ‘Vert de Terre’ walls. Holding the scheme together is the contrasting red detailing around the edges and on the architraves – Farrow & Ball’s ‘Terre d’ Egypte’ paint (marcante-testa.it). ‘Vert de Terre’ and ‘Terre d’ Egypte’ paints, both £43.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball ( farrow-ball.com)


HOT TREND

EMBRACE THE DARKNESS Dial up the drama in your bathroom with sumptuous black stone and rich woods Dark stained parquet wood flooring and richly veined inky stone is the height of sophistication. Take, for example, London-based architecture and design practice Foster + Partners’ ‘Tono’ collection for Porcelanosa, which features a luxurious stone bathtub, shower and floating vanity unit, all turned out in the moodiest of tones – deep black, stormy grey and rust brown. ‘Tono’ bath by Foster + Partners, £36,732; ‘1600’ shower, £10,781; ‘1600’ vanity unit, £12,509, all Porcelanosa (porcelanosa.com)


HOT TREND

PAINT THE LILY A new generation of waterproof wallpapers means pattern can bloom in the most unexpected of places This floral, fresco-like backdrop is actually the ‘Niveum’ waterproof wallpaper by Eva Germani from Italian company Wall & Decò’s ‘Wet System’ range. Thanks to its revolutionary watertight design (patent pending), you can use this pattern inside showers without fear of water damage or the need to apply an extra layer of varnish (wallanddeco.com). ‘Niveum’ wallpaper from the ‘Wet System’ range for Wall & Decò, £160 per square metre, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

WINNING BRONZE Bring a bit of rustic bling into your interiors with metallic glazed tiles When it comes to brass accents like those of the washstand and mirror in this bathroom, the choice is whether to take the bling down a notch or pump up the volume. The designers here have done the latter, adding tiles with a bronze glaze to make this scheme really zing. The uneven, imperfect surface of the tiles keeps this bathroom just the right side of flashy. ‘Grove Brickwork’ field tiles in ‘Bronca’, £307 per square metre; ‘Rowan’ washstand, £2,375, both Waterworks (waterworks.com)

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WORDS: JACKIE DALY PICTURES: ELSA YOUNG/FRANK FEATURES (PHOTOGRAPHY), KERRYN FISCHER & LUANNE TOMS/FRANK FEATURES (PRODUCTION)

CASE STUDY

SOAK I N TH E VI EW The bedroom-bathroom of this Cape Town house feels at one with the landscape This South African abode is a futuristic vision of metal, glass and concrete, which sits above a spectacular swathe of coastline. The building itself cuts into the mountainside, creating a subterranean floor (the ‘engine room’ of the house), while the upper levels of the property are designed for luxurious living – they accommodate this amazing glass-lined bedroom-bathroom suite. The house belongs to property developer Shane Thompson, and was realised by architect Philip Olmesdahl of Cape Town-based practice SAOTA and interior designer Debra Parkington of Studio Parkington. The materials used throughout echo those of the natural landscape, which is framed by striking floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. ‘Texture is very important in a pared-back scheme, especially with the strong light that you get here,’ says Debra. ‘There needs to be variation in how that light is dispersed and absorbed.’ It is the simplicity of this space that Shane enjoys the most: ‘Nothing detracts from the calming views,’ he says. Floor Sandblasted granite tiles flow from bedroom to bathroom, and resurface as a countertop on the vanity unit and cladding on the bath. Try the ‘AKDO’ Granite Collection at Strata Tiles for similar (stratatiles.co.uk) Bath Try Duravit’s ‘Vero’ inset bath for similar (duravit.co.uk) Cabinetry A blond oak veneer vanity conceals storage – try ‘Finion’ by Villeroy & Boch for a similar look (villeroy-boch.co.uk) Brassware Try Crosswater’s ‘ Mike Pro 2’ wall-hung taps (crosswater.co.uk) ➤

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The glass-lined bedroom and bathroom are designed to make the most of breathtaking coastal views

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CASE STUDY

ROSE TINTED Brass combined with rose pink is one of today’s biggest and best decorating trends. This bathroom by interior designer Rebecca Judd shows how it can be used to update your space

PICTURE: JAMES GEER

Tiles For a similar pink mosaic look, try Waxman Tiles’ ‘Corali’ mosaic sheets from the ‘Mazurka’ range, £34.25 per 348x348mm sheet, Walls And Floors (wallsandfloors.co.uk) Walls White ‘Calacatta Oro’ marble pairs beautifully with brass and pink. £726 per square metre, Lapicida (lapicida.com) Sinks Try Lusso Stone’s ‘Ethos’ stone resin wall-hung washbasin, £625 (lussostone.com) Bath For an equally curvaceous tub, try Lusso Stone’s ‘Picasso’, £2,695 (lussostone.com) Hardware Aston Matthews new brass ‘Ambra’ range, from £351 for a shower kit; £265 for a wall-mounted mixer tap (astonmatthews.co.uk)

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HOT TREND

BARE NECESSITIES Plain concrete walls and minimal furnishings – this season, pared-back chic reaches its peak When your bathroom is this unadorned, the pieces that you do choose need to be perfect. And, if you’re looking for perfection, Danish design studio Norm Architects’ new ‘Prime’ range for Spanish brand Inbani is a good place to start. The bath features a rolled edge that’s reminiscent of antique metal tubs, but with a look that’s pure minimalism. ‘Prime’ freestanding bathtub by Norm Architects for Inbani, £6,962, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

CASE STUDY

U N D E R T H E E AV E S Despite being located in the attic of a converted barn, this bathroom’s monochrome palette – white metro tiles, dark slate and chrome hardware – is the epitome of cosmopolitan chic

PICTURES: RIS HAVEKES/ C-MORE INTERIOR DESIGN BLOG/INTERIEURADVIESBLOG.NL, ROGER DAVIES

Flooring ‘Slate Riven Grey Natural Stone Tile’, £12.59 per tile, Wickes (wickes.co.uk) Walls ‘Victoria Metro’ tiles in gloss white, £18.69 per square metre, Victorian Plumbing (victorianplumbing.co.uk) Lighting Try a reclaimed ‘Polish Industrial Light’ from Skinflint Design for similar, £325 (skinflintdesign.com) Shower Try a ‘Premium’ wetroom panel, from £79 for a 700mm sheet of glass, Soak (soak.com) Hardware We recommend a chrome ‘Heritage’ handset, £36.95, and a ‘Crosswater’ showerhead, £145, Victorian Plumbing (victorianplumbing.co.uk)

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WORDS: JACKIE DALY PICTURES: CHRISTIAN SCHAULIN (PHOTOGRAPHY), KERSTIN ROSE (PRODUCTION)


CASE STUDY

INTO THE BLUE Statement colour and pattern can inject style into a bathroom without swamping the space. This Parisian home shows you how to take the plunge French interiors architect Anne-Sophie Pailleret’s apartment is the epitome of Parisian chic: from its striking colour palette to the luxurious details throughout. Located in Paris’s elegant 16th arrondissement, the 165-square-metre 1930s space is shared with her husband and their three young children. As a family residence, the home is not only beautiful and original but eminently practical, too. Anne-Sophie has created two separate wet spaces – a main bathroom and a shower room – and consequently ensured that if one of them is engaged, the other is free during the morning rush. Both of the rooms have their own slick styles, but are united by their use of strong, graphic lines and colour, balancing both form and function. A spacious tub provides a focus for the main bathroom, where the decor is bold but harmonious. By contrast, the shower room (next page) is simple and monotone. The polka dot-tiled floor is a smart design twist that elevates the look. anne-sophiepailleret.com Floor Mosaic tiles flow from wall to floor, while plain blue Emery & Cie tiles complement the geometric look (emeryetcie.com) Ceiling Pops of cobalt blue paint by Little Greene have made their way onto both the ceiling and window frame (littlegreene.com) Bath Try Victoria + Albert for similar (vandabaths.com) Brassware Try Dornbracht’s ‘Tara’ taps in black (dornbracht.com) Vanity unit For similar basins, try Duravit’s ‘Vero’ design (duravit.co.uk) Shower room (next page) Floor Polka dot tiles from Paris-based company Petit Pan. The ‘Dotty Mixtures’ design by Decorum is similar (decorumtiles.co.uk) Shower 1930s-style metal-framed shower enclosure Accessories Small bar stool from Hem (hem.com) ➤


Both of the rooms have slick styles that are united by the use of strong, graphic lines and colour


AT I O N

HOT TREND

WORK THE PLANK Reclaimed wood is a great way to give your bathroom texture and charm New sealing treatments for wood that protect it from water damage mean there’s now no reason not to use it in your bathroom. In fact, using reclaimed planks, say, to enclose your bathtub, is an easy and effective statement. First, remove any old paints or lacquers from your salvaged planks, then sand and wipe them down with white spirit. Finish off with a layer of heavy duty wood protector – German brand Osmo is a good source for this (£51.87 for 2.5 litres, Wood Finishes Direct; wood-finishes-direct.com). Contrast the timber with an equally rough-hewn material for the walls, such as Mandarin Stone’s ‘Mortar Sand Porcelain’ tiles. ‘Mortar Sand Porcelain’ tiles, from £29 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

CASE STUDY

T H R OW SOME SHAPES Geometric tiles in a bold shade of green add extra character to an already glitzy mix of stone, iron and glistening gold Wall ‘Architectonics’ tiles in ‘Moss’, from £277.67 per square metre, Waterworks (waterworks.com) Vanity unit ‘Fabienne’, £5,197, Waterworks (waterworks.com) Hardware ‘Henry’ low profile taps, £1,244, Waterworks (waterworks.com) Accessories For gold bathroom soap dishes and dispensers, try Decor Walther, available at Amara (amara.com)

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RAW BEAUTY Be inspired by nature with a design that celebrates organic textures and shapes This bathroom is a place to meditate on the majesty of its forest views. Cleverly, the design includes many subtle nods to nature, from Cedit’s ‘Archaeologie’ ceramic wall surface that appears to have weathered at least a few storms, to the smooth, flowing lines of the Agape ‘DR’ soaking tub by Studio MK27. ‘DR’ bath by Studio MK27 for Agape, from £10,200, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com). ‘Archaeologie’ ceramic panels, from £132 per square metre, Cedit (ceditceramiche.it)


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PICK UP STICKS Get to know the new must-have tile style: the stick – designed to hug curved walls This extra-slim rectangular tile is perfect for covering a curvaceous surface. In this bathroom, designed by the Australia-based Doherty Design Studio, the rolling green wall contrasts with the solid beauty of the marble cladding opposite (dohertydesign studio.com.au). Try ‘Arabian Sea’ tiles in ‘Karachi’, £174.88 per square metre, Fired Earth ( firedearth.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND PICTURE: DEREK SWALWELL, JO BRIDGES

DOUBLE OR NOTHING Twin sinks are a must for busy couples. Now, functionality gets a vintage twist A sink each is brilliantly practical (no need to wait your turn during the morning rush), but not always beautiful. That’s why we love this extra-large, vintage-style pedestal sink sourced by salvage and interior design firm Retrouvius. Its tapered pedestal base makes it look far more elegant than your average supersized sink. Salvaged double basin, from £1,800, Retrouvius (retrouvius.com)

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CASE STUDY

PURPLE R AIN This spa-style home sanctuary revives body and soul using water and light Lighting sets the tone in this bathroom, where a cutting-edge smartphonecontrolled LED system is inset into the ceiling, allowing the colour of the room to be changed to one of 16,000 variations. Purple is the favoured hue in this home as, according to chromotherapy (the study of how coloured light affects people’s moods), it helps to reduce stress and aid sleep. This dark, dramatic space was not always so high-tech, though. When the Bjørnvad family moved into the 1930s villa in Copenhagen, Denmark, the 5.5-square-metre bathroom had not been refreshed since the 1960s. Consequently, it was modest, dated and, without a bath, failed to meet the family’s needs. Their solution was to combine the bath and shower in one spa-style wetroom, which was accommodated by extending the room by just 1.56 square metres. ‘But where is the bath,’ you ask? Close the drain in the floor and the sunken shower at the end of the bathroom is transformed into a giant tub.

WORDS: JULIA MINCARELLI PICTURES: BIRGITTA WOLFGANG/SISTERS AGENCY

Floor and walls Ceramic ‘Eiffel Metalico’ tiles from Odorico are used across the floor and walls. Find similar tiles at Porcelanosa (porcelanosa.com) Cabinetry and basin The vanity unit with drawer was sourced from Copenhagen Bath (copenhagenbath.co.uk). It is teamed with a Vola tap and a large back-lit mirror by Dansani (vola.com; dansani.co.uk) Shower Axor showerhead fromHansgrohe. The wetroom steps and floor are clad in handmade Italian mosaic tiles, try Sicis for similar (hansgrohe.co.uk; sicis.com) ➤

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Glints of metal, such as Tom Dixon’s brass table and copper light, add a touch of luxury


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HOT TREND

SPLIT THE DIFFERENCE A two-tone wall can modernise any bathroom in an instant Elevate traditional wood panelling and classic bathroom furniture with a bold paint effect. Here, splitting the wall into two perfect portions of block colour turns a dull scheme into a daring one. The trick is to choose a subtle pairing of shades – we suggest picking two hues from the same colour family, such as Paint & Paper Library’s delicate ‘Porcelain’ blue, which is used here. ‘Porcelain II’ (top) and ‘Porcelain V’ ( bottom) paints, both £52 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

CASE STUDY

R O C K F O R M AT I O N From the stone backdrop that recalls a cliff face, to the pebble-like smoothness of the bath and diaphanous view of the light-dappled canopy beyond the window, this bathroom is a nature lover’s paradise

PICTURE: PAUL RAESIDE

Wall ‘Keystone Field’ tiles in ‘Redwood’, £247.87 per square metre, Waterworks (waterworks.com) Bath ‘.25’ oval tub, £10,453, Waterworks (waterworks.com) Hardware ‘.25’ floor-mounted tub filler with handshower in nickel, £3,577, Waterworks (waterworks.com) Accessories For a similar stool, try the ‘Stool Three’ by Another Country, £205 (anothercountry.com)

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HOT TREND

MODERN ORIENTAL Traditional Japanese and Chinese bathing rituals have been given a slick, contemporary overhaul The deep soaking tubs common in Japan and China are usually made of wood, but here, Shanghai-based designers Neri & Hu have created a sleek take on tradition: the ‘Immersion’ tub for Agape. This elegant bath takes centre stage, but oriental touches are also evident in the black lacquered side tables and the light simplicity of the floating vanity unit – West One Bathrooms carry a good selection (westonebathrooms.com). ‘Fez’ freestanding bathtub spout, £736.27; ‘Immersion’ bathtub by Neri & Hu, available December 2017, both Agape (agape.it)

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HOT TREND

WILD WALLS In the bathroom at the El Imparcial restaurant in Spain, local studio Madrid in Love (madridinlove.com) has used the extravagant ‘Audubon Grove Birch’ wallpaper from American brand Kasmir. For an injection of English pattern, try a William Morris print, available from Jane Clayton. Worried about using wallpaper in the bathroom? Don’t be – just protect it from water damage using ‘Decorators Varnish’ by Polyvine (£18.62 for one litre; polyvine.com). Morris & Co wallpaper, £62 for a ten-metre roll, Jane Clayton( janeclayton.co.uk)

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PICTURES: DEREK SWALWELL, LUCIA MARCANO ALVAREZ

Add life to a small space by letting loose with pattern


HOT TREND

GREY AND GRAIN Urban style has taken a softer turn – pair slick concrete walls with wood Contemporary doesn’t have to mean cold. Take inspiration from Australian firm Schulberg Demkiw Architects, which has created a simple yet striking statement with concrete walls, wooden floors and little else. The pared-back look allows the natural grain of the eucalyptus wood floorboards (made water resistant with six coats of decking oil) and the uneven textures of the concrete to be the stars of the show (schulbergdemkiw.com). Teak Decking makes similar custom solid Burmese teak shower trays, from £720 (teak-decking.co.uk)


HOT TREND

BLUR THE EDGES Forget straight lines and corners, subtle curves are the way forward Danish designer Cecilie Manz reimagines the minimalist look as ethereal and graceful. Her ‘Luv’ collection for Duravit is wonderfully curvaceous, from the vanity unit to the sink and bathtub. In true Scandinavian style, the range comes in ultra-matt white and works best when paired with oak flooring – try Danish brand Dinesen for similar (dinesen.com). Floorstanding vanity unit, £2,041; bath, £2,860; washbowl, £542, all from the ‘Luv’ collection by Cecilie Manz for Duravit (duravit.co.uk)


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CASE STUDY

ART DECO OPULENCE The magic of this bathroom in Oregon, US, designed by Bright Designlab, is the decadent mix of marble, rich green tiles and shiny brass. It’s a look that oozes luxury (brightdesignlab.com)

PICTURES: BRIGHT DESIGNLAB

Tiles ‘Calacatta Honed Marble’ tiles by Mandarin Stone, £59.96 per square metre (mandarinstone.com). ‘Dandelion’ green patterned tiles from Marrakech Design, £152.16 per square metre (marrakechdesign.se). Metro tiles from Devol’s ‘Emerald Green London Tiles’ collection, from £15 per tile (devolkitchens.co.uk) Sink The wall-mounted marble sinks in this home are custom-made. Try Salvatori’s ‘Stiletto’ basin in ‘Bianco Carrara’, from £5,985 (salvatori.it) Lighting Unique and stylish ‘Trapeze 2’ wall lights by Apparatus, £1,118 each, FBC London (fbc-london.com) Hardware All from Waterworks’ ‘Henry’ collection in burnished brass. Gooseneck three-hole tap, £1,227; showerhead, £1,363 (waterworks.com)

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CASE STUDY

ASIAN FUSION Tropical living merges with a modern, urban sensibility in this fluid bathroom This idyllic holiday home in Bali is shared by friends, Danish designer Birgitte Raben and Australian interior designer Lisa Taffin. They built the house with the intention of creating a space that was not only tranquil and immersed in nature, but imbued with an urban, loft-like aesthetic in line with their modern tastes. Their contemporary bathroom is a testament to their sense of style. There is a feeling of spaciousness throughout the home that is especially effective in this room. A free-flowing space, it is finished in concrete and tadelakt plaster and divided into a wetroom and vanity area. ‘We wanted to work with the natural light, which is a warm, beautiful colour in Bali,’ says Birgitte. The giant mirror over the vanity amplifies the daylight, which floods through industrial-style metal doors and windows in both the bathroom and the bedroom. The metal-framed design is not common to Indonesia – the details are bespoke in order to get the look and quality just right. ‘We wanted them to resemble those of a Parisian atelier,’ Lisa says. Floors and walls The wetroom has been tanked (a preparation that waterproofs the floor) and tadelakt plaster used to keep the space watertight – try Tadelakt London (tadelaktlondon.co.uk) Cabinetry and basin Two wall-mounted dark wood shelves create a vanity area, upon which sits a ceramic basin. Kohler’s ‘Vessel’ basins are similar (kohler.com) Shower Try Hansgrohe for a similar wall-mounted shower unit (hansgrohe.co.uk) Accessories Bowls and vessels by Rabens Saloner – available in the UK at The Mercantile London. Try Society Limonta for bedding, and Maisons du Monde for cushions (themercantile london.com; societylimonta.com; maisonsdumonde.com) ➤


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WORDS: JACKIE DALY PICTURES: PRUE RUSCOE/HOUSE OF PICTURES (PHOTOGRAPHY), TAMI CHRISTIANSEN (STYLING/PRODUCTION)


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The space is tranquil, but imbued with an urban loft-style aesthetic. The main bedroom, for example, is framed by iron windows that overlook rice ďŹ elds


HOT TREND

FAIR COPPER Take the trend for metallics to new heights with statement floor-to-ceiling cladding Copper accents produce a beautiful glow, but if you want to make a big impact, cover a whole wall in this most atmospheric of metals. In this apartment in Belgium, the owner has used simple copper sheeting to brilliant effect. We love the way that the steam rising from the bath has aged the metal, creating a natural antiqued look. Copper cladding, ÂŁ216 for two one-metre sheets, Metal Sheets (metalsheets.co.uk)


PICTURE: PATRICIA GOIJENS/NOGLITTERNOGLORY.COM


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

CASE STUDY

DA R K AG E S There’s no reason to be afraid of the dark. Here, Danish studio Norm Architects shows how textural touches such as concrete, metallic effect tiles and industrial details can soften even the edgiest of spaces (normcph.com) Flooring ‘Eiffel’ tiles in ‘Metálico Natural’, £52 per square metre, Inalco (inalco.es) Walls Try Clayworks’ natural clay plaster finishes for a similarly textured concrete effect on the walls, £20 per square metre (clay-works.com) Vanity unit Stainless steel ‘ILA100’ basin, £960; reclaimed wood countertop, from £860; wallmounted storage unit with wired glass doors, from £2,105, all by Moab80, House Lab (houselab.co.uk) Hardware Vola’s ‘111’ wall-mounted basin mixer, £815 and ‘2441T8-061’ bath mixer with showerhead and hand shower, £3,038, YDA (yorkshiredesignassociates.co.uk) Accessories Gubi round ‘Adnet’ mirror with black leather frame, from £599, Nest (nest.co.uk)

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HOT TREND

LINE DRAWING Elegant black outlines are the height of fashion in bathrooms This lounge-like bathroom designed by Dutch studio The Loft almost floats in a geometric grid created by the ultra-thin lines of the Ex.t ‘Stand’ tub and freestanding sink by Norm Architects, which are echoed in the house’s similarly slim black window frames. A Beni Ourain rug offers a break from strict, straight lines and grounds the space with a softer touch (entertheloft.com). ‘Stand’ washstand, from £910.79; bathtub, £5,752, both by Norm Architects for Ex.t (ex-t.com)


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CASE STUDY

RIPPLE EFFECT The bathroom at New York’s by-appointment design showroom Avenue Road 8A could look stark, with its terrazzo flooring and pale palette, but softly curved porcelain tiles add character (avenue-road.com)

PICTURE: ALICE GAO

Flooring and countertop For bespoke poured terrazzo designs, try Diespeker & Co, from £250 per square metre (diespeker.co.uk) Tiles ‘Soap’ tiles by Sebastian Herkner for Kaufmann Keramik, £214.30 per square metre (kaufmann-keramik.de) Lighting ‘Captured’ pendant light by Michael Anastassiades for Lobmeyr, from £5,529 (lobmeyr.at) Sink ‘Shell’ solid walnut sink by Nina Mair, £1,950 (ninamair.at) Hardware ‘590V’ tap by Vola, £789.60, YDA (yorkshiredesignassociates.co.uk)

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CASE STUDY

F R E E F L OW Arranged across an entire floor of a Dutch home, this suite is a relaxing open-plan retreat Open-plan living has extended beyond the main living spaces in modern homes. A new, fluid approach to spatial design has encouraged the rise of the open-plan suite. Indeed, this is an ethos that Annemarie Vlaming, founder of lifestyle store AAI Made with Love, and Henk-Jan Mulder, owner of the Kunsthuizen art gallery, have embraced wholeheartedly. Built in 1890, their canalside mansion house in Leiden, southern Holland, was spacious enough when they moved in, but was divided into distinct rooms that did not serve their lifestyle. The couple have two daughters and hectic schedules, which left them in need of a sanctuary. So they devoted an entire floor to their new retreat. The new private suite is one seamless space, which can be divided when desired by a series of folding wooden doors. The different textures on the walls and floors provide further visual demarcation. Here, the couple have not only created a bathroom and living area with a natural flow, but one that adapts effortlessly to their needs. aaimadewithlove.com; kunsthuizen.nl Floor ‘Mews’ herringbone floor tiles in ‘Soot’ by Mutina (mutina.it) Walls Plaster walls in a muted, grey tone. Oak panelled doors fold back to open up the space Bath Freestanding Cocoon bath (bycocoon.com) and tap by Grohe (grohe.co.uk) Cabinetry and basin An antique cabinet has been converted into a vanity unit. Try West One Bathrooms for modern basins, mirrors and lighting (westonebathrooms.com) ➤


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WORDS: JACKIE DALY PICTURES: JELTJE JANMAAT


The scheme in the gym is monochrome and contemporary, which ensures it blends seamlessly with the ultramodern aesthetic of the suite

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HOT TREND

MARBLE MINGLE Artfully blend white and grey tiles for a fresh take on coloured marble Instead of using large panels of marble, opt for tiles in a modern chevron design that allow you to create a more playful effect. In this shower room, one wall features Mandarin Stone’s white ‘Calacatta Tumbled Marble’ tiles, while the other is clad in the darker ‘Bluestone Tumbled Marble’ variety. The floor is where the two marbles meet, in a fluid pattern that feels like a gradual colour gradient. ‘Calacatta Tumbled Marble’ and ‘Bluestone Tumbled Marble’ tiles, both £47.70 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

CASE STUDY

B E YO N D V I N TAG E Spanish interior designer Cristina Rodriguez converted a vintage wooden desk into a washstand and topped it with a basin made from a slab of marble. Rustic simplicity has never looked so good (cristinarodriguez.com.es)

PICTURE: MONTSE GARRIGA GRAU

Washstand Can’t find an old desk? Try Tikamoon’s teak ‘Bahya’ washstand, from £249 (tikamoon.co.uk) Sink For a similar look, try LivingRoc’s marble ‘Pegasus White’ design, from £400 (livingroc.co.uk) Lighting The ‘Brooklyn Vintage’ pendant in pewter has an industrial feel. £69, Industville (industville.co.uk) Hardware Sleek hardware contrasts well with vintage pieces. Try CEA’s ‘Mil35’ tap from the ‘Milo360’ collection, from £627.56 (ceadesign.it)

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CASE STUDY

S I T A N D S OA K Reclamation and design company Retrouvius has created a comfy raised seating platform that’s ideal for relaxing on with a book after a spell in the sunken bathtub (retrouvius.com)

PICTURE: JO BRIDGES

Seating Bespoke design by Retrouvius made out of salvaged tropical hardwood, from £174 for similar (retrouvius.com) Bath Try Duravit’s ‘DuraStyle’ inset tub for similar, £657.50, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk) Hardware Silver nickel ‘Mackintosh MH 1260’ bath set with pull-out shower, £1,434, Lefroy Brooks (lefroybrooks.com) Blinds ‘Floppy’ linen roman blinds, £668 as pictured, Nest (nestdesign.co.uk) Accessories Lefroy Brooks’ ‘LB 3206’ ladder towel warmer in silver nickel, £1,942 (lefroybrooks.com). The Organic Sheep’s ‘Icelandic Sheepskin’ rug, £440, Heal’s (heals.com)


HOT TREND

NATURAL TEXTURE Lift a soothing palette of greys and whites with a mix of tactile materials A combination of tonal greys, browns and whites can be much more than the sum of its parts – all you need is texture. Here, a stark concrete and steel vanity is warmed by a rich, glistening backdrop of white lacquered wood mosaic tiles from Viva Made. The ‘Caffé’ reclaimed wooden planks on the floor, with their uneven brown tones, add more character to this subtle scheme. White lacquered ‘Mosaico Ciotolo’ tiles, £45.60 for a 30x30cm section; ‘Caffé’ lacquered wood planks, from £78 per square metre, both Viva Made (emilgroup.it/viva)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

SPLASH OF PATTERN Use tiles as a decorating device for highlighting a standout feature In this Byron Beach home in Australia, the sink gets special treatment thanks to a tiled strip that descends from the ceiling down to the floating shelf supporting the basin. The intricately patterned tiles add colour and help to energise the otherwise plain, white room (byronbayabodes.com.au).

PICTURE: JESSIE PRINCE

‘Batik Patchwork Blue’ tiles, £49.99 per square metre, Topps Tiles (toppstiles.co.uk)

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Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

CASE STUDY

RUGGED CHARM Tough materials take on a luxurious quality in this bathroom by interior design studio Handelsmann + Khaw. Be inspired by the simple beauty of limestone floors, aged metal cabinetry and a classic steel tub (handelsmannkhaw.com)

PICTURES: HANDELSMANN + KHAW

Flooring Try Stone Superstore’s textured ‘Dijon’ tumbled limestone tiles, £36.90 per square metre (stonesuperstore.co.uk) Bath ‘Vasca Vieques’ steel tub in white by Agape, £6,691, Tanini Home (taninihome.com) Vanity unit ‘Must’ by Altamarea, customised with integrated Paonazzetto marble basins, from £1,238 (altamareabath.it) Taps Try Lusso Stone’s ‘Luxe Series’ in matt black, £285 (lussostone.com) Lighting ‘Vanity’ sconces by Apparatus, £1,053 each, 1st Dibs (1stdibs.com) Accessories For a similar circular mirror, try Perch & Parrow’s ‘Grantham’, £110 (perchandparrow.com)

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D I R E C T O RY

THE SHOWROOM

PICTURE: PHILIP ETHERDEN

Planning a bathroom upgrade, or fitting a whole new suite? You’ll be spoiled for choice with this, our guide to the country’s leading showrooms. These specialists stock the best of both British and international brands. Visit to discover the latest designs, compare product features, materials and colourways, and select every important finishing touch with the guidance of experts

A

A L B I O N B AT H C O M PA N Y

Words NATALIE EGLING

There are 54 different luxury tubs available at this Essex-based bath specialist. Its fine collection is made from a durable Iso-Enamel material that gives the look and feel of original cast iron at a third of the weight. Visit for fine brassware, basins and cabinetry, too. Pictured ‘Dalby’ double vanity console with ‘Tuscany’ bowl and granite top, £1,139 The Factory, High Birch Road, Weeley Heath CO16 (albionbathco.com)

ALTERNATIVE BATHROOMS

A S T O N M AT T H E W S

Find great style at every price point at the three London showrooms. From deluxe showers to waterproof TVs, it has products by a bunch of top brands, including Bette and Lefroy Brooks. Pictured ‘Horus’ Ceramilux basin by Marco Baxadonne for Mastella, £834, with ‘Up&Down’ wall-mounted tap by CEA, from £1,560 105–107 Wandsworth Bridge Road, London SW6 (alternativebathrooms.com)

Founded in 1823, this impressive north London showroom stocks over 2,000 big-name brands and exclusive lines in a mix of styles sourced from across Europe. Browse modern wall-hung basins, sleek showers, traditional wooden cabinets and classic cast-iron baths. Pictured ‘Ambra’ shower rose and arm in ‘Polished Brass’, £431.99 141–147A Essex Road, Islington, London N1 (astonmatthews.co.uk)

B

B&Q

BAGNO DESIGN

In-store consultants at this DIY chain use the innovative ‘B&Q Spaces’ 3D software to help bring your design to life. Both traditional and contemporary ranges are available, and space-saving and storage ideas are key considerations. Look out for toilets and basins by Ideal Standard and showers by Mira. Pictured ‘Imandra’ range by Cooke & Lewis, from £50 for a wall cabinet Showrooms nationwide (diy.com)

The company’s practical, eye-catching designs encompass everything from walk-in showers to taps and furniture. You can explore it all at the brand’s flagship showroom on London’s King’s Road, as well as at branches in Birmingham, Glasgow and Edinburgh. Pictured ‘Art’ floorstanding vanity unit, £2,235, and countertop with basin, £785 Showrooms nationwide (bagnodesignlondon.co.uk) ➤ 133


B AT H R O O M S I N T E R N AT I O N A L B Y T H G This French-owned company offers sleek and highly ornate bathrooms that can be viewed at its London showroom. Its latest collaboration with interior designer Timothy Corrigan has resulted in two slick new lines. Pictured ‘West Coast’ collection by THG Paris and Timothy Corrigan, from £1,401 4 Pont St, London SW1 (bathroomsint.com)

B AT H S T O R E

B E R T & M AY

This one-stop bathroom retailer sells its own ‘Contemporary’, ‘Traditional’, ‘Boutique’, ‘Timeless’ and ‘Space-saving’ ranges, plus lighting, heating and decorating solutions. It has 173 UK venues, including a branch in Edinburgh and flagship store in London. Pictured ‘Transition Touchstone’ bathtub, from £2,399, with ‘Transition’ floorstanding mixer in ‘Rose Gold’, £1,199 Showrooms nationwide (bathstore.com)

A dreamy bathroom collection is available at the London showroom of this encaustic tile expert. Visit to admire and explore its tactile and sculptural cast-concrete basins, offered in the same natural pigment colours found in its collection of artisan tiles. Pictured ‘Pedley’ concrete basin in ‘Limestone’, £720 67 Vyner Street, London E2 (bertandmay.com)

BOFFI With a roster of world-class designers on board, this Italian brand stands out for its use of ultra-luxe materials. Its new bathroom collaborations include the addition of two washbasin projects for the smart ‘Boffi_Code’ collection by architects Victor Vasilev and Piero Lissoni. Pictured ‘Wood_In’ bathroom by Piero Lissoni, from £15,000 254 Brompton Road, London SW3 (boffi.com)

C

CAESARSTONE

B I S A Z Z A This Italian mosaic specialist teams up with designer greats such as Jaime Hayón and Marcel Wanders for its ‘Bagno’ collection. Expect to find everything from sanitaryware to stylish lighting, as well as accessories such as marble trays. Pictured ‘Daffodil 205’ bathtub in ‘Black’, from £6,900, ‘Bergamot’ ceramic washbasins in ‘Black’, from £792, and ‘Gentian 75’ single-lever basin mixer in ‘Chrome’, from £570 60 Sloane Avenue, London SW3 (bisazza.it) 134

Founded in 1987, this quartz specialist manufactures high-quality premium surfaces for countertops, vanity units, wall cladding and floors. There are over 40 options in its colourful catalogue to choose from. Its first UK showroom is due to open later this year. Pictured ‘Statuario Nuvo’ quartz, from £300 per square metre Unit 3, Navigation Park, Morson Road, Enfield EN3 (caesarstone.co.uk)


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

CZECH & SPEAKE Quintessentially English, London-based and family-owned Czech & Speake offers a well-thought-out curation of fittings and accessories for a dreamy bathroom. Choose from either the traditional ‘Edwardian’ or modern ‘Cubist’ ranges at its Belgravia showroom. Pictured ‘DCA’ three-hole mixer with pop-up waste in a chrome finish, £910 54 Pimlico Road, London SW1 (czechandspeakebathrooms.com)

CP HART

C AT C H P O L E & RY E A British maker of timeless sanitaryware and taps in classic silhouettes and alluring finishes. Its cast-iron baths are poured using traditional techniques and hand finished by skilled and experienced craftspeople at its foundry and showroom in Kent. Pictured ‘The Mayfair’ shower tray, from £4,800, with ‘Le Thermo Grand Exposed’ shower, from £2,280 282–284 Fulham Road, London SW10 (catchpoleandrye.com)

PICTURE: JERONI AGUAYO

D

This London flagship store is the place to find on-trend pieces from Bette, Duravit, Fantini, Neutra and Ex.T, as well as a range of ceramics and brassware designed in-house. There are also eight further London stores to visit. Pictured ‘Narciso’ vanity unit with basin by Cielo, from £4,452 Railway Arch 213, Newnham Terrace, Hercules Road, London SE1 (cphart.co.uk)

D AY T R U E

D E S I G N S PA C E L O N D O N

DOMUS

A London-based firm that creates grand bathrooms using shower enclosures by Bette and The Shower Lab, and brassware from Samuel Heath. It’s also the exclusive UK stockist of Rexa Design. Its showrooms are in Maida Vale and Chelsea – the latter featuring edgier brands and products. Pictured ‘Unico’ bathtub/shower tray by Rexa Design, from £9,840 128 Elgin Avenue, London W9 (daytrue.com)

Now at its south London base in the city’s emerging design quarter, this company’s huge showroom is arranged as a series of room sets that showcase its Italian-made Modulnova bathrooms. There’s also a showroom on London’s Wigmore Street. Pictured ‘Oval Twin’ bath in Tecnoril by Modulnova, £8,357, and ‘FRE10’ floorstanding bath mixer by Cea, £3,504 120 Webber Street, London SE1 (designspacelondon.com)

Celebrating over 50 years of trading, this south London company sources stone, tiles and mosaics globally, with designs by Mutina and Florim. Its extensive portfolio includes over 200 product ranges. It has four showrooms in London and an outlet store in Surrey. Pictured ‘New Terracotta’ tiles in ‘Ballet Pink Glazed’, from £195 per square metre 60 Queenstown Road, London SW8 (domusgroup.com) ➤ 135


DEVON & DEVON Taking its style influence from the 1920s, its luxe west London showroom has freestanding baths, vanity units and marble flooring. The brand has just launched its wallpaper debut, too: a collection of 126 dazzling designs by Francesca Greco, Nina Farré and Vito Nesta. Pictured ‘Memphis’ console, £4,143, and ‘Majestic’ wallpaper by Vito Nesta, £118 per square metre 77–79 Westbourne Grove, London W2 (devon-devon.com) 136


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

DRUMMONDS Classically inspired and traditionally made, this British company’s elegant collection includes freestanding cast-iron bathtubs, china sinks and glass wall lamps – all on display at its Chelsea showroom. A second London showroom can be found in Notting Hill. Pictured ‘Bute’ cast-iron bathtub with steel surround, £6,792, and ‘Chessleton’ floorstanding bath and shower mixer in ‘Antique Nickel’, from £3,090 642 King’s Road, London SW6 (drummonds-uk.com)

E PICTURE: DAMIAN RUSSELL

E D W I N S B AT H R O O M S This family-run firm stocks elite brands such as Dornbracht and Effegibi. There are several showrooms and a dedicated plumbing and heating counter dotted along London’s All Saints Road, plus a specialist ‘Spa and Wellness’ venue. Pictured ‘Edge’ wall unit with basin, £5,124, ‘Via Veneto’ mirror, £3,078, and ‘Controstampo’ bath, £9,067, all by Falper 17–26, All Saints Road, London W11 (edwinsbathrooms.co.uk)

F

FIRED EARTH Combining expert craftsmanship with practicality, this brand’s products span the classic to the contemporary, and include superb paints and tiles. It has 62 showrooms – the one in Portman Square in London has several beautiful bathroom displays. Pictured ‘Babylon’ bathtub, £6,650, ‘Top Hat’ wall paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, and ‘Hammam’ tiles, £690.06 per square metre Stores nationwide ( firedearth.com)

H

HANSGROHE The Water Studio – this German brand’s hub of inspiration located in the heart of London’s Clerkenwell design district – has working tap and shower displays. Products can’t be bought there, but customers can look at designs before being referred to a retailer. Pictured ‘Uno’ floorstanding bath spout by Axor, from £1,548 12–16 Clerkenwell Road, London EC1 (thewaterstudio.co.uk) ➤ 137


H O L L O WAY S O F L U D L O W Known for its unique showcases, this basement showroom features eight contemporary bathroom displays, and stocks products from Laufen, Matki, CEA and others. It also offers a complete design and fit service. Look out for its bespoke items made from reclaimed bricks. Pictured ‘Madison’ cast-iron bathtub, from £4,755 113 Shepherds Bush Road, London, W6 (hollowaysofludlow.com)

L

J

J U S T A D D WAT E R Contemporary names, including Bauhaus and Sottini, can be found at this brand’s ample showrooms in London, Essex and Hertfordshire, with on-site plumbing, heating and building merchants available. Pictured ‘ME’ basin by Starck, £196.80, and ‘L Cube’ vanity by Christian Werner, £471.60, both for Duravit, with ‘Axor’ mixer by Starck for Hansgrohe, £220 202–228 York Way, Kings Cross, London N7 ( justaddwater.co.uk)

LAURENCE PIDGEON

LIQUID DESIGN

Visit Laurence’s London showroom for modern, innovative and high-end solutions from Italian brand Moab 80 and Copenhagen Bath, as well a great collection of taps by CEA and Vola. Pictured ‘Muschel’ bathtub, £4,319, and ‘SQ2’ furniture, from £246 for a countertop, all by Copenhagen Bath; ‘FS1’ bath mixer, £2,672, by Vola 31–35 Fulham High Street, London SW6 (laurencepidgeon.com)

High-end bathrooms with designs by Italian brands Agape and Antonio Lupi are paired with superbly engineered Vola and Dornbracht fittings at this Northampton showroom, which works with architects and designers. Pictured ‘Lariana’ washbasin with stand and shelf by Patricia Urquiola for Agape, from £4,992 64–66 High Street, Kingsthorpe, Northampton NN2 (liquiddesign.co.uk)

LUNDHS Norwegian brand Lundhs has been quarrying and supplying 100 per cent natural stone for over 50 years. Its four materials (‘Emerald’, ‘Blue’, ‘Royal’ and ‘Antique’) are showcased at the Surrey showroom of Gerald Culliford. Each slab of stone is unique. Pictured ‘Lundhs Emerald’ stone worktop, from £680 per square metre 52 Lower Marsh Lane, Kingston-UponThames KT1 (lundhsrealstone.com) 138

M

K

K O H L E R AT W E S T O N E B AT H R O O M S This east London showroom is the flagship space for luxury US brand Kohler and its other labels – Kallista, Robern and Sanijura. Look out for Ann Sacks, the Kohler-owned brand providing beautiful surface finishes. Pictured ‘Veil Intelligent’ wall-hung toilet, £4,448 44–48 Clerkenwell Road, London EC1 (kohler.co.uk)

L I V I N G S PA C E & PA R T N E R S An Italian designer furniture company with three London stores, featuring modern bathroom ranges by Lago. Floating modular vanity units, illuminated mirrors and glass-bottomed basins are standout signature looks. Pictured ‘Depth’ sink in ‘Wildwood Natural’ by Lago, £2,475 55 Baker Street, London W1 (livingspaceuk.com)

MANDARIN STONE

MARAZZI

A large selection of luxurious stone, decorative tiles and practical woodeffect porcelain planks can be found at this brand’s ten showrooms around the country – from Cardiff to Cambridge and Cheltenham. All materials are competitively priced and most are held in stock for speedy delivery. Pictured ‘Geoform’ tiles in ‘Ivory Porcelain’, £107.22 per square metre Stores nationwide (mandarinstone.com)

Designed by architects Lorenzo Baldini and Antonio Pisano, this Italian tile brand’s first London showroom occupies three immersive floors. Head over for a masterclass in seductive textures and glossy stoneware for modern interiors. Pictured ‘Stoneart Decoro Pattern’, ‘Stoneart Mosaico’ and ‘Stoneart Steel’ ceramic tiles, price on application 90–92 St John Street, London EC1 (marazzitile.co.uk) ➤


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

N

NEPTUNE This homeware company is known for its solid timber washstands, simple accessories and oversized mirrors. It collaborates with Lefroy Brooks and Perrin & Rowe, and its newest showroom recently opened on The Broadway in Wimbledon, London. Pictured ‘Edinburgh’ large marble-topped washstand, £1,320, ‘Keats’ wall lights, £108 each, and ‘Wingfield’ jars, from £16 each Showrooms nationwide (neptune.com) ➤ 139


N A P I E R B AT H R O O M S AND INTERIORS Find the full service at this high-end Edinburgh-based retailer – from bespoke bathrooms to installation services. It showcases pieces by Armani/Roca and Keuco, and recently launched high-tech brand Toto in Scotland. Pictured ‘Washlet’ wall-hung toilet by Toto, from £1,750 30 Canonmills, Edinburgh EH3 (napierinteriors.com)

NICHOLAS ANTHONY Ranges from leading names including Dornbracht, Hansgrohe and Teuco are offered here. Consultations and orders are available at its London locations, but for full displays visit the brand’s Ascot, Colchester and Cambridge showrooms. Pictured ‘Y-line’ vanity unit in ‘Golden Oak’, with ‘Kensho’ countertop by Silestone, price on application 43–45 London Road, Colchester CO3 (nicholas-anthony.com)

P

PORCELANOSA This Spanish manufacturer has 21 UK showrooms and delivers functional, yet luxurious style. Expect to find water-saving toilets, smart shower columns and radio-integrated mirrors. Pictured ‘Tono Elements’ stone shower, £10,781.33, stone basin, £1,901.22, basin mixer, £233, magnifying mirror, £227, and mirror, £735.26, all by Foster + Partners Wandsworth Bridge Road, London, SW6 (porcelanosa.com/uk) 140

PORTER A team of skilled designers, stonemasons and wood craftspeople make up Porter Vanities, where quiet luxury is the main focus. Choose from shaker-style painted vanity units or clean-lined contemporary twists alongside polished finishing touches. Pictured ‘Carlton’ vanity, from £2,634, ‘Everdon’ mirror, from £474, ‘Hayden’ light, from £294 and ‘Pelham’ brassware, from £294 115 Queenstown Road, London SW8 (portervanities.com)

R

RIPPLES A luxury retailer that creates its bespoke bathrooms using designs by Samuel Heath, Bisque, Burgbad and Hansgrohe. Among its 14 showrooms is its most recent opening in Beaconsfield. Pictured ‘Eclipse’ bath in ‘Bagnotec Stone’, £2,999, with ‘Massaud’ floorstanding bath spout, £2,868, and ‘Palace Carrara’ tiles, from £105 per square metre Showrooms nationwide (ripplesbathrooms.com)

R O C A L O N D O N G A L L E RY This Spanish brand’s super-stylish basins, showers and brassware are on show alongside a striking interactive water display designed by the late Zaha Hadid at its contemporary flagship bathroom space in London. Pictured ‘Inspira’ two-drawer wall-hung unit, from £793, and basin, from £262, with ‘Lanta’ extendedheight basin mixer, £315 Station Court, Townmead Road, London SW6 (uk.roca.com)


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

S PICTURE: GYORGY KOROSSY

S A LVAT O R I Designed by architect Piero Lissoni, the London showroom of this luxurious Italian stone specialist will tempt you with elegant bathroom collections, supreme wall and floor surfaces and smaller gems such as mirrors, soap dishes, wall hooks and side tables. Pictured ‘Adda’ wall-mounted basin and modular drawers with top in ‘Pietra d’Avola’ limestone by David Lopez Quincoces, from £5,000 26 Wigmore Street, London W1 (salvatori.it) ➤

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S A M U E L H E AT H Made by an elite team of craftspeople, this British heritage company’s brassware and accessories are available in a variety of finishes. Visit the Chelsea showroom in London to see the range – the most recent ‘Landmark’ line is inspired by the Bauhaus School of Design. Pictured ‘Landmark Industrial’ single-lever basin mixer, from £762.20 Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 (samuel-heath.co.uk)

V

T

TOPPS TILES

TOTO

There’s an extensive choice of floor and wall tiles at this British chain. Make a statement with natural stone (marble, slate, limestone) or various mosaic options – and use the helpful online Visualiser during the planning process. Pictured ‘Wild Blossom’ tiles in ‘Seagrass’ (left), £39 per square metre, with ‘Wild Blossom’ tiles in ‘Seagrass Floral’ (right), £54.90 per square metre Showrooms nationwide (toppstiles.co.uk)

This Japanese firm’s focus is on a healthy, stress-relieving bathing experience aided by modern technology. As such, expect state-of-the-art investment tubs, showers, basins, taps and shower-toilets – which cleanse with warm water – at the east London showroom. Pictured ‘Flotation’ tub, available Spring 2018 140–142 St John Street, London EC1 (gb.toto.com)

V I C T O R PA R I S Established in 1975, this is Scotland’s leading luxury bathroom and tile specialist, stocking brands including Jacuzzi, Keuco, Bette and Hansgrohe. Find everything from towel rails to taps and sinks to showers at its showrooms in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee. Pictured The ‘DuraSquare’ range by Duravit, from £700 178 Dundee Street, Edinburgh EH11 (victorparis.com) 142


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

VICTORIA + ALBERT Sculptural baths and basins based on the design of cast-iron tubs are supplied in Quarrycast (an easy-to-clean stone) at this specialist. There is also trend-led hardwood furniture and Art Deco-inspired brassware on offer. Pictured ‘Eldon’ bath in collaboration with Conran + Partners, from £2,880, with ‘Tubo 21’ polished chrome tap, from £1,440 Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 (vandabaths.com)

PICTURE: JONATHAN JAMES, SIMON WHITMORE

VOLA Expect iconic brassware collections by design hero Arne Jacobsen, as well as minimalist accessories that evoke a spa-like feel at the brand’s more than 100 showrooms nationwide. Pictured ‘5474R-081D-16’ wall-mounted mixer with overhead shower and hand shower in ‘Polished Chrome’, £2,194.80 32–36 Great Portland Street, London W1 (vola.com)

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T H E WAT E R M A R K COLLECTION

WA R E B AT H R O O M CENTRE

Combining industrial heritage with a contemporary spin, this brand’s new modular tap collection, ‘Elements’, has over 175,000 configurations to play around with. The London showroom is open by appointment only. Pictured ‘Brooklyn’ deck-mounted three-hole mixer in ‘Charcoal’, £1,428 58 Riley Road, London SE1 (thewatermarkcollection.eu)

Visit this riverside showroom in Ware, Hertfordshire, to browse designs by Aqualisa, Svedbergs and Hib. The company prides itself on over 30 years of product knowledge and designs to suit every style. Pictured ‘DuraSquare’ freestanding bath, £5,930.40, and ‘L-Cube’ vanity unit, from £2,109.60, both by Duravit 4 Star Street, Ware SG12 (warebathrooms.co.uk) ➤ 143


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

T H E WAT E R M O N O P O LY

WAT E RW O R K S

W E S T O N E B AT H R O O M S

An expert in antique and reproduction bathrooms, this UK firm employs its own technicians, restorers and plumbers. Its ‘Rockwell’ range provides a quick, modern colour infusion, with ten mouthwatering hues available. Pictured ‘Rockwell’ bath with feet in ‘Powder’, from £5,640, and wall-mounted tubular bath spout, from £640 10–14 Lonsdale Road, London NW6 (thewatermonopoly.com)

This US company’s expanded studio line now includes 50 new styles, including brassware and a lighting collection. We love the ‘Decibel’ range of fittings and hardware, which mimics the arm on a record player and a vintage radio’s circular volume knobs . Pictured ‘Decibel’ deck-mounted three-hole basin tap in ‘Chrome’, £536 579–581 King’s Road, London SW6 (uk.waterworks.com)

Established in 1978, this family-run firm supplies bespoke bathrooms worldwide, and stocks brands such as Agape, Wall & Decò and Villeroy & Boch. It has nine showrooms, and its Mayfair flagship store has the world’s largest collection of bathroom accessories. Pictured ‘Script’ basin tap with ‘Spring Rain’ enamel by Kallista, from £1,446 45–46 South Audley Street, London W1 (westonebathrooms.com)

WILLIAM HOLLAND Set in a lovingly restored barn, this Dorset-based business showcases beautiful brassware, as well as glorious, handcrafted copper baths and basins available in over 70 finishes – all meticulously hand-finished in the UK. Customers can also order a miniature bath – tailor-made to their material and colour specifications – as a handy design tool for planning the rest of their bathroom project. Pictured ‘Bateau’ bath with ‘Verdigris’ exterior, from £4,704 Lewell Barn, Lower Lewell Farm, West Stafford DT2 (williamholland.com) 144


ADDRESS BOOK

STOCKISTS

Love something you’ve seen in ELLE Decoration Bathrooms? Here’s where to buy it 1ST DIBS 1stdibs.com AGAPE agapedesign.it ALTAMAREA altamareabath.it AMARA amara.com AMAZON amazon.co.uk ANOTHER COUNTRY anothercountry.com ANTHROPOLOGIE anthropologie.com ANTONIO LUPI antoniolupi.it APAISER apaiser.co.uk ARMANI ROCA armaniroca.com ASTON MATTHEWS astonmatthews.co.uk ASTRA WALKER astrawalker.com.au ATKIN AND THYME atkinandthyme.co.uk AYTM aytm.dk BAGNO DESIGN bagnodesignlondon.com BATHANDSHOWER.COM

bathandshower.com BATHSTORE bathstore.com BERT & MAY bertandmay.com BETTE bette.de BISAZZA bisazza.it BOHEMIA bohemiadesign.co.uk BURLINGTON burlingtonbathrooms.com CAESARSTONE caesarstone.co.uk CATCHPOLE & RYE catchpoleandrye.com CEA ceadesign.it CEDIT ceditceramiche.it CERAMICA FLAMINIA ceramicaflaminia.it CHECKALOW checkalow.co.uk CLEARWATER clearwaterbaths.com COCOON bycocoon.com COPENHAGEN BATH copenhagenbath.co.uk CORIAN corian.uk CP HART cphart.co.uk CROSSWATER crosswater.co.uk CURIOUSA & CURIOUSA curiousa.co.uk CZECH & SPEAKE czechandspeake.com DANSANI dansani.co.uk DÉCO NATURE deco-nature.com DECORUM decorumtiles.co.uk DEVOL devolkitchens.co.uk DIESPEKER & CO diespeker.co.uk DINESEN dinesen.com DISTINCTIVE DOORS distinctivedoors.co.uk DOMUS domustiles.co.uk DORNBRACHT dornbracht.com DRUMMONDS drummonds-uk.com DULUX dulux.co.uk DURAVIT duravit.co.uk ECORA ecora.co.uk EMERY & CIE emeryetcie.com ENGLISH SALVAGE englishsalvage.co.uk EX.T ex-t.com FARROW & BALL farrow-ball.com FBC LONDON f bc-london.com FERM LIVING fermliving.com FIRED EARTH firedearth.com FRED frednology.com FRENCH CONNECTION frenchconnection.com FRETTE frette.com FRITZ FRYER fritzfryer.co.uk FRONTLINE frontlinebathrooms.co.uk FUTURE AND FOUND futureandfound.com GEMINI TILE geminitile.co.uk GROHE grohe.co.uk

H&M hm.com HABITAT habitat.co.uk HAECKELS haeckels.co.uk HANSGROHE hansgrohe.co.uk HAVWOODS havwoods.co.uk HAYGEN haygenshop.com HEAL’S heals.com HEM hem.com HOLLOWAYS OF LUDLOW

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DESIGN DECODED A closer look at the groundbreaking designs of Italian bathroom brand Agape For over 40 years, luxury bathroom brand Agape has made its name by taking traditional bathroom designs and reinterpreting them as beautiful, contemporary pieces. Established in 1973 in northern Italy by the Benedini family, the award-winning company is renowned for its commitment to innovation, working closely with top international design influencers. Its first success came with the ‘Bjhon’ washbasin, designed in 1970 by Italian architect Angelo Mangiarotti – its shapely freestanding base is made of luxurious white marble. Architects Benedini Associati designed yet more hits, including the utensil-inspired ‘Spoon’ bath in 1998 and 2009’s Victorian-style ‘Ottocento’ tub. The company also experiments with groundbreaking materials and new manufacturing techniques. Many of its designs are made using sustainable material Cristalplant – this non-toxic material, exclusively produced in Italy,

THE BIG HIT Agape first found success with the ‘Bjhon’ washbasin designed by Italian architect Angelo Mangiarotti. The contours, which resemble a garden planter, quickly became a design classic. Its 2011 iteration is the ‘Bjhon 1’ (right).

is formed using a mix of all-natural minerals and bio-resin. It is brilliantly resilient (any small damage to its surface can be easily fixed), as well as hygienic and stain proof. One of the standout designs of recent years is the ‘Vieques’ bathtub (2008) by Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola. Taking its name from a small island just off of the shores of Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea, the classically shaped tub comes in smooth coated stainless steel, and is available in chalky shades of grey and white, with a dark, rich teak shelf and backrest. Agape’s collaboration with Urquiola also resulted in 2015’s playful ‘Cuna’ bathtub, a steel tubular frame that comes in a variety of colours, and the ‘Lariana’ bathtub and washbasin made from Cristalplant – these were both originally created for the Urquiola-designed interior of the five-star Il Sereno Lago di Como hotel on the shores of Lake Como, Italy. And so, the link to Italian luxury remains (agapedesign.it).

A N I N S TA N T CLASSIC The much-loved ‘Vieques’ bathtub (right) by Patricia Urquiola was not only inspired by a Caribbean island, but also the simple forms of an antique steel bathtub or washtub (below) from a bygone era.

PROLIFIC PROFILE Founded in 1999, Milanbased architecture practice Benedini Associati has worked on over 100 designs for Agape. These range from the uber-popular sculptural, utensil-like ‘Spoon’ washbasin (left) to an extensive collection of bathtubs, shower enclosures, lights, taps, shelves and storage.

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WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: ALAMY

AHEAD OF THE CURVE Another of Urquiola’s successful designs is the striking ‘Cuna’ bath (below). The curved lines of the compact tub were produced by thermoforming a solid-surface material into the desired shape. Its finishing touch is a tubular stainless steel frame, which comes in a variety of colours.


Elle decoration uk october 2017  
Elle decoration uk october 2017