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“THE BEST THING YOU CAN POSSIBLY DO WITH YOUR LIFE IS TO TACKLE THE MOTHERF*CKING SH*T OUT OF IT.” – CHERYL STRAYED

eL LE APRIL 2018

ELLE AUSTRALIA / APRIL 2018 / #55

AUST R AL IA

HAIR SPECIAL

THE TRENDS TO KNOW (AND HOW TO PULL THEM OFF)

TOMB RAIDER’S

MOOD. SLEEP. SEX. WEIGHT. FIX YOUR HORMONES,

ALICIA VIKANDER

YOU ARE

EVERYDAY CHIC THE CLOTHES

IS YOUR

NEW FEMINIST ICON

FIX YOUR LIFE

YOU’LL WANT TO WEAR 24/7

FANTASTIC! POWER MASTERING

THE OF

YOU’RE SO FUNNY!

PRAISE

(MEET THE QUEENS OF COMEDY P74)

YOU’RE AN EXCELLENT FRIEND! (IT’S A SKILL P47)

#ELLEAUS

YOU GOT THIS!

(LESSONS IN RESILIENCE P56)


www.chanel.com


D I O R .C O M


contents APRIL 2018

P58.

EVERYDAY CHIC Athleisure gets an upgrade (and you’ll want to wear it 24/7).

P69.

THE POWER OF PRAISE How to master the art of the compliment.

P74.

FUNNY BUSINESS The (hilarious) guide to life from Australia’s queens of comedy.

P116.

ALICIA VIKANDER The butt-kicking feminist action hero we can all get behind.

P143.

HAIR SPECIAL All the trends, tools and treatments you need to know about.

ON THE COVER Photography: Norman Jean

16

Roy at Art + Commerce. Styling: Anne-Marie Curtis. Hair: George Northwood. Makeup: Kelly Cornwell at Agency Artists. Manicure: Adam Slee at Streeters. Tailor: Michael Hunt. Alicia Vikander wears: coat, $25,800, top, $POA, shorts, $POA, all LOUIS VUITTON, au.louisvuitton.com


play it like Hermès


Designers are going wild about florals – and it’s all about wearing them with attitude. P32.

YOU TUBES

Knee-high socks go from school to cool. P34.

SWISH SWISH

This month’s hottest trend comes with fringe benefits. P36.

STATUS UPDATE

Our favourite homegrown labels reveal their hero pieces for the new season. P38.

TO BE DETERMINED

P46.

Actress Tessa Thompson refuses to follow the easy path to success.

P66.

GOING CLEAR

There’s more to the transparent trend than just a fashion statement.

P47.

P70. OVERSHARE, DON’T CARE

Rather than an innate ability, you actually have to work at it.

We’ve become a world dominated by TMI, but is it time to keep a little to ourselves?

WANT TO BE A BETTER FRIEND?

P48.

GET IN!

With hit films (and an Oscar nomination) under his belt, Daniel Kaluuya is gearing up for a big year.

P82.

ELLE FICTION

Joan by Talin Rose Hadlow.

SENSE AND SUSTAINABILITY

P42.

H&M proves you can go green without compromising style.

It may be the world’s oldest tipple, but mead is making waves again. P50. SAVE IT FOR LATER

How screenshots are messing with your memory.

INSTAGRAM IS THE NEW BOOK CLUB P52.

THE SUV GETS SEXY P54.

SHE SOUNDS

Women are taking centrestage at this year’s Coachella.

A RELUCTANT STAR

P45.

18

Olivia Cooke is slowly adjusting to fame (and the reality of working with Steven Spielberg).

P132.

LESS IS MORE

Ten-step beauty routines are all the rage, but they may be doing more harm than good. P135.

IN MY KIT

Nail guru Jin Soon Choi reveals her perfectly polished essentials. P136.

THE BIG CHILL

READ MY LIPS

P152. BALANCING ACT

VIKING SPIRIT

And it’s being spearheaded by A-list celebrities.

P44.

It can improve your skin and your digestion.

What’s really behind that dry pout.

P49.

Journalist Sabina Socol has Paris It-girl fashion down pat.

THE NEW HEALTH HERO?

P138.

Leopard print roars back to life with a new, grown-up twist.

FRENCH DRESSING

P130.

The easy way to bring cryotherapy into your daily beauty routine.

COOL CAT

P40.

BEAUTY IS COLLAGEN

No longer reserved for “soccer mums”, the SUV is getting a makeover courtesy of luxury car labels.

“WE STRIVE FOR PERFECTION, BUT PERFECTION DOESN’T EXIST”

How fixing your hormones can overhaul your life.

FASHION FULL BLOOM P90.

Enter the enchanted garden in wallpaper florals with a retro ’60s tinge.

FORCE OF NATURE

P102.

Safari suits, utilitarian details and adventure-ready accessories – the country girl just got cool. P110.

P154.

FIELD TRIP

A quaint Tasmanian farmhouse gets a super-chic renovation. P158. DESTINATION NEXT

The new global hotspots rocketing to the top of travel hit lists. P165.

PRIVACY NOTICE

P167.

HOROSCOPES

GET IN LINE

Introducing the accessories we’ll be hanging out for this season.

P56.

A lesson in resilience from swimmer Cate Campbell.

LIFESTYLE

P30.

FEATURES

FIRST LOOK FLOWER BOMB

AND MORE…


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

JUSTINE CULLEN @JUSTINE_CULLEN JUSTINECULLEN

DEPUTY EDITOR Genevra Leek CREATIVE DIRECTOR Carly Roberts FASHION DIRECTOR Rachel Wayman

FASHION BOOKINGS AND STYLE EDITOR Dannielle Cartisano MARKET EDITOR Claudia Jukic FASHION ASSISTANT Samantha Wong CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR Emma Kalfus

BEAUTY

BEAUTY AND FITNESS DIRECTOR Janna Johnson O’Toole BEAUTY AND LIFESTYLE DIRECTOR Amy Starr

LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE

CHAIRMAN & CEO LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE FRANCE & INTERNATIONAL Constance Benque CEO ELLE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES François Coruzzi SVP/INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF ELLE Valeria Bessolo Llopiz SVP/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT & SYNDICATION Mickael Berret ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata DEPUTY SYNDICATION TEAM MANAGER Thérèse Genevois SYNDICATION COORDINATOR Johanna Jegou COPYRIGHTS MANAGER & DIGITAL SYNDICATION Séverine Laporte

EDITORIAL

FEATURES DIRECTOR Lauren Sams CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Laura Culbert FEATURES AND CULTURE EDITOR Elle McClure EDITORIAL COORDINATOR/ PA TO JUSTINE CULLEN Morgan Zhang (02) 8114 9431 EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 T: (02) 8114 9431 E: elleaustralia@bauer-media.com.au WANT TO BE AN INTERN? Email your CV to the above address

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR OF BRANDS AND CATEGORIES Jane Serember (02) 9282 8904 GROUP BRAND MANAGER – LUXURY Janice Rauter (02) 9288 9122 BRAND MANAGER Stella Berry (02) 8114 9420 AD PRODUCTION MANAGER Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 SENIOR EVENTS MANAGER Cate Gazal (02) 8116 9342 BRAND EXECUTIVE Emily Whelan (02) 8268 6293 HEAD OF KEY ACCOUNTS, NSW Karen Holmes (02) 9282 8733 HEAD OF DIRECT AND AGENCY SALES, NSW AND QUEENSLAND Brigitte Guerin (02) 9282 8249 DIRECTOR OF SALES, VICTORIA, SOUTH AUSTRALIA AND WESTERN AUSTRALIA Jaclyn Clements (03) 9823 6341 HEAD OF DIRECT SALES, VICTORIA Will Jamison (03) 9823 6301 HEAD OF SALES, QUEENSLAND Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636 OVERSEAS ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Europe Magazine International SRL +39 02 796 451

ART ART EDITOR Michelle Jackson With thanks to... Marissa Foye

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Edwina Kerrigan (02) 9282 8626 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691

DIGITAL

DIGITAL MANAGING EDITOR Jenna Clarke

BAUER MEDIA GROUP CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Paul Dykzeul GENERAL MANAGER PUBLISHING Fiorella Di Santo COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Paul Gardiner GENERAL MANAGER MEDIA SOLUTIONS Jane Waterhouse MARKETING DIRECTOR, FASHION, BEAUTY AND HEALTH Zenna Katsikaris ASSISTANT BRAND MANAGER Alicia Raiti GROUP SUBSCRIPTIONS MANAGER Sean McLintock SUBSCRIPTIONS CAMPAIGN MANAGER Lauren Flinn RESEARCH DIRECTOR  Miriam Condon RESEARCH ANALYST  Charlotte Gray

www.ellearoundtheworld.com

INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE: LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING Stéphanie Delattre/stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising, 124 rue Danton, 92300 Levallois-Perret, France ELLE is published by Bauer Media Pty Limited, 54 Park Street, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. © 2018; the contents of this publication are not for reproduction, redistribution or reuse, by any means whatsoever or in any form whatsoever without the express permission of Bauer Media. Printed by PMP Print Pty Limited, 31 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, New South Wales, Australia. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Limited, 26 Rodborough Road, Frenchs Forest, New South Wales, Australia. All prices quoted include GST, are approximate and are in AUD unless otherwise stated. Bauer Media accepts no responsibility for damage to or loss of material submitted for publication. Please keep duplicates of text and illustrative material. For all subscription and sales enquiries, visit magshop.com.au; email magshop@magshop.com.au; or phone 136 116 between 8am and 6pm (AEST) Monday to Friday. Correspondence should be addressed to: Magshop, GPO Box 4967, Sydney, NSW 2001. ISSN 2202-7254. Trademark notice The ELLE trademark and logo are owned in Canada by France-Canada Editions et Publications, Inc. and in the rest of the world by Hachette Filipacchi Presse (France), each LAGARDERE ACTIVE Group companies. ELLE is used under license from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse.


IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS

cover, and generally “ooh” and “aah” over. Importantly, it’s also where we get a sneak peek of all the accessories that will be released for that particular season, the shoes and bags (and also the belts, costume jewellery and hats, but mostly the shoes and bags) that will, in many ways, end up defining the season. I’m writing this from Paris Fashion Week. (I realise that More and more, accessories are where it’s at, both for I start with that disclaimer in every April and October the designers, because this is where they make their issue, I think partly to apologise in advance for whatever money, and the women they’re selling to, because as we jet-lagged, fash-fatigued drivel I may be about to present all know, shoes and bags make an instant statement, to you, and partly in the hope that I get some recognition always fit regardless of the time in your cycle or your pastry for the incredible sacrifice I must be making by dragging intake, and let you update your look for the new season myself away from yet another delicious French pastry to sit inside a hotel room and do my job.) even if the rest of you can barely get out of When most people think of fashion week, leggings most days (see our essential they think of the shows – huge runway athleisure update on p58). This season, productions on crazy sets (see Chanel’s I saw lots of ready-to-wear looks that I can’t enchanted woods built inside the Grand wait to put in the pages of ELLE, but it’s Palais, complete with tree roots and Céline’s cross-body purses, Saint Laurent’s crunchy autumn leaves underfoot) that chunky platform boots and Dior’s feature celebrities (see Elle Fanning D-buckled belt I know you’ll be putting on channelling Amy Winehouse at Miu your actual shopping lists immediately. Miu), supermodels (see Kaia Gerber, Whether you’re shoe mad or everywhere) and the odd severed head a handbag aficionado (and we know or baby dragon (see Gucci). Much of you’re one or the other, if not both), I’m Valentino everything. leaving Paris this season determined that what happens at fashion week, though, you’re going to be seeing more goes on between the shows. Parties, of accessories in ELLE’s pages than ever course, but also meetings – so many meetings that sometimes it feels like before, so start from “Get In Line” on p110, and stay tuned. the whole industry is running itself from the lobby bars of Le Bristol/Le Meurice/the Plaza Athénée – and showroom re-sees, Dior “D” belt. where the collections presented on the runway the day before are on display for editors to touch and feel, decide what we might want to put in the pages or on the

Enjoy the issue,

Apple HomePod – Siri wins the battle for the kitchen bench for design plus speaker amazingness.

22

@JUSTINE_CULLEN

Photography: Adrian Price; Imaxtree. Hair: Travis Balcke. Makeup: Danielle Butcher

CURRENT FASCINATIONS


@JANNA_OTOOLE

ELLE’S BEAUTY AND FITNESS DIRECTOR HAS ROCKED A MID-LENGTH BOB FOR THE

CHANING FLAHERTY @CHANING_MESAHAIR

BETTER PART OF A DECADE, BUT

THE TASMANIAN MAKEUP ARTIST

THE HAIR SPECIAL SHE COMPILED

(AND MUM TO A VERY ACTIVE

ON P143 MAY HAVE CONVINCED

TODDLER) PUT HER SKILLS TO USE

HER TO GO SHORT

ON “FIELD TRIP” ON P154

hot lists

On my playlist: A bit of everything – The Chainsmokers, Fleetwood Mac, Missy Elliott and Drake. On my reading list: A magazine with my coffee is about the only book I have time for these days. Unless Thomas The Tank Engine counts? On my to-do list: Finishing the last of our renovations. On my wish list: A Gucci GG Marmont velvet shoulder bag. On my bucket list: I’d love to experience a white Christmas and see Niagara Falls. On my blacklist: Donald Trump.

@AIDOCARDO

SURE, THE GOLD COAST-BORN PHOTOGRAPHER GOT INTO THE

STEFANIA PAPARELLI

INDUSTRY FOR THE FREE CATERING, BUT HIS TALENT IS UNDENIABLE – HE BRINGS A COOL EYE TO OUR FIRST LOOK FASHION PAGES

@SPAPARELLI

THE SARDINIA-BASED PHOTOGRAPHER, WHO SHOT HER

On my playlist: Whatever Spotify playlist our resident team DJ Danni Cartisano (aka ELLE’s bookings and style editor) is spinning. Lately it’s been a lot of Janet Jackson. On my reading list: Why I Am Not A Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto by Jessa Crispin, about the commercialisation of the women’s movement. I don’t read as much as I used to so I try to select books I’ll learn something from. On my to-do list: Devouring fish tacos at El Molino Central while I’m in Sonoma, California, this month. It’s the best Mexican food I’ve ever had (and I’ve been to Mexico twice). On my wish list: My trusty black Goyard tote has sadly seen better days, so I’d love to invest in a new one... this time I’m thinking grey. On my bucket list: Visiting the Maldives. I haven’t had a proper beach vacation for years. On my blacklist: Tiny sunglasses. Few people can actually pull them off, plus the beauty editor in me will never give up oversized frames... they prevent crow’s-feet!

ADRIAN PRICE

FIRST EDITORIAL 20 YEARS AGO, FOR ELLE ITALY, WAS ENLISTED FOR “FULL BLOOM” (P90) AND “FORCE OF NATURE” (P102) THIS MONTH

On my playlist: Norah Jones. I love her because she was the playlist of my first amazing holiday with my partner. On my reading list: Nothing! I’ve been working like crazy lately. On my to-do list: I’d love to have more time for Pilates and for a romantic weekend in Amsterdam. On my wish list: A Céline suit. On my bucket list: An adventure holiday in Africa with my kids – safari, waterfalls and the dunes in Namibia. On my blacklist: The Northern Hemisphere winter! I hate when it’s cold.

On my playlist: Everything – if it makes you want to start awkwardly dancing, even better. I love the playlists by Carpenters-Daughter on Spotify. They’re called the Full Moon Mixes for each month and they wrap up the best music your ears can listen to. On my reading list: Every time I go to my local bookshop, I get talked into the latest and greatest book that’s on the counter... but I never get past the first few pages. So I have a pile of great books next to my bed with the best intentions of reading them. On my to-do list: I’ve been working on a series of photos documenting nomadic Himalayan shepherds. I want to get back there for their spring climb back up the mountains. On my wish list: I’m always wishing for a new camera of some sort – film or digital. On my bucket list: To travel more with my girlfriend. It doesn’t matter where, just as long as we’re adventuring somewhere new and that makes us happy. On my blacklist: I don’t dwell on anything too much. There’s no point focusing on the negativity as it only brings your energy down.

contributors

Compiled by: Laura Culbert

JANNA JOHNSON O’TOOLE

The people behind this issue reveal their


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LOOK TUNES TO first

MAKE MOVES TO, FASHION

TO TAKE

STRIDES IN, STARS ON THE RISE. IT’S ONWARD AND UPWARD – DON’T BE CAUGHT

STANDING STILL.


10

things

Your guide to everything worth watching, wearing and wanting this month

Words: Elle McClure; Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani and Chris Jansen (still-life); Harley Weir; Instagram: @b.d.graft; @ineslongevial; @lianafinck. Compiled by: Samantha Wong

THIS MONTH:

@LIANAFINCK

@B.D.GRAFT

#1

INSTA ART

Instagram is the new art gallery – and these are the exhibitions (nee profiles) to visit next.

#2

MIX IT UP

@INESLONGEVIAL

28

The mismatched talismanic earring is the new charm bracelet. Albus Lumen’s pair features the “cornicello”, a horn-shaped piece of coral traditionally worn to protect against the evil eye. Earrings, $190 for set, ALBUS LUMEN, albuslumen.com


#5

THE GOOD STUFF

Singlet, $370, MIU MIU, (02) 9223 1688

In 2018, if your treat isn’t working overtime to do good, it’s not worth the indulgence. Enter Hey Tiger, ethically sourced chocolate that also funds community development.

#3

IT’S ALL WHITE

The white tank is back. Make yours ribbed with a racer-style neckline for the ultimate in laid-back chic.

#4

CATCH THE BUGG

Singlet, $105, RE/DONE, mychameleon.com.au

Think you’re above a crush on Harry Styles or Jake Bugg? Your loss. They’re both on our shores this month for respective tours. Harry Styles tours April 21-28, hstyles.co.uk; Jake Bugg tours April 19-21, jakebugg.com

Yes Empress (top) and Summer In The City chocolate, $12.50 each, HEY TIGER, heytiger.com.au

#6

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE

#7

Need to make your feed more lit? Hightail it to Brisbane, where the latest James Turrell light installation will illuminate the Gallery of Modern Art after hours. From April 20; qagoma.qld.gov.au

PILLOW TALK

A pining for everything Alessandro Michele touches now extends to homewares. Couch time has never looked better. Cushions, $1,475 each, GUCCI, gucci.com/au

#8

NAILED IT

Forget only wearing dark tones in the cool months – Chanel’s latest releases will convince you to go for punchy, vibrant, even fluoro nail shades instead. Le Vernis Longue Tenue in (from top) Rose Néon and Violet Piquant, $41 each, CHANEL, 1300 242 635

#10

DOG DAYS

#9

FEELING FRESH

You no longer have to hunt down your fave Fresh face mask and polish in the depths of the internet – they’ve just landed at Sephora.

Human colour palette Wes Anderson is back with his first film in four years, the stop-motion Isle Of Dogs, and all the women you want to be have voiced it (hi Tilda, hey Scarlett). In cinemas April 12

Rose Face Mask, $36, Sugar Face Polish, $36, both FRESH, sephora.com.au

29


Louis Vuitton

Marni

Mules, $695, BALLY, ballyofswitzerland.com

Bag, $1,575, MAX MARA, maxmara.com

MOOD BOARD:

flower bomb

Sweet, innocent florals? Not this season IF YOU THINK FLOWER PRINTS

30

Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Pablo Martin (still-life); Jason Lloyd-Evans; Instagram: @beyonce. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano

Marni

Shorts, $289, KATE SYLVESTER, katesylvester.com

Beyoncé in Zimmermann

Erdem

are strictly reserved for christenings, morning teas and meeting the in-laws, it’s time to cast an eye to the runway. Or better still, to Beyoncé walking the blue carpet at the recent A Wrinkle In Time premiere, where she rocked a flippy floral mini-dress by Zimmermann. Cut low at the front, big in the sleeves and short at the hemline, the white and teal printed number was everything we want from fashion now – assertive, alluring and all about the attitude. At Zimmermann, and elsewhere, it’s not hard to see that today’s blooms give new meaning to the term flower power. Demure, this season’s florals are not. The best versions are bright, bold and just a bit wild. At Marni, creative director Francesco Risso’s jumping-off point was the idea of a young woman on a skateboard. That notion played out in toxic greens and blues and blotchy outsized roses strewn across off-kilter shapes and clashing combinations that pushed the signature vintage house prints into renegade territory when teamed with bright bags and painted kitten heels.


Earrings, $690, REBECCA DE RAVENEL, matchesfashion.com

Dress, $829, KATE SYLVESTER, katesylvester.com

Erdem

Prabal Gurung

Zimmermann

Mary Katrantzou

Zimmermann

In London, Erdem – a favourite of royal newcomer Meghan Markle – took its inspiration from the Queen while researching her connection to the ’50s jazz scene and to African-American culture. Meanwhile, local hero Mary Katrantzou sent out brash dresses that morphed paint-bynumber prints with ’80s parachute streetwear. And relative new kid on the block Mother Of Pearl, a womenswear brand making a name for its celebration of individuality, riffed on multicoloured pattern in looks that were at once built for special occasions and the every day, office included. By the time Paris Fashion Week rolled around, the futureflorals theme was really gaining traction, so much so that at Louis Vuitton, Nicolas Ghesquière was layering lighter-than-air chiffon dresses with reworked Marie Antoinette-style corsetry. The real twist was the addition of the new LV sneakers. A French revolution, indeed. And it’s just the way we want to be wearing this trend. Like Beyoncé with her big loopy earrings, glittery clutch and speckled sunglasses, the look is best worn with a subversive spirit. And a spring in your step. Because even though winter is coming, fierce femininity is in the air. E

Dress, $295, CUE, cue.cc

Dress, $695, ZIMMERMANN, zimmermannwear.com

Dries Van Noten

Dress, $1,495, MOTHER OF PEARL, parlourx.com

31


PH OT OG RAPH Y BY

A DRI A N P RI C E

THE PIECE:

you tubes The perfect partner to ladylike slingbacks, old-school sneakers and your favourite pair of loafers: socks are back in a big way. Miu Miu, Prada, Gucci and Preen By Thornton Bregazzi reinvented the humble knee-high for SS18 with colourful variations that serve a dual purpose – keeping feet warm and adding a new-season sports edge to your look. E

SOCKS, $290, MIU MIU, (02) 9223 1688

Coat, $2,455, BALLY, ballyofswitzerland.com; jumper, $110, ELLESSE, jd-sports.com.au; trainers, $170, ADIDAS, subtypestore.com; earrings, model’s own

32

Words: Claudia Jukic. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano. Hair: Anthony Nader at DLM. Makeup: MollyXxxxxxxxxxxx Warkentin at(still-life) Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Company 1. Model: Kelsey Martinovich at Kult

The new power pairing? Long socks with anything


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Pale pink jumper, $638, PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI, net-a-porter.com; rose pink jumper, $239, KATE SYLVESTER, katesylvester.com; skirt, $549, GINGER & SMART, gingerandsmart.com; heels, $895, STUART WEITZMAN, hermanns.com.au

Dress, $795, ELLERY, ellery.com; top, $79.99, H&M, hm.com/au

UP CLOSE:

swish

swish

Swingy, playful, flippy fringing is the short cut to a good time. Get ready to twirl, girl

Bodysuit, $580, MAX MARA, maxmara.com; skirt, $2,890, bag, $3,970, both FENDI, fendi.com

Blazer, $730, SANDRO, davidjones.com.au; earrings, $165, 2 BY LYN & TONY, 2lynandtony. bigcartel.com

P H O TO GR A P HY B Y

AD R IAN PR ICE

34

Top, $135, COS, cosstores.com/au; pants, $392, PARIS GEORGIA, themercantileonlinestore.com; belt, $539, KITX, kitx.com.au

Words: Claudia Jukic. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano. Hair: Anthony Nader at DLM. Makeup: Molly Warkentin at Company 1. Model: Kelsey Martinovich at Kult

Fringing is everywhere this season. From handbags to hemlines, designers have been trimming the most head-turning pieces in tassels. The key to getting the look right? Balance. Pare back a tiered skirt with a sherbet knit or add a shredded leather or string accessory to your staples. Round out the look with tossable hair that’s just as fun and flirty. E


IN FOCUS:

status update

Bag, $149, SANS BEAST, sansbeast.com

THE PIECE:

THE FOUR-WAY BAG

The label: SANS BEAST. The backstory: Cathryn Wills, former managing and creative director of Mimco, conceived her vegan accessories brand after going vegetarian in 2015. Utilising high-quality materials from nonanimal sources, the “eco-responsible” bags of her first collection are inspired by women of the French Resistance. Why you need it: “Gender-neutral styling is playing a big part in fashion today, and this bag talks to the rise of utilitarian influences,” she says. How to wear it: “The strap has two adjustable buckles with several eyelets for varying length options, so it can be a hip bag, shoulder bag or clutch if you add a wrist strap. But my favourite styling option is strapped at the waist.”

36

THE PIECE:

THE RELAXED TRENCH

Blouse, $120, NICE MARTIN, nicemartin.com

THE PIECE:

THE VICTORIAN BLOUSE

The label: NICE MARTIN. The backstory: For Jody Feldhofer and Jessica Cadby, price never outweighs ethical means or individuality when it comes to their range of effortlessly cool clothes. Their MO is affordable style reminiscent of the Australian summer (and possibly cult flick Picnic At Hanging Rock), no matter the weather. Why you need it: “The Iris blouse was influenced in particular by Parisian style, then we added the contrast stitching and textured fabric to give it a street look.” How to wear it: “We love to mix feminine pieces with masculine shapes, footwear and accessories. Layer your shirting under dresses, then add a blazer and boots.”

Shorts, $250, belt, $130, both CAVES COLLECT, cavescollectstudio.com

The label: ZULU & ZEPHYR. The backstory: This Australian brand has built a cult following thanks to its breezy swimwear and easy separates. This season, they teamed up with Lara Worthington, who creatively directed the campaign for Cami, a nature-inspired collection described by designer Karla Rose as “the collection that stirs the dust”. Why you need it: “We’ve updated the classic trench by using a natural fabrication called ramie, our signature tortoiseshell buttons and sleeve ties for an unexpected take on a wardrobe staple,” Rose says. How to wear it: “Create a masculine look by pairing with culottes, or take a feminine approach by styling it with a slip dress.”

THE PIECE:

TRANS-SEASONAL SHORTS

The label: CAVES COLLECT. The backstory: Melbourne-based duo Sarah Russell and Johanna Howe don’t design in traditional collections; rather, they’re constantly creating, with their designs produced in small runs by local makers. All the pieces have the same ethos: “Simplicity, quality materials and attention to fit” – so they’ll be right at home in your well-consolidated wardrobe. Why you need them: A pair of tailored shorts are the new trousers this winter. “The classic cut and textured fabrication are what make the Tilda shorts.” How to wear them: “We love to design things that are trans-seasonal. We wear ours in summer with sandals and in cool weather with stockings and brogues.” E

Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Chris Jansen (still-life); Darren McDonald

A new season can bring with it the urge for a sartorial startover. But sometimes all it takes is one key piece to make everything feel new again. Here are the homegrown names to know and the steals to covet

Trench, $280, ZULU & ZEPHYR, zuluandzephyr.com


D I S C OV E R T H E F L AW L E S S C O L L E C T I O N L I Q U I D F O U N DAT I O N A N D C O N C E A L E R

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N U D E BY N AT U R E .C O M . AU


TRY THIS:

cool cat

Leopard print finds its groove We only have to cast our minds back to our spirited, animal print-wearing sisters from the ’90s (Scary Spice, Samantha Jones, an unimpressed Shania Twain...) to know there’s an inherent fierceness to leopard. With the addition of just one piece, its wearer can evoke that elusive confident, sexy, cool energy – the same effect perfectly tousled hair or worn-in red lipstick has. This season, street-style favourites went Kate Moss-does-boss lady in polished coats, pencil skirts and trousers. Follow suit in a coordinating, well, cat suit or opt for accessories with bite – a bucket bag and retro sunglasses are all the more empowering in spots. Meow. E Bag, $765, ALEXANDER WANG, shopbop.com

Blouse, $231, EQUIPMENT, edwardsimports.com

Sunglasses, $39.95, MINKPINK, theiconic.com.au

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Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Chris Jansen (still-life); Jason Lloyd-Evans

Pants, $449, MANNING CARTELL, manningcartell.com.au


Winner Hair Care Category Survey of 13,500 people by Nielsen.


How to dress Parisian? “It’s essential to have basics you swear by and mix them with some more fun, bright pieces or intimate jewellery. These are the kind of details that form your style.”

INSIDER:

french dressing PHO T O GR APHY BY

Add Sabina Socol to the list of reasons you’ll never tire of Parisian style. The Romanian-born, French-raised journalist and street-style star is everything you’d expect an It-girl to be: classic, cool and totally natural. Here, she gives us a glimpse of her enviable collection of vintage handbags, high-waisted denim and perfectly mismatched furniture

“I live right above a tiny park in Paris, and I’m in love with my neighbourhood, the 11th arrondissement. It has this small-town vibe where everyone knows each other. It’s hard to not stop by La Mode Vintage. My friend Carole curates the best vintage designer pieces, and it’s right below my apartment.” This Fendi Baguette is one of Socol’s best finds.

As told to: Claudia Jukic. Additional photography: Instagram: @sabinasocol

JEAN PI CON

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Socol’s 11th arrondissement little black book: “Variations Végétales is the cutest flower shop ever, Le Square Gardette is a cosy, vintagedecorated restaurant that’s great for Sunday brunch and Broken Biscuits is a tiny coffee shop that sells the best cakes and takeaway coffee in Paris.”

“This is like my daily uniform. I’m wearing a Jacquemus top, Khaite jeans and Stone Paris earrings.”

What’s inside her Burberry makeup bag? “I love Tom Ford for blush and bronzer, and before I apply it, I use Dior Capture Youth serum to plump my skin.”

“I don’t wear a tonne of makeup on a day-today basis, but I have my rituals. I never leave home without some lipstick on. Not red, but a more berry shade to get that sort of just-bitten effect. Super natural.” E

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SENSE &

INTEL:

Fashion and sustainability. A contradiction in terms? Fashion is, by nature, cyclical. Built on desire. Fuelled by our need to Buy. New. Stuff. Sustainability is the ability to sustain, not being harmful to the environment or depleting natural resources. It means we want our planet to be around for a long time. Fashion companies like H&M want to be around, too. And they understand that being around means there needs to be a world worthy of being around in. The fashion industry is one of the world’s most polluting; it’s also a $3 trillion industry that isn’t likely to suddenly grind to a halt. But the most visionary players are trying to find ways to close the loop, shifting their focus to renewable materials, finding smarter ways of working, and supporting safe and fair working conditions down the supply chain. One of those ways is H&M Conscious Exclusive, a limited capsule that acts as a testing ground for innovative textiles that have the potential to be scaled up throughout the main collection and across the industry. This year, along with organic linen, Tencel and recycled polyester, H&M has introduced recycled silver and Econyl, a 100 per cent regenerated nylon fibre made from fish nets and other nylon waste. The aim is fashion without compromising on quality or price. So when a delicate fabric with dramatic embroidery that once passed as fishing net turns up in the collection, woven into a beautiful white lace dress, you know it’s been put through its paces.

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Tencel scarf, $44.99, H&M CONSCIOUS EXCLUSIVE, hm.com/au

CONSCIOUS STARS: H&M’s 2018 campaign stars Aamito Lagum, Giedre Dukauskaite and Christy Turlington Burns (top left)

Working with fabric developers to create renewable alternatives takes time, and the research is ongoing. Wherever possible, the design team, overseen by H&M’s creative adviser Ann-Sofie Johansson, opts for the friendlier version, right down to the recycled plastic beads adorning earrings and bags. Experimentation is vital if H&M is to reach its goal of using only fabrics from sustainable sources by 2030, and collaboration with scientists and stakeholders is crucial. Initiatives in the works include vegan leather, made from grape skins or mushrooms, and Orange Fiber, which is silk-like and made out of citrus juice by-products. And a recent breakthrough with a Hong Kong research centre in how to recycle donated clothes looks a promising solution to an ongoing challenge for H&M. The new collection is inspired by the tapestries and paintings of Swedish artists Karin and Carl Larsson, which translate beautifully into modern-day floral jacquards, abstract embroideries and colourful prints. There’s not a piece that’s been compromised, and in fact some designs, like the flared trousers transformed from recycled PET bottles, are better for their storied past. “There doesn’t have to be a contradiction between sustainability and trends,” says Johansson. “[It’s] about pieces you can wear over and over, and that’s what it’s like with trends overall now. People are so aware and they grasp new trends quicker than before, but at the same time these trends stick around for a longer time.” Sustainable style at its best.

Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Courtesy of H&M

IT’S THE BUZZWORD OF OUR TIMES, BUT MORE AND MORE LABELS ARE PUTTING THEIR MONEY WHERE THEIR MOUTHS ARE WHEN IT COMES TO THE FUTURE OF FASHION


SUSTAINABILITY

GREEN MACHINE

ANNA GEDDA, HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY AT H&M, SAYS THE TERM ISN’T JUST A CATCHPHRASE BUT A CALL-TO-ACTION FOR THE INDUSTRY AT LARGE

IS H&M BEING SUCH A BIG COMPANY A CHALLENGE YOU’VE HAD TO FACE IN IMPLEMENTING CHANGE? It’s a double-edged sword. It’s a massive organisation, so if you want to try something like sustainability it’s important you have a clear direction that guides people in making decisions. I also think it’s a huge opportunity. [H&M Conscious Exclusive] is a great example – even though this is a small capsule collection, once we actually get those materials up and running and we take them to scale in regular collections, that has a huge impact on the supply chain and the environmental effects. If you use a recycled material compared to a conventional one, you save between 70 and 90 per cent in carbon emissions. Looking at the amount of material we use, those are huge savings. WHAT ARE THE OTHER BARRIERS TO CHANGE? There are different barriers. The social side is [where] we are dependent on so many others. If you want to address the issue around wages, for example, you can’t just address it with us. All the suppliers work with other brands as well, so you need to work with those brands, with the government and with the trade associations in those markets. You need collaboration to create long-term solutions. With material innovation, the main barrier is that research takes time. But this is a good saying: “If you want to go fast, you go alone. If you want to go far, you go together.” Sustainability work requires a lot of collaboration and it simply takes time. IS IT GENERALLY UNDERSTOOD THAT THIS IS THE ONLY WAY FORWARD FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY? Internally, yes. And I think many other brands view it that way. But I’m still surprised that some don’t even have their minds set on it, because to me, no matter if you do it from an ethical perspective or not, it’s about securing the business, and if you want to be in the business in 2050, what materials will you use? How will you meet the customer’s expectations? I don’t understand how you can operate a business and not really have this top of mind. But I have an organisation of 250 people working with this, a lot of the smaller brands might have one person. I hope that being so big, we can help in a sense. We share what we’re doing with the industry so others can follow in those steps. ON ONE HAND, H&M ENCOURAGES US TO HOLD ONTO THE CLOTHES WE’VE GOT AND REALLY CARE FOR THEM, DONATE CLOTHING, RECYCLE IT, BUT IT’S ALSO A BUSINESS THAT WANTS US TO KEEP BUYING CLOTHES. HOW DO THOSE MENTALITIES COEXIST?

Recycled silver tulip earrings, $79.99, H&M CONSCIOUS EXCLUSIVE, hm.com/au Recycled polyester slippers, $119, H&M CONSCIOUS EXCLUSIVE, hm.com/au

Looking into population growth, we know there’ll be more people, and people need clothes. And I don’t see it’s about them buying more clothes than they need, but rather that whatever they buy, we would like them to buy from us. I hope we have such a great offer that customers feel, if they need a pair of socks, a pair of trousers, they go to H&M because it’s a more sustainable choice. So it’s not about increasing consumption; it’s more that we are hopefully increasing the market share. WHAT SETBACKS HAVE YOU LEARNT FROM? Long-term, I believe in transparency and I think all companies in this industry need to be open about things. When you are one of the first to publish things, like your supplier list, there’s always a risk that instead of being praised, you become more scrutinised and those who aren’t transparent get away with it. But that is part of leadership – it’s about sticking your neck out to do something you very much believe in. YOU’RE PUSHING FORWARD IN A FIELD WHERE THERE ARE A LOT OF UNCERTAINTIES. DO YOU PERSONALLY CONSULT YOUR OWN MORAL COMPASS? We collaborate with a lot of experts and stakeholders, so when it comes to what materials we should push for in 2019 versus 2020, there’s a lot of input. That’s quite scientific. But then you have other things that [require], as you say, the moral compass. At H&M, we have always aimed for doing it right. It may not always be the most communicative solution, it may not be the quickest one, but you’ll always aim for the most sustainable solution. So that is really where I come back to the core. You always go with what you feel is right, the thing that makes you sleep well at night. AND DO YOU SLEEP WELL AT NIGHT? I still worry about the industry at large. How can we get everyone along on the journey, because us doing everything right will solve some things, but not all. It’s important to get collaboration, for others to move in the same direction, to find those mobilising powers – where are the platforms where everyone can meet? That is also part of leadership, seeing how we can make others come to the table and discuss what needs to be done. And I think that’s been exceeded in some areas that I’m really proud of, like wages. Today we are collaborating with 99 other brands to push for fair living wages in the supply chain. The Bangladesh Accord [on Fire and Building Safety] is another example. It takes time, but compared to where we were 20 years ago, so much has changed in that area. WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES FOR YOUR CHILDREN IN THEIR LIFETIME? I hope we can find a solution that enables my children and their friends to live a life that is not in conflict with the planet. That is really what I would like to aim for. E The H&M Conscious Exclusive 2018 collection will be available in selected stores worldwide from April 19


MUSIC:

she sounds

CHLOE X HALLE KELELA

If Washington DC-born Kelela’s “Rewind” and “LMK” aren’t already firmly stuck in your head, you’re missing out. Since breaking with a mixtape in 2013, she’s been building buzz among those in the know (including Solange, who enlisted her for the track “Scales” on her seminal album A Seat At The Table), with Kelela finally dropping her debut studio album – the muchlauded Take Me Apart – late last year. Already a Calvin Klein favourite – having appeared in a #MyCalvins campaign alongside Solange and Blood Orange’s Dev Hynes – and now with a coveted Coachella spot, best get addicted now in anticipation of what’s next.

@kelelam

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Both still in their teens, Atlanta natives Chloe and Halle Bailey have been making good on their “Beyoncé protégé” tag ever since their considerable cameo in Lemonade (they now post personal birthday wishes to Blue Ivy... NBD). They’ve released a debut studio album, The Kids Are Alright, and have doubled down on their acting credits, landing recurring roles in the Black-ish spin-off Grownish, for which they also created the theme track. Rapidly building fashion cred, too – whether that be walking the runway for Dolce & Gabbana or sitting front row at Louis Vuitton – they’re showing no signs of slowing down. Keep all your fingers and toes crossed for a Chloe X Halle X Beyoncé moment onstage. @chloexhalle

HOT TICKETS: Coachella runs April 13-15 and April 20-22

Words: Elle McClure. Photography: Dicko Chan; Kurt Iswarienko; Milah Libin; Getty Images

Within a year of releasing her first EP, Don’t Kill My Vibe, 21-year-old Norwegian pop ingenue Sigrid took out the BBC’s Sound Of 2018 award (past alumni include Adele, Sam Smith and Ellie Goulding) against other young guns Billie Eilish and Khalid. Now, Sigrid, who hails from the small seaside town of Ålesund, has embarked on a far-flung (and largely sold-out) world tour that has seen her play around Europe and even visit Brisbane and Melbourne, culminating in her Coachella slots. Catch her now to say you saw her first – if her rollcall of beyond-her-years influences is anything to go by (think Joni Mitchell, Chet Baker and Neil Young), there’s a way to go yet. @thisissigrid

Beyoncé, SZA, Cardi B and Haim are just some of the women leading the charge at this month’s Coachella. But here are four female acts from lower down the bill that are just as worthy of checking out

American rapper Destiny Frasqueri is no stranger to the music game, independently releasing material under various pseudonyms until the moniker of Princess Nokia stuck back in 2013. While her personal style has caught the attention of Gucci, Calvin Klein and Barneys New York, it’s her songwriting – at the forefront of which is a voice for advancing intersectional feminism and LGBTQI issues – and an inclusive, energetic performance style that’s earned her somewhat of a cult following. Her Coachella appearances are just part of a huge world tour until July, so rest assured if you manage to catch her, you’re in for a treat – she’s known to call women to the front of the crowd, saying, “I show up for [people] and rip that mic so they leave feeling inspired and happy.” E @princessnokia

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

SIGRID

PRINCESS NOKIA


Edie

CHOC-TOPS AT THE READY THREE FEEL-GOOD FILMS NOT TO MISS THIS MONTH

FILM:

your picture taken and you think, “Oh my God, I’m hideous,” but no-one else *** can see that. When I’m on GURRUMUL set and playing with all A look at the life of the these different characters, it late Indigenous Australian just feels like make-believe musician Geoffrey – I forget that [people are] Gurrumul Yunupingu, going to see things that who was born blind. In cinemas April 25 I do. Then I watch [the film] for the first time and I’m like, *** “What the fuck am I doing? EDIE A woman in her eighties What am I doing with my sets her mind to climbing face? Why is my eye a Scottish mountain after twitching?” But you have to the death of her husband. throw that away. It takes In cinemas April 5 a while, though – I don’t think that will ever go away. It *** possibly gets harder. THE PARTY NOT REALLY BEING ON This British comedy, SOCIAL MEDIA IS JUST about a celebratory FOR MY SANITY. Doing dinner party that takes moment, especially for this job, I’m already an ultimate pessimist like a turn for the worse, is exposed, and while there’s myself. I just never in my witty, sharp and darkly an element of celebrity wildest dreams thought funny in all the best ways. that was going to In cinemas April 12 I have to lean towards, when happen to me. I’m just working, I don’t want to put myself on social WORKING ON A FILM IS SO INTIMATE AND SO INTENSE. media. I think there’s a mystery I still want When I was younger I would have done to keep, and I don’t want people to get to anything but now, luckily, I’m able to be know me because then it would be really hard for them to see me as anything else. If a bit choosier with roles, about how I want to spend my year. As I become more wired I can’t go down the street to get a bottle to the way I want to work and the way other of milk, then what’s the point? people work, I want to choose quite READY PLAYER ONE COMPLETELY BENT meticulously who I give myself to next. THE [SCI-FI] GENRE FOR ME AS I KNEW BEING RECOGNISED ON THE STREET IT. But it’s a future that’s not too far away – IS A REALLY STRANGE THING TO GET an internet that’s so developed it’s YOUR HEAD AROUND. The first time completely immersive, which isn’t hard to imagine. Next I’m doing a movie with was probably after [TV series] Bates director Rebecca Thomas called Gonzo Motel, because as soon as something hits Girl, based on the book of the same name, Netflix, then everyone’s seen it, it seems. Sometimes people who have seen which was written by one of Hunter S something you’re in look at you with these Thompson’s assistants. I play the assistant, starry eyes, and you’re like, “Oh my God, who wants to be a writer herself and really you’d be so disappointed if you actually looks up to him, but quickly realises you knew me!” [Laughs] should never meet your hero. Humans are I DON’T THINK I’LL EVER COME TO very flawed and so, despite who they are, TERMS WITH IMPOSTOR SYNDROME. some people are going to surprise you, and some people are going to disappoint. Ugh, I need people around me reassuring me, that was wanky, that was really wanky. E until I’m like, “Alright, I did an okay job.” It’s such a personal thing, like when you get Ready Player One is in cinemas now

A RELUCTANT STAR Olivia Cooke won (and broke) hearts in Me And Earl And The Dying Girl, and now she’s building on her leading-lady potential with a role in Steven Spielberg’s new sci-fi thriller – and slowly coming to terms with fame WHEN I FOUND OUT I’D BEEN CHOSEN FOR STEVEN SPIELBERG’S READY PLAYER ONE, I FELT A BIT SICK. It was a combination of celebrating, especially a job this big – the biggest I’ve had in my career – and the self-doubt of, “They’ve got the wrong girl. I’m going to fuck this up. This is a terrible decision on their part. I don’t want to do this. I do want to do this.” There’s a breadth of emotion that comes with getting that call. I HAD HUGE ACTING ASPIRATIONS AS A KID. But when you get the call to say it’s going to become a reality, it’s mind-blowing. I think when you actually achieve whatever it is you wanted to do, it’s a pinch-me

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STREAMING:

the experiences of black students at college. expedition in the wilderness. Even at her “I had a burning to be involved,” she says. audition, after giving what Garland says “Sam could have been grating, in the was “an exceptional reading”, Thompson wrong hands,” Simien says of Thompson’s quizzed him about decisions he’d made in character, a biracial activist. “But Tessa has his previous film, the Oscar-winning Ex this uncanny ability to let you peer into Machina. “Most people would be Sam’s eyes and see layers of emotion wary to do that,” he says. “But Tessa has underneath her hard shell.” Ultimately, that no guile about that kind of thing.” Her gig led to Thompson being offered dynamic co-star Natalie Portman adds that there’s new roles. “She never struck me as the kind much more to the 34-year-old than star of person who was going to take a job quality. “She’s someone you can dance because it was what she was supposed to or laugh with, or talk about politics do,” Simien continues. “It’s passion only, [with],” she says. “And she’s beautiful, of you know? And that can be a really course, which you have to say, even though it’s not important.” scary place for any actor, but especially While Thompson insists acting wasn’t an actor of colour who’s a woman.” always her endgame, her fascination with Two months later, she appeared in the performance of identity and the director Ava DuVernay’s Martin Luther complexities of race has been a constant King Jr biopic Selma as Diane Nash, since her childhood in LA. “I think our ideas a radical revolutionary “wrapped in the about what a young black person or package of a mild-mannered, pretty, pretty lady,” DuVernay says. “I was looking for a young Mexican person or a young white person should be like weren’t as expansive someone who could embody that, and I think then as they are now,” says the actress, of Tessa so much in that way.” Then, in the whose mum is of Mexican and European 2015 Rocky reboot Creed (which grossed descent and dad is Afro-Panamanian. “It more than $220 million worldwide), she made me think I had to fit into a box.” played a musician who struck up It wasn’t until she was enrolled a relationship with a boxer played by at a community Michael B Jordan, a role for which Thompson, a singer-songwriter in her own college that she right, wrote three songs that appeared in began to immerse the film. “She’s really talented at everything herself in the LA she puts her mind to. It’s scary!” Jordan says. theatre scene and Thompson’s career has been in realised acting overdrive ever since, and she’s now was “a compulsion I had a hard time gearing up for a string of sci-fi projects, shaking”. While considering drama school, including the upcoming Avengers: Infinity she met with an agent, hoping to War. As for the critically acclaimed robotsupplement her income — she’d been western Westworld, returning for season two this month, Thompson will reprise her role working at a Chinese restaurant and as as an executive who operates fearlessly a “motivational dancer” (aka hype woman) at bar and bat mitzvahs — and promptly in the sexual and professional realms. booked a job as a lesbian bootlegger on During season one, some fans deemed her too young for such an elevated position. an episode of Cold Case, then landed a season-long arc on Veronica Mars. “But once I was cast, there was an For the next eight years, she excitement on my part and on worked steadily, but there were [co-showrunner] Lisa Joy’s that, TUNE IN: always roles she refused to play. in the future, what does power Westworld “The one-dimensional girlfriend or look like?” Thompson says. “It season two is on Foxtel from the sassy black friend — those looks like a young black woman.” April 23 weren’t going to work for me,” she “Tessa is controlling her says. As she was thinking of career; she’s not letting her career stepping back from the industry, she read control her,” DuVernay says. “She could writer-director Justin Simien’s script for be following a traditional career path, 2014’s Dear White People, a satirical skating by on her beauty. Instead, through her work, you hear her voice.” E drama that explored racial identity through

TESSA THOMPSON IS A TRULY MODERN STAR, WITH ENERGY – AND SOCIAL CONSCIOUSNESS – IN SPADES

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With the word “Yes” tattooed on her wrist, arms as ripped as Sarah Connor’s and glitter sparkling above her eyes, it’s clear that the kind of focused charisma Tessa Thompson radiates would prompt double takes no matter her profession. “Tessa’s engaged,” says Alex Garland, who directed her in Netflix’s Annihilation, about five women (including Thompson’s astrophysicist) who go on a scientific

Words: Molly Langmuir. Photography: Terry Tsiolis; Kkgas/Stocksy United

to be determined


WILL YOU BE MY...

Aristotle believed friendship LEAVER’S TOP TIP FOR wasn’t for everyone. He said it was MAKING NEW FRIENDS: USE YOUR PHONE a skill we must work on over a lifetime; “Technology so often gets that it’s not for the faint-hearted, lazy blamed for our loneliness or self-obsessed. I agree. Friendship and disconnection, but it is something we must proactively work can also be the solution. at, if we’re to be any good at it at all. Approach people on It’s one of the loveliest things a person Twitter for a coffee, make can do, so of course it must be earned. friends on Instagram or Friendships require a decent SELF: download apps like investment of time, for a start. A recent Hey! VINA, Bumble, Groupon survey found that 66 per Huggle or Badoo for their cent of Australian women say they friend-making functions. The don’t spend enough time with their great thing about these friends, which means you’re not apps, particularly for alone in the struggle to find the hours introverts, is that you can between work, romance, laundry, use them as a screening family dinners, childcare and process for people, Pilates to actually be there for break the ice with digital the people you adore. And those communication and people deserve kindness, love and then use them to set up empathy, the likes of which inspire a face-to-face meeting. When I was nine years old, us to listen and respond tactfully to It’s far less terrifying than I decided to learn the flute. It their concerns about life. Female approaching someone was a challenge, given my friendships in particular are made in public – in a bar or cafe, lack of musical ability, delight in up of confessions, vulnerabilities at the library or a party. At skipping lessons and refusal and gossip. They are, at their best, least if someone is signed to practise. That flute spent incandescent and uplifting, like no up to a friendship app, other relationship in our lives. But they most of its life resting against you know they’re willing take work, and commitment, and the wall, abandoned and to make new friends. emotional investment. untouched, while I got on with That’s half of your fear of So how do you learn to be my childhood. I barely raised social rejection slashed!” a good friend? Begin by following that instrument to my lips in my dad’s dogged advice and ask a year, yet was bitterly questions. Whether it’s a new friend disappointed to discover or an old one, asking questions is the quickest way to build intimacy. I wasn’t a prodigy. We so Revealing something about yourself is another important short cut to often treat friendship the building trust and compassion between two people. Listening with same way, with lackadaisical effort and a whopping expectation intent is a fine skill – one you have to practise and deliberately of success. We believe friendship is one of those innate human cultivate. It’s not about waiting for your turn to speak; it’s about abilities; something we’re born able to do. But as someone I count conscientiously taking in what the other person has to say. We are as a friend, Dr Andrew Solomon, psychiatrist and author of so often in such a rush over our mugs of coffee or glasses of The Noonday Demon: An Anatomy Of Depression, rosé that we forget to stop and truly listen to each other. so succinctly put it, “Friendship is a human instinct, BOOKMARK: Then, of course, there are the practicalities of friendship: but it is also a skill – one that can be learnt and, on The Friendship Cure by Kate making your presence in someone’s life conspicuous that, can be taught.” Leaver ($29.99, when they need it, whether that’s by delivering chicken A little audit of your childhood experiences in the HarperCollins) playground should be enough to remind you that soup to a bereft household or lighting up their phone with is out now friendship can be difficult and confusing. It’s a skill to little WhatsApp messages of support. It’s knowing the tiny details of someone’s life so you can anticipate their be learnt over a lifetime – often the hard way, with the sting of social rejection or the ache of loneliness. As our brains needs: how they take their tea, their favourite song, their comfort develop, right up to that time our frontal lobe is settling into place at food of choice, their mother’s phone number, their favourite rom-com and what they might need to hear in a moment of doubt the beginning of adulthood, we’re still trying to understand what’s required of us when it comes to friendship. Loyalty, compassion, or insecurity or grief. It’s about trading intimacies, demonstrating love, encouragement, honesty and joy are the standard tenets of loyalty, truly listening and actively making someone a priority in decent friendship – why should we assume such glorious things your life. Practise all these lovely skills and you’ll be a better friend than I ever was a flautist. Promise. E would come naturally, without work?

WANT TO BE A BETTER FRIEND? Then be prepared to work at it. In her new book The Friendship Cure, Kate Leaver says while most of us are preprogrammed for friendship, few of us realise it’s a honeable skill

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MAN:

get in!

He’s the Skins and Black Mirror alumnus who starred in last year’s surprise horror hit Get Out and features opposite Lupita Nyong’o in the Marvel blockbuster Black Panther – 2018 is set to be the year of Daniel Kaluuya

“Got any nibbles?” Daniel Kaluuya asks very loudly. We’re sitting in a silent, very LA restaurant next to a West Hollywood art gallery. You might think the fact that Kaluuya’s become one of cinema’s most coveted young actors and an internet sensation (his expressive face in box-office hit Get Out inspired a stream of GIFs) would make him a little more reserved in public. Maybe quieter, avoiding recognition. No. Unapologetic and unaffected by his success, the 29-year-old doesn’t put on any new-fame affectations, nor does he stray far from his English roots. Having grown up on a council estate in North London, the son of Ugandan parents, he keeps all the same friends, listens to the same grime artists and wears his jeans like the boys outside the local Tube station – below the bum. The waitress clearly doesn’t have a clue what “nibbles” are, but hazards a guess. Kaluuya has

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a charmed way of making you understand exactly where he’s coming from. There’s a lightness and humour to the actor, which is a deep contrast to his on-screen roles. He’s drawn to rebellious, provocative projects, whether that’s the first cast of noughties teen drama Skins, an episode of Charlie Brooker’s dark sci-fi Black Mirror or 2017’s cult horror smash Get Out, which made more than $300 million at the global box office and earned Kaluuya a best actor nomination at both the Golden Globes and the Oscars this year. “I’ve always been looking to fuck shit up,” he says. “I was a shit in school. When I got into acting, a teacher said to my mum, ‘He needs to let out some energy.’” When Kaluuya got the part of Chris, an African-American who goes home to meet the parents of his white girlfriend (played by Girls’ Allison Williams), in Get Out, he

ignored director Jordan Peele’s advice to do his horror-film homework. Instead, he drew on his own experience of everyday racism. “I lived it. I live it. I live this,” he says. “I just read the script, so it was in me.” The themes of outsiderdom and otherness have made Get Out almost a documentary in its realness. “I go through racism every day, man,” says Kaluuya. “Probably the same for you with sexism, no? Every day someone says some sick stuff. Racism is horrifying. People end up dead, mothers lose their kids. This shit’s fucked up. You have all these experiences and you have to keep going for your dreams, but you’re carrying this.” (If you haven’t noticed, Kaluuya says fuck a lot.) On the subject of waking people up to hard truths, I ask if he was surprised by the revelations of sexism in his industry following the Harvey Weinstein scandal. He takes a moment. “A lot of men are raised in a mad way,” he says. “I’d be lying if I said I was shocked. Everyone knows. Now it’s time to listen to people’s stories, to do things properly. Make it a criminal case as opposed to a public shaming. Make sure there are repercussions.” After joining a small theatre group in North London, by 19 Kaluuya had been brought in to write on the first series of Skins, a show about teenagers, for teenagers, by teenagers. The producers loved the character he created – Posh Kenneth – so much, they had him act the part himself. A cult success, the show was notorious for its depiction of sex, drug use and adolescent pressures, as well as its cast of then-unknowns who were living parallel lives to the on-screen storylines. The rave continued off set. “It was our uni,” he says. “And, yeah, it got a bit crazy.” Fun aside, the freedom and exposure of Skins birthed a new breed of Hollywood breakout stars (Nicholas Hoult, Jack O’Connell, Dev Patel, Joe Dempsie), who didn’t need private-school connections to make it. “There are so many people I know from London in LA now, and we all started together,” Kaluuya says. “We used to go raving at [London’s] Cameos nightclub. Sometimes you have to appreciate that because when it gets low, it gets low. You have to enjoy the wins.”


LOOK When Kaluuya was starting out, it was grime MCs like Skepta and JME and actor Ashley Walters (formerly Asher D in So Solid Crew) who he looked up to; people from his “ends” who made him realise he didn’t need to minimise his lower socio-economic experience to pursue success. He sees the rise of grime as a sign that the people he grew up around are getting their dues now. “Everyone was late to the party,” he says. “Systematic blocks were put in place to stop grime artists from becoming the Oasis of our time. That’s who they are. It’s so inspiring. You don’t understand how subconsciously we’ve been told that we can’t. [Now] we can just be us and we can thrive.” Kaluuya is careful about the films he signs up to, preferring to portray characters in which he sees himself. When talking about his role in Marvel’s Black Panther, a largely black-cast blockbuster, he says, “That story resonated with me because I know that [character]. The sensibilities are aligned.” The film also stars another British rising star, Letitia Wright, who Kaluuya recorded plays with for the UK’s BBC Radio 4. “And now she’s got a phat Marvel poster of herself,” he says in smiling disbelief. He was just as surprised when the poster with his face came out. “[It was like] I’m in a Marvel film? Holy fuck… It just doesn’t compute ’cos I know my life. All my boys said to me, ‘Yo, you don’t understand what’s about to happen. After Black Panther, you can’t get a bus anymore.’ But I’m still going to get the bus.” With his winning optimism, and the promising year he’s set to have, it’s difficult to believe there’s ever a bad day for Daniel Kaluuya. He assures me there is. “This industry’s hard,” he says. “The world is hard. Being young and black is tough. You can’t complain about it, so you need a safe place to moan. When I need a reality check, I call my mum. She gives me the realness and says, ‘You were born in England. Shut up!’” E

DRINK:

viking spirit

set to open one in Brooklyn this year. Its current trend-worthiness can be traced back to a few things. First is craft beer’s entrance into the mainstream – in the mid-noughties, craft beer events began adding mead competitions to the line-up, such was the demand. Mentions of the liquor in pop culture did their part, too (see: 2007’s Scandinavian odyssey Beowulf), and the revived interest in medieval and fantasy worlds – thanks, Vikings and Game Of Thrones – set mead up to be the, ahem, buzz-worthy drop it is today. Scientists have even vouched for its health benefits – the honey’s antibacterial properties help fight infection, reduce stress and aid digestion. (Arguably, a spoonful straight from the jar would do the trick, but where’s the fun in that?) Though the traditional liquor can be dense and syrupy, modern versions are lighter, fresher and often sparkling. “Ours is a dry, sparkling style that is super refreshing, and is a more sessional alternative to sparkling wine because it’s less sweet than cider and naturally gluten free,” says Eddy Collett, from Adelaide’s Sunlight Liquor, who might be the first to take mead to the masses via the humble tinnie. “Australia is the continent of flowering plants, and the diversity of honey is extraordinary; we’ve been using some unique native botanicals, like strawberry gum leaves. Once you think of mead as the product of the nectar of flowers, rather than just a winter drink for vikings, the possibilities are endless.” E

Meet the ancient libation that’s making a sweet return

Get Out

CHECK OUT: Black Panther is out now Black Panther

Words: Eve Barlow; Laura Collins. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Getty Images. Mead available from sunlightliquor.com

first

In Norse mythology, a magical tincture existed called “Poetic Mead”. Crafted with honey and the blood of a wise man, it gave the gift of great intelligence to anyone who drank it. Mead (of a stockstandard, non-poetic variety) was also the drink of choice for the Greek gods, and vikings were rewarded with a bottomless cup of it upon reaching Valhalla (like a viking heaven). While tinctures made with the blood of wise men would certainly not meet modern food safety standards, a selection of other mead-based innovations are currently infiltrating bottle-shop shelves and inner-city bar menus. Believed to be the world’s oldest tipple, predating beer and wine, mead’s production has been dated back to China 7000BC. In the US, the number of dedicated meaderies has increased from 30 in 2003 to more than 300 in 2018, with former child star Dylan Sprouse (The Suite Life Of Zack & Cody)

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SAVE IT FOR LATER

documenting things we find in the corners of the internet – such as photos you must repost, addresses you must remember, emails you must not lose to the depths of your inbox, things you must buy, restaurants you must try and books you must read. The idea is that you’ll know exactly where to look when you need to book a hotel in a new city (the one with the fab bathtub that in-the-know local posted to her Insta Stories last month) or buy your mum a birthday gift (that book Oprah tweeted about at the end of last year). But how often do you actually call on them? Studies of our phone habits show that when we file away information to our phones (say, with a screenshot), assuming we’ll have access to it later, we promptly forget about the info, no doubt replacing it simply with where we can find it. Essentially, knowing that information is stored on our device mitigates the need for remembering what it was we even needed to know so badly in the first place. Cybersecurity company Kaspersky has touted the phenomenon of forgetting information you trust a device to store (and hence remember) for you as “digital amnesia”. It found that 44 per cent of Americans admitted that their smart phone serves as their memory, holding almost everything they need to know or recall, and only 69.7 per cent said they would know their partner’s number without the aid of their contacts list. And it’s not just a thing for young digital natives – it’s a trend that’s equally and sometimes even more prevalent in older age groups. When we offload information to our device, using it as a crutch for our memory, we can forget that information alarmingly quickly. In one study that took place in a museum, participants found it harder to remember details of the objects they photographed a day after a tour compared to the works they purely observed.

Some of the seemingly most important details of our daily lives exist in screenshots accumulated and stored for when we’ll one day need them (we swear). But what are we actually doing with them? And what are they doing to our ability to remember what’s in them in the first place? The most fiercely guarded images on your phone might be holiday snaps and selfies with your nearest and dearest, but if the Screenshots folder were to evaporate into the iCloud, it would feel a little like losing an arm – one with a lot of random, but vital, notes scribbled on it. Screenshots have become the preferred method of

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Dr Kathryn Mills, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Oregon’s Developmental Social Neuroscience Laboratory, goes so far as to say that, “Reliance on digital devices – and the trust we place in them – can resemble a human relationship.” She explains: “Repeated experience with a reliable individual builds an association for that individual in our memory, telling us that this person can be depended on. If a digital device is continually reliable, then we will build that into our schema of that device.” So how to dial down the reliance? There are plenty of ways to streamline the endless barrage of information you would otherwise capture in screenshots, including apps like Thinglist (which will categorise things like movies you want to watch, books you want to read, even interesting ideas and people you’ve heard about), and services such as LIKEtoKNOW.it (which automatically sends shopping links for pieces you’ve captured off Instagram). Instagram’s Saved section has a little-used functionality to categorise posts you’ve bookmarked. Apple’s new instant access and editing function on the iPhone allows you to edit and send your screenshot without having to leave the app you’re in, meaning you can scribble a note on it, send it to a friend and be more likely to act on it. And don’t discount the simple act of writing things down. Research shows that when we put pen to paper, we recall what we’ve written more easily than if we’d typed it (or, as the case may be, taken a screenshot). Even Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg – arguably the most successful woman in tech globally – keeps a notebook on hand at all times. Or, next time you go to press those two little buttons, why not make for one less screenshot and instead just get on Amazon and buy the book, or call and make a reservation at that hot new restaurant, or order the ingredients for the food blogger’s dish you’d love to make... not later, but now. Just don’t forget to ’gram it afterwards. E

Words: Elle McClure. Photography: Courtesy of Apple

LIFE:


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@reesesbookclubxhellosunshine

@belletrist

@emmawatson

become bestsellers – through Instagram itself. Before that, she was self-published. Now, she’s a bona-fide phenomenon. Welcome to the new book club: Instagram. Its unofficial – yet clear – leader is Reese Witherspoon, whose second post ever was a shot of J Courtney Sullivan’s The Engagements. Around the same time she posted the pic (along with the caption, “I love this book! Has anyone else read?”), it was announced that the film rights had been snapped up and she’d been enlisted as a producer. Though she may not have realised it at the time, it was the start of the #RWBookClub hashtag, which, in turn, was the beginning of the account @ReesesBookClubXHelloSunshine, which – we’re getting there – is now where 390,000 followers get book suggestions from the Oscar winner herself. There was a time when a book recommendation from Oprah cemented its status as a bestseller – but now, those endorsements happen in beautifully shot flat-lays, or stacks of artfully colour-coded editions, with hashtags like #shelfie, #bookstagram and #amreading. Celebs like Witherspoon can send a book rocketing up the bestseller list with a single post, and authors like Kaur can cultivate a following previously unknown to all but the most successful authors. To wit, when Witherspoon posted a pic of Jessica

@belletrist

Colour-coded shelfies and celeb endorsements have transformed books into hot social-media property

@bellaheathcote

The second bestselling book on Amazon in 2017 was Milk And Honey, a collection of poetry by 25-year-old Canadian Rupi Kaur. That’s right, poetry. You know, that stuff you probably last read during your Year 12 exams. To put it into context, Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies – a book that dominated conversation due to the award-winning HBO miniseries it spawned – was all the way down at number 53 on the same list. Even more jaw-dropping, in 2016, Milk And Honey outsold the next bestselling book of poetry (The Odyssey by Homer) tenfold. Rupi Kaur, in case you don’t know, is a poet for the Instagram age. And we mean that quite literally – she posts poems so brief, they fit neatly into Insta squares, meaning that not only can her 2.3 million followers read her work instantly, they can also regram her poetry to their own followers (for example, “But what is stronger/Than the human heart/ Which shatters over and over/And lives” had more than 260,000 double-taps at time of press). What’s most amazing about Kaur, though, is that she’s become famous – and her two books, Milk And Honey and the more recent The Sun And Her Flowers, have

@phoebejtonkin

instagram is the new book club

@emmaroberts

BOOKS:

Knoll’s debut novel Luckiest Girl Alive, the book quickly climbed into Amazon’s top 100 bestsellers – despite not actually being published yet. Witherspoon had already secured the film rights, and soon after Luckiest Girl Alive was published, the book became a New York Times bestseller and had found its way into Amazon’s top 10. It seems that if anything can save the book industry, it’s social media. After all, what is prettier than a book nestled in a tangle of sheets, resting next to a pot of tea or propped up on smug holiday toes? And what better way to tap into the psyche of a celeb than by sneaking a look at what they’re reading? Instagram posts from the likes of Emma Watson (who runs a feminist-themed book club, Our Shared Shelf, on Goodreads), Emma Roberts (one half of the online


EMMA GLASS (THE WRITER OF THE BREAKOUT HIT, PEACH)

SUCH SMALL HANDS By Andrés Barba I loved this ghost story. The language is crisp, with the narrative [using] direct expressions of concepts too difficult for the young characters to comprehend. This timeless, placeless story is a fresh addition to the horror genre. ($31.95, Transit Books) THE END WE START FROM By Megan Hunter This could be anywhere in the world and it could be happening now. A fragmentary illustration of motherhood in a postapocalyptic world, the poetic novella examines big themes in a small space. ($19.99, Picador)

Some of the biggest names in books right now are gracing our shores this month for the Sydney Writers’ Festival. We asked them to let us in on their latest literary obsessions

JENNY ZHANG (THE AUTHOR OF THE LENA DUNHAM-APPROVED SOUR HEART)

YRSA DALEY-WARD (THE POET BEHIND THE WILDLY POPULAR BONE)

FORGET IT By Anastacia Reneé A new collection of poems I’m completely in love with. Visceral, raw, gorgeous language and words. ($22, Black Radish Books) SEXING THE CHERRY By Jeanette Winterson One of the dreamiest historical-fantasy stories I’ve ever read... and read and read. I float away with this book. ($22.99, Penguin)

ASYMMETRY BY LISA HALLIDAY

*

HER BODY & OTHER PARTIES: STORIES By Carmen Maria Machado These stories defy genre and redefine it at the same time – the horrors and pleasures of having a body glisten across every page of this book. ($24.99, Serpent’s Tail) HUNGER By Roxane Gay Gay’s memoir left me reeling. In it, she writes poignantly, honestly and beautifully about unruly bodies and sexual assault, and examines what it means to accept yourself when your body has been deemed unacceptable. ($22.99, Hachette) Sydney Writers’ Festival runs April 30-May 6; swf.org.au E

Comprised of two stories, the first part of Halliday’s debut novel is a thinly veiled account of her relationship with novelist Philip Roth, told through the eyes of Alice, an aspiring writer embarking on a romance with a much older and more established author (and the power play that ensues). The second part is told from the perspective of Amar, an Iraqi-American being held in immigration at Heathrow. The two stories seem unrelated, but are tied together via a tiny clue – and it has the literary world abuzz. Asymmetry ($27.99, Granta) is out now This is the latest instalment of the ELLE Book Club, where each month we recommend one read we know you’ll love. To win a copy of this one, head to ELLE.com.au/win.

BOOK OF THE MONTH

book club Belletrist) and Sarah Jessica Parker (honorary chair of the American Library Association’s Book Club Central) can transform a book from a littleknown debut to a blockbuster in a matter of days. What’s more, these ticks of approval from female celebs usually champion women writers. In fact, Witherspoon has made an entirely new career out of advocating for female writers – her films Wild and Gone Girl were based on novels written by women, and her book club selects works solely written by women. The power of Instagram isn’t lost on the book industry, with publishers now clambering to make covers stand out in your feed. “Judging a book by its cover is inevitable in any scenario,” says Allen & Unwin publisher Kelly Fagan, “but since Instagram, we’ve seen a resurgence of typographicdominated covers, letting the title, style of font and colour speak for the content. These types of covers are often more creative: they employ metaphor instead of relying on images to convey a message.” Ironically, she says, this marks a return to a more traditional style of cover design. Allen & Unwin recently published the first book by Insta-famous artist Mari Andrew, whose 749,000 followers regram the hell out of her quirky self-help-themed illustrations. But perhaps the greatest indication that Instagram has become the new destination for book lovers is that Oprah has brought her famed book club back. One of her latest picks? The very Instagrammable Behold The Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue. E

@reesewitherspoon

Words: Lauren Sams; Elle McClure

@kiing.2003

words with friends


LAP OF LUXURY: Maserati’s Levante takes SUVs to the next level

DRIVE:

Forget every stereotype you’ve heard – the new high-riding passenger vehicles are getting a very luxe makeover

Toorak tractors, soccer-mum mobiles, rockhoppers... those big-bottomed SUVs get a bad rap, and yet Australia loves them. Last year, in a market traditionally dominated by hatchbacks and sedans, they managed to overtake the sales of traditional passenger vehicles, prompting motoring purists to roll their eyes and manufacturers to take note. Really, it was only a matter of time. The rise has been steady and it’s opened up a dialogue of how far, in terms of performance, technology, style, value and safety, the class has come. It’s hard not to notice the influx of tempting new SUVs and crossover cars (or mini SUVs) packed with impressive safety features, dynamics and functionality – Peugeot’s 5008, Land Rover’s Velar, Jaguar’s E-Pace, Toyota’s C-HR and Hyundai’s Kona, to name some stand-outs. However, we’re yet to hit the top of the bell curve. There’s another wave of game-changing SUVs afoot and they’re breaking the school-run mould and bringing the thrill of driving back. Lamborghini, Aston Martin, Ferrari: they’re brands associated with sexy, sumptuous, back-seat-free automobiles and certainly not considered as “family friendly”. They’re the makers of dreamy supercars, intimate moments you’d often

only just be able to share with one other person (bar a couple of models as exceptions) with as little luggage as possible and definitely no space for your festival fit-out. As women, our relationship to our cars is personal; we do everything in them – so, what if, ask the brands, we started making our sexiest sports cars more social? Enter two new categories: supercars masquerading as SUVs and extreme high-luxury SUVs; they’re cake plus eating it, too. You could say the latter started in 2016, with Bentley’s luxurious Bentayga, and was fully realised by Maserati with the beautiful Levante a year later. “The arrival of the SUV in the high-luxury and performance sector has transformed the top end of the market,” says Glen Sealey, chief operating officer of Maserati Australia, New Zealand and South Africa,

SUVS ARE BREAKING THE SCHOOL-RUN MOULD AND BRINGING THE THRILL OF DRIVING BACK

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noting that the Levante is a true Maserati, with no corners cut. “The challenge for car makers [now] is to not produce an SUV with a badge on the front as the only emblem of their involvement, but to [also] ensure the vehicle remains true to the values and abilities of its forebears.” This is the bar set rather high by the tridentstamped icon, a trailblazer (pun intended) for the SUV new world order. Now, the noise around manufacturers who said they’d never do an SUV is rumbling. Ferrari has a top-secret model in development, late 2019 will see Aston Martin drop the “high-luxury SUV” DBX, and Rolls-Royce’s “high-sided vehicle”, the Cullinan, will also arrive to have a swing at Bentley’s crown. And at the forefront of the high-performance subsector for 2018 is Lamborghini, which just launched the “super sports utility vehicle” Urus. Fierce, powerful, fast – it’s everything you expect from the Italian bull, but with comfort (and plush back seats, TV and more). Supercars can be loud, stiff, low, frustrating to park and tight with luggage – altogether an antisocial event. But the new SUVs are the cars we never even knew we needed, borrowing the design aesthetic, exclusivity and experience of owning a dream car, but adopting some everyday ease. They’re functional, fashionable and ready to take on every terrain, quite literally. E

Words: Noelle Faulkner. Photography: Courtesy of Maserati

THE SUV GETS SEXY


REPAIR damage and protect from helps


PERSPECTIVE:

Swimmer Cate Campbell says she experienced the “biggest choke in Olympics history” when the race favourite failed to place in the 100m freestyle final in Rio. But as she prepares to take to the pool at the Commonwealth Games, she shares how she transformed her shame into a new outlook

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I went to my first Olympics when I was 16. I didn’t have the normal teenage, high-school life, but in saying that, I got to do things and see things that my classmates couldn’t even dream of. I looked “sacrifice” up in the dictionary and it says, “The surrendering of something of value in the hopes of obtaining something better.” If you’re not giving up something you value, then how can you possibly hope to achieve something great? For a long time, I was giving up things I cared about, but the things that I wanted, I valued more. However, it was very clear that when I started resenting the things I was having to sacrifice, that was the moment I needed to reassess my goals. I took last year off competing internationally. I needed time to come to terms with who I was as a person outside of the pool, and what life could look like without that black line being such a major part of my every day. And I needed time away from the pressure and the public scrutiny and people’s expectations of me and my expectations of myself. Life was tough after Rio. I remember feeling this overwhelming sense of embarrassment and shame that I let myself and my country down, along with my friends and my family and everyone who has invested time into me. People would be congratulating me, saying, “You did such a good job,” or “You handled yourself so well,” and to me it was like nails down a chalkboard – that was the level of discomfort it caused me. I wasn’t proud of myself and didn’t feel like I was worthy of their praise. I really felt like swimming had broken my heart. I felt betrayed. It sounds weird but I had given so much of myself to this thing, and it had completely let me down and I didn’t know who I was without it. It was like going through a break-up. I’ve been swimming for 10 years, so it’s like a 10-year relationship you’re having to come to terms with ending. I’m the eldest of five children so I’ve always been the responsible one, the one to look out for people and to look after them. But for the first time, I needed help and other people around me. It was an uncomfortable and vulnerable position. I guess I went through a bit of a quarter-life crisis, but it made me realise it’s okay to not be okay. I think it’s allowed me a greater understanding of when

other people are going through things. Sometimes there’s nothing you can do to help someone except be there, to check in with them. I feel like I’m a much better person for what happened in Rio, and I’m going to be a person a lot longer than I’m going to be a swimmer. People have helped me see that they respect me not just for my performances in the swimming pool, they also respect me for a whole heap of other reasons. For me, it’s about cutting myself a bit of slack. I’m finding enjoyment in other things rather than just swimming. I’ve started hiking and just got myself a kayak. I really enjoy music; I try to get out and support some local Australian artists and see a gig once every few months. I’ll get a haircut, because as a swimmer to have dry hair is a real novelty. We spend most of our time with wet, smelly, chlorine-infested hair, so to allow myself to be okay with spending time and money on myself is important. And I’ve started brewing my own kombucha! So I’m making sure I have other things outside of the pool that I’m putting energy into and enjoying. Being back in the pool feels really good. I’m so pleased I took time off to figure out what life could look like, what I would look like without swimming. I now make time for breaks and to go travelling. I’m planning two big road trips around Australia this year, so that’s something to look forward to. There’s obviously the Commonwealth Games – to have a home games is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for me as an athlete. But I’m also studying media and communications, and later on in the year I’m actually going to dabble in the real world and ask to do some internships at a couple of different companies. I can see my swimming career wrapping up after 2020 and need a bit of a progression plan. It’s important to have things in and out of the pool that you’re striving for, so the Commonwealth Games in the pool and getting a real job outside of the pool – I think that’s it for this year! I still don’t think I have realised my dream. Don’t get me wrong, there are milestones, achievements and things I’ve done along the way that I’m incredibly proud of, but I think that once I’ve realised my dream, I’ll close this chapter of my life and begin something else. The really beautiful thing about swimming, or about sport, is that as perfectionists we strive for perfection, but perfection doesn’t exist in any area of life. It’s a goal that’s unobtainable, yet you still want to keep trying for it. To achieve my dream will be when I get to a stage where I can look back on my career and be proud of everything I’ve achieved along the way, feel like I’ve given everything that I have to this sport and can walk away at peace with it. E

As told to: Genevra Leek. Photography: Pierre Toussaint at Vivien’s Creative

“As perfectionists we strive for perfection, but perfection doesn’t exist in any area of life”


S O M E T I M E S O N LY A CAPPUCCINO WIL L DO The new Lattissima One. For the love of quality coffee moments.


THE ELLE MANUAL:

HOW TO DO THE NEW SPORTSWEAR It’s activewear (without the sneakers)

EVERY SEASON, A THEME APPEARS

in so many collections it becomes known as a Very Clear Trend. For SS18, it was elevated athleticwear. From New York to Paris, the runways were rife with performance pieces, utilitarian details and a strong outdoorsy spirit – it’s a whole new genre of athleisure that fuses evening-, sport- and workwear. Tap into the mood in jackets with drawstrings, sandals with rubber soles and pockets on everything.

STAY ON TOP

’90S CROP

Pick an era, any era, and the activewear codes of that decade still work in a 2018 way. Try these...

Top, $44, ASOS, asos.com/au

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’00S SLIP

’70S COLOUR ’80S VOLUME

Top, $59.99, H&M, hm.com/au

Crop, $49.95, CALVIN KLEIN, calvinklein.com/au

Top, $65, IRIS & INK, theoutnet.com


Calvin Klein 205W39NYC

Mary Katrantzou

Jacket, $499, TOMMY HILFIGER, tommy.com

Valentino

Jacket, $179, LULULEMON, lululemon.com.au

MEET THE OUTERWEAR PHENOMENON OF SS18

Unlike your denim and leather jackets, the waterproof, wind-resistant anorak is the staple that won’t make you choose between fashion and the weather forecast. The two silhouette options? Longer-line with a drawstring waist or cropped and voluminous. Try it over a floaty maxi-dress or tailored knee-length shorts. >

Jacket, $150, COS, cosstores.com/au

Oscar De La Renta

Jacket, $110, NUDE LUCY, myer.com.au

Jacket, $1,755, SPORTMAX, sportmax.com

Dion Lee

THE JACKET TO REPLACE EVERY OTHER JACKET


Top, $180, C&M CAMILLA AND MARC, camillaandmarc.com

THE NEW SPORTSWEAR

POCKETS

Area

Shirts, pants and all kinds of outerwear were covered in brilliantly practical, oversized pockets on the SS18 runways.

Valentino

THE ELLE MANUAL:

TWO REASONS TO NEVER

Tod’s

HOLD A BAG AGAIN

Loewe

Dress, $125, COS, cosstores.com/au

Sportmax

Fenty X Puma

PICK A STRATEGY, STASH YOUR STUFF AND LET YOUR HANDS DO THE TALKING

Valentino

Marc Jacobs

Belt bag, $1,360, PRADA, (02) 9223 1688

BELT BAGS This season, they’re big enough to fit the contents of your everyday handbag. Wear it around the waist or slung over the shoulder and stick to a boxy, sleek silhouette.

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Belt bag, $299, SANS BEAST, sansbeast.com


Gucci Isabel Marant

Tod’s

Lacoste

Jacket, $169, pants, $219, both KATE SYLVESTER, katesylvester.com

THE FULL SWEATSUIT NO ACTUAL SWEATING REQUIRED

Jacket, $100, pants, $90, both PUMA, au.puma.com

Designers have spoken: no longer will you need to pant-toss the moment you get home. Tracksuits, sweatsuits, jogging suits... whatever you call them, a coordinating sport set is the new power suit. Look for retro-minded panelling in warm ’70s tones of red, cream and mustard.

Top, $75, shorts, $75, both COS, cosstores.com/au

Jacket, $79.95, pants, $59.95, both TOPSHOP, topshop.com Top, $175, skirt, $150, both COS, cosstores.com/au

SCULPTURAL MULES

STEER CLEAR OF SNEAKERS AND ELEVATE THE LOOK WITH THESE INSTEAD BLOCK RED BOOTS

An arty heel will amp up the cool factor. Heels, $1,390, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, ferragamo.com

A contrasting colour makes for maximum impact. Boots, $240, SKIN FOOTWEAR, skin-footwear.com

KNOTTED WHITE SANDALS

To freshen up retro hues. Sandals, $225, COS, cosstores.com/au

BOLD FLATFORMS

The vibe of a sneaker without looking “performance”. > Shoes, $215, MARIMEKKO, marimekko.com

EVENING SILK SLIDES

Luxe silk takes the tracksuit to the next level of glam. Heels, $785, STUART WEITZMAN, hermanns.com.au

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THE ELLE MANUAL:

THE NEW SPORTSWEAR

Pants, $380, CAMILLA AND MARC, camillaandmarc.com

TIE ME UP

Pants, $169, KATE SYLVESTER, katesylvester.com

STIRRUP PANTS

Isabel Marant

Mary Katrantzou

Give the ’80s favourite a modern update by wearing the strap on the outside of your shoes.

For a short cut to sports-luxe, add a drawstring detail to your waist, neck or strapline

WHAT TO WEAR INSTEAD OF LEGGINGS

Emporio Armani

Pants, $479, BOSS, hugoboss.com

Peter Pilotto

PAY HOMAGE TO SPORTY SPICE IN A PAIR OF THESE

ATHLETIC STRIPED PANTS

Pants, $99.95, TOPSHOP, topshop.com

Y/Project

Pick the colours of your favourite team (otherwise, green and black work well) and go wide.

FAUX TRACKPANTS Pants, $62, ASOS, asos.com/au

Y/Project

Pants, $53, ASOS, asos.com/au

Perfect for entry-level adopters, the side stripe adds just the right amount of sports edge. Skirt, $75, TOPSHOP, topshop.com

PARACHUTE PANTS

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Opt for high-waisted and khaki, then wear with a plain white tee and heels for the embodiment of utility-cool.


Valentino

Balenciaga

PIP EDWARDS, THE CO-FOUNDER OF PE NATION (WHICH JUST WON THE NATIONAL DESIGNER AWARD AT VAMFF), IS THE PERSONAL AMBASSADOR FOR ELEVATED SPORTSWEAR. SHE SHARES HER LATEST SPORTS-LUXE FAVES

THE COLOURED COURT

THE

A-TEAM

IT’S ONLY FAIR THAT WE HONOUR THE STREET-BORN TREND WITH THE BEST PLAYERS ON THE STREET-STYLE SCENE. HERE ARE OUR FAVOURITE LOOKS – DO TRY THIS AT HOME.

Bag, $4,400, LOUIS VUITTON, au.louisvuitton.com

OFFWHITE DENIM JACKET Wear with performance pants for added edge.

LOUIS VUITTON TWIST BAG

Jacket, $716, OFF-WHITE, net-a-porter.com

My everyday staple that works with activewear.

T-shirt, $430, BALENCIAGA, matchesfashion.com

Koché

Bring a hint of the trend to the office with a racing-car bright heel – the bolder, the better.

BALENCIAGA LOGO TEE I’d pair it with denim that has a track stripe down the side.

ANYTHING BY KOCHÈ This label is the perfect mix of street, sport, comfort, ’90s and denim. Sunglasses, $222, ROBERI & FRAUD, roberiandfraud.com

@pip_edwards1

Tom Ford

Calvin Klein 205W39NYC

PIP’S PICKS

Heels, $745, STUART WEITZMAN, hermanns.com.au

ROBERI & FRAUD SHADES They add a street element to any look. >

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THE ELLE MANUAL:

The boilersuit is your one-step dress-to-impress item with style for days. Cinch it with a belt. Roll up the sleeves. Take out pole position.

Fenty X Puma

Dress, $135, COS, cosstores.com/au

FORMULA 1: A BOILERSUIT

Valentino

THE NEW SPORTSWEAR

TENNIS: A CRISP WHITE SHIFT

Stella McCartney

Off-court, the tennis dress still has all the go-getting appeal of a ’70s Grand Slam without the need for a water break. Ace.

THE MODERN ALL-IN-ONE

GYMNASTICS: AN ALL-BLACK UNITARD

Fashion is channelling a time when athletes were the peak of chic. Think the glory days of Wimbledon, Formula 1 or the Olympics, when an all-in-one with swift details and retro panelling was the uniform norm. For 2018, choose a neutral colour – black, white or tan work best – then pick your favourite sport. These throwback throw-ons are your new LBD.

This is the go-hard or go-home piece that will require a pro-athlete-grade training schedule just to slide into, but the rewards will be worth it.

Jumpsuit, $60, PUMA, au.puma.com

Jumpsuit, $1,099, IRO, (02) 9362 1165

Sportmax

Peter Pilotto

Monse

Words and styling: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani and Chris Jansen (still-life); Aleksandra Rozniata; Imaxtree; Jason Lloyd-Evans

Emporio Armani

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Christopher Kane

MAKE THE CUT

Another way to elevate sportswear? Add an unexpected glimpse of skin


Marc Jacobs

PERFORMANCE, BUT MAKE IT FASHION THESE HERO ITEMS WERE MADE FOR YOUR 6AM REFORMER CLASS. BUT WORN WITH A FEW EXTRAS, YOU’VE GOT THE NEW-SEASON LOOK

Bag, $495, OROTON, oroton.com.au

Shoes, $1,070, PRADA, (02) 9223 1688 Pants, $320, C&M CAMILLA AND MARC, camillaandmarc.com

RUBBER-SOLED SHOES

Stella McCartney

In patchwork colours, the sneaker/Croc hybrid will elevate any look. As seen at: Prada, Marc Jacobs, Christopher Kane.

Earrings, $149, VALET STUDIO, valet-studio. myshopify.com

Blazer, $499, C&M CAMILLA AND MARC, camillaandmarc.com

Sunglasses, $129, LE SPECS, lespecs.com

Boots, $1,615, STUART WEITZMAN, hermanns.com.au

FAST SUNGLASSES

Dion Lee

Small yet impactful, if they wouldn’t look out of place at the velodrome, you’re on to a good thing. As seen at: Stella McCartney, Prada, Louis Vuitton.

Dress, $287, RAG & BONE, rag-bone.com

Bag, $2,300, CHRISTIAN DIOR, (02) 9229 4600 Necklace, $150, PETITE GRAND, petitegrand.com

Earrings, $129, RELIQUIA, reliquiajewellery.com

BIKE SHORTS Clean, minimal and perfect poking out from under a blazer. Opt for a longer length and master entry-level chic. As seen at: Off-White, Dion Lee, Nina Ricci. E Bag, $4,700, CHRISTIAN DIOR, (02) 9229 4600 Blazer, $999, GEORGIA ALICE, georgiaalice.com Pants, $895, SPORTMAX, sportmax.com

Heels, $120, TOPSHOP, topshop.com

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going

From Chanel to Céline, transparency ruled the shows this season. Véronique Hyland submits, fashionably, to prying eyes, testing see-through items fresh off the runway

clear

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans

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Céline

Chanel

I’m a person given to discretion. The contents of my brain, bed, inbox and medicine cabinet are not up for public consumption. But the contents of my purse soon may be – at least, if designers have anything to say about it. Fashion’s biggest players have fallen head-over-Lucite-heels for all things seethrough this season, albeit in their own signature ways. Chanel showed extreme over-the-knee boots and transparent totes (all the better to weather the show’s indoor waterfall), Valentino nestled smaller pouches inside clear Rockstud clutches and Céline presented a “plastic” bag – elevating it to must-have status. The young-designer crowd got in on it, too. Shayne Oliver’s debut show for Helmut Lang featured an oversized acrylic briefcase emblazoned with the brand’s logo – making “transparency” more than a boardroom buzzword. Collaborator extraordinaire Virgil Abloh linked up with Jimmy Choo on “glass slippers” for his Princess Diana-inspired Off-White show, where models donned polybagged heels. It’s a daring look for sure. One that Rihanna has already endorsed, having braved the kerbs of New York in a pair. But with the exception of protective coverings ripped off pieces moments before a runway show begins, clear plastic isn’t generally equated with high fashion. Its associations include cling film on leftovers, shower curtains and those rain bonnets women of a certain age wear after their biweekly salon visits. For sports fans, clear bags mean “stadium-approved”. Headed to an AFL game? Stash your belongings in a see-through carryall and you’ll breeze through security. So how to explain lowbrow plastic’s proliferation among the hautest of fashion houses? And, really, who wants to be so exposed? Clearly (pun intended), I needed to take the trend for a test run. Enter the aforementioned enormous Helmut Lang briefcase. The plan: carry it as my work bag. Keep in mind that every day I shuffle through this world with a morass of ugly or downright embarrassing items, from a First Amendment bookmark to a healthcare card that looks like it survived Pompeii. Staring into the depths of my go-to leather bucket bag, I realise I need to edit my life to be more suitable for the


John Galliano

Emporio Armani Valentino

Diana’s accessible “People’s Princess” image. But while the fairytale glass slipper is fragile, plastic has an uncanny edge, “analogous to Diana’s personality that was exposed to the real world,” he says. She was a woman we thought we knew, but who was enveloped in the same slick layering that encases the British tabloids she once starred in. In other words, fashion’s journey into clear territory may not be about exhibitionism at all. Maybe it’s just about security – an insurance policy, of sorts, against disaster, both natural and man-made. (Note to Melania Trump: if you’re going to wear stilettos to a flood-ravaged city, might I suggest ones that at least nod to water resistance?) Psychologically, transparency provides a sense of safety from unthinkable acts of terror. Wrapped up in clingy, elements-repelling film, one is more likely to feel safe. And while not foolproof, a see-through bag would make concealing a weapon at least somewhat more difficult for a would-be assailant. Maybe I’m overthinking it, though. Not everything about the trend boils down to political and psychological turmoil. This really falls into place when I carry the briefcase, empty, into the office of an ELLE colleague. “What is the utility of such an item?” I ask. She looks at it with the cool, practised eye of someone used to evaluating even the most arcane of trends. “There is no utility – it’s just a showpiece,” she says. Which really cuts to the chase. It’s not for anything. It just offers ridiculous fun. And if that’s not enough to sell you on it, there’s one big perk so obvious it initially escaped me. “If you drop something on it, you can actually wipe it off,” Choi says. “That’s quite cool.” E Off-White

gaze of others. The usual bottom-of-the-bag detritus – gum wrappers, a rogue Tic Tac – are the first to go. Other items I give a bit more thought: that mini hairbrush I rarely use, the portable charger that’s never charged. I consider them carefully before deciding to ditch them, my possessions reduced to an aesthetically pleasing few. Mid-Kondo method, it occurs to me that this is the exact sort of hyper-curation many of us do when creating an Instagram post. Social media has made us all editors. Perhaps a clear bag is just a physical continuation of our compulsion to erase, remove or heavily filter the unsightly aspects of our lives. The hope, of course, is that what we present for outside consumption speaks directly to our personal narrative and brand. Then again, long before shelfies and flat-lays, red-carpet reporters were lobbing “What’s in your bag?” at A-listers – the implication being that we are, in some ways, the junk we carry. To lay all of it bare is to telegraph who we are at a specific moment. Currently, I’m reading The Handmaid’s Tale, and a photo editor in the office spots the book sandwiched between my wallet and assorted papers and strikes up a conversation about it. Generally, I’m restrained about sharing my interests at work. But the bag makes connecting easy. To wit, a woman stops me on the street to share that she’d love to display the bag at home – namely, to house her coffee-table books safely away from her dog’s claws. We end up conversing for a while, and I give her my business card. Pleased with the bag’s capacity to help identify like minds in the wild (even if it does give me a sense of being surveilled: “Under his eye” indeed), I try out Abloh’s plastic-bagged shoes. I slip into the five-inch heels, each outfitted in the shoe equivalent of an emergency poncho, and head out. Rihanna I am not, but I do get a lot of stares. Unlike the briefcase, though, the shoes don’t lead to any networking. This could be explained by what Sandra Choi, creative director of Jimmy Choo, says is a certain “look at me/don’t look at me” quality to clear accessories. “The plastic element is about protection, in my mind,” she tells me. They’re at once voyeuristic and closed off, shrouded as they are in their plastic covering. Abloh tells me that wrapping the shoes was part of creating “our very own living, breathing Cinderella story” for the show, a way of playing with

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ON THE P WER OF PRAISE

Is there anything more moodaltering than a beautifully timed compliment, delivered with style, wit and grace from someone you admire? Or quite like? Or even a stranger? Is there anything more likely to guarantee a good night out? Some people can’t relax at a party until they’ve had two-anda-half units of fizzy alcohol; for me, it’s praise that helps me come into my own. One “Look at your lovely dress!” and my conversation flows. My jokes get funnier. My cheeks grow rosy. Sometimes, when I feel anxious, I think of the time I was standing in front of [actor] Bill Nighy in a queue at the theatre and he murmured “Beautiful skirt” as he passed. (It was my best one.) Of course, the more original the compliment, the deeper in it goes. “I won’t forget it, not even after I’m dead,” my daughter said on her third birthday when she saw the castle cake, complete with horsedrawn carriage and turrets made from inverted ice-cream cones dusted with edible lustre. I’d been cursing the piping bag into the small hours, but maybe it was worth it after all? We all know the damage a vivid insult can do, but elaborate compliments can stay with you forever, too. In a pistachio-green silk dress printed all over with robots and black lace at the collar, I was greeted by a friend who said, “You are so Ginger Rogers in space, if space were Italian.” I nearly curtseyed. Thousands of likes on Instagram can’t compete with a moment like that. Although by day, when I’m writing, I generally live in a grey or navy skirt and jumper, by night, the allure of flattery influences my look: rose silk dresses, polkadot ruffles, black velvet with white lace. I choose clothes that have an emotional charge, and I’m drawn to items that express the faded glamour of the past. Woe betide a dress that nobody notices. It’s straight to the back of the wardrobe: the rack of shame. I can see it’s a failing to require a thumbsup from the world in this way, but it’s hardly unusual. Mark Twain said a good compliment could keep him going for two months. Of course, we should provide our

out in the end. “All you care about is books and grilled fish!” my teenager yelled at me last night. Wounded, I wasn’t! My new novel Love & Fame is partly set in the theatre, where the economy of praise is at its most fraught. My heroine, Eve, an actress, muses on this in chapter one. “I’m thinking of that thing Dad said once about people visiting people backstage when the show wasn’t working and that they found themselves in a state of paralysis, wanting to be warm but not wanting to tell actual lies and the things they came up with, like ‘Good just isn’t the word!’ or ‘My word! You’ve done it again!’” “What kind of job, what kind of world, makes people develop a rotten language like that, just to exist?” her mother asked. There are parallels to the world of writing. “I liked your book,” a friend said recently, before changing the subject. When you hear “like”, it’s difficult not to hear “I didn’t love”. You have to be strict with yourself at these moments. I cheer myself up with compliments of old. A book I wrote 10 years ago made someone wake up from a coma, his girlfriend wrote to tell me. But a strange thing has occurred post Harvey Weinstein: my attitude towards appearance-based compliments is starting to waver. I have two daughters, and people own pats on the back and not put our dwelling on their looks makes me queasy. happiness in the hands of others. You don’t Their appearance is the least of it, I want to have to be Sigmund Freud to detect I may protest. “Yes, but did you see her drawing of be compensating for something: being the a pineapple?” or “Cute? She does so much youngest of a large family, I was all taekwondo we have a trained assassin in homework and tap shoes and “Remember the house now.” For many people, the most me?” (Freud also declared he was interesting thing about women will always be the way they look. That’s unacceptable. “defenceless” in the face of praise.) Because I love receiving compliments, I try I feel more unsettled now when to be lavish when dishing them out. “How do complimenting friends on their appearance. you manage to look 19?” is I sometimes attend a board meeting for a charity I’m a hit with fresh-faced friends. GOOD READ: involved with, and before it “Superlatives fail me” goes Love & Fame starts, the women might say down well, too. But you have to ($32.99, Virago) things like “Love those boots”. be careful. I eschew anything is out now Do the men say “That tie is to time-related, such as “You look die for”? They do not. It feels wonderful tonight”. Praise that suggests overfamiliarity with a look – unprofessional to me now. It didn’t used to. I still soar a little when complimented, “I always love you in that dress” – is also best avoided. Now and then, compliments and I’m not above wilting if they’re not misfire – I don’t love it when people say to forthcoming, but in the past few months, the me, “You could maybe make it as a hand only compliment that feels safe, because it is model.” But occasionally an insult can give always welcome, is “How lovely to see you.” you a colossal boost, so perhaps it evens I’m going to stick with that from now on. E

Compliments are writer Susie Boyt’s biggest vice – but while she craves the high they give, she knows they’re not always good for her

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overs hare, don’t care


SOCIAL MEDIA IS HELPING TO SMASH TABOOS AS WE SHARE MORE ABOUT OUR LIVES THAN EVER BEFORE. BUT TMI DOESN’T ALWAYS TRANSLATE IRL. MEG MASON ASKS, WHEN IS ENOUGH

ENOUGH?

Lena Dunham has endometriosis, once bled for almost a month and recently opted to have a hysterectomy. She also has OCD and couldn’t resist checking out her sister’s vagina as a child. Lady Gaga has battled anorexia and bulimia since her teens and Demi Lovato has bipolar disorder. Shailene Woodley regularly suns her vagina, Khloé Kardashian has a “puffy pussy” and Adele had bowel issues before going on stage once. But you already knew all that. And not because seedy tabloid journalists hacked phones, stole medical records or paid off exes to acquire the intimate information. All of the women shared these details voluntarily, in magazines and in memoirs, on Instagram and their own reality shows, as jaunty asides while promoting work. We live in a culture of confession. Radical honesty has become our highest social virtue and authenticity our end goal, achieved through total transparency. “There’s no such thing as oversharing,” declared columnist Caitlin Moran, who’s written extensively about her abortion and discovering masturbation at a young age. “I’ve never seen a taboo that I didn’t want to run into the middle of and smash up with a wooden spoon... But in order to write about taboos, you have to talk about the things you’ve done, be very honest and make yourself very vulnerable. Anytime anybody says, ‘Okay, you’ve shared and that makes it easier for me to be me,’ I feel I can share more.” Mostly, that’s why celebrities say they do it – to help others, break down stigmas and normalise what, a generation or so ago, was considered unspeakable. Social media has made it easy for them to share so much directly, and normal for us to see women of influence living without inhibition. And whether we

admire them personally or simply thirst for the specifics of their sex lives, mental-health and bodyimage issues, menstrual cycles and breakfast choices, we are without a doubt emulating them. “[Oversharing] is happening a lot these days thanks to reality TV and social-media sites, where it’s perfectly normal for people to share every single detail of their lives, no matter how mundane or personal,” writes The Wall Street Journal’s Elizabeth Bernstein. “In the culture we live in, it’s hard to remember that some things should be private.” Although it’s tricky to shape something as abstract as our perceptions of privacy into data, in a UK study, 51 per cent of respondents agreed that talking explicitly about sex is more acceptable now than it was in previous generations. Just under a third of people said they openly discuss their salary and state of their finances, and 40 per cent would share the specifics of their health problems. But just how eager would we be to hear that kind of personal information from someone who lacks the social capital of Lena Dunham or a sundry Kardashian? Somewhere between “Not very” and “Violently opposed”, probably, because what works for a celebrity rarely works the same way for us. In fact, for we the non-famous, oversharing may not serve us at all. “Celebrities are rewarded for divulging their personal lives in our climate of oversharing,” says clinical psychologist Dr Lillian Nejad. “There may be downsides as well, but we don’t necessarily see them.” And when we follow their example, Nejad says, “We are more likely to experience those negative consequences without the reward.” The catalogue of downsides runs to pages, but unless we’re fresh off a disastrous episode of self-disclosure, still riding out the hangover feeling that invariably follows, we pay little attention to what we share, when and with whom. And because we’ve become attuned to the risks of sharing too much online, we’re apt to forget that doing so in real life can cause just as much damage to our friendships, relationships, careers and reputation. “Very often sharing has the opposite effect to what we think it will,” says life coach Alex Kingsmill. “Although in a surface sense we value openness and authenticity, beneath that we also value reliability, good judgement, trust >

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and an ability to self-regulate. Oversharing speaks against those qualities and can leave you extremely vulnerable.” Imagine, for example, coming into work the day after receiving a diagnosis of adult ADHD. Although you’re yet to fully process it yourself, your desire to be open and honest sees you divulge it to your boss straight away. But as sympathetic and understanding as she may seem, it’s impossible to tell if her subsequent decision to take you off a project or redefine your role stemmed from an even-subconscious shift in perception of you. The condition isn’t all of who you are, but if a cursory Google search tells her that people with adult ADHD are forgetful, disorganised and bad time-managers, it may be the only thing she sees you as. “We can never control what other people will do or think or say,” says career coach Lucy Allen. “Every ‘share’ carries a risk and although it can be good and powerful, you have to consider each individual circumstance. Always assume that what you share will be passed on and determine if you can deal with the ripple effect of that.” When it comes to love, we’re told honesty is the bedrock of intimacy. But early on, laying out your entire sexual history, every break-up, Tinder hook-up and almost-infidelity, is more likely to sabotage fledgling trust than make you seem like a wonderfully open book to a new partner. And as relationship expert Esther Perel explains, honesty is not the same thing as transparency. Healthy intimacy allows a measure of individual privacy and “desire is fuelled by the unknown”. With friendships, being filter-free is just as complicated. “People are easily overwhelmed by hearing too much personal information, especially when you’ve just met,” says Nejad. “As a means of building social connection, it’s likely to backfire.” Although extreme honesty can strengthen existing relationships, it can’t create them. More often, it marks you out as needy, intense, off-key. And then there’s something called spontaneous trait transference – when you share your negative opinion of another person, deep-diving on how insecure or sloppy or whiny she is, subconsciously the listener will attribute those qualities to you.

So why do we do it? And why, when we’re firehosing someone we barely know with our most intimate and not-totallyappropriate thoughts, is it so hard to pull back? Beyond cultural influence, beyond social media, the Kardashians et al (barring Kylie Jenner, of course, who kept her recent pregnancy uncharacteristically quiet), there are so many internal and external triggers to oversharing that, when considered together, it’s amazing we’re able to withhold a single fact at all. Physically, talking about ourselves has been shown to set off the same kind of “biochemical buzz” as sex and food, according to research by Harvard University. It’s believed that physical touch can also stimulate a feeling of emotional intimacy, which is why your facialist knows the minutiae of your marriage breakdown. Another study showed the kind of high you get after exercising can trigger TMI, driving us to share things even when we don’t really want to. Emotionally, we’re more likely to overshare when we need reassurance, when we feel lonely and want connection, or because we’re still harbouring a Year 9-ish desire for popularity and attention. Between close friends, there can be a kind of peer pressure to go deep or competition to be the trainwreck-iest of all the trainwrecks present. Connecting over failures is easier and more effective, it feels like, than sharing success. In a social setting, concern for the emotional state of a near-stranger can see us fill an awkward silence with a hardcore gastro anecdote, designed to put them at ease and achieving the opposite. Above all, however, anxiety is what drives us to overshare. “Humans are naturally looking to establish connection with each other,” says psychotherapist Natajsa Wagner. “When we don’t feel connected, we experience a social pain that our brain registers the same way as physical pain. People who overshare are generally more anxious, emotionally stressed or highly sensitive to rejection.” Being that kind of keyed-up at work, an event or in an intense relationship moment sets up the vicious cycle that is say-too-much-feel-horrible-apologise-talk-even-more. “Often oversharing serves to increase anxiety not relieve it,” adds Wagner. So wine then? Or something else? Actually, there is a lot we can do to train ourselves out of oversharing. First is to identify when we’re most prone to it, so we can work out why certain situations have us divulging. “We always share with intention,” says Allen. “So ask yourself what purpose you’re hoping it will serve. Are you

“People are overwhelmed by hearing too much personal information. As a means of building social connection, it’s likely to backfire”

72


seeking approval? Advice? Acceptance?” While age and experience generally improve judgement around sharing, “we have to put steps in place to make that a reality,” says Allen. “It’s a muscle, and once you start using it, it becomes more natural.” In the meantime, there is slowing down, physically and mentally, taking a conscious breath before we speak, asking questions when we feel a monologue coming on. There is telling a therapist instead, trying to be okay with silence, writing it down and taking one tiny moment to work out whether the person you are about to unleash on is interested, invested and emotionally available to you – or whether they just happen to be standing right there. Deciding, just sometimes, to withhold something of ourselves isn’t the same as being dishonest. You can be authentic without being overexposed. “The things we reveal in those moments of oversharing don’t reflect who we actually are, only what’s at the forefront of our mind at the time,” says Kingsmill. “The funny thing is, the more selective you are about what you share, the more able people will be to form a true picture of you.” Whether or not you’ve ever sunned your vagina doesn’t have to come into it. E

THAT DON’T IMPRESS ME MUCH

Photography: Coliena Rentmeester/Trunk Archive

THE UPS AND DOWNS OF UNDERSHARING

If you have ever – no wait – if you always come home from a party wishing you hadn’t told your friend’s half-sister that you’re $30,000 in debt and allergic to most brands of lube, it’s hard to believe there could be any kind of downside to saying nothing all night. But being an undersharer in a world that values revelation is not without hazard. “Introverts are easily misunderstood,” writes Michaela Chung in The Irresistible Introvert: Harness The Power Of Quiet Charisma In A Loud World, adding: “Extroverts have laid claim on the definition of normal, leaving introverts to feel guilty for not fitting in... Many introverts come to believe that there’s something wrong with them.” It’s not hard to see why. TMI can be exhausting, but also hilarious. The opposite can be boring, even rude – or so it seems to extroverts who find silence terrifying, interpret reserve as arrogance and feel judged when someone isn’t being actively effusive. And in social settings, the person who is silently reading the back of a sauce bottle seems like they’re not pulling their weight compared to someone sharing a super-detailed pap smear anecdote all in the name of fun. “I’m absolutely an undersharer, and I don’t feel people share as much [with me] because there’s no give or take,” reveals a 36-year-old introvert who works

in the loose-lipped world of fashion and, unsurprisingly, prefers not to be named. “It can be socially isolating for people who are naturally private and reserved,” agrees Nejad. “Ours is an extroverted culture, but not everyone in it is an extrovert. It’s important to be mindful of the differences between people.” And however it looks to an oversharer, not needing to talk about yourself is actually a sign of strength, according to researchers at The University of Texas who studied the relationship between self-concept and the use of the word “I”. They found people who use the pronoun often can be more self-conscious than those who limit their use of it. ”There’s a misconception that people who are confident, have power, have high status tend to use ‘I’ more than people who are of low status,” the researchers said. “That is completely wrong. The high-status person is looking out at the world and the low-status person is looking at himself.” Which to an introvert sounds kind of boring. As Chung writes, “It’s such a rare thing in this world to find someone who is not constantly trying to impress someone, be liked or fill empty airspace with mindless chatter. A person who is completely, unapologetically okay with who they are and what they feel is like a beacon of light in the dark.”


FU NN Y BUSINESS

I L L U S T RAT I ON BY

T A NY A C O O P ER

Profound insight, useful advice and fierce one-liners from a collection of Australia’s brightest comedic minds


THEY SAY LAUGHTER IS THE BEST MEDICINE...

Think back to the last time a joke hit the sweet spot – did you lose all sense of decorum? Perhaps it was a cackle in line for coffee, a fit of giggles mid-Pilates or an eruption of laughter so loud it startled an entire carriage of commuters. That’s the power of good comedy. But a comedian’s role is so much more than making people laugh. They also ask hard questions, opening the floor to topics that make us feel uncomfortable in order to hold up a mirror to society. Take John Oliver’s view on the same-sex marriage postal survey (“It’s the weirdest waste of Australian C OMP IL ED BY money since every Baz Luhrmann movie L AUR A COLLI N S ever made”), or an SNL sketch on the recent allegations made against Aziz Ansari (a dinner party chat turns awkward after someone tries to broach the much-debated area of sexual assault, with cast member Kate McKinnon tiptoeing around her words to a resounding chorus of “Carefuuuul”). Comedy is also evolving at warp speed. From podcasts and viral videos to Twitter parody accounts and reactive memes, comedy is everywhere and it’s thriving. As our collective consciousness continues to rise, audiences are demanding more laughs, more diversity and more opinions. But in an age where it’s easier than ever for a comment to be taken out of context or trigger the fury of an online lynch mob, it’s comedians who are in the firing line, making it an often thankless and unforgiving existence that isn’t for the faint-hearted. Being a woman in comedy? That takes balls. But their voices are louder and reaching further than ever before. Amy Schumer became the first woman to crack Forbes’ highest-paid comedians list in 2016. Closer to home, Australia’s own Hannah Gadsby had her critically acclaimed swan song Nanette picked up by Netflix (despite the fact that she’s announced her retirement). We think Samantha Bee says it best: “Ladies, your jokes about Gilmore Girls and yeast infections and what it feels like to be angry all the fucking time are great... Because somewhere out there, there’s a woman who works at a bank who got a dick flashed at her in a meeting she wasn’t allowed to talk in. And when she gets off work tonight, she wants you to make her laugh about it.” Loss of decorum? Check. So meet Australia’s brightest and bravest women in comedy – from actors and stand-ups, to writers and producers. Whether you’re in search of inspiration, good advice or just a moment’s relief from a shitty day, they’re serving it with a side of laughs.

woM en iN cOm edy

WAS YOUR

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION

TO GET

MORE

ATTENTION?

If so, Becky Lucas – whose show Cute Funny Smart Sexy Beautiful is playing the comedy festival circuit this year – has some advice

The idea of explaining to people how you can be “cute funny smart sexy beautiful” is obviously an idea born from a complete sense of self-entitlement. I think everyone has the ability to be completely self-absorbed and entitled and, let’s face it, the culture we surround ourselves in encourages it. So with that in mind, I’ve collated the perfect list of things to do to complete your transition into the attention-seeking nightmare person you’ve always wanted to be:

1. BURST INTO TEARS WHEN THE HAIRDRESSER SHOWS YOU THE BACK OF YOUR HEAD WITH A MIRROR. 2. REFER TO YOURSELF AS A “SHUTTERBUG” JUST BECAUSE YOU LIKE TAKING SELFIES. 3. DRINK WHITE WINE AND DISCLOSE A MAJOR SECRET. 4. BLOCK YOUR BEST FRIEND ON INSTAGRAM JUST AS A JOKE. 5. FAKE A LISP. >

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SISTERS ARE DOIN’ IT FOR THEMSELVES Hannah and Eliza Reilly create television with a fresh, femalefirst approach. Their show Growing Up Gracefully was a smash hit – the clip for their “3:43 song” about the gender pay gap has 7.8 million views on Facebook – and next up, Sheilas tells the stories of overlooked heroines in Australian history. They prove that siblings can build an entire career out of getting along

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We grew up on a farm an hour out of Sydney, fairly isolated from other children so we only had ourselves for company. We would keep ourselves amused by catching snakes and lighting small fires. It was pretty idyllic. We rarely got proper TV reception, so out of boredom we would put on hour-long improvised plays for our parents, and they seemed to enjoy them and encouraged us to do more. They’re very patient people. While hosting a show on Sydney community radio station FBi, Julian Morrow from The Chaser heard us, gave us a call and asked if we were interested in television, which is when we pitched Growing Up Gracefully. Our inspiration for the show came after collecting a few really strange ’50s etiquette books for women. We wondered what would happen if they were applied in a modern context – could we actually learn something from them about what it means to be a young woman today? We wanted to explore the contradicting expectations put on women by both old and new ways of thinking, for example, that we’re expected to be “beautiful” but not “try too hard”, and encouraged to be “sexy” but shamed for being a “slut”. It’s mind boggling. We didn’t expect the show to be so well-received. Our mum is in the show, playing herself, and we really didn’t want her to disown us. We’re launching Sheilas this year, which we’re very excited about. We’re excited to revive some forgotten stories of great women in Australian history – WWII spies, bushrangers, activists – the way we’d wish it was presented to us, with lots of jokes and costume changes. Their stories are legitimately inspiring, especially in this cultural climate. It’s nice to think, “If this bad-ass lady can make it through being a spy, hunted by Nazis in WWII, I can make it through the Trump presidency.”

HOW TO BE FUNNY

IN 140 CHARACTERS OR LESS

Taking inspiration from MTV’s cult show Daria and Darlene from Roseanne, Bec Shaw, the brains behind our favourite Twitter account @notofeminism, has a sixth sense for sarcasm. Case in point: “I don’t need [feminism]. Men and women are EQUALLY terrible! For example, yes men murder women, but women FRIENDZONE men! Friends??? Horrifying.” On Twitter, you need to be quick for a joke to work. If there’s some sort of breaking news event and you have a joke about it, I would urge you to search Twitter to see if it has already been done 3,000 times by the time you got to take your lunchbreak. There are some days where the only news around is extremely depressing, and there is just not that much humour to be found anywhere... but those are the times where I think comedy and finding the ability to laugh becomes even more important. On a joke-writing level, [I think] the limited space you have to work with on Twitter in order to get an entire joke out inspires cleverness. Not from me, obviously.


”MY ONLY GOAL IS TO BRING JOY” WELCOME TO THE BIZARRE,

HILARIOUS

without stopping my hands moving, then read it back and title it. My most recent work was called “Shrieking Barbara”.

AND TOTALLY UNEXPECTED ON NOT TAKING SHIT WORLD OF STAND-UP WUNDERKIND DEMI LARDNER ON DRESSING FOR WORK

My favourite thing to wear onstage is jogging shorts and socks with sandals. It doesn’t mean anything but I love it. Sometimes I hide my nose ring so people don’t think I’m trendy. My downfall will be if people ever find out that I’m secretly really fucking cool and great at intercourse.

ON NIXING A CREATIVE BLOCK

I do insane stream-of-consciousness writing that my friends swear is going to be scrawled on the walls in blood once I murder them. I set a timer and write for five minutes

Of course, it’s a shitty industry for women, but I’m not in the most at-risk or vulnerable group of people in comedy, or any field. It’s usually just sexism, microaggressions, shitty assumptions about what a “female comedian” does. But I have no time for it, to be honest. I used to get angry, and now I just plainly tell people why they are 10 butts in a mask and get on with my job.

ON DEALING WITH HECKLERS

Hecklers have taught me that some people think they have important opinions that we all need to hear, even though we didn’t ask for them, and that they’re important enough to disrupt somebody else’s night. I never respond. I loudly proclaim “No” and continue my set.

ON BOMBING MID-SET

It’s simply impossible – I’m very, very good.

COLLABORATION 101

woM en iN cOm edy Zoë Norton Lodge has made a career out of working with her mates, on-screen and in the writers’ room at ABC’s consumer affairs show The Checkout, and as the co-founder of live comedy night Story Club. Here, she shares the allimportant questions that’ll determine your ability to work well with others IS THERE A COMMON GOAL?

Collaboration isn’t always smooth sailing. It’s not like everyone agrees all the time, and you can end up having very heated debates about very silly things (in the writers’ room, it’s usually whether a photo of a frozen lasagne is sufficiently disgusting). But at the end of the day, when everyone shares a common goal and there’s plenty of respect and trust, it can be a huge amount of fun.

ARE YOU TOUGH ENOUGH? Having a thick skin is important. It’s always better to thrash it out together rather than realising the work isn’t right when it’s already too late. It’s like when you see your friend has shit in their teeth and they’re about to go on a date – telling them is a kindness.

CAN YOU HANDLE CRITICISM? Listen to criticism and try not to be defensive, but also evaluate it and assess whether it’s even right for your work. You don’t have to take on board everything everyone says – sometimes you just need to smile politely, say thanks, then throw the feedback into your mind-bin. >

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SOMETIMES ME, SOMETIMES NOT ME ANNE EDMONDS HAS MADE A NAME FOR HERSELF PLAYING A HOST OF COLOURFUL CHARACTERS. SHE SHEDS LIGHT ON THE JOY OF ESCAPING INTO THE MIND – AND SARONG – OF SOMEONE ELSE

I love playing characters because I can go to the extremes of every emotion. Most of my characters have something fundamentally wrong with them, some deep hurt or sense of exclusion. And most of them fall to the floor and cry out in agony at some point. Who doesn’t? I do. Who cares? So far you’re probably wondering, what’s so funny about all this? But

it is to me. My whole life is a series of meltdowns and recoveries and when you think about it from the outside, it’s hilarious. Helen Bidou, a character I did on ABC’s Get Krack!n who dropped her sarong and lost the plot and who I’m doing an entire show of this year at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, is a prime example of this. She swings from elated about jeggings to mumbling with her bum out. I love stand-up comedy because you get to talk directly to the audience and be brutally honest about yourself, but sometimes it’s so liberating to morph into someone else and cut sick. You can let your imagination run wild and see how far you can push a character. To the edge! To the edge! Let’s go...

@gizmozfro

THE ART OF TELLING

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A GREAT STORY At last year’s Melbourne

International Comedy Festival, Ghenoa Gela won the National Deadly Funny competition, which champions Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander comedians, with her hilarious tales of growing up in Rockhampton. This year, as she returns as host, she shares the secrets to good storytelling

GO DEEP ON DETAIL Set the scene and create an atmosphere that your audience can be enticed by. The tricky part is, you want to make sure you recall the events and thoughts you had at the time, not in hindsight, because otherwise you’ll kill your punchlines. FIND A TEST AUDIENCE Kids are the best to try your stories on, because they’re never afraid to give you honest feedback. Adults tend to keep their thoughts to themselves, so you’re left trying to interpret body language. BE A GOOD LISTENER By listening to how other people tell stories, you can get a better understanding for what makes a good one, and a bad one. Don’t be afraid to put your moment in the spotlight on the backburner so you can learn from – and enjoy – other people’s stories. STAY ON TOPIC If your audience isn’t into the story you’re telling, gauge their interest by making it about them. Do they have any similar stories or experiences? If they start sharing them, it’s an easy segue for you to jump back into your story. If they’re still not interested, let it go, mate! CONFIDENCE IS KEY Know that your stories are valid and believe in your words, because great stories have the power to change hearts and minds. If you don’t have confidence in the story you’re telling, then no-one else will either.


Vicky Hanlon and Claire Hagan, founders of Melbournebased production company Commit To Your Jokes, have made it their mission to promote the voices in comedy that aren’t always heard. These are their takeaways on the future of the craft

NEW PUNCHLINES, NEW PLATFORMS

It still depends on where in the world you are, but there’s a shift happening – people want to hear better, smarter comedy. Different stories and voices instead of the same old narratives. And they’re more easily able to find and connect with the kinds of comedy they want to see, especially via social media. It’s created a bigger audience base to tap into (whether through live comedy, videos on social media or podcasts) and there’s more content all the time.

BE SHARP, NOT “EDGY”

In the live scene, you’ll still see a lot of comedy that’s toeing the line of offensiveness (whether knowingly or not) and it always feels good to be in a room where those jokes fall flat. It pushes people to try harder and write more thoughtful jokes. There are so many more stories to tell and topics to joke about that don’t marginalise groups of people.

COMEDY CAN CREATE CHANGE

There aren’t too many positions in society that get to speak their opinion on stage and have people actually listen to them. The job description is “Be funny” and there’s nothing wrong with the intention of pure entertainment without other messages. That said, comedy can be an incredible vehicle for social messages, an examination of the world and its joys and horrors.

LET’S TALK ABOUT SEX

It’s a persistent double standard that women who play up their sex lives are “slutty” and men who do the same are lauded for it. The value of women talking openly and brazenly about their sexual exploits is that it helps bust the pervasive slut-shaming narrative of mainstream media. Women are just as gross as men and just as dysfunctional in sex and romance and now we can talk about it (and, eventually, one day not get called slutty for doing so).

BRIDGING THE GAP

GOING ALL IN

woM en iN cOm edy FRIDA DEGUISE IS THE UNAPOLOGETIC MUSLIM COMEDIAN WHO’S NOT AFRAID TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES I STARTED PERFORMING STAND-UP FIVE YEARS AGO AS A WAY OF RECLAIMING MY IDENTITY. I TALK ABOUT BEING A MUSLIM AS PART OF MY ACT, AND SOMETIMES PEOPLE DON’T LIKE TO HEAR ABOUT IT. AT FIRST, I WAS SCARED TO SWEAR OR SAY THINGS THAT MIGHT BE TOO CONTROVERSIAL, BUT NOW I’VE REALISED THAT I NEED TO GET MY POINT ACROSS SOMEHOW. THE POLITICALLY CORRECT CROWD HAVE A HARD TIME ACCEPTING MY JOKES, BUT THE WAY I SEE IT, I’M A MUSLIM SO I CAN MAKE MUSLIM JOKES. NOT EVERY COMEDIAN HAS THAT AUTHORITY. OF COURSE, IF NO-ONE IS LAUGHING DURING MY SET, I MAKE SURE TO HAVE A FEW LINES UP MY SLEEVE. RIGHT NOW IT’S “IF I KEEP GOING LIKE THIS, I’LL BE THE FIRST MUSLIM TO BOMB AND LIVE TO TELL THE STORY.” >

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MAKING THE BEST OF A BAD SITUATION They say truth is stranger than fiction – and Michelle Law puts forward a strong case for it being much funnier, too

Michelle Law honed her comedic voice in difficult circumstances. “Having alopecia in high school really helped people look past my appearance and want to be friends with me, because I cracked jokes and made them feel at ease.” Law’s astute outlook on life informs all her work, and has been a driving force behind two of her biggest personal projects – her play, Single Asian Female, which just closed its second hit season, and her semi-autobiographical series Homecoming Queens, streaming now on SBS On Demand. “My friend Chloë was diagnosed with breast cancer in her early twenties,” she says. “We’d go to parties with other people our age and feel as if we no longer belonged in that world... We’d sit in Chloë’s car and commiserate with each other, wishing there was a show that depicted experiences like ours.”

Law is a master at embedding real heart into larger-than-life characters and challenging her audience’s ability to empathise. “I think there’s a way to make anything funny, but there needs to be a reason behind it; [it’s] about having a sense of empathy and the perceptiveness to know when a serious thing should be undercut with humour or when a serious thing is just a serious thing.” Liv Hewson, who stars as Chloë in the seven-part series, says that’s what makes Australian comedy so great. “When I think of what I love about Australian comedy, I think of a healthy mix of the grounded and the absurd. I think the best writing plays with language, status and either ridiculous characters in a grounded situation or grounded characters in a ridiculous situation.”

WHAT ALWAYS “I MAKE MY DAD SING CHER SONGS TO ME ON THE PHONE. IT’S SIMPLY EXQUISITE.”

MAKES YOU LAUGH?

– DEMI LARDNER

“Dad jokes. I love them.” – CHLOE RICKARD

“ABSURDIST SKETCH COMEDY, WITHOUT FAIL.” – LIV HEWSON

“Sitcoms from the ’90s, like Frasier and The Nanny.” – FRIDA DEGUISE

“It’s still Bob Katter not spending any time discussing same-sex marriage because every three months a person is torn to pieces by a crocodile in north Queensland.” – MICHELLE LAW


THE FIVE RULES OF ivism

t m a l #g ...ACCORDING TO THE FRINGE WIVES CLUB, THE TRIO OF ALL-SINGING, ALL-DANCING COMEDIANS WHO SPREAD THEIR

FEMINIST MESSAGE WITH Photography: Daniel Boud; Monica Pronk; fridadeguise.com.au; Instagram: @chloericko; @demilardner; @gizmozfro; @liv.hewson; @msmichellelaw. Illustration: Tanya Cooper at The Illustration Room

A SIDE OF GLITTER

1. YOU CAN HAVE A DICK, BUT DON’T BE A DICK

One of our first-ever “rules” and it still holds true. Aretha said it best. It’s about respect. We want everyone at our feminist party.

2. RESIST WITH FURY, AND LOVE

Loving fiercely, passionately and openly is a radical act, and we aim to bring that same fierce love and openness to all our conversations, whether they be at the bar, on stage or in the bedroom.

3. SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL GIRL GANG

The Fringe Wives was built on a network of celebrating each other. Glamtivists don’t need to tear other women down in order to achieve. We shake up the ways in which women and their bodies are seen and discussed in public spaces. If we can shake up an espresso martini at the same time, so much the better!

4. CONSENT IS THE SEXIEST WORD OF ALL

There is nothing so exciting as an enthusiastic YES. From a lover, from the audience, from your friends, from your peers, from your allies. And then – just keep talking. Yes! Yes! Yes!

5. A REVOLUTION WITHOUT

DANCING IS A REVOLUTION NOT WORTH HAVING

Paraphrased from one of social media’s favourite quotes, we are our own knights in shining armour – and that armour is fully sequinned for maximum disco-ball intensity.

THE BIGGEST COMEDY EVENTS AROUND AUSTRALIA, AND WHEN TO HIT ’EM

woM en iN cOm edy

LOL A MINUTE

GET ON THE COMEDY-FESTIVAL TRAIN TO SEE THE LIKES OF BECKY LUCAS, DEMI LARDNER AND ANNE EDMONDS DO THEIR THING – AND GET AROUND THESE FRESH ACTS WHILE YOU’RE AT IT

ROSE CALLAGHAN Her show Will You Accept This Rose? was a hilarious take on The Bachelor, and now Callaghan is showcasing No Way Rosé at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. @operation_rosie

CLARE CAVANAGH An improv and sketch comedian (she’s a member of Improv Theatre Sydney’s ensemble and a founding member of improv troupe Confetti Gun), Cavanagh’s new show Thrilled You’re Here! is based on her “trying to throw a banger party like I never had in high school”. Catch it at the Sydney Comedy Festival. @clarecavanagh

LAURA DAVIS The Melbourne-based comedian is touring her sell-out show Ghost Machine at MICF. It’s earned her a bunch of awards, including a Best Comedy nod at Melbourne Fringe Festival. @lauradaviscomic

MADDIE HW After performing to sell-out crowds at Edinburgh Festival Fringe and touring the US, Maddie HW’s new solo show Self-Made is set to be a SCF highlight. @maddehhw

SOPHIA STANLEY Stanley is touring her first solo show, 101 Texts Not To Send To Jarrod, at MICF, and she guarantees you’ll relate to it “if you ever sent a text message only to wait by your phone checking the reception quality nervously”.

MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL Until April 22; comedyfestival.com.au SYDNEY COMEDY FESTIVAL April 23-May 20; sydneycomedyfest.com.au PERTH COMEDY FESTIVAL April 23-May 20; perthcomedyfestival.com SYDNEY FRINGE FESTIVAL September 1-30; sydneyfringe.com MELBOURNE FRINGE FESTIVAL September 14-October 1; melbournefringe.com.au E

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J O A N

The reflection on the water ripples beneath the wind, blurring the clouds and the pot plants surrounding the pool. Joan stands on the edge of the pool, toes curling like claws over the lip of the sandwash coloured tiles. Like the clouds and the pot plants, her reflection in the pool flickers, distorting her naked figure. A figure she no longer recognises. Joan’s traditionally flat stomach now has a little fatty layer under her belly button. Her ass and thighs have grown heavier, too, even though Joan didn’t think it possible as they were already a reasonable size. Her thighs rub together now when she runs, causing a red rash to break out on her tanned legs. She has her dad to thank for those thighs. And the bum. Both used to be strong but now they are flab. Her duck bum was always a trophy body part. She sighs as she studies her rippling reflection in the pool. She’ll get her body back again eventually. She thought it would be back by now, but not quite. The shape of her waist has returned, despite the residual roll of fat on her belly, but her jeans are still that little bit too tight, and she hasn’t even attempted to try on her leather pencil skirt again. That’s the price to pay for being happy and indulging in life. Travelling for months, undisturbed by the chaos and stresses of routine and everyday life. No family drama to roll her eyes at, no ex-boyfriends to tear her down, no boredom or lack of enthusiasm for activities. The jolly fat girl. Like Santa. She W ORD S BY tries to imagine a thin, fit Santa. No. It just wouldn’t work. TAL I N RO SE H A DL O W The only physically positive aspect of this weight gain for Joan is the boobs. Normally a happy handful, they now sit full and heavy in her bra, perking up depending on which Elle Macpherson she wears. The boys don’t seem to mind the extra junk in the trunk either. It’s also the case that happiness radiates positive vibes. Big smiles and an open expression are sexy and inviting. She pulls more lads now than when she was skinny and depressed. Sadness radiates negative vibes and no-one wants to be with the negative girl. Even if she is fit and thin. The sun beats down on Joan’s bare shoulders, warming her neck and turning her chest pink. She stretches her arms above her head, causing all of her body to move up a few centimetres. Arms that used to be toned, that used to pull her body weight, now flab like uncooked chicken wings. Changing into a dive position, she uncurls her toes from the edge and launches from the tiles, sliding into the water. Loose leaves and bits of bark float around the pool, layering the surface as Joan swims underneath, holding her breath as she tries to swim from one end of the pool to the other. This is not as easy as it used to be. When she was younger, Joan could push four laps underwater. Swimming with her arms by her side, her hands near her hips and working through the water, with her legs frog-kicking behind her. She would bounce off the tiled walls, cruising from one end to the other. She wouldn’t even be puffed by the end of it. She would spring through the water with a big smile on her freckled face and laugh when she discovered that she had beaten all the boys.


Joan makes it one lap holding her breath underwater. She emerges pink-faced and breathing deeply, as if air never tasted so good. The ripples from her dive have pushed the debris from the previous night’s storm further towards the edges of the pool. It floats into the filter, clogging the grate with a black-brown muck of waterlogged bark and broken leaves. Nothing is as easy as it was when she was younger. Adult dramas and responsibilities have invaded her life, causing her fun to feel like guilt. The psychic had told her she has too much fun. As if an adult cannot possibly enjoy life as much as Joan does. The psychic had grabbed Joan’s left wrist, stroked it lightly with her thumb as if wiping away a layer of dust, gazed at the wrinkles on her wrist and then thrown her head back and burst into laughter. “Girl, you have far too much fun. How do you have so much fun? Far too much fun and you never get caught. How do you do this?” Joan takes another deep breath, drops underwater and kicks off from the wall. The tiles are slippery with muck. Arms by her side, hands by her hips, legs frog-kicking, she goes for two. Nothing has changed since she’s been away. The house is the same, smells the same, of Mamma’s cooking and cleaning products. She can single out her brother’s smell, crisp and light. If there had to be a colour for his smell, she’d choose blue. Light blue, like the sky on a really hot day, when it turns almost pastel and no clouds float by to disturb the sun’s glare, full of life’s pure energy and heat. Like when a ring forms perfectly around the sun as if celebrating how brightly it shines. Joan’s dad had told her that it’s called a halo. He explained that it’s formed by thin clouds, almost invisible, that carry tiny ice crystals that bend the sun’s rays. This break in the light reflects to the shape of your eye, therefore forming a ring around the sun. Everyone behaves the same, too, since Joan’s arrived home. She has no idea how her family, or anyone, sit in front of the TV for hours after dinner, watching a new series or the news. Don’t they know there’s a bar down the road? There are probably fun people to meet, crazy people to talk to and someone who will always want to hear your stories. Don’t they want to go venturing out to see what they can find? Joan breaks the surface after two successful laps underwater. It was harder than she suspected. She lolls the back of her head against the dry sand-coloured tiles, holds onto them and lets her body float to the surface. Joan’s always been good at floating. Do fat people float easier than skinny people? More buoyancy maybe? It hasn’t changed her floating skills either way. Salt water is the key to easy floating. Joan discovered just how salty the ocean can be while sailing the Aegean Sea in Greece. She had never experienced anything like it. The salt creeps into every cut and sore you have, burning your eyes and parching your lips. But the stinging pain is nothing compared to the beauty and serenity of the ocean. Joan could float forever in the Aegean. No sharks, no jellyfish, no crocs. Just you and the endless clear blue ocean, holding you up like a child in its parent’s arms. Her pink chest heaves as she breathes, causing the water to lap at her bare breasts. Her stomach breaks the surface as she moves the air to breathe from her stomach like you’re supposed to. She could go for three.

EL Lfiction E She kicks off the wall, arms by her side, hands by her hips, pushing back water, legs kicking. In the quiet she wonders how many laps her brother did. Yesterday, before the storm, when he woke up at the hospital, Joan’s younger brother said he was swimming laps underwater before he blacked out. Joan’s dad said it’s called shallow water blackout, also known as SWB. If you take hyperventilating breaths before holding your breath underwater, it lowers the level of carbon dioxide in your body, which increases the amount of time you can hold your breath, which increases the likelihood of passing out. From there, you have approximately two-and-a-half minutes before you die or suffer brain damage. If your lungs let in water you can drown. If you stay submerged but your lungs stay closed, you can suffocate. Fitness level is irrelevant. Joan isn’t sure how long he was in the water before she pulled him out. She called the ambulance straight away, just as you’re supposed to, then she started CPR. CPR was taught in school. Joan followed the steps and easily remembered what DRABC stood for. D: danger. He was alone with no posing threat around, but something was lying at the bottom of the pool. R: response. None. His lips were slightly blue and his body limp. A: airway. Clear. She stuck her fingers in his mouth and felt around; she peered in and saw nothing. B: breathing. Negative. C: circulation. She felt for a pulse on his wrist. She had always struggled at school to locate a pulse on the wrist, and she couldn’t do it then either. She moved to his neck and felt the pulse there, although light. She proceeded to perform CPR. His chest was still quite childlike. He hadn’t filled out yet like some of the other boys his age. He didn’t have any chest hair either, Joan noticed, as she pumped her clamped hands onto his chest, between the nipples, reciting “Baa Baa Black Sheep”. The nursery rhyme provided the perfect timing and 30-pump count rate if you sang it to the second verse. Three bags full of wool. At school she had been warned to sing it under her breath or in her head, so that it didn’t seem disturbing or disrespectful to onlookers. Next to her backyard pool, it wasn’t something she had to worry about, though she still kept her voice low. Her brother’s head was tilted back in the right position so his airways were clear and open. His hair was plastered to his forehead and fell funnily to the side. He’d hate it looking like that, she thought. She’d have to fix it later and remind him to book a haircut. As she started whispering the nursery rhyme to herself for the second time after forcing more air into his lungs, Joan’s brother came to. He coughed and spluttered like they do in the movies. Joan put him into the recovery position so he could cough up the water from his lungs comfortably. Joan’s hands shook as she felt his cold skin and let her tears fall freely, mixing in with the pool water still dripping from her face. She brushed back his hair from his face and fetched him a towel. The ambulance arrived and rushed him away. Joan’s parents were contacted and were at the hospital with him, leaving Joan alone at the house, staring at the 20kg bench-press weight sitting at the bottom of the pool. Joan’s dress was still wet from diving in to retrieve her brother’s body. Her reflection in the pool showed how the dress clung to her body and bunched up around her thighs. >

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She contemplated changing into her bathers before going in again, but that would be pointless. Joan stood at the edge of the pool, focusing on the circular weight, right beneath where her head was reflected, and dived in. The air bubbled out from her dress as it flared out slightly around her, making her feel like a mermaid. Everything weighs less in water; however, the bench-press weight was still heavy – heavy enough to pin you down onto the green tiles. It must have slipped off him after he passed out or his hands let it go. Joan dragged it from the water, dried it off and carried it back to its rightful place among the other bench-press weights in her brother’s room. So much weight. Joan breaks the surface at three-and-a-half laps. She allows herself to float and stares at the blue sky. She won’t try for four. She stares at the halo that circles the sun and pictures the tiny ice crystals, trying their hardest to bend and reflect the light. Her parents stayed at the hospital overnight and told Joan to come and visit her brother today after he had some rest. She didn’t tell them about the 20kg bench-press weight.

JOAN II Joan wakes with the sun. 6am, she rises with the birds, shaking off the dreams from the night. She rinses her face with cold water, washing away the layer of sweat. Water splashes onto the benchtop next to the sink. Joan looks at her reflection in the mirror. Droplets run down her face as she licks them off her lips. Her freckles have come out since being in the sun. They scatter across her nose and cheeks, her forehead is victim of a few as is her chest. There seem to be more every day, creeping onto her shoulders and appearing on her knees. She remembers the sun burning her face when she was little, her nose glowed red and soon began to peel. As her dead skin fell away, it took the freckles with it. Holding the flakes of her face up to the light, she could make out the specks. Joan hasn’t slept easy since finding her brother’s body, unconscious and limp in the water. First hailed as a hero by family, friends, her town, now she is questioned, her motives supposedly unknown. There were rumours whirling around the town like a tornado, catching everyone in the chaos and throwing out new theories with the debris. The family was blamed, bad parenting, negative household. Her brother under speculation, unable to defend himself. The worst theory was that Joan was an accomplice. That she had tried to help end her brother’s life. There was no hiding from it. People constantly searching for truth in a story they can’t understand. A story that Joan struggles to understand herself. The morning is the perfect time to run in summer, before the brutal heat sets in for the day and the body sweats without even moving. Before too many people are awake and crowd the streets. No-one is around to gawk at her or point. No whispers or glances from strangers and friends as she passes. Running at that time is like standing in the eye of the tornado, calm, quiet and safe, with mayhem swirling around her. When she’s running, lost in her own mind, she is untouchable.

84

Joan ties up her laces, making sure they don’t touch her ankles as she runs. It irritates her, making her feel like a bug is crawling up her leg and she needs to swat it away. The sun has risen a little higher and the birds welcome it. Light flashes through the gumtrees, creating shadows on the dirt roads as their branches hang relaxed. There’s a slight breeze dancing about the air, which tastes perfectly like summer. A mixture of gravel and dirt covers the road, the heat drying it out, making it into a dusty whirlwind when the wind picks up. The dust is dragged in with Joan’s breath and coats her throat. The scratchy feeling of dirt up her nose will stay there until she immerses herself in the ocean. It will sweep away all the dirt and dust, leaving her clean with only sea salt layering her skin. Joan dodges the potholes as she runs, which are more like craters in the ground. Miniature swimming pools if it ever rained. The council is constantly regrading the road, filling in the craters and smoothing the gravel. However, it’s never long until the corrugation reappears, like ripples reaching over the road after a crater impacts. Joan breathes deeply in through her nose and out through her mouth, controlled but desperate for more air. Her three-quarter Skins cling to her legs and protect her thighs from hitting, although this is becoming less of a problem or a priority now. Joan feels the stress and pressure from her family and the town is slowly chipping away at her extra baggage, developing back to the body she once had. Nothing like some attempted suicide to get back into shape, whether she wanted to or not. She follows the back roads to the beach until she has to rejoin the main road of the surf beach. Cars fly along this road – even though it’s supposed to be 60km/h, surfers push it to 80km/h. Out-of-towners slow it down to about 40km/h to take in the sights of the shrubs and brief glimpses of the sea. They’re just as bad as the speeders. A line of cars and bike riders will tailgate them until they speed up or pull over. Joan pounds along the bitumen, following closely to the white line and into the grass when she can. Her breathing, the crashing waves and her runners hitting the road synchronised into a comfortable rhythm. She drifts away like the ocean tide with her thoughts, never questioning where she will go, knowing she is powerless against the current. Her brother was checked out from hospital a week after his near drowning. He wasn’t sent home, but admitted to a mental-health facility out of town, closer to the city. On suicide watch. Somewhere for him to work out his issues and talk to professionals in a safe, controlled space. He hasn’t spoken much to the doctors. They try, in their sessions, but he won’t talk. He had been in there for a few weeks when the truth came out. Joan went to visit him alone. The centre looks like a hospital ward, or a nursing home. The floors are covered in that special non-slip coating and all the bathrooms have railings. They force him to get dressed every day, to shower and brush his teeth. Attempting to return him to his normal, everyday routine. They sat outside together in the garden, surrounded by perfectly manicured grass and trees, luscious and green. He had sat there, in his normal clothes, in his normal slouched way. The only difference is they had given him a haircut. About time, Joan thought. Joan confronted him about the weight left in the pool. About his actions. About how she found him. How scared she was. She


Photography: Stocksy. If you or someone you know is struggling to cope, visit beyondblue.org.au

thought he was dead. And with her encouragement, the words, and tears, came. He said there was a heaviness constantly pushing him down. He needed to fight for breath, he needed to pull himself out of bed in the morning and resist the temptation to hide in it as soon as he was home. He found no joy. He felt lost and alone. He looked to Joan, eyes pleading for answers to his own feelings. Joan listened to her brother’s pain, while watching the agapanthus droop and move with the wind. The bell-shaped flower spurted out from the stem, reaching far and opening up, just like the flowers next to it. Joan knew the feeling of isolation and failure. The embarrassment of barely reaching expectation. But could it push her far enough to stop it all? Tall shrubs cover the sand hills, hiding full view of the ocean and oncoming road. Makeshift dirt carparks dot the right side of the road. Cars already occupy some of the spots and surfers are scattered among the line-up. Sweat covers Joan’s face, undoubtedly pink now, dabbling into red. Sweat runs through her scalp, dampening her hair, and trickles down her neck, connecting to the sweat on her chest, becoming one. Early bike riders push past her, dinging their bells on approach. There was barely enough room for Joan on the road, she wondered how the bike riders managed. On the inclines they huff and puff together. Struggling to get enough momentum to pass Joan quickly, they sit beside her briefly as they travel past. An awkward pleasantry exchanged between biker and runner. Joan always looks forward to these odd moments and laughs when they try that little bit harder to move forward. What was so uncomfortable about some in-sync gasping for air anyway? Glimpses of the ocean show through the thick shrubs as Joan approaches the main staircase to the surf beach. The water is calm as clean two-foot waves peel. Longboarders getting a solid ride catch it out the back, following it all the way into shore. Shortboarders sulk and watch on in jealousy, pumping their boards along when they do catch a wave. Joan gains her breath as she stands on the top landing of the stairs. She jogs down the wooden stairs, flaked with sand and damp from swimmers. The smell of the ocean hits her when she is at the bottom. The smell of washed-up seaweed, drying in the morning heat, sneaks up her nose, mixing with the dust. A smell she has never hated, more so welcomed. Joan’s dad use to hang dried-up seaweed on the side of their back door. It was how they would tell if it was going to rain. He explained to her that if the seaweed remained dry and crisp, then the day was going to be hot. But if the weed was lithe, returning to its original rubbery state, then they could expect rain. Joan’s runners sink into the dry sand as she reaches the beach, her foot sliding to one side as the sand gives way underneath her. Sand creeps into her shoes and works its way into her socks, making her toes feel like grit as they rub together. Their mum was listening in the garden as Joan’s brother opened his heart. She had seen them sitting, quietly chatting, from the bedroom window and decided to join them. But she didn’t join them. She hovered behind them, close enough to hear their conversation. That is when life erupted. Their mum cried, frustrated nothing horrific had happened to him to justify his actions. He was just feeling down. From then on Joan’s brother received double counselling sessions and doctor appointments. Their mum was dissatisfied and didn’t believe his truth. It wasn’t enough.

EL Lfiction E Joan removes her runners and socks, tipping out the sand and placing the socks carefully back into her shoes. She peels off her tights and singlet, folding them neatly on top of the shoes. Her skin is free and breathes in the ocean air. The wind is always a little cooler coming off the water than at home. She runs from the sand to the water, kicking her legs out to the side from her knees as she meets the water, like they taught her to in Nippers life saving. Reaching waist-deep, she dives into a small, unbroken wave. The water is clear, quiet. The wave rolls over her and moves towards the shore. Breaking the surface she begins to paddle out further, duckdiving beneath the waves like a mermaid, flicking her feet behind her and feeling the water stream through her open fingers. She swims until she is out past the break. The surfers are further down along the beach where the small swell is peaking. Longboarders tiptoe along their boards, older men with bellies hanging out and wet little ponytails dripping down their necks. The water gives Joan goosebumps, but she knows her body will adjust soon, like the surfers without wetties. Joan wades the water, feeling it move between her arms and legs, wiggling her toes to keep them warm as the ocean bobs her lightly. Chunks of dark seaweed sit still and flat on the bottom of the ocean bed like stingrays. It reminds Joan of floating in the dinghy with her dad and brother at the inlet when they were kids. Giant stingrays, as big as the blow-up boat, glided underneath them as Joan and her brother shrieked and hung their heads over the side to get a closer look. Their reflections stared back at them showing their hat strings tied underneath their chins and pink zinc on their nose. The sun and water were warm and there were sandwiches waiting for them back on the beach. When the stingrays had passed, their dad had picked them up, one in each arm, and threatened to throw them overboard so they can tow the boat back to shore. They kicked and wriggled and squealed louder. Eventually, their dad had braved the stingrays, saving them all and delivering the sandwiches. Joan had thought the stingrays were giants – she had never seen them that big before, nor had she seen them since. She loved those beach days, hot and lazy in the blue beach tent, held down with bags of sand. Her mum biting into the skin of an orange and peeling it for her as Joan sat between her legs. Nothing had tasted so good before that first orange of the day. Wading the water now, looking across the ocean to where the blue meets the sky, Joan wonders if her brother can remember those days. Couldn’t he find happiness and joy in the nostalgia of their childhood? Wasn’t it enough to pull him back from the dark times? Letting out her breath, Joan begins to sink, blowing out bubbles of air as she descends, until she hits the bottom. The salt stings her open eyes but not enough to close them. It’s a familiar feeing, that sting. She looks around the bottom of the ocean, in the blurry, never-ending blueness. It’s quiet down there, peaceful. Unable to hold her breath any longer, she kicks off from the sand, feeling the ripples of pattern like the corrugation on the dirt roads, and breaks the surface, taking in a raspy breath. She blinks the salt water from her eyes and it runs down her cheeks as if she is crying. She pictures the giant stingrays gliding through the water, and begins to swim back to shore. E Taken from She Wolf by Talin Rose Hadlow

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TAKING A BREAK?

DID YOU KNOW ... MAKING A FINANCIAL PLAN BEFORE TAKING A CAREER BREAK COULD MAKE A REAL DIFFERENCE TO YOUR FUTURE. Career breaks hit women hardest, reducing average superannuation savings by nearly $160k in the long term.+ And while we are 13 per cent more likely than men to take a career break (hello holidays, babies, study time, health focus), we’re also 30 per cent less likely than men to make any superannuation plans for the impact that time will have on our superannuation in the long term. Add this little nugget to those stats – after a career break, women returning to work earn 29 per cent less than their male counterparts. Do the maths and it’s easy to see why women who have taken a career break are predicted to retire with an average superannuation balance of $283,141+ less than their male counterparts. For Mary Atley, General Manager, Brand, Marketing and Communications at REST Industry Super, the gender imbalance doesn’t have to continue. “We know health breaks can come out of the blue, but just as many are planned. Among those who took career breaks, the lack of planning for their superannuation is concerning, with only 6 per cent of women we surveyed*consulting a financial advisor prior to their break, and just 16 per cent making voluntary contributions to their super during that time,” she says. The good news, though, is that knowledge is power – buck the trend with some upfront financial planning. Keeping your superannuation on track is a key way to help ensure your financial security is in your control and your future is clear.

“IT IS INTERESTING TO SEE THE LARGE PROPORTION OF WORKING AUSSIES FORCED TO TAKE BREAKS DUE TO THEIR HEALTH.” MARY ATLEY, GENERAL MANAGER, BRAND, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS, REST INDUSTRY SUPER


CAREER BREAK: WHAT DO YOU NEED TO CONSIDER? C A SH FL O W MA N A GEMENT Every little saving can make a huge difference long term. For example, even something as simple as forgoing that second cup of daily coffee can equate to big gains. According to the ASFA calculator, a saving of just $3.80 per day with a 5% growth over 37 years could add over $144,000 to your super. SU P ER C O N SO L I D A T I O N Look to consolidate super into a single fund if you haven’t already. Speak to a financial adviser to check how switching might affect your insurance, benefits and any exit fees in your current fund. SU P ER A SSET ALLOCATION Having time on your side gives you the ability to ride out any market volatility over the long term. Making informed choices around this is important. Talking to a financial adviser can help navigate the options that might best suit your circumstances.

16%

OF WOMEN ARE MAKING VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO THEIR SUPER DURING CAREER BREAKS. THINK OF YOUR FUTURE

At REST Industry Super, there’s support for members to maximise their super at every life stage – including during career breaks. Whether career breaks are planned or come out of the blue – it’s important to speak with a financial adviser either before, during or after a career break. Some super funds, like REST, provide access to a financial adviser for members. A short call can make a real difference.

TOP SUPER TIPS FOR A CAREER BREAK YOUR COVER: Look at your insurance cover to ensure it meets your – and your family’s – needs and reflects your financial commitments while you are not working. CONTRIBUTIONS: See if you or your partner are eligible for a spousal contribution or are in a position to make voluntary contributions during a career break. REVIEW: REST offers a complimentary review of member’s insurance needs as well as a simple super health check.

+ Longergan research economically modelled amount of lost superannuation balance of working women at the retirement age of 67 between those taking no career breaks and those taking career breaks, of which they took 4.2 career breaks on average. The calculations are based on self-reported cost per career break; 9.5% compulsory contribution to superannuation is assumed for the entire working life; 15% contribution tax; and superannuation account balance is compounded annually at 4.95% (Based on average 10-year rate of return after tax and fees from apra annual fund-level superannuation statistics 2016). No voluntary contributions are modelled. The results are in 2017 Australian dollars with no adjustment for inflation. * Surveyed 1,030 Australians (both males and females) who have ever taken a career break of at least three months between 4 October and 9 October 2017.

For clear and simple financial advice and to learn about managing your super, go to rest.com.au/member/advice REST financial advice is provided by REST advisers as authorised representatives of Adviser Network Pty Limited AFS Licence 232729 ABN 25 056 310 699. Product issued by Rest. Go online for a PDS to consider before deciding.


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THIS MONTH,

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WILDEST WAY. OR GO WEST. YOU DECIDE.


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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Dress, $595, skirt (worn over top), $1,350, both ZIMMERMANN, zimmermannwear.com; top, $580, MAX MARA, maxmara.com; (from top of ear) earcuff, $190, earcuff (worn throughout), $195, earring (worn throughout), $2,800, all SARAH & SEBASTIAN, sarahandsebastian.com


S T Y L I N G BY

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RA C H E L W A Y M A N

This season, garden florals come loose, languid and layered from head-to-toe. Wallflowers need not apply PH OT OG RAPH Y BY

ST E F A NI A P A P A RE L L I

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Top, $29.99, pants, $49.99, both H&M, hm.com/au; earring, $130, KERRY ROCKS, kerryrocks.com.au (worn throughout); on model’s right hand: coin ring, $139, BY CHARLOTTE, bycharlotte.com.au (worn throughout); pearl ring, $130, KERRY ROCKS, kerryrocks.com.au (worn throughout); on model’s left hand: ring, $1,100, SARAH & SEBASTIAN, sarahandsebastian.com (worn throughout)

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Top, $350, skirt, $350, both SCANLAN THEODORE, scanlantheodore.com; boots, $2,370, CHLOÈ, chloe.com (worn throughout); on model’s left hand: coin ring, $189, BY CHARLOTTE, bycharlotte.com.au (worn throughout)

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Top, $1,669, skirt, $2,368, both CHLOÈ, chloe.com


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Top, $3,420, skirt, $4,210, both MARNI, marni.com

95


96

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Dress, $950, ZIMMERMANN, zimmermannwear.com


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Dress, $2,910, MAX MARA, maxmara.com; hat, $125, LACK OF COLOR, lackofcolor.com.au (worn throughout); ring (on thumb), $98, KERRY ROCKS, kerryrocks.com.au (worn throughout)

97


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Top, $79.99, H&M, hm.com/au; skirt, $2,340, MAX MARA, maxmara.com


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Dress, $269, pants, $169, both H&M CONSCIOUS, hm.com/au

99


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Dress, $460, MATIN, matinstudio.com


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Jacket, $3,510, top, $965, pants, $2,270, all MAX MARA, maxmara.com Photography: Stefania Paparelli at Company 1. Hair: Daren Borthwick at The Artist Group. Makeup: Molly Warkentin at Company 1. Model: Chiara at IMG

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Shirt, $450, pants, $450, both MICHAEL LO SORDO, michaellosordo.com; shoes, $459, EXTRAORDINARY ORDINARY DAY, eodstyle.com (worn throughout); watch, $12,200, CARTIER, au.cartier.com (worn throughout)

S T Y L I N G BY

FORCE OF NATURE

Be prepared in utilitarian safari suiting paired with adventure-ready accessories

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

DA NNI E L L E C A RT I SA NO


Jacket, $99.90, skirt, $59.90, both UNIQLO U, uniqlo.com/au; turtleneck, $459, LEE MATHEWS, leemathews.com.au; belt, $850, ACNE STUDIOS, (02) 9360 0294

PH OT OG R A PH Y B Y

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ST E F A NI A P AP AR ELLI

103


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Shirt, $470, ACNE STUDIOS, (02) 9360 0294


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Vest, $175, COS, cosstores.com/au; shirt, $600, N°21, matchesfashion.com; pants, $60, H&M, hm.com/au; belt, $49.90, UNIQLO, uniqlo.com/au; bracelet, $9,900, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com

105


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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Coat, $10,400, shirt, $1,450, pants, $1,900, all CÈLINE, (02) 9232 7051; shoes, $409, EXTRAORDINARY ORDINARY DAY, eodstyle.com (worn throughout)


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Trench, $4,150, GIORGIO ARMANI, armani.com/au; shirt, $340, BASSIKE, bassike.com; shorts, $135, COS, cosstores.com/au; wallet belt, $440, MARTINE ROSE, matchesfashion.com

107


108

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Vest, $2,150, pants, $1,230, both LOEWE, (03) 8614 1190; cuff, $149, RELIQUIA, reliquiajewellery.com


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Jacket, $790, MAX MARA, maxmara.com; jacket (worn underneath), $110, INSIGHT, generalpants.com.au; turtleneck, $271, PARIS GEORGIA, themercantileonlinestore.com; pants, $219, KOWTOW, au.kowtowclothing.com; bag, $380, YU MEI, yumeibrand.com Photography: Stefania Paparelli at Company 1. Hair: Pete Lennon at Company 1. Makeup: Claire Thomson at Company 1. Model: Sydney Davis at IMG

109


FROM LEFT Jacket, skirt, choker, circular bag, cuffs, all $POA, all CHANEL, 1300 242 635; heels, $1,640, TOM FORD, tomford.com; earrings, model’s own; tote bag, $39,780, PRADA, (02) 9223 1688 Dress, $33,000, CHRISTIAN DIOR, (02) 9229 4600; slides, $1,200, FENDI, fendi.com; earrings, $1,655, GUCCI, gucci.com/au; bag, $POA, CHANEL, 1300 242 635; blanket (worn over arm), $POA COACH, coachaustralia.com; crown (held in hand), $POA, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com

n i t e g Dress, $POA, embellished bag, $3,740, both VALENTINO, valentino.com/au; stockings, $25, CALZEDONIA, calzedonia.com; heels, $POA, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com; bangle, $535, ERICKSON BEAMON, stylebop.com; furry bag, $POA, NINA RICCI, ninaricci.com

110

PH OT OG RAPH Y B Y

M A RC E L O KRA S ILCIC

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

In basket: blue bag, $POA, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com; clutch, $POA, CHANEL, 1300 242 635


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

e lin

S T Y L I N G BY

FROM CENTRE Jacket, $3,200, shirt, $800, pants, $1,150, all DIOR HOMME, (02) 9229 4600; shoes, $1,249, MANOLO BLAHNIK, manoloblahnik.com; bag, $3,755, GUCCI, gucci.com/au; surfboard, $10,590, CHANEL, 1300 242 635 Top, $POA, LOUIS VUITTON, au.louisvuitton.com; shorts, $240, ROY ROGER’S, royrogers.it; heels, from $1,556, CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA, charlotteolympia.com; earrings, $24.95, H&M, hm.com/au; scarf, $380, MISSONI, missoni.com; belt, $725, HERMÈS, (02) 9287 3200; bag, $4,690, FENDI, fendi.com Jacket, $POA, VERSACE, versace.com; shirt, $438, MOTHER, motherdenim.com; pants, $1,615, GUCCI, gucci.com/au; socks, $16.95, HAPPY SOCKS, happysocks.com/au; brogues, $1,590, CHRISTIAN DIOR, (02) 9229 4600; bag, $POA, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com Coat, $2,560, GUCCI, gucci.com/au; hoodie, $80, NIKE, nike.com; jeans, $POA, BALENCIAGA, balenciaga.com; bag, $3,350, PRADA, (02) 9223 1688

In basket: bag, $2,360, GUCCI, gucci.com/au

A L B E RT O Z A NO L E T T I

The latest accessories are guaranteed to make a statement. Add to basket now 111


FROM LEFT Jacket, $450, PROENZA SCHOULER, proenzaschouler.com; dress, $POA, CHANEL, 1300 242 635; heels, $89, ALDO, theiconic.com.au; necklace, $812, KENNETH JAY LANE, kennethjaylane.com; heart bag, $6,900, CHRISTIAN DIOR, (02) 9229 4600; canvas bag, $2,100, CÈLINE, (02) 9232 7051

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Coat, $POA, pants, $POA, both CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, calvinklein.com/au; jacket (tied at neck), $1,540, GUCCI, gucci.com/au; sunglasses, from $1,230, DOLCE & GABBANA, net-a-porter.com; striped bag, $3,230, PROENZA SCHOULER, proenzaschouler.com; monogram bag, $POA, FENDI, fendi.com

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

FROM CENTRE Jumper, $1,940, shirt, $1,550, skirt, $3,720, all MIU MIU, (02) 9223 1688; heels, $POA, VERSACE, versace.com; purple bag, $9,720, BOTTEGA VENETA, (02) 9239 0188; red bag (in basket), $POA, LANVIN, lanvin.com Coat, dress, both $POA, both MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION, michaelkors.com; heels, $1,405, OFF-WHITE C/O JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com; hat, from $405, MISSONI, missoni.com; sunglasses, $304, MOSCHINO, farfetch.com; necklace, $750, VANDA JACINTHO, matchesfashion.com; shoulder bag, $POA, FENDI, fendi.com; heart bag, stylist’s own

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Jacket, $4,633, shirt, $1,177, skirt, $1,965, boots, $1,869, white bag, $2,183, all BALENCIAGA, balenciaga.com; tights, $25, EMILIO CAVALLINI, emiliocavallini.com; necklace, $750, VANDA JACINTHO, matchesfashion.com; monogram bag, $POA, LOUIS VUITTON, au.louisvuitton.com; striped bag, $18,885, HERMÈS, (02) 9287 3200

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

FROM LEFT Dress, $POA, MISSONI, missoni.com; sunglasses, $POA, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com; scarf, stylist’s own; necklace, $17,800, BULGARI, bulgari.com; bag, $4,633, BALENCIAGA, balenciaga.com


Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

FROM CENTRE Cardigan, $9,690, dress, $4,640, turtleneck, $975, tights, $635, socks, $315, boots, $1,385, sunglasses, $POA, belt, $1,685, wicker bag, $2,360, all GUCCI, gucci.com/au; choker, $POA, NINA RICCI, ninaricci.com; cat bag, $412, KARL LAGERFELD, farfetch.com; skateboard, stylist’s own Dress, boots, both $POA, both SAINT LAURENT, ysl.com/au; bangles, from $445, all KENNETH JAY LANE, kennethjaylane.com; silver bag, $609, KATE SPADE, katespade.com; Paris bag, stylist’s own Jacket, $4,550, dress, $11,400, both BOTTEGA VENETA, (02) 9239 0188; heels, $1,425, MANOLO BLAHNIK, manoloblahnik.com; hat, $POA, MARNI, marni.com; bag, $POA, FENDI, fendi.com; watch, $73,000, BULGARI, bulgari.com Shot on location at Essex Street Market, New York

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AS THE STAR OF THIS YEAR’S BIGGEST BLOCKBUSTER, THE TOMB RAIDER REBOOT,

ALICIA VIKANDER IS A MODERN ACTION HERO WE CAN STAND BEHIND. THE OSCAR-WINNING ACTRESS OPENS UP ABOUT SHEDDING HER FEAR OF TALL-POPPY SYNDROME, LEARNING TO SPEAK OUT, THE REALITIES OF MARRIED LIFE AND THE JOY IN TAKING A BREAK

P HO TO GR A P HY B Y

N OR M AN J E AN R OY

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

RUE

GRIT


Dress, $3,750, LOEWE, (03) 8614 1190; vintage boots, RALPH LAUREN; hat, $141, BAPTISTE VIRY, baptisteviry.com (all worn throughout)

STY L ING B Y

AN N E -M AR IE CUR TIS

W ORD S BY

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

L O T T E JE F F S


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Gilet, $4,900, top, $POA, shorts, $POA, all LOUIS VUITTON, au.louisvuitton.com; hat, $746, LOCK & CO HATTERS, lockhatters.co.uk


“I WANTED LARA

Top, $4,600, jeans, $1,300, belt with chain, $1,050, all GIVENCHY, (07) 5631 4594; boots, $1,069, JESSIE WESTERN, jessiewestern.com

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CROF T TO


BE STRONG” ALICIA VIKANDER HAD ME AT “HALLÅ”. The Oscar-winning Swedish actress, who is starring in 2018’s biggest blockbuster, Tomb Raider, and happens to be married to the equally bankable Michael Fassbender, turned up to breakfast at London’s Haymarket Hotel five minutes early. Her cheeks were flushed from having walked the 52 minutes from north London (a perfect opportunity to catch up on the phone with her dad), hair swept back into a messy ponytail, wearing skinny jeans, white trainers and a chunky grey jumper. She doesn’t like to stand out, which she tells me is very Swedish, as her homeland suffers from tall-poppy syndrome. “You shouldn’t be too good, or do something different… In a way it’s great to grow up with that, as it

makes you very grounded, but also a bit scared of standing out and making a big leap away from the rest of the group.” Vikander took that leap at 15, when she moved from her family home to attend ballet school in Stockholm, and she’s been outgrowing the poppy field ever since. Critically acclaimed performances in Anna Karenina, Ex Machina, The Light Between Oceans, plus a best supporting actress Oscar for The Danish Girl, have led her to take on every video gamer’s fantasy, Lara Croft in Tomb Raider. The film is a prequel to Angelina Jolie’s 2001-2003 franchise (so Lara Croft is younger this time round), which, even back then, before social media, grossed a massive $550 million. It brings with it millions of dollars worth of merchandising opportunities (hands up for an Alicia Vikander action figure) and a whole new level of global recognition for this unassuming star. “When they first called me about making a new Tomb Raider, I was like, ‘Hasn’t that been done?’” says the 29-year-old. “And then I realised there was a chance to tell a story about a girl that I think a lot of young people will relate to. When we meet her at the beginning of this film, she lives in a commune in Hackney [in London] and is a bicycle courier delivering food. You get to see her mature and turn into something exceptional.” Vikander says the character’s journey really resonated with her, particularly because she was the same age as Lara when she first came to London and lived with her girlfriends – a crew of Swedish musicians, including Tove Lo. “There’s an awful lot of pressure on you when you’re 20, 21, not really knowing what you want to do with your life – and that’s exactly the position Lara is in.” Training for Tomb Raider was arduous. “For three months before filming, I started every morning with an hour’s workout. Then there was a lot of eating going on; I had to have five meals a day,” she says. “I wanted Lara to be strong. I’m very petite myself, and I wanted the audience to find the action sequences plausible – to believe that she could do it, that she could lift herself up with her own body weight.” One of the most demanding days of filming involved Vikander being thrown down rapids of a white-water-rafting course that was built for the 2012 Olympics with her hands tied together, over and over again until they got the shot. I wonder what’s more difficult: making such a physically draining film or a more emotionally taxing one, known as she is for her ability to plumb the depths of raw human experience. “It’s interesting,” she says. “With physical films, as long as you get home, you get a good night’s rest. Weirdly enough, it gives you energy in the end; it’s just really tough to go through at the time. When I think about some of the biggest, most emotionally draining scenes I’ve done – in The Danish Girl, for example – it’s not too different. I found myself having to go to sleep afterwards, but by the next day I’d be fine.” For Vikander, it’s dealing with the emotional trauma in real life that’s most taxing. “In real life you hold back, you always try to pull yourself together. I’m the kind of person who doesn’t cry very often. I try to be fine about things, which I think is a very human thing. But as an actor, when you have stories to tell about these kinds of emotional moments, you have to push yourself to go there. I don’t keep this darkness hovering over me, though. It’s more like it comes out and it’s a physical thing [just watch her portrayal of a woman miscarrying in The Light Between Oceans for an example], and that makes it easier to walk away and move on.” >

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Denim jacket, $554, AGOLDE, agolde.com; denim jacket (worn underneath), $150, bandana, $10, both LEVI’S, levis.com.au; hat, $405, LAIRD HATTERS, lairdlondon.co.uk

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

Cape, $7,100, dress, $3,700, shirt, $1,850, all CHRISTIAN DIOR, (02) 9229 4600; boots, $1,247, JESSIE WESTERN, jessiewestern.com; hat, $580, LOCK & CO HATTERS, lockhatters.co.uk

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I get the sense that dealing with the real-life moments is something Vikander is still getting to grips with. I ask if she has ever lost someone she loves. “My mum was very ill a few years ago, and I was in the middle of filming – it was when my career was taking off, so my dad stepped in. It was an immense support.” She says it was a “very tough time”, because she wanted to be with her family, but even her mother, who was battling cancer, said, “You can’t.” It made her feel lonely, but she would tell herself, “What I’m going through is nothing compared to what she’s going through.” Her mother, also an actress, is now in remission and recently starred in a play in Sweden. Vikander attended the first night. “I just jumped on a plane, because I couldn’t miss it for anything in the world.” Vikander was so overwhelmed with pride that she did that rare thing – she cried. “It was a total parent-child role reversal. They’d come to see me singing at school and I’d say, ‘Why are you crying? That’s just weird and embarrassing.’ Well, that was me this time.” Her mother Maria divorced her father Svante (a psychiatrist) when she was a child, but Vikander says she’s never had anything but a happy relationship with him and her five half-siblings from his other relationships. After Anna Karenina, when her career really took off, Vikander’s biggest fear was that she would lose touch with her friends and family. “I was terrified they wouldn’t be there when I went back.” She tells me that, a few weeks ago, she met up with her oldest, closest friends. “We had the best time together; nothing had changed. I’ve always been very aware of wanting to keep what is my emotional home and my family close to me.” We talk about the importance of having an “anchor”, a strong sense of what’s important that isn’t defined by superficial things – the films, the awards, the Louis Vuitton campaigns, the media frenzy over your heart-throb actor husband (Vikander married Fassbender last October). “I have that anchor now,” she says, smiling. “I felt a bit lost. I was maybe not so happy with myself for a while…” Now she’s in a good place, she wants to help others. We meet amid the wave of allegations against male producers and the topic of sexism in Hollywood hangs thickly in the air. “I’ve been very fortunate that I haven’t had any sexual harassment on set. But I’ve been in situations where people in power have put me on the spot, or made me feel stupid and young when I wasn’t able to express myself publicly. Once, an older female co-star actually said on my behalf, ‘That’s not okay.’” She wants to be this person now, looking out for her younger colleagues who maybe don’t have the confidence or experience she does. “I can now speak up and say that is not fine. I’ve been given the fortunate position of not being, in the same way, afraid of losing my job, which is deep down the reason you don’t want to be in trouble, you don’t want to be difficult…” While filming Tomb Raider, she was conscious of making Lara Croft powerful. “Sure, Lara is a sex symbol in some ways, but for me, what makes a woman or a man attractive is someone who dares to speak up, who dares to show their personality. It’s tough being a young girl at this time, you know? I’m working in an industry that lives on creating an image, a fantasy, and I feel like I need to show younger women that’s the way it is. Even I was fooled [into thinking a woman in Hollywood needed to be a certain way]. When I first went to America to work, I was told, ‘Maybe you should wear heels and curl your hair when you go to meetings.’” She took that advice, but didn’t feel good about it. “I really felt compromised, like, ‘Shit,

I ended up there. I did it.’ You know? I thought I was trying not to be like everyone else. I almost felt ashamed.” It’s no wonder Vikander needed a hiatus from Hollywood. “As an actor, there’s this underlying fear of never getting another job. Until now, I’ve always felt like I couldn’t stop, but I realised I had to take a break, I had to remember what it was to be me without work. I don’t have a clue what’s coming next, and I’m fine with that. It’s been a bit of a whirlwind, the past few years. I was thrown into so many new experiences that I could never have even imagined, so I couldn’t really prepare myself emotionally for them.” Vikander and Fassbender recently moved to Lisbon. “When I met my husband three-and-a-half years ago, he mentioned he’d been to Lisbon and loved it, and I knew friends who were moving there. And that was a time when I was just starting to feel really at home in London, but after Brexit I was like, ‘You know what, I want to stay in Europe.’ I’ve fallen in love with the city and the fact that it’s just on the waterfront, close to nature, and I like the warm weather a lot. It’s a place that is just constantly alive. And they’re known for their sardines; I do love sardines.” As much as I’m desperate to know the inner workings of their married life, I understand the reasons Vikander wants to keep that part of her world private. It also means she is appreciated as an exceptional actress in her own right, and not the “wife of actor Michael Fassbender”, which is still a depressingly common narrative in Hollywood. What she does reveal is that the pair first met on the dance floor at the Toronto International Film Festival, and then again, a few months later, on the dance floor after the BAFTAs: “Yep, the first two times we met, we didn’t chat, we only danced.” I can’t help but say “Sexy!” out loud and Vikander laughs. “Actually, we didn’t talk until we worked together [in The Light Between Oceans, during which the pair fell in love].” Vikander and Fassbender like nothing more than hosting friends at home. “I love to get guests playing games,” she says. “It’s like stepping on new ground for the first five minutes, then people really enjoy it. Normally, you kind of just fall into patterns of how dinner parties should be – you should be polite and you should say these things. But I like to shake the box a bit. I really enjoy throwing dinner parties or surprise parties and I can spend weeks planning them. I come up with games that introduce new people to one another. I spend hours with seating plans, even for a small dinner. It really makes such a difference. And I always try to put people next to someone they haven’t met before.” Did she spend a lot of time doing the seating plan for her wedding? She nods gravely. “A lot of time... It’s gut instinct in the end, though, like, ‘These people will have a fun time together.’” I have no trouble believing she’s a lot of fun, particularly after she tells me, “I do love a drink. More and more, I love wine, but I like vodka martinis or straight-up tequilas. I’ve taken to drinking straight, but I only ever have one or two, and I never really get drunk.” It’s no wonder Vikander is the life of a party. She’s found love with one of the sexiest men alive, won an Oscar before turning 30, has a loving family, good friends and at her feet is a multimilliondollar film franchise, which, at a time when women in the industry are still being variously disempowered, is about a petite, initially unassuming young woman kicking ass and saving the world. I think we can all agree: that’s definitely something worth celebrating. E Tomb Raider is out now

G N U O Y A G N I E B H G IT’S TOU


Photography: Norman Jean Roy at Art + Commerce. Hair: George Northwood. Makeup: Kelly Cornwell at Agency Artists. Manicure: Adam Slee at Streeters. Prop styling: Gillian O’Brien at Lalaland Artists. Tailor: Michael Hunt

” E M I T S I H GIRL AT T

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checklist

Hat, $99, LACK OF COLOR, lackofcolor.com.au

Dress, $369, HANSEN & GRETEL, hansenandgretel.com

Best buys inspired by this issue’s fashion shoots Dress, $230, KEEPSAKE THE LABEL, fashionbunker.com Dress, $110, THE FIFTH LABEL, fashionbunker.com

Earrings, $249, RELIQUIA, reliquiajewellery.com

TEA PARTY With longer sleeves, hems and added ruffles, the floral tea-dress you lived in this summer evolves for the cooler months.

Dress, $250, SPORTSCRAFT, sportscraft.com.au Skirt, $299, WE ARE KINDRED, wearekindred.com.au

GARDEN STATE

Dress, $80, H&M, hm.com/au

Opt for a suitably autumnal palette – start with a mustard dress and add warm brown accessories.

Dress, $649, BAUM UND PFERDGARTEN, (03) 9421 0592

Top, $325, WYNN HAMLYN, wynnhamlyn.com

Bag, $129, POSSE, theposse.com.au

Boots, $239, SOL SANA, sol-sana.com.au

Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Stefania Paparelli at Company 1; Chris Jansen (still-life). Styling: Samantha Wong

DOWN TO EARTH

PAIR WALLPAPERFLORAL DRESSES WITH EVEN MORE FLORALS, IN THE FORM OF PANTS AND BLOUSES, FOR A LOOK AS WILD AND VIBRANT AS YOUR GARDEN GROWS.


Jacket, $110, INSIGHT, generalpants.com.au; turtleneck, $59.90, UNIQLO, uniqlo.com/au

Shirt, $79.95, INSIGHT, generalpants.com.au

NATURAL BEAUTY Extend the life of button-down staples by wearing them over tops, shorts and knits. Stick to shades of sandstone accented with gold and tortoiseshell fastenings.

Shirt, $69.95, SPORTSGIRL, sportsgirl.com.au

Dress, $250, BEC & BRIDGE, becandbridge.com.au; top, $45, H&M, hm.com/au

Trench, $149, ASOS, asos.com/au

MAKING TRACKS

UTILITY SHIRTING AND BUSH-INSPIRED COLOURS LOOK BEST WORN LAYERED AND TONAL – LET THE OUTBACK BE YOUR MUSE.

Jumpsuit, $84.95, TOPSHOP, topshop.com; shirt, $99, COS, cosstores.com/au

Pants, $49.90, UNIQLO, uniqlo.com/au

Shorts, $260, HER LINE, her-line.com Belt, $40, UNIQLO, uniqlo.com/au

GREAT OUTDOORS In reliable leather and canvas, these are the accessories that will have you covered come rain, hike or shine.

Hat, $70, THE CRITICAL SLIDE SOCIETY, generalpants.com.au

Belt, $35, ARVUST, generalpants.com.au

Shoes, $199, ST AGNI, st-agni.com

Skirt, $189, KOWTOW, au.kowtowclothing.com

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GET ELLE ON YOUR IPAD 11 ISSUES

TO SUBSCRIBE: VISIT MAGSHOP.COM.AU/ELLEDIGITAL OR CALL 136 116 AND QUOTE M1801EED Terms and conditions: Savings based on single issue digital edition price of $3.99. Offer available until 24/6/18. Subscription automatically renews unless cancelled. If you do not want your information provided to any organisation not associated with this promotion, please indicate this clearly when you subscribe. For full terms and conditions, visit magshop.com.au and for our Privacy Notice visit bauer-media.com.au. Apple, the Apple logo and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc, registered in the US and other countries. Also available on Android.

Photography: Chris Jansen. Sunglasses, $210, Ray-Ban, ray-ban.com; bag, $4,050, Céline, (03) 9530 4300; Rouge Pur Couture lipstick, $55, Yves Saint Laurent, 1300 651 991; Gypsy Water, $158 for 50ml, Byredo, mecca.com.au; diary, $99.95, The Daily Edited, thedailyedited.com

ONLY $19.99


THE AUTUMN EDIT?

PARE THINGS BACK, RADIATE FROM WITHIN AND EMBRACE YOUR NATURAL HAIR: GO SHORT.

GO WAVY. GO YOUR

OWN WAY.

BEAUTY


Ultiboost High Strength Vitamin C Effervescent, $39.99, SWISSE, swisse.com

Collagen Inner Beauty Boost, $39.95, THE BEAUTY CHEF, thebeauty chef.com

BOOST YOUR BOOSTER

Make a collagen supplement more efficient by loading up on...

IS COLLAGEN THE NEW HEALTH HERO? Come for the glow, stay for the… better digestion?

As well as giving us bouncy, radiant skin, a collagen supplement has joined the ranks of pre- and probiotics as a powerful player in gut health, which we now know is ground zero for pretty much anything related to our wellbeing, from acne to anxiety. “Gut issues are on the rise – our modernday lifestyles are filled with stress, processed foods, caffeine, alcohol and other toxins, causing the gut cells to become damaged, inflamed and irritated,” says medical scientist and Swisse expert Di Mitchelmore. “Collagen contains amino

VITAMIN C Citrus fruits, red capsicum and broccoli are packed with the antioxidant, which is critical to the production of collagen. ZINC The collagen-boosting mineral is found in oysters, poultry and cashews. PROBIOTICS Get happy insides faster by doubling down on collagen’s gut protection with a quality probiotic.

acids critical for the repair of inflamed and damaged gut cells, helping to seal and soothe the gut lining and provide a barrier to protect. By stabilising the integrity of the gut, inflammation is kept at bay and healthy digestion is optimised.” Unfortunately, our natural collagen production starts to slow in our twenties, but a supplement is an easy fix. Liquid, pills, dissolvable powders: take your pick. “There’s no research to suggest one consistency is better absorbed than the other,” Mitchelmore says, though not all collagen is equal, either. “Our body makes about 20 different types of collagen, with the most abundant being types one, two and three. Type two is supportive of cartilage and joint flexibility, whereas types one and three are predominant in the skin and gut matrix.”

Collagen-C, $52.95, BEAUTY BOOSTERS, beautyboosters. com.au

Marine Collagen in Citrus, $49.95, PROPLENISH, proplenish.com.au

So a supplement that’s promoting joint health may relieve that elbow pain from boxing class, but is unlikely to reduce bloating. Supplements are sourced from animals and fish that have skin, tendons and cartilage. It’s a bit unsettling to think about, but makes sense — it’s really no different to sipping on bone broth, which is naturally rich in amino acids. Marine collagen does have a leg (er, fin?) up though, as research has shown its smaller molecules are better absorbed than bovine collagen. Vegetarian or vegan? The Beauty Chef’s Collagen Inner Beauty Boost (a favourite at the ELLE office) works a little differently, helping to improve the body’s natural collagen stores. “It doesn’t contain collagen, but is rich in vitamin C, biofermented ingredients and probiotics to help balance gut health and boost collagen production,” says the brand’s founder, Carla Oates. “It also has zinc and grapeseed extract, which studies show have a positive effect on gut inflammation and health.” The mild berry-flavoured elixir is dissolved into water, making for a refreshing, glow-inducing, gut-protecting guzzle. Make ours a double.

TAKE NOTES

Inspired by the English countryside, Jo Malone’s latest collection of scents is floral and earthy without ever being basic or been-there-done-that predictable. The cool 30ml bottle size makes them handy for throwing in your handbag, but the palette of colours is pretty enough to be left out on display, too.

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English Fields Cologne in (from left) Oat & Cornflower, Primrose & Rye,  Green Wheat & Meadowsweet, Honey & Crocus and Poppy & Barley, $98 each for 30ml, JO MALONE, jomalone.com.au


au be

now

ty

4.

1. 9. 6.

10.

5.

7. 2. 11. 3.

8.

WHAT I USE: WHAT I USE:

suki waterhouse

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Ryan Conduit at DLM. Beauty case, $169, Journey, journey-co.com

The British actress and new face of Amo Ferragamo shows off her beauty arsenal

I DO TWO THOROUGH CLEANSES every night for two minutes each. I use the cleanser from Obagi to combat acne when my skin is breaking out. I MASSAGE IN OILS or Weleda Skin Food after my evening cleanse. I basically do a mini lymphatic-drainage massage. VITAMIN C PRODUCTS are essential. I invest in them 100 per cent, such as Obagi’s Professional-C Serum. I’VE ONLY JUST DISCOVERED this skin treatment from Bioeffect. It’s gorgeous and so moisturising. I ALWAYS DO MAKEUP REALLY QUICKLY, so I have to know my products are going to be foolproof. Charlotte Tilbury’s range is just that. FOR A GLOWY COMPLEXION, my go-to products are Chantecaille Future Skin foundation and Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage concealer. IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A BABYPINK PRODUCT for cheeks and lips, try Tata Harper. I’m actually obsessed with all the brand’s products for natural,

gentle options, such as the Clarifying Mask. I love pampering, but I don’t beat myself up if I’m not militant – it probably means I’m having fun. AMO FERRAGAMO REMINDS ME of growing up at my grandmother’s house, running in the catnip fields, making daisy chains, eating ice-cream and Coca-Cola floats, riding my uncle’s tractor, being covered in mud – the thrill of losing myself to nature and running wild. The fragrance evokes those memories for me – the possibilities that spontaneity provides. ONCE YOU DISCOVER THE JOYS OF HAND CREAM, you’ll never look back! I don’t leave home without Dr Hauschka’s Regenerating Hand Cream. 1. Amo Ferragamo, $122 for 50ml, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, davidjones.com.au 2. Clarifying Mask, $110, TATA HARPER, net-a-porter.com 3. Volumizing Lip And Cheek Tint in Very Charming, $49, TATA HARPER, net-a-porter.com 4. Gentle Cleanser, $49.95, OBAGI, obagi.net.au 5. Future Skin  foundation, $114, CHANTECAILLE, mecca.com.au 6. Regenerating Hand Cream, $49, DR HAUSCHKA, drhauschka.com.au 7. Skin Food, $14.95, WELEDA, weleda.com.au 8. Rock ‘N’ Kohl eyeliner in (from left) Veruschka Mink, Marlene Midnight, Bedroom Black and Barbarella Brown, $43 each, CHARLOTTE TILBURY, charlottetilbury.com/au 9. Professional-C Serum 10%, $66, OBAGI, obagi.net.au 10. Secret Camouflage concealer, $55, LAURA MERCIER, davidjones.com.au 11. EGF + 2A Daily Treatment, $295 for set, BIOEFFECT, bioeffectaus.com.au

WHAT I SWEAR BY:

WITH SUPERSTYLIST

JEN ATKIN Want perfectly

polished waves that last all night long, and then some? Steal hair guru (and celeb favourite) Jen Atkin’s trick. Spray strands with her Memory Mist, tong, then let hair cool while wrapped around the product can itself. “Ouai Memory Mist ensures your hair is protected against heat damage, so it holds for an extended period of time,” she says. “Then use hairspray to help seal in the look.” Memory Mist, $43, OUAI, sephora.com.au

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LESS IS MORE

IN THE QUEST FOR PERFECT SKIN, IS YOUR THICK, UNCTUOUS MOISTURISER DOING

“You have a lovely fat face,” London’s favourite facialist Kate Kerr tells me, pinching my cheeks and analysing my skin under an oh-so unforgiving spotlight. “It’s plump to touch, which indicates it’s full of healthy collagen.” Then she floors me: “But I can tell just by looking at it that your skin is lazy.” This is a fair analysis of my favouring food and box sets over the gym, but my face? I’ve spent years putting in daily groundwork, following strict routines and trying out every miracle moisturiser in the book. So how can my skin be lazy? Kerr explains that when it comes to skincare, too much of a good thing can actually be quite the opposite. By plying our faces with products that do all the hard work for us, such as thick moisturisers and oils, our skin becomes lax and complacent. What we really need, Kerr says, are products that give our skin the tools it needs to do a better job on its own. Or, rather, to stop handing our skin everything on a plate and give it a kick up the epidermis. “It has been ingrained in us from a young age to supplement our skin with excess moisturisers,” Kerr says. “We think all skin types need this, but in most cases, the skin is capable of maintaining its own hydration levels. Over-moisturising our skin’s surface sends a signal to its water reservoirs to halt production. When that happens, the skin becomes sluggish and actually lacking in moisture, which makes us reach for even creamier formulas, exacerbating the problem.” Specialist dermatologist Dr Stefanie Williams agrees: “Overloading the skin with too-rich, heavy and occlusive textures [which form a film on the skin] can clog

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pores and slow down the skin’s vital, natural surface renewal.” Telltale signs of lazy-skin syndrome include tightness, dryness, dullness, congestion and reactive, breakout-prone skin – all symptomatic of sluggish cell renewal (when old cells linger, preventing shiny new cells from coming forward). You might not even notice at first, but these dead cells create a layer of tiny blockers that stop your skin from reflecting light, meaning they basically steal your glow. On the other hand, skin that’s well-balanced, calm, strong and working hard to keep up healthy cell renewal looks lit from within. If that’s the ultimate endgame, Williams recommends assessing your routine and going back to basics. “Applying too many products with different textures suffocates the skin, so I’m sceptical about the current trend of applying layer upon layer of skincare – sometimes more than 10,” she says. “This will compromise optimal absorption of active ingredients and could put the interaction of products at risk.” Instead, Williams advises sticking to three layers, especially if you have oily, reactive skin. “And always use the lightest formulations you can get away with without skin feeling dry,” she adds. With this approach, thick, heavy creams are counterintuitive, and oils (which Kerr believes congest skin, upset moisture processes and prevent product penetration) are a no-go. To get the hydration boost your skin needs, look to a product with naturally occurring ingredients such as urea, low-to-medium levels of glycerine and hyaluronic acid (The Ordinary’s HA serums have become global favourites).

“These ingredients are already part of our skin’s natural moisturising mechanisms, so they don’t upset its functionality when applied topically,” Kerr says. “Remember that even without a heavy moisturiser, the skin is not bare – if you use active serums that help prevent and correct skin conditions and skin ageing.” That said, there is one particular skin type that both Kerr and Williams agree definitely benefits from these heavier formulations: true dry skin. The problem is that lots of us think our skin falls into this category, when really it could be those dead skin cells getting comfy. “Only 10 to 15 per cent of people have true genetically dry skin because their skin’s moisturising processes aren’t able to function effectively,” explains Kerr. “They have always had dry skin, have never had

Words: Joely Walker; Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Sabine Villiard/Trunk Archive

MORE HARM THAN GOOD?


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acne-prone skin, it’s imperative to treat the inflammation, rather than simply soothe the sensation with skincare that causes trouble down the line. But what about those with lucky skin? Or, rather, “normal” skin that doesn’t cause much bother and just gets on with it, no matter what you throw its way? If it still looks a little lacklustre and dull, it’s most likely a result of stifled cell renewal leading to lazy skin behaviour and dehydration. In other words, no skin type gets away scot-free. Give skin the motivation (and aforementioned kick) it needs to get moving optimally with a topical regimen that focuses on cell renewal. Topical exfoliators such as Paula’s Choice Skin Perfecting exfoliant will help get rid of the surface-glow thieves and reveal brighter skin underneath. AHAs (such as glycolic or lactic acid) or polyhydroxy acids/PHAs (which are larger molecules and gentler on skin) will get things going in the right direction (try Nip+Fab Glycolic Fix Gentle Pads). For moisture, go for a hearty dose of hyaluronic acid and always use a protective antioxidant and daily SPF, or regret it later. If you want to pull out the big guns, try a dermatologygrade facial to get you going. In Sydney, All Saints Skin Clinic offers bespoke treatments that involve a combination of light-to-deep peels and advanced microdermabrasion. Time pressed? Dermalogica’s facials use pro-grade products and tools in treatments that range from 10 to 60 minutes. While a professional session will speed up the process, be warned: rebooting your skin with an effective skincare routine won’t happen overnight – think of it as a skin marathon, not a sprint. “Expect a notable difference within six weeks – and a big one within 18 weeks, once three skin cycles have taken

place,” says Kerr. “During the transition period, you might notice your skin feels tighter, perhaps a little flaky, and products may tingle very slightly. But don’t quit – that means it’s working.” Ultimately, whether you favour longterm skin balance or an instant selfie complexion, your skin is an incredibly clever organ and it will tell you when it’s not happy. If it’s giving you what you want (within reason – perfect skin is a myth), keep on doing what you’re doing. If it’s easily agitated, congested and duller than you’d like, there’s a good chance you’re experiencing lazy skin and it’s up to you to get it moving and motivated again. Streamlining your skincare regimen and choosing renewing formulations that get your cell turnover into bootcamp mode is the best place to start.

“Overloading the skin with heavy textures clogs pores and slows down the skin’s natural surface renewal”

any problems with acne or excessive oil flow and are often prone to eczema and dermatitis. For them, a moisturiser with a perfect ratio of lipids, protein and water, such as SkinCeuticals Triple Lipid Restore 2:4:2, is needed.” Equally, just because you feel your skin is dry and tight, it doesn’t necessarily mean it is; chances are it’s just dehydrated. “This feeling can also be a sign of microinflammation, as we often see in rosaceaprone skin,” says Williams. “In these cases, slathering on rich moisturisers might make the rosacea worse.” For both rosacea and Mascara Vinyl Couture in (from left) I’m The Storm and I’m The Fire, $57 each, YVES SAINT LAURENT, yslbeauty.com.au

Marine Hyaluronics, $12.90, THE ORDINARY, theordinary.com

Triple Lipid Restore 2:4:2, $183, SKINCEUTICALS, skinceuticals.com.au

Glycolic Fix Gentle Pads Sensitive, $34.95, NIP+FAB, nipandfab.com.au

Skin Perfecting 2% BHA Liquid, $37, PAULA’S CHOICE, paulaschoice.com.au

KIRAKIRA+ IRL

IF YOU CAN’T QUIT THE WORLD’S MOST BELOVED INSTA-TWINKLING APP, TRY HAVING IT WITH YOU ALL DAY (AND NIGHT) LONG. THESE SHIMMERING MASCARAS FROM YVES SAINT LAURENT LAYER ON THE FINEST GLITTER, AND IF YOU’RE LUCKY, YOU MIGHT JUST CATCH THE SPARKLE IN YOUR PERIPHERAL VISION.

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Balmain

askELLE ELLE #ask Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter Duo in Lightning Dust/Fire Crystal, $50, FENTY BEAUTY BY RIHANNA, sephora.com.au

Q.

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO TRY:

sound-bathing massage

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WHAT IT IS: This face and body massage combines a variety of techniques (shiatsu, reflexology, remedial, Hawaiian and hot and cold rocks), all set to the dulcet tones of chanting Tibetan monks, plus a little singing bowl and Buddhist cymbals. “People can have trouble surrendering to relaxation – sometimes it won’t happen for them until the treatment is almost over,” says Jeannie Bourke, owner of Sydney’s Venustus. “By listening, we’re symbolically and physically acknowledging our connection to all other living beings, nature and the universe. It’s a type of

energy medicine and it promotes healing.” WHAT IT FEELS LIKE: The mixed forms of massage stimulate the mind enough to keep busy thoughts at bay, while the hypnotic sounds play away in the background. The therapist also burns a stick of palo santo beneath the massage table, which only fuels the senses further. THE VERDICT: If you still find meditation tricky, the sounds that fill this treatment will suit your sensibility. It’s a fast-track to chill town, so you get to enjoy every one of your 90 minutes. Om Massage, $299, VENUSTUS, venustus.com.au

I love the subtle glow of highlighter, but how can I use it without ending up looking sweaty, not sexy? Kate Highlighting Palette in 04, $16.95, RIMMEL LONDON, 1800 812 663

Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter Duo in Mean Money/Hu$tla Baby, $50, FENTY BEAUTY BY RIHANNA, sephora.com.au

A.

For the record, a sweaty post-workout glow is sexy. But we get your point. Autumn and winter are the perfect seasons to break out the highlighter, as it’s not competing with perspiration. Since sheen is your issue, we’re guessing you have an oily skin type, in which case a powder formula is key (you’re using a creamy one, right?). Prep skin with a mattifying primer, followed by your favourite foundation or tinted moisturiser (or nothing if that’s your game), then use a tapered brush, which will pick up just the right amount of product, and sweep the powder across the highest part of the cheeks, temples, wherever (highlighter is fun to freestyle, but go for a touch of radiance, not a hi-vis strip of light). Selecting the right shade is also essential. If you’re fair, opt for something more pink. For medium tones, peachy shades are beautiful, while darker skin looks amazing with peach or bronze. As a general rule, if the highlighter is two to three shades lighter than your foundation, you’re good to go. Can’t quit the creamy stuff? Try Benefit’s cream-to-powder formula — you’ll still dab/smudge/blend it in, but it sets with a velvety finish that won’t look slick an hour later.

Watt’s Up! Cream Highlighter, $53, BENEFIT, myer.com.au


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1. 6.

On any given day, NYC-based nail guru Jin Soon Choi is formulating new products for her eponymous range, overseeing the nail direction at NYFW and on fashion campaigns, or popping into one of her salons. She reveals her secrets to staying polished

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4.

IN MY (FASHIONFORWARD NAIL) KIT:

7.

3. 5. 2.

8.

10.

9.

11.

“It goes without saying – moisturiser is a must.”

12.

17.

1. Fresh Lotion For The Body, $71, 15.

DIPTYQUE, mecca.com.au 3. Make

16.

A Difference Rejuvenating Hand 14.

Treatment, $23, ORIGINS, mecca.com.au

“I’m never without a few classic polish shades that suit everyone. My Nail Lacquer in Coquette is a rich, vibrant red that’s sexy, modern and ageless, and it works well with all different skin tones.” 2. Nail Lacquer in Coquette, $26, JINSOON, mecca.com.au 11. Nail Lacquer in Pixie, $26, JINSOON,

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Bjarne x Takata/Trunk Archive; Jason Lloyd-Evans

mecca.com.au

“It’s important to push cuticles back thoroughly and trim only the loose portion that results from this process.”

13.

“For a natural nail, I use these two nude shades from my collection. Muse is a sheer pink that imparts a fresh look, and Nostalgia is a rosy beige that is particularly suited to long nails. I sometimes layer two shades to tweak the right look for different skin tones.”

“Sometimes I’m able to sneak away from a shoot and do a few minutes of skipping to get invigorated. I also keep coconut water, an apple, chocolate and mandarins on hand for a quick energy boost.”

edge on the corners while seguing to a slightly curved form as you approach the tip area is the most flattering nail shape. My nail technicians call it the ‘Jin Soon shape’.”

9. Skipping rope, $1,790, CHANEL,

mecca.com.au 14. Stainless Steel

1300 242 635 17. Coconut Water

Fingernail Clipper, $14.25,

6. Nail Lacquer in Nostalgia, $26,

StraightUP, $22 for eight, RAW C,

TWEEZERMAN, i-glamour.com

JINSOON, mecca.com.au

rawc.com.au

15. Stainless Steel Toenail Clipper,

4. Rockhard Cuticle Nipper, $65.95,

7. Nail Lacquer in Muse, $26,

TWEEZERMAN, i-glamour.com

JINSOON, mecca.com.au

12. Pushy And Nail Cleaner, $32.95,

“I keep a few bottles of top coat in my kit so I can add shine to nails between shots.”

“I added strengthening biotin and keratin, plus diamond particles for durability, to my base coat. It really helps prime and protect the nail.”

5. Top Gloss Quick Dry Top Coat,

8. Power Coat Strengthening Base

$26, JINSOON, mecca.com.au

Coat, $26, JINSOON, mecca.com.au

TWEEZERMAN, i-glamour.com

13. Nail file, $6, MECCA MAX,

$16.95, TWEEZERMAN, i-glamour.com

“I wear an LED headlamp for when I really need to see details clearly while painting nails.” 10. 7 LED Headlamp, $10, TACTICAL, anacondastores.com

“After clipping nails, I file and buff gently. I think shaping straight on the sides with a soft

“Most of my polishes are 10-free [without 10 toxic ingredients] and I use a non-acetone nail polish remover — it’s effective without the harsh chemicals.” 16. Non-Acetone Nail Polish Remover, $20, KESTER BLACK, adorebeauty.com.au

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“I would never use acids or retinoids” And other ballsy

ON OUR RADAR:

THE BIG CHILL Forget freezing your butt off in a sub-zero room – there’s an easier way to put the ageing process on ice

mantras by the doctor disrupting skincare

sculpts and boosts hydration. Our pick? The Cryo Energising Face Serum, which firms and refines the skin’s surface for a smoother look over time. For more instant results, try the latest release from celebrity aesthetician Kate Somerville. “Tight’N Cryogenic Tightening Gel feels chilly when you apply it and this effect helps to visibly tighten the appearance of skin,” says Somerville, who recommends using it as a primer before foundation. The chilling effect also “crackles” on the skin, leaving your complexion taut as it warms. Cool, right?

Cryotherapy – three teeth-chattering minutes of standing in a chamber cooled to around -140°C – is lauded for its anti-ageing benefits, and now two new skincare products have harnessed those perks in a more tolerable, topical application. “Cold shocks the body, constricting blood vessels, tightening and firming the skin, and provides the best possible environment for collagen synthesis – key to the anti-ageing process,” explains Dr Yannis Alexandrides, a London-based Cryo Energising Face Serum, plastic surgeon and founder of 111Skin. $262, 111SKIN, “We looked at ingredients that would mecca.com.au mimic these benefits.” His research resulted in 111Skin’s Cryo collection, a product line that tightens,

Herbal Deodorant Roll-On, $35, AESOP, aesop.com/au

the sniff test

Tight’N Cryogenic Tightening Gel, $183, KATE SOMERVILLE, mecca.com.au

If an underarm rash is keeping you from fully extending in your yoga class, pesky razor burn may not be to blame, but rather irritation caused by a reaction to sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), a common ingredient in deodorant and antiperspirants, especially natural ones. The ingredient has a pH of nine (slightly alkaline), which can throw off the pH balance of skin (which usually sits around 5.5) and as a result make underarms uncomfortable. Since smelling fresh is workout (and general life) decorum, going without isn’t an ideal option either. Try these formulations that are baking-soda free, but still hold up in sweat sessions.

Natural Deodorant, $9.99, A’KIN, akin.com.au

Meet Dr Barbara Sturm, the orthopaedic doctor-turned-skincare guru with a cult following. Seventeen years ago, she began experimenting with the regenerative benefits of platelet-rich plasma, and her fascination with anti-ageing was born. Lucky us, because today Sturm spends her time mixing bespoke blood face cream (called MC1, it costs around $1,800... plus a trip to her practice in Düsseldorf) and formulating (more obtainable) products focused on skin healing --- particularly from inflammation. “It’s the foundation for all skin conditions: acne, eczema, rosacea...” she says. “My products contain ingredients to soothe, repair and hydrate.” In fact, you could say Sturm is just a little passionate about ingredients… among other things. FRAGRANCE AND MINERAL OIL SHOULD NOT BE IN SKINCARE. They irritate your skin. I hate them. I use as few ingredients as possible. I DON’T BELIEVE IN LASERS – AT ALL. Gentle light therapy is fine, but why would you burn the skin? If something hurts, it’s the body’s way of telling you to stop. ACIDS AND RETINOIDS ACCELERATE THE AGEING PROCESS. PERIOD. I would never use them, particularly in a climate like Australia. For exfoliation, I recommend a gentle scrub or my mask, which won’t compromise the integrity of healthy skin cells like acids do. QUESTION EVERYTHING. You can’t just buy into any claim on a jar. I want proof. I want science. I want studies. That’s the basis for each of my products. Face Mask, $212, Hyaluronic Serum, $423, both DR BARBARA STURM, mecca.com.au


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THE PIECE:

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Stocksy. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano. Model: Kelsey Martinovich at Kult. Model wears: top, $347, By Malene Birger, net-a-porter.com; briefs, $120, Matteau, matteau-swim.com

get lost

PH OT OG RAPH Y BY

A DRI A N P RI C E

Innate coolness runs strong in the Chloé DNA, and its latest fragrance is true to the bloodline. Suede touches, a feminine silhouette — the best details of the brand’s coveted handbags now cradle this understated floral. Combining earthy moss, sweet plum and freesia, it smells new yet comfortably familiar — a classic in the making.

Nomade, $140 for 50ml, CHLOÉ, 1800 812 663

PICK ’N’ MIX So, you’ve customised your phone case, your yoga mat and the blanket you take with you on the plane (our faves are from phile.com.au) – now what? Try making your mark with your signature lip colour. Pick your favourite from Guerlain’s Rouge G collection and you can also choose your preferred bullet out of 15 equally beautiful cases. It’s chic, dialled up to 11. Rouge G De Guerlain Exceptional Complete Lip Colour, $74 each, GUERLAIN, sephora.com.au


Michael Kors Collection

Alexander Wang

Ultra Lip Balm, $3.99, CHAPSTICK, terrywhitechemmart.com.au

Ultra Lip Balm SPF 50+, $3.95, BLISTEX, priceline.com.au

editor’s obsessions 1. ROAD TO PARADISE

What’s better than new-car smell? Diptyque car smell. Toss your hanging Christmas tree and clip on this chic diffuser that releases the brand’s iconic Figuier scent with every engine start. 2. LIGHT THE WAY

Combination skin standing in the way of a full- blown La Mer love affair? Try the newly formulated lightweight texture, which delivers the iconic Miracle Broth in a fresh, bouncy gel. 3. EYE FOR DETAIL

Inspired by colour-correcting banana powder, the makeup artist must-have, this cream is a brightening, fine line-busting

formula with a pale-yellow tint that works to conceal dark circles, too. 4. SLIM SHADY

The same cult Baume De Rose formula, now in a handier-than-ever stick shape. It’s like when you thought you couldn’t love chocolate any more, and then someone added peanut butter. 5. PASSION PROJECT

Armani’s Sì scent has been given a punch of pink pepper and cedarwood and a hot red dress for the occasion. Warning: it’s sexier than a Fifty Shades marathon, so wear at your own risk.

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1. Scented Insert in Figuier, $45, Car Diffuser, $73, both DIPTYQUE, mecca.com.au

2. The Moisturizing Cool Gel Cream, $242, LA MER, cremedelamer.com.au

3. Banana Bright Eye Crème, $55, OLE HENRIKSEN, sephora.com.au

4. Baume De Rose Crayon, $50, BY TERRY, mecca.com.au

5. Sì Passione, $149 for 50ml, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmani beauty.com.au

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Jason Lloyd-Evans; Instagram: @sammcknight1

Chanel

DNA Lip Balm, $19.90, DNA RENEWAL, dnarenewal.com.au

Chanel

We all have that friend who’s really good at hair. For Karl Lagerfeld, it’s Sam McKnight, the guru who oversees the hair direction at Chanel’s six annual collections. For the recent Métiers d’Art show, which traditionally showcases the craftsmanship involved in Lagerfeld’s complex designs, McKnight showed off his own intricate handiwork with a series of braids adorned with ribbons and brooches, which added an equal dose of sophistication and fun. So grab that friend and a ribbon, take a seat, request a fishtail or two (because unless you’re seriously ambidextrous, it’s near-impossible to do them on yourself) and revel in knowing you have both fabulous hair and a fabulous friend (much like Lagerfeld himself).

“Every person, at a certain age, says they have dry lips – particularly in Australia,” says dermatologist Dr Ronald Moy, who founded skincare brand DNA Renewal. “But it’s not dry lips, it’s actinic keratosis, which is basically sun damage – a crusty, scaly growth caused by damage from exposure to UV radiation.” His line is built around clever DNA-repair enzymes. “They work like a seamstress, fixing the torn fabric. They recognise rips in the DNA and repair it.” Moy works both in aesthetic medicine and the treatment of sun damage, so he has a unique perspective on protecting your largest organ and ensuring it looks its best. “Any skin cancer [around the lips] has a 10 per cent chance of metastasising to another area, so compared to a skin cancer on your cheek, it’s the worst place to get one,” he adds. TL;DR: don’t even think about not protecting your precious pout. Moy’s version includes ingredients to restore and prevent DNA damage, while Blistex and ChapStick use a high-grade SPF.

READ MY LIPS

Chanel

adorned plaits

Alexander Wang

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THIS IS A THING:

Michael Kors Collection

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LIQUID ENVY NEW PURE COLOR

Matte. Metallic. Vinyl.

esteelauder.com.au

Pure Color Envy Paint-On Liquid LipColor on Hilary, Juiced Up. On Carolyn, Wine Shot. On Fei Fei, Shameless. © 2018 Estée Lauder Inc.


Healthy hair is always in style, no matter what your age. In celebration of Mother’s Day, we’re applauding new tech that prevents extreme heat damage and protects natural shine. Meet the power tool making this season’s hottest hair reboot happen – the Dyson Supersonic™ hair dryer

KNOW YOUR ROOTS

NEW TWIST Free-flowing curls give youthful energy to every face. Shake out wet natural waves or hot-rolled hair with the Dyson diffuser nozzle to stimulate natural drying around each curl and defy frizz.


AHEAD OF THE CURVE The bigger the barrel of your round brush, the looser your wave. The Dyson styling concentrator focuses a strong blade of air that styles each section fast.


“MUM’S GOT THE INSPO, YOU BRING THE INNOVATION” Shop the special limited-edition Mother’s Day Dyson Supersonic™ hair dryer in red, $549, at participating retailers and at dyson.com.au/supersonic

LAID-BACK LUXE Clip on the Dyson smoothing nozzle for relaxed slink. The gentle, wide airflow helps smooth texture without flattening your hair’s natural movement and character.

Let’s start with Cindy Crawford and Kaia Gerber. Next? Bella and Gigi Hadid’s style sync with their model mother Yolanda. We’re not saying “mum hair” has quite the same ring to it as “mum jeans” does in fashion, but there’s no missing the redux going on right now – if you’re hunting for new hair inspo, find a few photos of your mamma working it back in the day. Fuse ’60s free-love curls with a shaken-out millennial vibe and you’ve got Acne Studios’ latest runway look. Picture Chrissie Hynde’s easy rock’n’roll texture with youthful lushness and you’re on the neo-’70s trend. Recharging the best looks in Mum’s hair album is as 2018 as it gets. Good hair never gets “old” – not if you treat it respectfully. So this is no throwback. Call it a flash-forward: we’re reworking iconic looks with new tech that helps to prevent extreme heat damage while protecting your hair’s natural shine, whatever your age. Tool of the moment? The Dyson Supersonic™ hair dryer, which took four years and 103 engineers, scientists and stylists to fine-tune. Rather than blowtorch hair into submission, the Dyson Supersonic™ intelligently controls the heat – no scorching extremes. Never known what to do with dials? The hair dryer’s glass bead thermistor monitors output and adjusts the temperature 20 times per second. Meanwhile, amplified by patented Air Multiplier™ technology, that gentleon-hair air is pressurised into a high-velocity jet, angled at a precise 20 degrees, so it dries, styles and sets hair quicker than ever. Better, faster, kinder. Mother will be impressed – she’s got the inspo, you bring the innovation.


hair ial spec ’18

THE ELLE GUIDE

TO BETTER

HAIR

THE CUTS, COLOURS, NEVER-FAIL PRODUCTS AND

QUICK TRICKS YOU NEED TO KNOW TO

BE MASTER OF THE MANE

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Anja Rubik at Saint Laurent

hair ial spec ’18

GLOBAL HAIRARCHY Take inspiration from the hair pros setting the style standards around the world

MEET OUR EXPERTS

REMINGTON SCHULZ, SYDNEY STYLIST AT EDWARDS AND CO AND PANTENE HAIR AMBASSADOR Celeb clients: Erin Holland, Anna Heinrich, Elle Ferguson

ADAM REED, LONDON STYLIST AND CO-OWNER OF PERCY & REED Celeb clients: Sophie Dahl, Ellie Goulding, Diane Kruger

JUSTINE MARJAN, LOS ANGELES TRESEMMÉ GLOBAL STYLIST Celeb clients: Ashley Graham, Khloé Kardashian, Lily Aldridge

WENDY ILES, PARIS EDITORIAL STYLIST AND FOUNDER OF ILES FORMULA Celeb clients: Cheryl Cole, Heidi Klum, Keira Knightley

JAMES PECIS, NEW YORK EDITORIAL STYLIST AND ORIBE GLOBAL AMBASSADOR Celeb clients: Cara Delevingne, Daria Werbowy

THE WORLDWIDE FAVOURITE:

Zoë Kravitz

POLISHED BOB

Gold Professional Styler, $280, GHD, ghdhair.com/au Bella Hadid at Jason Wu

POPULAR IN: New York, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Sydney Women around the globe are embracing a shorter length, with the bob the most coveted style in every city. “It makes clients feel instantly polished and put together,” explains Schulz, who says Sydneysiders love the ease of shorter hair, especially in the city’s warmer climate. Parisian women don’t toe the line with a lob, adds Iles. “They take it shorter and it just works better.” In New York, it’s the perfect cut to “make a strong statement,” says Pecis, while in LA and London, it’s all about keeping ends sharp and blunt. STYLE NOTES: A protein-packed conditioner is an essential (it’ll keep split ends at bay), while styling products should coax out shine and minimise frizz. When styling, Marjan suggests prepping strands with a smoothing, heat-protecting spray, then blow-drying with a round brush for a bit of body. Once dry, finish with passes of a flat iron, moving in “paper-thin horizontal sections,” she says. >

us, both Schulz and

Haute Performance Finishing Serum, $69, ILES FORMULA, morphhaircare.com.au

Pecis

ro you’re feeling adventu g,” says Pecis, DO YOU DARE? If erating and cleansin

“It’s lib r-short, shaved cuts. mainstream in are inspired by supe zzed strands become bu e for be g lon be ultimate hair icon, who believes it won’t dits Zoë Kravitz as his cre lz hu Sc rk. Yo New ed cuts. refreshingly #woke nt for stand-out, cropp admiring her pencha

3 Minute Miracle Conditioner Daily Moisture Renewal, $6.99, PANTENE, 1800 028 280


Gigi Hadid at Isabel Marant

hair ial spec ’18 Detangling Hairbrush, $16.95, WETBRUSH, i-glamour.com

“I THINK MINIMALISTIC ACCESSORIES WILL BE THE NEXT BIG TREND. Think beautiful fine-leather headbands and bobby pins made of gold, which have a subtle, simplistic hint of class. Less is more.” — ADAM REED

THE LOOK WITH LENGTH:

EFFORTLESS LAYERS

Karlie Kloss at Brandon Maxwell

Curl Gloss Hydration & Hold, $54, ORIBE, 1300 725 122

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THE HOT HUE:

PLATINUM

POPULAR IN: Sydney, across the US Platinum blonde is the It-hue, with Schulz “obsessing” over the colour, particularly when warmed with a champagne toner. “It has to be done carefully, but can give a cool street-style look,” he says. Marjan agrees the icy hue, popular among celebs, has never looked better. “It’s finally being done with more care and hair is looking healthy and fresh,” she says. STYLE NOTES: Treat processed hair with a little extra TLC by opting for gentle, colourspecific hair products. A weekly sudsing with a purple shampoo will also neutralise brassiness and keep the look salon-fresh.

Round Brush 3, $115, R+CO, 1300 725 122 Curve Classic Wave Wand, $230, GHD, ghdhair.com/au

THE SUITS-EVERYONE SNIP:

CURTAIN FRINGE

Really Rather Radiant Divine Shine Shampoo, $30, PERCY & REED, sephora.com.au

POPULAR IN: Sydney, London, Paris A face-framing fringe is a flattering, low-maintenance option that is ideal if committing is an issue. “They’re easy to grow out,” explains Schulz. The wispy pieces are a signature of Iles’ haircuts. “I like to give a client bangs that hit at the chin or cheek — they have become my trademark,” she says. “It just adds such personality to any cut and is a great element to play with for the camera.” Even if you’re only shooting selfies, Reed says it gives any length of hair a “Parisian chic” touch that’s “beautiful, soft and feminine”. STYLE NOTES: Schulz recommends blow-drying with a medium round brush to smooth – but be wary of creating too much volume, as it will end up looking retro. > Suki Waterhouse at Alexander Wang

Wave Spray, $40, OUAI, sephora.com.au

POPULAR IN: New York, Los Angeles, Paris “My celebrities all love length in their hair,” says Iles, who isn’t afraid to give clients a snip on set, cutting in graduation and long layers. Marjan seconds the importance of a quality trim to lay the style’s foundation. “Make sure hair is cut with a razor and weight is taken out with thinning shears so the ends have a lot of movement,” she says. “Your facial features should be your guide, shaping in regard to your cheekbones, lips and collarbones.” STYLE NOTES: This look is best played to your natural texture. If you’ve got some wave, prep damp strands with a curlenhancing product, dry with a diffuser and enhance the bend with a curling wand. Poker-straight hair? Opt for the ghd Curve tong – the flat oval shape is insurance against dated barrel curls.

Really Rather Radiant Divine Shine Conditioner, $30, PERCY & REED, sephora.com.au

Jaime King

Supersonic, $549, DYSON, dyson.com.au

Large Metallic Slides, $9.99 for six, LADY JAYNE, ladyjayne.com.au

ck – finally,” erms are coming ba re re who would like mo all the people out the for e ar y es he av “T . W cis nt. Pe me says ost move or a chill wave to bo bounce and volume, trend and I know we ing go on the biggest and curls have been coming into play.” will see more perms

GIVE IT A CURL “P


THE TEXTURISER “I love this for creating volume and hold that looks lived-in and cool, not fluffy.” – Michele McQuillan, editorial stylist

Dry Texture Spray, $49.95, MOROCCANOIL, 1300 437 436

ONLY THE BEST

Australia’s top stylists build the perfect kit. You – and your great hair – can thank them later Free Styler Working Hairspray, $63, ORIBE, 1300 725 122

THE HAIRSPRAY

“TRENDS ARE COMING FROM POP CULTURE and ’80s and ’90s fashion. In LA, people are willing to take risks and are less likely to care what others think, so there’s a lot of fun to be had.” – JUSTINE MARJAN

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Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

“It’s a super-light, non-sticky hairspray that’s easy to use. I like hair that moves and looks free.” – Lok Lau, editorial stylist


“This conditioning spray was honed by stylists working backstage, so you know it’s weightless, flexible and versatile. I use it when I want a little volume and invisible hold in a blow-dry, and it never goes greasy. It also reverses styling products that might already be in the hair, like salt spray or hairspray, so in that way it’s a great refresher for second-day hair.” – Travis Balcke, editorial stylist

THE VOLUMISER “They’re like injecting oxygen and force into hair.” – David Mallett, celebrity hairstylist

Spray No.2: Le Volume, $54, DAVID MALLETT, david-mallett.com.au

“I apply it to freshly washed hair, then blow-dry and style it. It takes away the softness and shine and adds a cool matte texture.” – Paloma Rose Garcia, owner of Sydney’s Oscar Oscar Salon

Matte Waves Texture Lotion, $64, ORIBE, 1300 725 122

THE CURL ESSENTIAL “Without a doubt, my favourite product is the YS Park Titan Mesh Diffuser. It dries hair in a natural way, allowing the curl to form without frizz.” – Alan White, editorial stylist

Leave-In Conditioning Spray, $50, BALMAIN PARIS HAIR COUTURE, balmainhaircouture.com.au

THE STRAND REVIVER Instant Volumizing Mist With Rose Water, $49, CHRISTOPHE ROBIN, adorebeauty.com.au

Supersonic, $549, DYSON, dyson.com.au

THE HAIRDRYER

Words: Xxxxxxxxxxxxx. Photography: Xxxxxxxxxxxx (still-life)

THE PREP STEP

hair ial spec ’18

Volume Powder, $52, DAVID MALLETT, david-mallett.com.au

THE MULTI-TASKER

“It’s genius. Some hairdryers can reach extreme temperatures, which can cause heat damage to hair, but the Supersonic has intelligent heat control, which helps protect hair and promotes natural shine.” – Renya Xydis, owner of Sydney’s Valonz

“I’m such a fan of rosewater and would bathe in it if I could. I have this bottle of goodness in my kit as my go-to for revitalising limp hair that needs a natural pick-me-up. It gives the roots that natural lift, but without feeling like it’s too ‘beached’, and it creates that Parisian-girl vibe that always appears effortless.” – Anthony Nader, owner of Sydney’s RAW Anthony Nader

Titan Mesh Diffuser, $49, YS PARK, alanwhite-anthology.com

THE SHOWER SAVIOUR

Re Store Repairing Cleansing Treatment, $54.95, KEVIN MURPHY, 1800 104 204

“This product, which is similar to an old-school ‘two-in-one’, eliminates the need to shampoo and condition every time you want to freshen up hair. So it prevents stripping away natural oils, which makes hair more prone to static and flyaways.” – Michael Kelly, master colourist at Edwards And Co

THE SMOOTHING OIL “This adds shine and definition while also eliminating frizz. The oil is intensive yet light, so it suits even those with thinner hair who wouldn’t normally opt for an oil-based product.” > – Xydis LuxeOil Reconstructive Elixir, $57.50, WELLA SYSTEM PROFESSIONAL, systemprofessional.com

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hair ial spec ’18

AIRHEAD

No styling tools, no problem Alexander Wang

HAIR APPARENT

Celeb favourite Renya Xydis has carved a career out of her ahead-of-the-game styles. We ask the Dyson ambassador to tell us what’s coming up next RETURN OF THE SHAG “I’m still a big fan of wavy layers, but for a fresh riff, trim shorter layers connecting from a grown-out fringe, giving it more of a shaggy look. It creates messy, undone textures that are a modern take on the shag haircut. Styling-wise for a wavy layer, I love a bend in a stretched-out wave – it’s a lot cooler than waves from top to bottom. Think effortless, think cool.”

SHORT GOES SHORTER “Shorter hair is the next big thing. A beautiful cropped, round bob can be chic and very sexy on a lot of women – no matter what, women want to look sexy.”

THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE YOU

STATEMENT COLOUR

, Margot

absolutely no-one

THE 2 with capsulates ever d sleek, or messy al golden bob en rsatile: smooth an Robbie’s ethere ve or is n at bu th t w lo cu t a ck in ing a grea n be tied up or ba ca t now. “She’s rock cu a er ny “H To s. I, di e r th re,” says Xy created for her fo bends and textu the face (what I nd roots ou ar -in s ed es liv ftn ith so w knot with a lour is spot-on co er H ). re ie hful and glowy.” Australian prem keeping her yout s, ne to y ne ho en fading into gold

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Margot Robbie

SE In a surprise to hing #goals about hair right 018 HAIR MU yt

Wonder Worker Blow Dry Perfector, $47, SHU UEMURA ART OF HAIR, adorebeauty.com.au Don’t Blow It (Thick), $45, BUMBLE AND BUMBLE, mecca.com.au

No Blow Dry Just Right Cream, $34.95, REDKEN, redken.com.au

MoistRepair Revival Creme, $31.95, KMS, 1800 506 060

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr; Victoria DiPlacido. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Jem Mitchell; Paul Musso; Getty Images; Jason Lloyd-Evans; Cibelle Levi Photography

GO NATURAL

1. A GOOD CUT AND COLOUR ARE KEY. Whatever your style is, make sure you maintain it. Tell your stylist to keep the shape in proportion (they’ll know what that means). 2. LET HAIR PART NATURALLY. “Not forcing your part adds a prettiness to it,” Palau says. “When you force your part, the look becomes [too considered].” 3. TROUBLESHOOT. If your hair tends to frizz, Palau suggests roughly blow-drying just the top layer to smooth it out. Fine hair can be twisted up when it’s still damp and pinned until dry for natural movement “without too much order to it”. E

Alexander Wang

“We’ll see creamier blondes, with natural, lived-in roots. Lots of honeys and golden tones can look really great, but it has to be on the right skin tone. Reds, coppers and strawberry tones are making a big statement, and I think it’s now their turn. For brunettes, I love rich, shiny, glossy shades. Smoky, deep caramel tones fading from a dark root will be a big hit. It’s also great for girls who naturally have dark hair and want to transition from dark to light gradually, as that’s the best way to not compromise the hair condition.”

A shiny, bouncy blowout was arguably the luxury hair symbol of the late 2000s and early 2010s. But the cultural cachet of a $50 blow-dry isn’t quite what it used to be, says Guido Palau, hairstylist and global creative director for Redken. “At one time, a great blow-dry felt super-rich,” he says. “Now, there’s a new luxury: shampooed hair left to dry naturally.” Palau is just one of many stylists who have been cutting back on styling tools – and, with it, uniformity. “We’ve become so accustomed to grabbing a curling iron that we’ve forgotten what natural hair looks and feels like,” he says. Marjan agrees: “We’ll continue to see more people embracing texture in their hair – big hair, natural hair and individuality in beauty.” Call it the hair equivalent of the no-makeup makeup trend, with a slew of new products designed to make shower-and-go possible. But this look isn’t meant to be prescriptive, says Palau. “I’m not saying you shouldn’t use styling tools; it’s important to have options.”


Time to shine this Mother’s Day

Special gift edition At the heart of the Dyson Supersonic™ hair dryer is the Dyson digital motor V9, producing a jet of focused air, designed for fast drying and controlled styling. Now with a special edition red presentation case.

Powerful digital motor. Designed for fast drying. dyson.com.au/supersonic


BALANCING

ACT MOOD, HUNGER, SEX, SLEEP –

HORMONES HAVE A HAND IN IT ALL. AS THE WELLNESS INDUSTRY BECOMES MORE BESPOKE, HORMONAL HEALTH IS THE LATEST FRONTIER. HANNAH NATHANSON GETS A TASTE OF THIS

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NEW ERA OF MEDICINE

Hormones make good headlines: “Can’t park the car? Blame your hormones”; “Want to buy sexy clothes? It might be your hormones.” They’re an easy target – we all know their influence on our mood. But hormone health is far more nuanced than hyperbolic headlines would have you think. To get the science bit out of the way, hormones are the body’s chemical messengers produced by glands: they trigger activity in different parts of the body and regulate the function of cells and organs. There are sex hormones, hunger hormones, love hormones and stress hormones (among others). If these are out of whack, it could cause a number of ailments, from insomnia to burnout to bloating. “Hormones are the foundations to your body,” integrative medical specialist Dr Sohère Roked says. “If your hormones aren’t right, it doesn’t matter what you’re doing with your diet and lifestyle. But if we can get the foundations right, everything flows better.” As a health-conscious person who has guzzled the green-juice Kool Aid, I realise that, at age 31, I’m spectacularly unaware of my own hormones. I’ve been on the pill for 10 years and I’m beginning

to notice changes in my body and my mood that I don’t feel in control of. Of course, age plays a big part. It’s only since I turned 30 that I started experiencing weight gain around my middle and mood swings that make my boyfriend run and hide. “Our hormones start to decline from about 27 onwards,” says Roked. “And it’s more complicated in women: too much progesterone and you feel moody, sluggish and tired, but if you have too little, you feel the same as well – it’s about getting the optimum level.” Roked had sown the seed: I want to find my perfect hormonal balance. After a blood test to measure my testosterone (important for women’s mood, sex drive and muscle strength), I leave with an adrenal stress kit. Adrenals are glands that sit above your kidneys and produce the stress hormone cortisol, which is linked to the body’s fight-or-flight response. When your adrenal glands are malfunctioning, you’ll notice symptoms such as tiredness and an inability to handle stress. The kit consists of four saliva collection tubes and some very complicated instructions. I’m both intrigued and terrified of what the results will reveal. Do I really want to know? Hormonal health is a growing area of medicine and part of the wellness trend for more bespoke treatments. “You can get a cheek swab and find out the best diet for your body,” says Roked, who offers genetic testing at her practice. “You can also see how your


Photography: Bjarne X Takata/Trunk Archive

HORMONE HACKS

body metabolises hormones, so you can use this and is fascinated by hormones. “Do you want a dopamine hit?” she asks information to determine if you need a supplement.” She’s not too concerned that, thanks to the cost during our session, as I follow her into involved, these tests aren’t exactly available to the ADAPTOGENS a cross-legged seated pose that masses. “In 10 years, it’s not going to be so These plant supplements, including involves stretching up, letting my head expensive – everybody will be getting it done. ashwagandha, maca and ginseng, fall, inhaling and opening my mouth Personalised healthcare will be the way forward.” help balance hormone levels, while sticking my tongue out as far as I wake up at 6am the next day to prepare for the increase energy and boost I can. I feel stupid, but then I feel the first saliva sample (one hour after waking and without general wellbeing. rush. “A large number of dopamine food or drink). Spitting into vials is far from glamorous, but receptors are in the mouth, which is why eating I pop them in the freezer to post to the lab at the end of comforts us,” she explains the day. Meanwhile, I start to research other Central to Cowan’s practice is our ability to “land in the areas of health linked to hormones and learn present, where you’re not guarded, not pretending, not *** that gut health is huge. According to worried – you’re still”. Through a series of postures, BROCCOLI AND nutritional therapist Eve Kalinik, 95 per cent MUSTARD POWDER breathing and stretching, she shows me how to do just of serotonin, the key hormone affecting this. She says when people come into her classes, their Boost broccoli’s powers with mood, is produced in your gut. “The gut bodies are filled with adrenaline, cortisol and mustard powder. Kalinik says testosterone. She aims to stimulate happy hormones is involved in many hormone-related to add the powder to conditions that might be felt far from the gut vinaigrette and drizzle such as dopamine and serotonin, our body’s natural itself,” she says. “We often think of thyroid it over broccoli. antidepressants that counteract stress hormones. hormones as being in the thyroid gland, but in fact Hooked on the high that is this newfound calmness, 20 per cent of them get converted in the gut, which has I meet with sound therapist Louise Shiels. Sound a massive impact on our metabolism.” therapy works by inducing calm brainwaves that *** put your body in repair mode. “We’re normally in Kalinik has dedicated a whole chapter to hormones THE RABBIT POSE beta mode – the active mind,” she says. “When in her book Be Good To Your Gut, which explores how we slow down, we go into alpha, then we go supporting the gut, and the trillions of microorganisms Like child’s pose, but with arms into theta brainwaves when we’re drifting off in it, can help achieve a “happy hormonal balance”. stretched back to hold your feet and your chin tucked into your I ask if there are any superfoods that help hormone to sleep. When these are activated, the chest. It stimulates the thyroid health. “Brassicas, such as broccoli, cauliflower and parasympathetic nervous system is switched kale,” she says. “They contain a compound that helps on, which is responsible for controlling all the gland to create a sense the body to metabolise oestrogen.” But Kalinik says you body’s systems.” During the hour-long session, of balance. we lie under blankets while Shiels plays the gongs. can’t just rely on adding a little extra broccoli to heal the gut. At one point, I peek open my eyes to see what’s going on “You need to have a healthy gut to reap the benefits.” Avocados – everyone is still and very zen. There’s a crescendo towards the are another hormone-happy food. “They contain good levels of the end before Shiels dings chimes to break the gong frequencies and pantothenic acid our adrenals need, but it only works to a point.” bring us back to earth. It’s one of the best hours I’ve spent all week To help manage my stress – and hunger – levels, Kalinik and makes me finally feel calm about my blood test results suggests I eat in a calmer environment and not at my desk. It turns out I could do with a lot more gong baths. Roked tells “Often, we wolf down our food and still find ourselves hungry, or we need a coffee,” she explains. “We just haven’t me my cortisol levels are elevated in three out of the four allowed enough time for our hunger hormones to samples, and off the scale in the morning. “High cortisol kick in and tell us we’ve had enough.” levels can’t be sustained and are often a precursor to *** But there are ways to influence your adrenal fatigue,” the results say. In contrast, my OHHHHHHM hunger hormones that don’t involve food, testosterone levels are low, which Roked explains Skip the chanting in your such as sleep and the time of day you could be due to the pill and elevated cortisol. “Doing yoga class? You could be exercise. Kalinik suggests working out first things like intermittent fasting, strength training and missing out. Chanting stimulates thing in the morning to “support glucose ensuring your diet has fat and protein is going to help the meridian points on the roof tolerance for more balanced blood-sugar your body make testosterone, which is very important of your mouth and helps management”. When it comes to exercise, for women – it gives you spark and get-up-and-go.” trigger serotonin and I decide not to get stressed about being officially dopamine. everyone I speak to says yoga is the best way stressed and something clicks. I’m much more in control, to minimise stress. According to Dr Amalia especially of lifestyle factors, than I think I am. Roked suggests trying Annaradnam of the London Hormone Clinic, “The people apaptogens (see top left), which I soon discover are the breakout who need to do yoga most are those who say, ‘Oh, I can’t relax in star on the wellness scene for their ability to lower stress and a yoga class, I can’t switch off.’ That’s why you need to do it! If you can’t switch off for an hour, that’s a problem.” promote balance. But mostly I’m glad I found out more about my So I find myself switching off with one of the most switched-on hormone levels. I definitely won’t take any notice of the shouty yoga teachers I’ve ever met. An ex-drug addict and alcoholic, headlines from now on. I’ll be too busy taking sound baths and getting my yoga-induced dopamine hits. E Carolyn Cowan has been a kundalini yoga teacher for 20 years

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OLD MEETS NEW: The hall runners are from West Elm and pendant lights from Sydney’s Cotton Love, while the pew is a local antique find

Backpack, $65, OLLI ELLA, olliella.com.au

PH OT OG RAPH Y BY

SE V A K B A B A KH A NI

HOME:

field trip

W ORD S BY

M O RGA N Z H A NG

A beautifully restored Tasmanian workers’ cottage makes for a chic home away from home for this Sydney-based family


Stool, $59, MATT BLATT, mattblatt.com.au

Vase, $16.99, IKEA, ikea.com/au

Print, from $120, BLACKLIST, blackliststore.com.au

TUCKED INTO THE ROLLING HILLS OF NORTHERN TASMANIA, entrepreneur

SETTING THE SCENE: This image by Stewart depicts the nearby Ben Lomond mountain, and his photos in the hallway (left) capture the farm in all four seasons

Lucy Hosken’s newly renovated, part-time residence redefines farmhouse living. Awash with light and a fresh, airy atmosphere, you would never guess that this white weatherboard cottage once lacked its quaint charm. Four years ago, when Lucy and her husband Stewart (who both grew up in nearby Launceston) and their children, Amelia and William, first stepped foot in the home, it was in obvious need of repair. But Lucy could see the potential. “We loved the character and bones,” she says. Determined to faithfully restore the cottage, the couple created a floor plan consistent with its idyllic setting. “We knocked down the shanty at the back of the house and rebuilt it into a modern space that allowed us and our guests to totally relax in the surroundings,” Lucy says. “I’d been collecting tear sheets of farmhouses and country escapes since high school, so I was thrilled to put all of that into play when we got our hands on the house.” >

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KIDS’ PARADISE: A picture on Pinterest led to the creation of the chic bunks, while the sweet chair used to belong to Lucy’s sister

Production: Amy Starr. Hair and makeup: Chaning Flaherty

Armchair, $839, HUDSON FURNITURE, zanui.com.au

Lucy relies on a clean, tonal colour palette and large windows to keep the home open and inviting. “Neutral colours work beautifully down here, as the surrounds are so lush and speak for themselves,” she explains. “I love using shades of beige, white and soft grey – they make me feel calm.” Reclaimed timber and natural fabrics add warmth to the space, while potted plants enliven each area with a burst of colour. Also helping to link the interior with the natural surroundings are the images of wheat, wild poppies and grass seed, all captured by Stewart, that line the walls. “His photographs give a really moody and honest feel to the house,” says Lucy. The custom bunk beds were something Lucy has always dreamt of, and with the cottage doubling as a boutique luxury accommodation known as Quamby Home (quambyhome.com.au) when the family return to their Sydney base, they also provide plenty of extra sleeping space. But Lucy says it’s not actually her favourite spot. “I love lying on the daybed on a sunny day, reading. It’s quiet, warm and I can look out the windows.” The overall effect is a space that’s simple and serene but still family-friendly – just what the couple intended. “This renovation allowed us to do what we had planned for years,” says Lucy. “My passion is styling and decorating, so for me this project was a dream come true.” E


PALE FORCE: A lamp from Pottery Barn and linen from Hale Mercantile Co and IKEA maintain the cool, understated tones

Pendant light, $219, TEMPLE & WEBSTER, templeandwebster.com.au

“We wanted the house to fit in with the Tasmanian backdrop and be a place that was calming”

Rug, $249, IKEA, ikea.com/au

Sofa, $2,200, MCM HOUSE, mcmhouse.com

Duvet cover, from $280, IN BED, inbedstore.com

Chair, $195, MATT BLATT, mattblatt.com.au Cushion, $180, BARNABY LANE, barnabylane.com.au

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THEY MAY NOT BE SATURATING YOUR INSTAGRAM FEED – YET – BUT THESE

INCREDIBLE CORNERS

TRAVEL:

OF THE WORLD ARE WORTH CHECKING IN TO, ASAP

DESTINATION NEXT You no doubt fell in love with the beauty of Italy’s Ischia in the 1999 film The Talented Mr Ripley, but despite the glistening endorsement, the island still only receives a fraction of the tourists that descend upon its southern neighbour, Capri. They don’t know what they’re missing. If you want to party, the northcoast towns of Ischia Porto and Ischia Ponte are dotted with flash hotels and nightclubs. For culture lovers, the north-west town of Lacco Ameno has two excellent museums with prehistoric finds and ceramics from the island’s early civilisation. And if you want to chill out, the southern town of Sant’Angelo is all idyllic sandy beaches and natural hot springs, with a zero-car policy to protect the peace.

ISCHIA 158

ITALIAN HOLIDAY: L’Albergo Della Regina Isabella and Albergo Il Monastero (left) offer postcard-perfect views

Fancy spending the night in a 16thcentury monastery atop a precipitous rock in the sea? Reached by a causeway from Ischia Ponte, then up in a lift cut into the rock, the 20-room Albergo Il Monastero hotel (albergoilmonastero.it) mixes spartan features with cool interiors and abstract paintings. Or if ornate majolica tiling, pastel palettes and hot tubs on the balcony is more your vibe, L’Albergo Della Regina Isabella (reginaisabella.com) could be for you – the 128 rooms are so luxurious that Hollywood couple Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton used to stay. Swim off a private beach, enjoy Michelin-starred Italian dining and spend time in the spa, indulging in its thermal baths and mineral mud wraps.


TWO TO TRY

EAT AND DRINK LIKE A STAR AT THESE CELEBFAVOURED ISCHIA SPOTS

RISTORANTE ALBERTO Kate Moss and Gwyneth Paltrow have both raved about the seafood here and we’re inclined to agree. The carpaccio lobster is excellent, but you must try the pasta taccozzette, which combines mussels, chocolate and zucchini to surprisingly good effect. albertoischia.it

MOMI BAY An unexpected island hideaway only a stone’s throw from our shores, the new Marriott Resort Momi Bay (marriott.com.au) can be found just a 45-minute drive from Fiji’s Nadi Airport. Opened a year ago, the resort is the only one on Viti Levu, the country’s largest island, with FOMOinducing overwater bungalows. It’s like you’re across the Indian Ocean in the Maldives, but without the jet lag (it’s only a four-hour flight from Sydney). Three large swimming pools dot the picturesque resort, including an adults-only infinity pool and spa at Fish Bar, as well as a main pool and piscine for the kids. You’re spoilt for choice with the dining scene, too. Local culinary offerings such as Kokoda (a traditional seafood dish), kava tasting and plenty of papaya are popular here, while coconut rum comes in spades at the Marriott‘s Goji Kitchen & Bar, where buffet-style Asian-fusion fare is served up for lunch and dinner, and an international buffet breakfast will keep you going all morning. Head to

the resort’s in-house bakery, Fiji Baking Company, for barista-style coffee if you’re one for flat-white withdrawals. Of the 250 rooms, there are 114 bure villas (22 are over water) and 136 deluxe rooms. A generously sized bath and bed take centrestage in a duplex bure, where a desk and speedy wi-fi are there if work beckons (although we know you’ll actually just use it to scroll through your social feeds in the tub). You’ll also score a private deck with a comfy outdoor lounge that has direct access to the lagoon, and a rain showerhead in the bathroom that’s (almost) as relaxing as a massage or facial at the resort’s Quan Spa. If you can bear to leave your room, fully immerse yourself in island life by taking in the breathtaking scenery on a helicopter ride. You’ll get a bird’s-eye view of the islands where The Bachelorette US (Vomo), Survivor (Mana Island) and Castaway (Akuila Tavi) were filmed. The highly ’grammable bright-blue landscape takes the sentiment “scenic route” to a whole new level. >

JANE DISCOTEQUE This boat-shaped beach bar is a landmark on the island and a notorious post-club drinking spot. With quality live music, the parties are so good that Mick Jagger has been known to pop in.

ZEN ESCAPE: Whether you opt for an overwater (top) or oceanfront bure (left), you’ll be in paradise

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RAJASTHAN The Indian state of Rajasthan captures the spirit of the country perfectly. While the more populous cities of Jaipur and Jodhpur have the bustling tourist calling cards covered, just over an hour’s flight away from either lies the “City of Lakes”, Udaipur, beckoning a slower pace with its old-world charm dating back to the 16th century. Think rambling streets filled with opulent palaces and havelis (traditional mansions), set amid a group of beautiful – but, if you can believe it, artificial – lakes, and backdropped by the hills of the Aravalli Range in the distance. The pièce de résistance of Udaipur’s architecture, the City Palace, harks back to the beginning of the city itself and, constructed almost entirely of granite and marble over 400 years, is a must-see for good reason. Once you’ve ticked it off your list, spend your days zigzagging through winding alleys, scoping neighbourhood bazaars and tasting native fare – local favourite Millets Of Mewar adopts a slow-food approach with its vegan and gluten-free dishes, while the more upscale Ambrai is the perfect place to take in the sunset lakeside. Contemporary art spot Bougainvillaea Art Gallery and the more traditional Shilpgram – a sprawling creative hub just a short drive west of the city – will give you your culture fill.

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PRIVACY SETTING: The lavish Amanbagh hotel (above) is set within a walled oasis

When it comes to five-star digs, Udaipur has its fair share, not least of which is Taj Lake Palace (taj.tajhotels.com), made famous by a cameo in 007 flick Octopussy. But for a less-hyped alternative, try the super-luxe Raas Devigarh (raasdevigarh.com), set in an 18th-century fortress in the Aravalli Range. It’s restrained in its design but with all the trimmings you’d expect – most suites have their own private balconies overlooking the frangipanilaced gardens and surrounding peaks. A 30-minute drive from the city centre, in the town of Bujra, lies Bujera Fort (bujerafort.com), a rose-coloured boutique hotel opened in 2015 at the hand of a British interior designer and, as such, impeccably furnished with a mix of both locally sourced and modern British wares. Take a bike tour of the surrounding region, or favour a G&T by the intricately tiled pool. If flying through Jaipur, a stay at Amanbagh (aman.com) – a two-hour drive from the city – is worth the bucket-list price tag, as one of the exclusive Aman Hotels’ only two outposts in India. Also joining the region’s luxury contingent later this year is Six Senses, set to open its doors in a 700year-old fort once owned by the Rajasthani royal family. Talk about geotag goals.

PERFECT MIX: Indian and British touches come together at Bujera Fort (above)


BEIRUT LIZA

bedrooms and a separate living area – but even the most standard of rooms is spacious by the city’s measures, at 40m2 minimum. While many have a private balcony or terrace, the vistas from those without are nothing to baulk at either, and the perfect place to take in the buzzing cityscape below. With an infinity pool boasting views out to the crystal waters of the Mediterranean and plenty of spots where you can enjoy a tipple, the rooftop is a huge drawcard. Sip on a sundowner in the Pool Lounge then, if your bedtime is past 9pm, venture back to Cherry On The Rooftop, the resident nightspot, before a nightcap at one of the many bars or clubs nearby, such as Iris and Skybar. In the morning, knafeh (a traditional pastry dish) or pancakes from downstairs cafe Gordon’s will cure any remnants of a hangover. The eatery sprawls out on the kerbside in a trés Parisian manner, backdropped by the meditative sounds of the Muslim call to prayer from nearby Mohammad Al-Amin Mosque (recognisable by its blue domed roof). Stretch your legs with a walk to nearby Beirut Souks, a chic shopping destination where you’ll find outposts from Balenciaga, Louis Vuitton and Chloé. By the time it comes to leave, you’ll wonder why a trip to one of the oldest cities in the world took you quite this long. >

THREE FOODIE DESTINATIONS NOT TO MISS

MAKE A SPLASH: Cool off at Beirut icon Sporting Club Beach

LEBAN-EATS

Both because of and despite the ghosts of Lebanon’s civil war (which came to an end just shy of three decades ago), much of Beirut has been immaculately rebuilt to the point that it’s often called the “Paris of the Middle East”. Though still very much a city in progress (and at times politically volatile, so as with any destination, always check official advice before planning your trip), the unique mix of its newfound character and old-world Levantine flair gives it a certain charm inimitable by any European destination. Just outside the city centre, the leafy streets of Gemmayzeh and Mar Mikhael aren’t short on concept bars, cafes, boutiques and galleries. Locals and tourists alike also take full advantage of the proximity to the Mediterranean Sea, regularly flocking to beaches and beach clubs. But for something a little less crowded, try nearby swimming pool Sporting Club Beach. The entrance fee of about $25 might seem steep, but the pay-off comes via the feeling of being transported to the pages of a Slim Aarons coffee-table book. In the Beirut Central District is Le Gray (lhw.com), the work of regarded hotelier Gordon Campbell Gray (also behind London’s One Aldwych and the dreamy Carlisle Bay Antigua) and part of The Leading Hotels Of The World group. There are 12 rooms and 75 suites in total – all the way up to the Presidential Suite, with its two

Imagine Wes Anderson took a jaunt across the Mediterranean Sea and you’ve got this superInstagrammable restaurant, serving up traditional mezzes (small plates) and signature dishes such as lamb shank confit, meatballs and citrus-spiced chicken. lizabeirut.com

AL FALAMANKI Locals play backgammon and smoke argileh (the Lebanese version of shisha or hookah) over traditional meals at this nostalgic cafe. When in Beirut… alfalamanki.com

BARON A modern Mediterranean restaurant that’s earned comparisons to London’s Nopi for its inventive but unfussy approach. baronbeirut.com

INS AND OUTS: Le Gray’s rooftop oasis, and (below) a chic suite

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If you ever needed a reason to go to Kyrgyzstan beyond the spectacular natural beauty of Song Kol Lake and the Mountains of Heaven, now you’ve got the World Nomad Games 2018. Athletes from more than 40 countries will compete in traditional nomadic sports such as horseriding, archery and eagle hunting in September. Meanwhile, Wild Frontiers’ 15-day Kyrgyzstan Explorer takes in the highlights of the country, including Tash Rabat and Song Kol Lake.

Kyrgyzstan’s isolated landscape

A courtyard in Fez, Morocco

KYRGYZSTAN

MOROCCO

A trip to this exotic destination just got easier thanks to a new internal flight route linking Marrakech and Fez, usually a sixhour drive apart. Adding to Marrakech’s ranks of swanky hotels, the Oberoi (oberoihotels.com), with 10 hectares of citrus orchards and olive groves, is opening soon. Fez is a medieval treasure, and the gateway to the less-explored north. Take a road trip from Fez to Tamuda Bay, home of a new Banyan Tree (banyantree.com), and with a RitzCarlton (ritzcarlton.com) and Chedi (ghmhotels.com) to come, this is set to be the new Moroccan beach hangout.

ZANZIBAR, TANZANIA

Look out for Zuri Zanzibar (zurizanzibar. com), which opens in May; the resort will have a beach within a large cove, resulting in a longer-lasting high tide than other local beaches (the tide goes out for hundreds of metres, meaning no swimming until it comes back). There’s a sustainability angle, too, with as many local products as possible used throughout the hotel.

TOM MARCHANT CO-FOUNDER OF BLACK TOMATO

CORN ISLANDS, NICARAGUA

These two islands, with their lush jungles, Creole culture, underwater worlds and the best lobster I’ve ever tasted, are the dream beach retreat. The opening of the ultra-exclusive, ultra-private Calala Island (calala-island.com) means guests can be Robinson Crusoe-d in style in luxe bungalow suites right on the beach.

TASMANIA

I’m pinning Tasmania as one to watch in 2018 – it has a thriving arts scene, hip foodie haunts and flavour-packed wines to rival those of the mainland. And the new MACq 01 Hotel (macq01.com.au) gives you a chic place to rest your head.

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO Named the World Design Capital for 2018, and renowned for its inventive food scene and architecture, Mexico City is at the top of many must-see lists. Its thriving arts environment is home to hot new designers, architecture tours and after-hours trips to galleries and artist collectives. E

Words: Elle McClure; Ally McManus; Holly Swayne. Photography: Getty Images; Marco Pinarelli; Ieva Saudargaite; Tracy Wong

Despite the beautiful mountains, epic scenery and ancient fortresses, Georgia was once almost off-limits, as getting there was such a hassle it put people off going. But now, Emirates flies from Sydney to the capital of Tbilisi via Dubai. Stay at Hotel Kazbegi in the mountains or Hotel Tbilisi in town (designhotels.com).

2018’s European Capital of Culture is, according to UNESCO, “one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world”, with beautifully preserved streets that are home to 320 designated monuments. This year sees more than 140 special projects and 400 events planned, but the biggest buzz is the opening of The Phoenicia, just outside the massive city gates. The latest project from Gordon Campbell Gray (also behind Beirut’s Le Gray), The Phoenicia has a threehectare garden and a stunning pool (campbellgrayhotels.com).

Zanzibar

Mt Kazbek, Georgia

GEORGIA

VALLETTA, MALTA

Coles Bay, Tasmania

JONNY BEALBY FOUNDER OF WILD FRONTIERS

TOM BARBER CO-FOUNDER OF ORIGINAL TRAVEL

Matemwe, Zanzibar

Three travel experts share the destinations they’re (wander)lusting after right now

Malta’s Blue Lagoon

THE INSIDER HIT LIST


ADVICE:

ask e jean

Tormented? Driven witless? Fear not, help is just a short letter away LOVE IN THE AGE OF INFLUENCERS

My man has become a public figure in the world of social media. He has strangers kissing his ass all day and women from all over the world propositioning him, which has inflated his ego to the point where I feel he doesn’t appreciate what he has (and he’s extremely lucky to have snagged a woman like me). I held out for love until I was 34. I wanted the kind of man who saw the best in me, and this was the man. We met last year and married secretly; he became famous, and my fairytale has now turned into a nightmare. On top of everything, he started an emotional affair with another woman, and I’m heartbroken. I don’t know what to do. If I leave him, I risk the possibility of not meeting someone else before it’s too late to have children. Besides, I don’t want to leave him – I love him! How do I forgive him when he’s starting to despise me because I haven’t been able to recover from his affair? He ignores me and escapes to the alternate universe of Instagram, where he’s perfect and loved by one and all. He doesn’t accept responsibility for the role he’s playing, which is destroying me – and us. I don’t want to give up on him and the future we imagined, but I don’t know where we go from here. How do I compete with his fame and this other world he inhabits? – UNSPECIAL IN HIS EYES Eyes, dear love First off, freeze your eggs. You can’t make a decision about staying with a “public figure”

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who’s “destroying” you if you’re compelled to keep one eye peeled on your own uterus. Now, my darling, advice columnists work as detectives. Each letter is a mystery, and we must comb through line by line, ignoring the red herrings (“he’s perfect and loved by one and all”) and rooting out the chumps, the glamour pusses and the dingbats (his followers on Instagram), and then zero in on the culprit and solve the problem. In short, I was admiring your Instagram when a trail of cryptic hashtags led me to the bloke you’re wedded to: an artist with 22,000 followers; a fantastically talented, handsome lad, I must say! So now I have the facts I’ve gone back and reread your letter, and I don’t want to go nuts here, but you can’t “compete” with him. Why? You’ve already won. Your big-time law

career, your extravagant beauty, the evidence you’re much richer than he is (make sure the house is in your name) and, on top of it all, your selfless charity work reveal you are the one who holds the cards, not him. I could leave it at that, but a second crime appears in your letter. There are 30,000 people in your marriage: you, him and your combined Instagram followers. The love between two personal brands constantly looking for “likes” will quickly turn to BS if you don’t limit the fairy dust and start seeing each other as human beings with flaws. He had an “emotional affair”. It hurts. But it’s not the end of the world. You can’t crowdsource forgiveness. So why don’t you end your secret marriage and try a second one with him for real?

YOUR NOSE IS DOING A JOB ON YOU

I’m in one helluva predicament. About a year-and-a-half ago, I was hit in the face by a tennis ball and it created a permanent lump on the tip of my nose, making it look wider and uneven. Most people didn’t notice, but it really bothered me, so about five months ago I decided to have it fixed by a plastic surgeon. I went to a certified surgeon who has won awards and who assured me that the fix would be “minor and

Q. I’m in love with a techierich guy who’s into first editions,

vinyl and vintage cars. How do I get him to commit? We’ve started getting sexual over text. Am I being too easy? Let me ask you a question: why does a rich man read first editions and drive vintage cars? Isn’t it because they are hard to get?

A.


Photography: Gregg Delman. Styling: Christian Stroble. Hair: Eduardo Carrasco at Ford Artists NYC. Makeup: Sylwia Rakowska at Ford Artists NYC

subtle and no-one will notice”, but the results are awful! It’s like half my nose is gone. And the tip is pinched. It looks completely different. Trust me – people notice. The impact on my life has been devastating. I’m having trouble at work and in my marriage because I cry so often. My self-confidence is destroyed. I cringe when I look in the mirror. And I’m scared to death of getting a fix in case it comes out even worse. How am I going to move past this? How can I forgive myself when I feel like I destroyed my face? Should I risk a second surgery when it was messed up by a professional the first time? How am I ever going to like what I see in the mirror again? – DEVASTATED BY REGRET, SHAME AND GUILT Miss Regret You’re blaming the wrong person! If the doctor made a bad job of it, it’s the doctor’s fault, not yours. Send me photos and let me take a look. Noses take at least a year to reveal their shape after surgery, so we won’t know for certain for seven more months. Until then, I advise you to say “to hell with it” and stop looking in the mirror. Enjoy looking at your husband for a change, and your co-workers. The other day I somersaulted over my dog, Lewis Carroll, and broke my own nose. It was two days before I saw my black eyes and the magnificent aubergine bulge on my schnoz, because I was on the greatest road trip of my life and filling my eyes with everything but myself. When I did notice it, I nearly crashed to the bathroom floor laughing, took about 180 pictures and sent them to my friends with captions that I cannot quote in this elegant magazine. My nose used to go to the left, now it goes to the right. So what? Nobody cares about my freakin’ nose.

I have sent you the name of the best plastic surgeon in my city. Seven months from now, if you still think your nose is “awful”, come here and we’ll drink oolong tea and eat little cakes. I’ll be liking my nose the way it is, you’ll be liking your redo, and together we shall present an appearance highly becoming to the beauty and wit of each. PS: I have just seen your photos. My God, woman! I want you to see a therapist asap. Not only are you beautiful, but you also possess a very beautiful nose. A few sessions with a counsellor will help you see yourself as you really are.

LOOKING FOR HAPPILY EVER AFTER

I’ve been with my boyfriend for four years – the happiest of my life. But when he started talking about buying engagement rings, I excused myself, stepped outside, called my old love, flew to his city and spent five days in bed with him! Now both men want to marry me! Who do I choose? – AM I TOTALLY INSANE? Insane, my love Why pick immediately? Let them fight for you. And enjoy them both as you make up your mind. (It may turn out to be neither chap.) – RAVISHING REGARDS, E JEAN E Jean! I was feeling panicked to decide straight away. Thank you for reminding me – giving me permission – to take my time. – GRATEFULLY AND HOPEFULLY LESS INSANE

TAKE THAT, ELITIST BOYFRIEND

My boyfriend is shocked when I don’t know a 17th-century historical event or an 18th-century philosopher. He sometimes belittles my taste in books and movies. Other times, he simply outshines me. We both took

exams to get into law school, for example, and he scored far better. He also landed a more lucrative job than I did upon graduating. We’ve been dating for a year. Since we met while we were studying – the occasions I have mentioned excepted – our relationship has been wonderful, respectful and loving. Yet I’m feeling a lack of confidence in my intelligence and accomplishments. Is it rational to feel this insecure? Or is my behaviour petty? – WHO IS SPINOZA, AGAIN? Spinoza, my sublime woman Of course your “behaviour” is “petty”. My God! Whose wouldn’t be? I, myself, am petty enough to bring the Advice Columnist’s Curse down upon your boyfriend. “Belittles” your taste, does he? Fie fie! May his jaws lock when he mocks your choice in books! May his bowels loosen when he hoots at your choix de films! May his nose run when he speaks to the boss at his “lucrative job” and finds he has no monogrammed hankie! You know 10 times more about certain topics than he knows (and 20 times more than I do – I looked you up, Miss Honours student!). The secret to gaining equal footing is to control the topics that you talk about. Next time the lad is shocked that you don’t understand one of his references, blast his frontal lobes with information about Mary Wollstonecraft or Artemisia Gentileschi. The insufferable twit only flits like a butterfly (and you only crawl at his feet like a caterpillar) because he controls a larger number of topics you discuss together and you’re a tad too concerned about appearing intelligent. Don’t be afraid of losing your dignity, and jump on him! Your confidence will come roaring like a polar bear. E ASK A QUESTION Tweet @ejeancarroll

PRIVACY NOTICE: This issue of ELLE is published by Bauer Media. Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media.com.au/privacy/ It also sets out how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000.

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With athleisure still going strong, so too are backpacks – and we’re coveting the Wave Backpack Mini from Tod’s. Crafted in Italy from smooth calf leather, it’s detailed with the brand’s signature “pebbles” for a cool texture, while the pretty pink hue will add a flirty touch to this season’s updated tracksuits. $2,475; (02) 8203 0901

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From bestselling author Madeline Miller comes the can’t-put-down new novel, Circe. A story of an outsider forced to make it on her own, the tale gets a mythical twist thanks to its ancient Greek setting where gods rule. Despite the historical context, the themes are just as relevant today: love, loss and a celebration of female strength. $29.99; bloomsbury.com/au

PANTENE Voted haircare Product of the Year, Pantene’s 3 Minute Miracle Conditioner Daily Moisture Renewal promises to help repair three months of damage in just three minutes. The secret? The conditioner penetrates deeply, locking in moisture and packing hair with antioxidants to revive strands and protect against further damage. Genius. $6.99; pantene.com.au

Flawless Liquid Foundation,

CALVIN KLEIN JEANS

$39.95, Flawless Concealer, $24.95; nudebynature.com.au

Dark denim is having a moment, and this Calvin Klein Jeans slim-fit shirt is an easy way to buy into the look. Straight from the brand’s American classics-themed SS18 collection, team it with tailored jeans or an A-line skirt for a modern take on the double-denim trend of the ’90s/late ’00s. $230; calvinklein.com/au

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LADY JAYNE Fish and chips, Dolce and Gabbana, Kath and Kim... some things just work better when they’re together, including this clever Vaddle brush from Lady Jayne. Combining a vent and paddle brush, the unique two-in-one creates volume and movement effortlessly, while ionic bristles help to reduce frizz – perfect for thick and long hair. $27.99; ladyjayne.com.au

DYSON Red symbolises power, so it’s the perfect colour choice for the Dyson Supersonic and matching case. What sets the hairdryer apart is its high-speed, fast-drying motor, which offers supercharged airflow while also preventing heat damage and protecting natural shine. And with the motor in the handle, you’ll have unparalleled control for styling made easy. $549; dyson.com.au

Backpacks, balms and innovative brushes: these are your April essentials


W ORD S BY

ASTRO:

ARIES MAR 21 – APR 20

A SH L E Y O T E RO

THE START OF THE MONTH OFFERS INSIGHT INTO THE WAY YOU COMMUNICATE. WHAT YOU SAY WILL HOLD MORE WEIGHT THAN USUAL, BUT THE ADAGE “ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS” STILL RINGS TRUE. IF YOU WANT TO MAKE A LASTING IMPRESSION ON OTHERS, THIS WILL BE THE TIME. THE NEW MOON ON APRIL 16 WELCOMES YOU TO LEAD BY EXAMPLE WHEN IT COMES TO SLAYING BOTH PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL GOALS. AN UNEXPECTED TURN OF EVENTS COULD CALL FOR A CHANGE IN DIRECTION, BUT YOU’LL ALSO FIND YOURSELF MAKING LARGE LEAPS TOWARDS SUCCESS.

TAURUS

APR 21 – MAY 21 This month, long-term planning will make distant goals tenable, and the best days to set aside for organising are April 7, 11 and 29. There will also be a turning point in a partnership, particularly around April 14, 17 and 30. Whether you decide to get hitched, travel or delve into spiritual matters, expect relationships to move to the next level. By month’s end, the sun will be in your sign, encouraging you to engage in more self-care and be mindful of your mental expenditures as you seek to reach your elevated goals.

Illustration: Tanya Cooper at The Illustration Room

GEMINI

MAY 22 – JUN 21 Potential partnerships and favours await this month, but you’ll be expected to offer something in return. Negotiations will help bring action to your hopes and dreams, although be prepared to make some adjustments because you won’t have all the information you need until after Mercury stations direct on April 15. Tensions could arise with others on April 4, 5 and 25, and don’t be surprised if you realise that what you wanted isn’t worth the work or expense required. Consider making a move to join forces with a resourceful colleague after April 24.

CANCER

JUN 22 – JUL 23 April’s astrology will encourage you to look closer at blocks in communication with loved ones and colleagues. Are you taking pressures from work out on an intimate partner? Or are your home troubles influencing your work? If you want your voice to be heard, rise above the drama and channel that passion into more functional arrangements. The new moon on April 16 will be a chance to make nice with enemies, creating new allies.

LEO

JUL 24 – AUG 23 Your reputation for practical choices will earn you favour at work as Venus anoints you with prestige. Put an “X” on April 7, 11, 17 and 29 to remind yourself that a little grace will go a long way and a raise could be just around the corner. While you have an enviable work ethic, more mediation will be needed at home around April 17 and 30. Be prepared for an end-of-month full moon to spill light on shadows waiting to be addressed.

VIRGO

AUG 24 – SEP 23 Exchanges of all kinds will be highlighted, making it important not to skim over the details while Mercury is retrograde until April 15. Also, be cautious of

how much you promise others. While you’re no doubt looking forward to free time, creative endeavours may have to be put on the backburner as you work to fulfil previous agreements.

LIBRA

SEP 24 – OCT 23 April begins with an opportunity to air out issues with a loved one, but it will take real effort to keep things civil as Mercury clashes with Mars and Saturn throughout the month. Be mindful of your triggers, particularly around April 4, 5, 11 and 25. On April 16, the new moon arrives with sudden changes at work and home. Your gaze will shift to various new interests that are awaiting over the horizon.

SCORPIO

OCT 24 – NOV 22 April revolves around a hefty schedule, with many tasks to tick off. The next few weeks also offer the chance to embrace more direct communication with family and friends. If you want to dig into the details of a partnership, take advantage of the free-flowing energy that supports open conversation on April 7, 11, 17 and 29. You can expect tension in your relationships during the full moon on April 30, but the ball will be in your court.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV 23 – DEC 22 Your motto is: work smarter, not harder. A little bit of efficiency and planning with daily routines will go a long way over the next few weeks. Although you may wish you could spend more time doing what you love instead of working, think practically until Mercury stations direct on April 15. Don’t be surprised if you find the joy zapped out of activities or a creative project fizzling out before that time.

CAPRICORN

DEC 23 – JAN 20 Power is pulsing through your veins this month. Your focus will be intense, which is great for personal projects and fitness goals, but it could cause conflict at home. Although family issues will require your attention on April 4, 5, 11, 18 and 25, a sincere conversation could turn things around on April 15. Consider the new moon on April 16 an invitation to review things that aren’t working in your life.

AQUARIUS

JAN 21 – FEB 19 Last month involved deep reflection as nostalgia crept into your awareness. While you can expect themes of inner unrest to continue surfacing on April 2, 5, 25 and 26, much of this month will bring support, so moments of contemplation are a time for healing. Consider scheduling time with loved ones to enjoy the satisfaction of inner peace on April 7, 11, 17 and 29. But don’t be surprised if a figure from the past gets in the way of professional ambitions during the full moon on April 30.

PISCES

FEB 20 – MAR 20 Well-defined aspirations offer comfort this month, but watch out for indecisiveness. Friends will have a strong influence over you, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing – although beware of working towards something that isn’t in your best interest once the Mercury retrograde confusion wears off after April 15. While it will be hard to resist diving head-first into ambitious ventures, you’d be wise to take your time discussing practical options so you can make solid choices you’ll feel comfortable with in the long run.

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…THING YOU DID BEFORE LEAVING HOME TODAY?

I said bye to my dog, Molly. That’s the last thing I do pretty much every time I head out.

…PARTY YOU WENT TO? The NBA All-Star Weekend party, thrown by [hip-hop group] Migos in the carpark of Capitol Records in LA.

…MEAL YOU COOKED?

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Toast with honey. It’s not really cooking.

…THING THAT MADE YOU MAD? A producer did a remix of one of my songs and didn’t tell me about it. I really liked the remix, so I wasn’t really mad, I was just like, “Dude, let me know – I would’ve posted about it.”

…HOLIDAY YOU TOOK? To Maui, Hawaii, for a week. About three years ago!

…INVESTMENT PIECE YOU BOUGHT? Some Bitcoin, after someone was telling me about it in Las Vegas. I limited the amount assuming I would lose it, but it ended up going up.

…TIME YOU SANG KARAOKE? In Japan at the end of last year. It’s embarrassing because I actually have a favourite karaoke song, “Word Up!” by Cameo, and it’s not even very cool.

Today. I woke up very happy because I found out my song “Church” was the third most added song on Australian radio.

…SONG YOU PLAYED ON ROTATION?

“King’s Dead” by Jay Rock, Kendrick Lamar, Future and James Blake.

…DRINK YOU ORDERED AT A BAR? A dirty martini, at Chin Chin in Sydney.

…TATTOO YOU GOT?

I got two on the same day, one on my arm that says “Order” and “Disorder” because I feel the two are a never-ending cycle. The other is the cat from Sailor Moon, on my foot.

When I stood next to Kanye West at a Coachella party without realising it was him. We were like, “Hey, what’s up?” to each other, but I was so tired I didn’t realise... until he performed.

…GIFT YOU GAVE?

A vinyl record by this really awesome jazz musician, Keith Jarrett, for the director of one of my videos as a thank you.

…BOOK YOU READ?

The Inner Game Of Music by Barry Green. It’s about getting rid of an inner demon when you’re trying to perform, and letting go.

…THING YOU BOUGHT WITH CASH?

It was so long ago. I think it was a coffee.

…TIME YOU CRIED?

Watching Queer Eye For The Straight Guy the other night.

…POST YOU TAGGED SOMEONE IN?

…TEXT MESSAGE YOU RECEIVED?

…PIECE OF CLOTHING YOU BOUGHT?

…TEXT MESSAGE YOU SENT?

A video on @browncardigan.

A Gucci wallet.

Cameo

WHAT WAS THE LAST…

…TIME YOU FELT REALLY HAPPY?

…TIME YOU WERE STARSTRUCK?

A video from [singer] Elohim, singing “Church” in a fake Australian accent.

“Hahaha, can I post this?” Alison Wonderland’s second album, Awake, is out April 6; alisonwonderland.com

As told to: Elle McClure. Photography: Getty Images; Stocksy; Instagram: @alisonwonderland; @donslens

Treasure Island by Keith Jarrett

IT’S THE LAST PAGE, SO IT’S ONLY FITTING THAT WE ASK AUSTRALIAN MUSICIAN (AND, THIS MONTH, THE HIGHEST-BILLED FEMALE DJ IN COACHELLA’S HISTORY) ALISON WONDERLAND


GRAB THE MAY ISSUE OF ELLE TO

Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

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