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The Spirit of Travel


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CONTENTS “A gleaming, futuristic building that wouldn’t look out of place in a Star Wars galaxy” The coast of utopia, page 89

Regulars 37 Editor’s letter 41 Notices Meet the contributors to this issue 46 Welcome to our world Discover Vogue online at Vogue.co.uk 110 Checklist What to pack for your vacations or staycations 202 Stockists

Vogue trends 57 Sense of occasion It’s wedding season – follow Vogue’s essential style guide to ensure you’re always the best turned-out guest

Jewellery 83 Cocktail hour Sculptural diamond watches to make evenings sparkle

PHOTOGRAPH: VENETIA SCOTT. TOP, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG. SHORTS, CYNTHIA ROWLEY. SANDALS, STELLA McCARTNEY

59 The bright side Live life in full colour

Vogue living

60 Join the dots Go graphic in playful spots

84 The return of the buffet Help yourself to the new trend in party dining, says Grace Dent

62 Flower girls A cultivated new take on the spring perennial

89 The coast of utopia Art collector Maja Hoffmann’s Mustique retreat. By Talib Choudhry. Photographs by Kate Martin

67 Noir moderne Sharp suits in midnight black 68 The zing thing The maximalist approach to print

Heat wave, page 144

COVER LOOKS From left: Vittoria Ceretti, Halima Aden, Adut Akech, Faretta Radic, Paloma Elsesser, Radhika Nair, Yoon Young Bae, Fran Summers and Selena Forrest. Hair: Orlando Pita. Make-up: Diane Kendal. Nails: Megumi Yamamoto. Set design: Piers Hanmer. Digital artwork: Silhouette Studio. Styling: Edward Enninful. Photograph: Craig McDean

GET THE LOOKS: SEE PAGE 44

97 Firmly rooted Landscape designer Sarah Price speaks to Katie Berrington

Viewpoint

71 Practical magic Sensible shoes with glam edge 73 How fashion got funny Fanfare for the comic muse. By Raven Smith 75 Crazy, sexy, cool That 1990s staple, the combat trouser, is on the comeback trail 76 Vogue darling Musician IAMDDB 78 Focal point Look-at-me accessories. Styling by Venetia Scott and Naomi Smart. Photographs by Feng Li

98 The story of us Have attitudes to the issue of abortion reached a turning point in Ireland? By Lynn Enright 100 The platonic ideal Salman Rushdie on his enduring friendship with the late Carrie Fisher 103 Sober girl’s guide to partying Socialising on the wagon needn’t be a drag, says Adwoa Aboah

Arts & culture 105 Drama queens Female talent takes centre stage in the theatre this year, reports Olivia Marks

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CONTENTS

Coat, bag and boots, all Marni

“When look-atme accessories meet classic coats, the results are striking” Focal point, page 78

Vogue tech 106 Instant access Eva Chen on her hi-tech essentials

Archive 108 The power of the muse Robin Muir looks back at a rare Robert Mapplethorpe shoot

Beauty 114 Face: the future Your face is your currency, discovers Nicola Moulton 119 In full bloom Erdem’s latest foray into beauty 120 Personal effects Bespoke beauty is big business. Jessica Diner investigates 122 Beauty musings The trends and looks to know now 125 Plant life Lorraine Pascale goes vegan 126 Bold beauty Couture-inspired make-up

Generation next Meet the new model army reshaping fashion-industry norms. By Ellie Pithers. Styling by Edward Enninful. Photographs by Craig McDean

164 A hand-made tale How haute couture is embracing diversity and democracy. By Anders Christian Madsen. Styling by Venetia Scott. Photographs by Willy Vanderperre

144 Heat wave Living the high life in breezy tropical style. Photographs and styling by Venetia Scott

178 The line of danger Vogue meets the women working to combat the threat of terrorism. By Helen Lewis. Photographs by Bastiaan Woudt

158 ON THE COVER Of gowns and glory The epic fantasy of a grand ballgown feels right for now, says Harriet Quick. Styling by Gianluca Longo. Photographs by Paul Wetherell

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182 “I make clothes for strong women” Rei Kawakubo speaks to Olivia Singer. Styling by Kate Phelan. Photographs by Tim Walker

192 ON THE COVER Quiet by design Tech supremo Jony Ive enjoys a chat in the Apple canteen with contributing editor Naomi Campbell. Photograph by Mikael Jansson 196 ON THE COVER Furiously funny Fleabag’s Phoebe Waller-Bridge is on the brink of comedy superstardom, says Eva Wiseman. Photographs by Scott Trindle Back page What would Farida Khelfa do? The filmmaker takes our quiz

Turn to page 116 for our fantastic subscription offer, plus free gift

PHOTOGRAPH: FENG LI.

Fashion and features 130 ON THE COVER


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EDITOR’S LETTER

CRAIG MCDEAN; GETTY

There are no two ways about it – like so many industries in recent months, fashion has found itself at an important crossroads. At the world’s great design houses, at photographic studios, at fashion weeks and in the offices of magazines such as mine at Vogue, crucial questions have been asked about working practices, safety and respect. Stock has been taken and safeguards to the way we operate have been made. Along the way we have heard from so many brilliant voices – amazing women such as Cameron Russell and Edie Campbell, who have worked hard to open up the conversation and make it possible for women and men from up and down the industry to be heard. These conversations are by no means over. Yet as a new mood begins to take hold – one that will only enrich and enliven creativity in fashion – I also believe that the time has come for us to look forward. In short, it is a moment for Vogue to do what it has always done best: to offer a bold vision of what the future can – and should – look like. To that end, a few weeks ago I flew to New York to meet the photographer Craig McDean, a dear friend and probably my longest-standing collaborator. Over the course of two days in a Manhattan loft studio we set about a very special project: bringing together nine future modelling superstars for a cover story that I hope defines everything we stand for as a magazine in 2018. I must say, assembling a star cast of fashion’s most-talkedabout new faces proved a truly exciting task. Even five years ago – and certainly 10 or 20 years ago – if you were shooting a group cover like this, the girls would not have looked like these young women do. But one of the great positives of the

past few months is the fashion industry finally embracing a concept that has defined my entire working life: diversity. When I say diversity, I want to be clear that it is never just about black and white for me. It’s about diversity across the board – whether that’s race, size, socio-economic background, religion, sexuality. That’s what I want to celebrate with this cover. Take Halima Aden and Adut Akech, born in the same refugee camp in Kenya and now standing at the top of their profession. How incredible is that? Along with Radhika Nair, Yoon Young Bae, Faretta, Fran Summers, Vittoria Ceretti, Paloma Elsesser and Selena Forrest, their CVs are bursting with big campaigns, catwalk appearances and millions of online followers. To me they represent a new global idea that anything is possible. How do I spot such talent? It’s a feeling you get when a girl walks into your office and you just know. It’s more than beauty. There are so many beautiful women in the world, but with some there’s a certain connection to the times they’re living in that makes them special – as with these nine. Often, they’re quite approachable-looking, yet with a certain magical quality you can never truly define. Actually, that’s what keeps you looking. The shoot was incredible, watching our group take such an important first step in their careers with this special Vogue cover. What really struck me, despite their varied backgrounds, was how similar they all were. Kind, engaged, socially minded and impressively sweet to one another. With the styling, I just wanted them to feel empowered, so chose a careful palette of khakis, blacks and creams so they’d feel ready for anything. Strong, powerful and poised for exciting futures. Three cheers for that.

Vogue’s new model army is photographed by Craig McDean on page 130: clockwise from far left, Halima Aden, Fran Summers, Vittoria Ceretti, Yoon Young Bae, Selena Forrest, Paloma Elsesser, Radhika Nair, Adut Akech and Faretta Radic

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Frivole collection Between the Finger Ring, yellow gold and diamonds.

Haute Joaillerie, place VendĂ´me since 1906

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NOTICES

On page 100, Salman Rushdie reflects on his 20-year friendship with the late Carrie Fisher, while endeavouring to answer an age-old question: is it ever possible to be “just friends” with a member of the opposite sex?

For this month’s cover shoot with Craig McDean, nine models from seven countries gathered at Milk Studios in New York’s Meatpacking District. “A playlist of Rihanna, Beyoncé and Kendrick Lamar kept everyone smiling,” says fashion features editor Ellie Pithers. “That and Ru, Edward Enninful’s Boston terrier, who has 12,600 Instagram followers and counting.”

GETTING TO KNOW YOU… Meet the contributors behind our May stories

Writer Harriet Quick considers the role of fairytale ballgowns in the modern era (page 158), from Molly Goddard’s frothy tulle dresses to Giambattista Valli’s show-stopping creations. Her dream frock? “The robot-painted gown Shalom Harlow sported for Alexander McQueen’s s/s ’99 collection,” she says.

MOLLY GODDARD

Vogue’s fashion team decamped to Cape Town for Heat Wave, on page 144, styled and photographed by fashion director Venetia Scott. They shot everywhere from the Sea Point Pavilion in gale-force winds to the financial district with a flock of ostriches in tow.

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

MARIJANA MARINOVIC; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY

Writer Grace Dent pens an ode to the buffet in all its kitsch glory, on page 84. At any given party, it’s the 1970s classics she gravitates toward. “You can try to impress me with Wagyu beef and ponzu on fancy spoons – but what my eyes scan the room for is the humble mushroom vol-au-vent,” she says.

For her first piece as a contributing editor, Lorraine Pascale debates the merits of veganism, on page 125. The model-turned-chef first appeared in the pages of Vogue in the March 2005 issue, wearing an Armani Privé dress embroidered with thousands of Swarovski crystals.

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NOTICES Ahead of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s new series, Killing Eve, Scott Trindle (below) photographed her for Furiously Funny on page 196. His favourite programme is more of a guilty pleasure. “I’m always watching First Dates on Channel 4. I’m trying to get all my friends to go on it.”

Writer Raven Smith (below) considers fashion’s newfound sense of humour on page 73. The trends that fail to raise a smile? “I cannot condone floral crowns, wellies in the city or puns on garments – if you have something to say, do it with fit and styling.”

“I remember my first Comme show in Paris, when models marched out to Patti Smith’s war cries in Rei’s take on armour,” says Walker.

Contributing editor Naomi Campbell (above, with Salma Hayek) visited Apple Park in California to interview Jony Ive (page 192). “For the man who designed the iPhone, Jony is amazingly humble,” she says.

COVER LOOKS From left: Vittoria Ceretti wears jumpsuit, £6,915, Ralph Lauren Collection. Necklaces, from £9,700 each, Vhernier. Halima Aden wears top, from £930. Skirt, from £3,240. Both Céline. Cardigan, worn underneath, £239, Johnstons of Elgin. Adut Akech wears embellished shirt, £1,715. Skirt, £1,115. Both Prada. Earrings, from £360, Jennifer Fisher. Faretta Radic wears off-the-shoulder trench coat, £2,800, Dior. Earrings, from £350, Céline. Paloma Elsesser wears top, £210. Trousers, to order. Both Paco Rabanne. Belt, £205, Dorothee Schumacher. Cuffs, from £725 each, Jennifer Fisher. Radhika Nair wears shirt, £800. Trousers, £1,030. Both Hermès. Belt, £490, Chloé. Bracelets, from £5,600 each, Tiffany. Rings, from £1,720 each, Pomellato. Yoon Young Bae wears shirtdress, £690, JW Anderson. Earrings, £2,600. Bracelet, £18,100. Both Chanel Fine Jewellery. Fran Summers wears poloneck, £780. Skirt, £1,250. Both Victoria Beckham. Small chain necklace, £18,600, Vhernier. Large chain necklace, to order, Jennifer Fisher. Ring, £2,020, Cartier. Selena Forrest wears jumpsuit, £1,450, Alberta Ferretti. Belt, £1,040, Hermès. Earrings, from £400, Jennifer Fisher. Get the look: Hair: L’Oréal Paris. Make-up: Estée Lauder. Hair: Orlando Pita. Make-up: Diane Kendal. Nails: Megumi Yamamoto. Set design: Piers Hanmer. Digital artwork: Silhouette Studio. Styling: Edward Enninful. Photograph: Craig McDean

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CRAIG MCDEAN; MORGAN O’DONOVAN; KUBA RYNIEWICZ; MARK SIMPSON; KEVIN TACHMAN

To accompany our exclusive Rei Kawakubo interview, on page 182, Tim Walker and Kate Phelan (above) photographed and styled Comme


G R AC E A N D C H A R AC T E R


VOGUE.CO.UK

WELCOME TO OUR WORLD… From videos of May’s cover stars to behind the scenes on shoots, get more of what you love on Vogue.co.uk

STYLE AND NEWS ON THE GO Three times a week, straight to your smartphone: Vogue on Snapchat is packed with exclusive videos, style quizzes, beauty tips and interactive articles. Discover our Snapcode now. Welcome to #NewVogue.

Lineisy Montero and Karly Loyce turned up the heat on location in Cape Town. See more at Vogue.co.uk/video

What to wear to every occasion this summer The best dresses, the definitive shoe guide – and should you wear a hat with that? Vogue has your sartorial season sussed.

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The next generation of fashion faces are emerging as forces for change. But what do they want to know about each other? From Fran Summers interviewing Halima Aden, to Selena Forrest answering questions from Vittoria Ceretti, go to Vogue.co.uk/video to watch them quiz one another

KLOSS FILMS; VENETIA SCOTT; PAUL BOWDEN; MINNIE J CARVER; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

Boyzone, kisses and Peter Pan – Phoebe Waller-Bridge is the latest star to step in front of Vogue’s lens and share the firsts that have shaped her life


G R AC E A N D C H A R AC T E R

JosĂŠphine Collection


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TRENDS

Wedding season

HAIR: MATT MULHALL. MAKE-UP: JANEEN WITHERSPOON. NAILS: ADAM SLEE. SET DESIGN: SOPHIE DURHAM. MODELS: RUTH AKELE, LAUREN CASE, KEKELI HOTSE, XU JING, ANNA PROFFITT. WITH THANKS TO THE AMAZON FASHION EUROPEAN PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO, LONDON. DIGITAL ARTWORK: ANTONIO PIZZICHINO AT DTOUCH LONDON

Crêpe-georgette jumpsuit with tie neck, £3,900. Striped shorts, worn underneath £680. Both Dior. Silk bra, £260, No 21. Felt hat, £210, Berta Cabestany

SENSE OF OCCASION

From joyous florals to bold, block colour, channel spring’s most head-turning trends and ensure you arrive the best-dressed guest. Photographs by Lena C Emery Edited by Naomi Smart Styling by Jack Borkett

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TRENDS

Wedding season

From left: Ruth wears shirt, £470. Skirt, £1,100. Belt, £85. All No 21. Clutch, £1,600, Giorgio Armani. Lauren wears dress, £721, Jacquemus. Xu wears dress, £2,255, Akris. Pouch bag, £405, Les Petits Joueurs. Far right, from top: dress, from £1,000, Tibi. Bag, £210, Staud, at Mytheresa.com. Wrap dress, £535, Ganni

THE BRIGHT SIDE

Left: dress, £1,174, Attico, at Net-a-Porter.com. Above: bag, from £1,890, Bienen-Davis. Right: sandals, from £387, Stella Luna. Halterneck dress, £860, Salvatore Ferragamo

CAROLINA HERRERA

LENA C EMERY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

Crayon hues bring an optimistic energy to softly draped party dresses. Go for vivid, complementary shades; this is a neutral-free zone

Head space

Top off your look with a bejewelled clip, satin headband or wide-brimmed hat

From left: sinamay hat, £3,600, Philip Treacy. Headband, from £825, Jennifer Behr. Gold-plated hair comb, £1,100, Dolce & Gabbana. Pillbox hat with veil, £745, Emily London

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TRENDS

Wedding season

SELF-PORTRAIT

Viscose dress, £49, Topshop. Palladium and crystal earrings, £855, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello

Join the dots

The graphic alternative to florals, polka dots bring a different kind of whimsy. Play with scale but keep it monochrome

“Polka dots signal poise when paired with ladylike accessories”

RODARTE

Naomi Smart, shopping editor

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From left: off-the-shoulder silk dress, £643, Caroline Constas, at Matchesfashion.com. Leather purse, £858, Perrin Paris. Beaded tassel earrings, £14, John Lewis. Leather sandals, £380, Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini. Silk dress, £320, Rixo, at Net-a-Porter.com. Embellished velvet bag, £1,550, Fendi

LENA C EMERY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

OFF-WHITE

Dress with kimono sleeves, £855, Awake, at Farfetch.com. Leather sandals, £710, Manolo Blahnik. Crystal earrings, from £760, Balenciaga


#GIRLOFNOW

THE NEW FRAGRANCE

FOLLOW US ON THE ELIE SAAB MAGAZINE THELIGHTOFNOW.COM


LENA C EMERY


TRENDS

Wedding season

FLOWER GIRLS

From splashy roses to wallpaper posies, micro cornflowers to graphic hothouse blooms, florals are no longer the humdrum option for summer engagements – in fact, styled head to toe, petals clashing and jostling for attention, they’re now considered a wild-card option. Don’t overlook the instant zing that comes with Dutchflower-painting-inspired tights paired with jewelled sandals, or the offbeat exuberance conveyed by fuchsia-printed boots under a femininely decorated dress. More is most definitely more: floret earrings only add to the flower-bomb effect. EP From left: Lauren wears jumpsuit, from £2,000, Dolce & Gabbana. Mules, £965, Christian Louboutin. Anna wears dress, £850, Zimmermann. Sandals, £500, Cushnie & Ochs. Ruth wears dress, £1,370, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi. Boots, £80, H&M. Earrings, £350, Jennifer Behr, at Liberty. Kekeli wears sleeveless dress, from £2,220, Proenza Schouler. Top, worn underneath, £643, Caroline Constas, at Matchesfashion.com. Feather boa, from a selection, Nina Ricci. Shoes, £450, Cushnie & Ochs. Earrings, from £525, Jennifer Behr. Xu wears dress, £1,795. Body, £575. Both Prabal Gurung. Tights, from £535. Sandals, from £535. Both Dolce & Gabbana. Clutch, £1,600, Giorgio Armani


TRENDS

Wedding season

“Seek out languid silhouettes – they’ll stop florals feeling prim”

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Clockwise from top right: earrings, £504, Rebecca de Ravenel, at Modaoperandi. com. Dress, £599, Leon Max. Top, £1,071. Skirt, £3,775. Both Brock Collection. Bag, £450, Shrimps. Sandals, £850, Jimmy Choo. Mules, £295, Russell & Bromley. Dress, £1,850, Alessandra Rich, at Modaoperandi.com. Bag, £900, The Row, at Matchesfashion.com. Dress, £3,080, Ermanno Scervino. Dress, £505, Sea NY

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

ERDEM

RODARTE

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

Ellie Pithers, fashion features editor


KARLIE KLOSS

ATELIERSWAROVSKI.COM


Xu wears tuxedo jacket with taffeta sleeves, £2,495. Trousers, £820. Boots, £3,650. Earrings, £1,195. Necklace, £845. All Alexander McQueen. Lauren wears tuxedo jacket, £1,610. Trousers, £1,735. Both Ralph Lauren Collection. Shoes, £475, Jimmy Choo. Earrings, £230, Roberto Cavalli

TRENDS

Wedding season

Noir moderne For a wedding in the heart of the city, make a black suit sing with epic jewellery and bedazzled shoes

LENA C EMERY; PIXELATE.BIZ

From top: diamond earrings, price on request, Buccellati. Tuxedo jacket, £560. Trousers, £210. Both Emporio Armani. Fan, £80, Fern Fans. Box bag, £3,075, Mark Cross, at Matchesfashion. com. Sandals, £885, Miu Miu

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TRENDS

Wedding season From left: Lauren wears dress, £1,499, Dries Van Noten. Handerkerchief top, £410, Tod’s. Ruth wears shirt, from £1,440. Skirt, from £1,980. Both Etro. Clutch, £2,100, Bottega Veneta. Earrings, from £435, D’Heygere. Anna wears top, £1,000. Wrap skirt, £1,500. Belt, from £1,450. All Céline

THE ZING THING

STELLA McCARTNEY

ROKSANDA

Embrace full-on exuberance with a maximalist take on print. Oversized hoops and vivid bags multiply the effect

From top left: dress, from £1,680, Johanna Ortiz. Earrings, £4,890, Silvia Furmanovich, at Bergdorf Goodman. Dress, £2,560, Duro Olowu. Shoes, £550, Rochas. Dress, £1,380, Borgo de Nor, at Fenwick. Bag, £615, Hunting Season, at Selfridges. Sandals, £129, Carvela

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Would you wear black to a wedding? “Black is fine – unless you’ve slept with the groom.” Lauren Santo Domingo (right), co-founder of Moda Operandi What works for a country wedding? “A dress that makes me feel confident and that I can have fun in. Organza has slight fuss and volume, but is ultimately light and free.” Emilia Wickstead, designer What is a wedding outfit no-no? “Accidentally wearing the same dress as the bridesmaids. Imagine!” Hannah Weiland, founder of Shrimps What doesn’t work? “Anything that’s too sparkly, shiny, too tight, too short or too revealing… You are going to a wedding, not prom. You have to be able to move, dance and drink, so don’t wear shoes you can’t walk to the bathroom in.” Sarah Staudinger, creative director of Staud How to stand out, but not upstage the bride? “Just look like a bright shining angel, there to do nothing but support, adore and love your friend. Your outfit should look like your heart – not like your boobs.” JJ Martin (right), founder of La Double J Editions

LENA C EMERY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ; GETTY

WEDDING WISDOM FROM FASHION’S MOST INVITED…


L I A N N E L A H A VA S , Musician I N C O N V E R S AT I O N S E R I E S . D I S C O V E R M O R E AT O L I V E R P E O P L E S . C O M


TRENDS

PRACTICAL MAGIC The sensible loafer is getting razzy for spring… Cue glittering rhinestones and punky hardware. Photograph by Matthieu Lavanchy

Clockwise from top: leather and crystal, £885, Gucci. Leather, £425, Bally. Leather and crystal, £480, Stuart Weitzman

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superga.co.uk


TRENDS MARGIELA’S PLANE PILLOWS

DOLCE’S FRUIT & VEG STAND Nobody has time for their five a day. Cheat the system with a Dolce & Gabbana cabbage gown or market bag.

Supremely chic powernapping is now feasible, thanks to Margiela’s bag that doubles as a pillow. Nothing says “I’m ready to tackle whatever life throws at me” like turning up to a meeting with the matching neck cushion. If 2017 was about dressing for bed in chic pyjamas, s/s ’18 is about dressing as your bed.

HOW FASHION GOT FUNNY The joke’s on us – literally – as designers put their tongues firmly in cheek. By Raven Smith

When he buys you flowers instead of a Gucci watch

K 

CHRISTOPHER KANE’S WASHINGMACHINE TOP

INDIGITAL; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

Nigella was wrong: why be a domestic goddess when you can be a domestic appliance?

BALENCIAGA’S PLATFORM CROCS Crocs are the most ridiculous things, but slip into their rubbery cavities and you’ll be a convert. The height, here, means you can reach the top shelf like a randy schoolboy.

nock, knock. Who’s there? Fashion. Yep, the industry that takes itself seriously is shedding the pout in favour of a smile. From the digital savants at Gucci communicating via meme to Raf Simons’s droll Friday the 13th hockeymask shoes for Calvin Klein and Emporio Armani’s childish crab motifs, the mood is lightening. Wit, of course, is different to comedy. Unlike Charlie Chaplin slipping on a banana peel, wit is more comfortable with the connection of two previously unjoined dots. Think practical trainers with a fantastical elf flick at the toe (Loewe) or built-forpurpose cycling shorts under statuesque ballgowns (Saint Laurent). These become a wry commentary on how we consume fashion today – scrolling feeds on screens. Vying for our attention as we scroll, designers are keen for us to be arrested by creations that initially baffle us and then cause us to raise a knowing eyebrow. These are clothes that say something witty about fashion. Like Dada and the Surrealists, we’re all in on the joke. Victoria Beckham may have taken an extended break from smiling but fashion can still be a laugh. Here are a few jocular ideas to get you through the silly season with tongue firmly in cheek. Q

GUCCI’S MEMES When it launched, the Gucci meme project flooded the internet with Renaissance imagery. Be the first of your friends to adopt this trend with a lacy girdle or casual ruff. Think Blackadder – but make it fabulous.

MOSCHINO’S CALLA LILY DRESS In centuries past, women carried posies because personal hygiene was zero. Update this tradition by dressing as an actual flower.

LOEWE’S ELF SHOES Thought you’d have to wait for December to get festive? Think again. This spring, channel your inner elf with Loewe’s trainers. People will think you work for Santa and be super-nice to you.

PRADA’S COMIC-STRIP PIECES Wear your cartoon-strip Prada under your suit – ready to burst out, Clark Kent-style, for dramatic effect. Added benefit: you’ll be as snug as chips in newspaper.

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SPRING / SUMMER 18

“She is my mirror, so I never walk alone. We’re always together and she means everything to me and vice versa.” GAIA & ANANIA # M O D E R N VAG A B O N D

D I S COV E R M O R E AT VAG A B O N D.C O M


MARC JACOBS

ALEXANDER WANG

SACAI

TRENDS

Hoodie, £170, Fenty Puma by Rihanna. Cargo trousers, from £450, Matthew Adams Dolan, at Themodist.com. Belt, £290, Altuzarra, at Net-a-Porter.com. Trainers, £62, Puma, at Asos.com

Crazy, sexy, cool

From left: cotton trousers, £345, T by Alexander Wang, at Net-a-Porter. com. Cotton trousers, £195 Zadig & Voltaire. Cotton trousers, £62, Alpha Industries, at Amazon Fashion. Sweater, £195, PS Paul Smith. Jewelled satin shoes, £945, Manolo Blahnik

STELLA McCARTNEY

LENA C EMERY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

Luxury sportswear has become synonymous with modern dressing. But if go-faster stripe fatigue is beginning to set in, move on to the combat trouser. Once the uniform of 1990s icons such as Lisa Lopes, Gwen Stefani and Melanie Blatt, the baggy, pocket-heavy style is back and shaping up to be the staple of the season. That said, these are not the grungy, low-slung trousers of yesteryear: worn high on the waist and with strappy sandals and even corsets, they can take you from day to night with effortless ease. What’s more, they have a pocket for every conceivable eventuality. A thoroughly practical investment. OS

PAIR WITH...

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VOGUE DARLING

IAMDDB wears tulle sweater, £500. Linen trousers, £620. Both Y Project, at Browns. Earrings, £220, Marques Almeida. Photograph by Greta Ilieva. Styling by Jack Borkett

CHEST AN

• ER

•M

“At the moment I’m into Jimmy Dludlu, a jazz artist from southern Africa, and Jordan Rakei’s neo-soul album Wallflower [right].”

“Manchester is my home now, but I still wear my Africa pendant every day.”

IAMDDB

“My most-used emoji is definitely the rose ; it’s a symbol that crops up in a lot of my music.”

“My hair is usually in braids; I’m trying to learn how to do it myself – but it’s ridiculously hard.”

“I’ve watched Scarface more times than I can count; I love Michelle Pfeiffer’s slinky dresses and power suits.”

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“I play around with lots of different brands – but I love Tom Ford for special occasions.” Sateen jacket, £2,200. Leather trousers, £2,240. Both Tom Ford

“I keep my nails simple: a neutral or dark red polish is best.” Le Vernis in Rouge Noir, £22, Chanel

“I would choose trainers over heels any day; comfort is key.” Trainers, £105, Nike

“My fantasy holiday would mainly involve lying on a beach in the Bahamas; it’s the island life for me.”

“In my downtime, I live in sports bras; I’m really picky about the fit, though.” Bra, £185, Fendi, at Net-a-Porter.com

INTERVIEW: HAYLEY MAITLAND. HAIR: PHILIPPE THOLIMET. MAKE-UP: NICOLA BRITTIN. NAILS: PEBBLES AIKENS. GETTY; INSTAGRAM; PIXELATE.BIZ; REX FEATURES

With Angolan and Portuguese roots, Manchester-raised IAMDDB (born Diana DeBrito, hence the initials) can recall the exact moment she decided to pursue a career in music. “I was in a lecture on my first day at Manchester Metropolitan University when I realised that I was meant to be writing songs – not term papers,” she says. “As a young black woman, I’ve been stereotyped all of my life, and I needed to give myself a voice. I ran out and never looked back.” Instead of studying, the 22-year-old has spent the past three years developing her signature urban jazz, while working different jobs to make the rent. It paid off: her most recent EP, Hoodrich, has racked up more than 5 million streams, turned Jorja Smith into a fan and earned IAMDDB third place in the coveted BBC Music Sound of 2018. Up next? Her first album, due out later this year on Union IV Recordings.


Give a neat tweed an instant refresh with vivid pink shoes and satin ankle ties. Wool coat, ÂŁ1,345. Satin shoes, ÂŁ540. Both Stella McCartney. Hair and make-up: Daniel Zhang. Nails: Jenny Li. Production: Sherry Ma and Vengo Huang. Model: Qiaoyu Li

FOCAL POINT

When look-at-me accessories meet classic coats, the results are striking. Photographs by Feng Li. Styling by Venetia Scott and Naomi Smart


ACCESSORIES

A sporty visor and finish-flag check bag from Dior take the humble mac into new territory. Cotton trench coat, £2,000. Leather bag with jacquard strap, £3,450. Visor, £265. All Dior


The new co-ordinates: traditional plaid with animal edge. Wool coat with tiger appliqué, £3,420. Embellished silk shirt, £3,150. Canvas and leather bag, £1,170. All Gucci


ACCESSORIES

Let your accessories do the talking with Burberry’s graffiti graphics. Gabardine car coat, £1,690. Canvas and leather tote, £1,090. Leather boots, £590. All Burberry For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information


JEWELLERY Silk/wool dress, £3,105, Valentino. Diamond watch, price on request, Chopard

Above: white gold and diamond, £43,670, Patek Philippe, at Boodles. Below: diamond and onyx, price on request, Bulgari

Cocktail hour

MITCH PAYNE. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CAROLYN GALLYER. NAILS: JENNI DRAPER. MODEL: RADHIKA NAIR

Evenings demand a more sculptural approach to timekeeping – sprinkled with diamonds. Edited by Dena Giannini. Photograph by Matthieu Lavanchy. Styling by Florence Arnold

From top left: diamond, £40,000, Asprey. White gold and diamond, price on request, Dior Watches. Diamond with satin strap, £20,700, Tiffany. Diamond bracelet watch, price on request, Van Cleef & Arpels. Diamond and rubellite, price on request, Cartier. Crystal, £249, Swarovski. Diamond with satin strap, £32,300, De Beers

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Forget stuffy canapés and fussy recipes, a heaving table of help-yourself deliciousness is the modern way to feed a party, says Grace Dent 84

TESSA TRAEGER/TRUNK ARCHIVE

the T return of the buffet

wo-thousand-and-eighteen is the year of the buffet, and as a restaurant critic, I applaud this. When Sabine Getty – queen of the dinner-party super leagues – recently told Vogue that she favours a buffet, it was a sharp thrill to know that the beau monde was finally resurrecting the cornerstone of 1970s entertaining. Case in point: creative director Alex Eagle’s loft in Soho, where celebrities, fashion designers, and editors regularly gather around a trestle table. “A buffet sets a relaxed, familial tone at a party,” she says. “Plus, it’s hard to compete with the drama of a well-done buffet on an aesthetic level: a whole leg of jamón; colourful plates of tapas; baskets piled with ripe figs…” It’s about time the buffet had its moment of culinary glory. In my job, as the scourge of chefs, the question I’m chucked daily is: “But, Grace, can you even cook?” To which my answer is always: “Well, you won’t find me standing by a sous-vide machine studiously broiling a veal cheek to within a millisecond of tender. Or erecting my own croquembouche tower.” Lord no. I leave that style of hospitality to ruddy-faced, kitchen-bound bores. But if you want a buffet, I say, then I am your girl. Give me an impromptu 50-person guest list, a fold-out emergency trestle table and a pack of frozen vol-au-vent cases and, darlings, I will give you a party. Perhaps vol-au-vents aren’t your thing? Possibly you’re more of an Ottolenghi “heaving pile of French beans with hazelnut” person or you hanker for a fistful of samosa chaat? Well, hooray. That’s the whole point of a buffet. There’s something for everyone. I’ve sat on lofty food award panels, held to dispense prizes and plaudits, hearing how buffet goddess Nigella is “not really a cook”. But, to be frank, if you come to one of my parties and the sight of my cheese’n’pineapple porcupine centrepiece fails to render you emotional, I care not for your opinion. If you don’t love a table groaning


LIVING with fancy salads, pimped-up couscous, show-stopping trifle and a cubic ton of my grandmother’s own recipe Coronation Chicken, watching friends gravitate towards it with plates and sharp elbows, then, sweetie, you’re not really an eater. And the emphasis here is on groaning. A good buffet table, like Richard Burton said of Liz Taylor, should be, “in short, too bloody much”. Forget food-waste worries. There will be none. Here’s the rules: you need enough food for each guest to have an early-evening pre-amble, a return visit after three glasses of champagne for more sturdy grazing, and then, for the party hardcore, to shift it into their handbags for an Uber smorgasbord on the way home. As a Golders Green buffet queen once told me about catering family bar mitzvahs, “If there isn’t too much food, there isn’t enough food.” I remember this phrase often at sterile Fitzrovia parties, where teensy kebab-skewers and sashimi are doled out abstemiously by servers. Yes, a buffet would have been less elegant, but it would have sent a message of largesse, of frivolity. Guests would have been able to chat without the constant interruption of the poor staff explaining the provenance of the caviar. Meanwhile, the frantic host is generally in the kitchen panicking that no one is eating, shoving servers out time and again with more fancy spoons of indecipherable mush that no one really wants. Do we have this problem with my tray of champagne jelly shots, warmed cocktail sausages with a vat of caramelised onion relish? No, we do not. Does anyone say, “Grace, we loved your party, but I wish you’d not provided such an array of delicious artisan cheeses?” Again no. The simple reason buffets light up a room is this: you are providing guests with a tiny dopamine shot from a point in life they were happiest; running into a brilliant birthday party aged five; their granny’s Boxing Day open house; the best Eid get-together of their teen years. In a world full of judgement over food choices, here is a hark-back to a time when our ancestors ate without fretting, rather than as a method of preening or point scoring. No one Instagrams, filters and hashtags buffets because buffets really are not that pretty. But then neither am I after a bottle of Taittinger. Isn’t that the point of a party? Q

RECIPES SKYE GYNGELL, SPRING “Put this out with warm crusty bread and a green salad” SLOW-COOKED LAMB SHOULDER WITH RED PEPPERS, PAPRIKA AND BLACK OLIVES Serves 6 Ingredients Method 1 shoulder of lamb, trimmed Preheat the oven to 200C. 2 red onions, peeled and chopped Season the meat and place in a large 1 dried red chilli saucepan on a medium heat. Brown all 1 tsp fennel seeds, toasted over for about 10 minutes. Remove and ground the meat from the pan, pour out any 1 bunch of marjoram, excess fat and reduce the heat slightly. leaves only Add the onions, chilli, fennel and 4 cloves of garlic, peeled marjoram. Cook for 15 minutes, and chopped stirring occasionally. Add the garlic, 3 red peppers, sliced into eighths red peppers and paprika. Cook for 1½ tsp of sweet paprika a further five minutes. Add the 500g ripe tomatoes, tomatoes, then turn up the heat roughly chopped slightly. When the mixture starts to 1 bottle of dry white wine bubble, pour in the wine. Return the 1 handful of small black olives meat to the pot, cover tightly with Roughly chopped parsley, foil and place on the middle shelf of to garnish the oven. Cook gently for three hours, Salt and pepper, to taste until the meat is falling off the bone and the peppers are melting. Season to taste. Serve with the olives and parsley.

RAVINDER BHOGAL, JIKONI “This brightly coloured jelly makes for an eye-catching – and delicious – centrepiece” NEGRONI JELLY AND CITRUS SALAD Serves 8 Ingredients Method For the citrus salad: Place the citrus, pomegranate and 1 ruby grapefruit, segmented strawberries in a large bowl. Pour in with pith removed the icing sugar and Moscato. Stir to 1 pink grapefruit, segmented combine, then put into the refrigerator with pith removed to macerate. Heat the caster sugar 2 oranges, segmented with and 500ml of water in a saucepan. pith removed Whisk gently until the sugar begins to 1 pomegranate, seeds only dissolve. Add the strips of orange peel 250g strawberries, hulled and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and cut into quarters and simmer for five minutes. Remove 2 tsp icing sugar from the heat and strain to discard the 50ml Moscato peel. Soak the gelatine leaves in cold For the Negroni jelly: water for five minutes. Squeeze out 150g caster sugar the excess water. Add the gelatine to 1 orange, peel only the syrup mixture and whisk until fully 5 leaves of gelatine, dissolved. Stir in the gin, Campari and platinum strength vermouth, then leave to cool. Pour 75ml gin into a jelly mould. Leave to set in the 75ml Campari refrigerator for at least six hours. 75ml sweet vermouth

NIEVES BARRAGAN, SABOR “This so-called Russian salad is a classic in Spain” ENSALADILLA RUSA, PRAWNS AND SALSA ROSA Serves 8 Method Ingredients Combine the tiger prawns, For the ensaladilla: potatoes, carrot, baby gem 16 tiger prawns, boiled in the shell, leaves, gherkins and chives in peeled and diced a large bowl. In a separate bowl, 300g baby potatoes, boiled, peeled mix together the mayonnaise, and diced ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, 1 carrot, boiled, peeled and diced brandy, Tabasco and orange 4 leaves of baby gem lettuces, juice. Stir the salsa rosa through julienned the ensaladilla. Season to taste. 2 tbsp of gherkins, chopped Put in the fridge to chill for at 2 tbsp of chives, chopped least an hour and a half. Serve For the salsa rosa: cold on pieces of toast. 250ml mayonnaise 2 tbsp ketchup 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce 20ml brandy 2 tbsp Tabasco ½ an orange, juiced Salt and pepper, to taste

A good buffet table, like Richard Burton said of Liz Taylor, should be, “in short, too bloody much” 85


LIVING Maja Hoffmann looks across the Caribbean sea from the balcony of one of three “pavilions” at her Mustique beach house. Styling: Gianluca Longo

THE COAST OF UTOPIA

Art collector Maja Hoffmann’s futuristic steeland-concrete beach home on the island of Mustique is her ideal place for creative contemplation, she tells Talib Choudhry. Photographs by Kate Martin

T

he water is the most miraculous colour,” says Maja Hoffmann, wistfully describing the dazzling azure of the Caribbean sea as it laps the sands on the private island of Mustique. “My house is located directly on Princess Margaret Beach, which is very beautiful and secluded. I swim twice a day and it’s paradise.” The view to the ocean from the banana orchard at Neubau Lagoon House is indeed the stuff of desert-island dreams. Glancing back from the beach, the sight of Hoffmann’s resolutely contemporary property is equally extraordinary. Architectural styles of the 104 homes on Mustique – which > 89


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LIVING Below: a vivid orange sofa and 1960s chairs, upholstered in Missoni Home fabrics, add colour in the off-white pool pavilion. Right: the angular pavilions are, Hoffmann says, “like tilted, triangular boxes on stilts”

sits in a chain of islands known as the Grenadines in the West Indies, and is owned collectively by its ultra-wealthy residents – vary widely, from colonial plantation houses and Balinese-style bungalows to frothy mid-century follies. Hoffmann’s, designed by the Venetian-born, New Yorkbased architect Raffaella Bortoluzzi, is without doubt the most striking. A gleaming, futuristic building that wouldn’t look out of place in a Star Wars galaxy, the house is made up of a series of cantilevered concrete-and-steel cubes with tiered terraces and pools. “I could have bought an existing house but I’ve always wanted to build one myself in Mustique,” explains the legendary 62-year-old arts patron. Besides, she already owns the more traditional neighbouring villa Gelliceaux, and built Neubau Lagoon House in its grounds. “I wanted something unique. It takes inspiration from Latin-American architecture and looks experimental, but it’s really just a beach house. At first, planning permission was blocked but now, I think, people understand and like what we’ve done.” The Zurich- and New York-based billionaire is no stranger to controversy surrounding her architectural innovations. Hoffmann reportedly donated more than £132 million of her pharmaceuticals fortune to fund the creation of a Frank Gehry-designed HQ for Luma, the cultural foundation she launched in 2004, in her hometown of Arles in the South of France – to much local opposition. It took protracted negotiations for her aluminium-faceted complex to rise defiantly in the centre of the umber-hued town. Whether it’s architecture or art, Hoffmann says she favours nurturing experimental projects that might otherwise not get built. After such high-stakes forays, Hoffmann always looks forward to a restorative break in the Caribbean, and visits several times a year with family and friends. “I came to Mustique for the first time in 1993 and it reminded me of the simplicity of growing up in the South of France,” she says. “It was the first time in my adult life that I took a proper vacation and it was also where I met my partner in life [the film producer Stanley F Buchthal], so it holds special memories.” Naturally, Hoffmann’s guests on Mustique include serious players from the art-world A-list, such as auctioneer Simon de Pury, “the man with the golden gavel”, and the uber-curator Hans-Ulrich Obrist, one of her trusted “Arles advisers”. “Mustique doesn’t just have to be about drinking rum and going to the beach,” says Hoffmann. “It has fabulous air, so

Naturally, Hoffmann’s guests include serious players from the art-world A-list Left: patterned furniture from the Sushi Collection by Edward van Vliet for Moroso. Below, from top: sail-like awnings shade the path to the banana orchard; a hanging chair by Patricia Urquiola

it’s a good place to have creative meetings and hold think tanks.” Hoffmann has been known to mix pleasure and business during the chic picnics she holds under the gently swaying palms. Meanwhile, an army of “super-dedicated” staff – gardeners, maids, butlers – run both of her villas like clockwork. “They take care of the houses in a way that makes them feel very lived in and welcoming.” No doubt the zingy palette at Neubau Lagoon also aids original thinking – Hoffmann and Bortoluzzi chose to cover the building in look-at-me turquoise, tangerine and saffron tones. The undulating metal panels, which cover the upper part of the structure and roof, were 3D-printed and coated in blue paint, which has to be refreshed regularly in the humid salt air. The climate of the island dictates the absence of paintings on the crisp, white walls inside; it would be wantonly decadent to hang priceless works here. Instead, the > 91


LIVING

Above: in one guest bathroom, the loo is hidden inside a novel pod. Top: a series of pool terraces lead down to Princess Margaret Beach. Top right: an undulating tiled wall at the back of the house provides a bold contrast to the futuristic architecture. Above right: the pool sitting room. Below: the pavilions’ 3D panels were designed to mimic the sea

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furnishings provide peppy jolts of pattern and colour. There are several pieces from the Italian company Moroso, including a rainbow-striped hanging chair, and similarly uplifting designs by the London-based duo Doshi Levien. “The colours of the Caribbean have always been strong and we wanted to reflect that,” explains Hoffmann. “Here, they don’t feel bright; they just feel right. The sun makes them come alive.” Visitors enter through the banana orchard, to the left and right of which are pavilions with sitting rooms that can be opened right up to the balmy air thanks to retractable, hydraulic walls. Downstairs there are bedrooms, more informal living areas, and a covered dining cabana with a high-spec outdoor kitchen. At the back of the house is a glass-tiled wall with free-form curves, where the angular architecture is softened by terracing and tropical planting – palms, baobab, frangipani and night-flowering jasmine – all overseen by Belgian landscape architect Bas Smets. Hoffmann’s favourite spot is the adjoining white-tiled pool area, inspired by cult architect Tadao Ando’s work on Naoshima (an island made famous as a contemporary-art hub in Japan). Having visited Mustique for some 25 years, Hoffmann knows how important it is to maintain cordial relations with the neighbours, who collectively form the Mustique Company, which dictates island law, runs customs checks and raises local taxes. The owners themselves are a wealthy, starry pack, earning the island a reputation for exclusivity and hush-hush bacchanalia – Mick Jagger, Bryan Adams and Tommy Hilfiger are currently residents. Recent visitors include Tom Ford, who often stays at the elegant Plantation House, which Hoffmann rented herself for a number of years, and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Of course, the royal resident who first gave Mustique an air of jet-set glamour was the late Princess M a r g a re t , w h o w o u l d f i n d comfortingly little changed on the island today. It is still a “no shoes, no news” kind of place where souped-up golf buggies known as “mules” are the preferred mode of transport. “Mustique has a certain reputation, but everyday life is not about being wealthy or flashy – it’s

very easy-going,” says Hoffmann. “There’s also a real feeling of community life, which is very appealing, and you can dip in and out of the social scene very easily.” The “scene” revolves around the art deco bar in the Great Room at the 17th-century Cotton House hotel, where the well-heeled gather to get well-oiled every Tuesday evening. It was decorated by the legendary theatre designer Oliver Messel, Lord Snowdon’s uncle, who also designed Les Jolies Eaux, Princess Margaret’s Mustique home, as well as a clutch of other iconic Caribbean houses. “There’s a routine here and you very quickly fall into a relaxing rhythm,” adds Hoffmann. “On Wednesdays we have rum cocktails and dance at Basil’s Bar. On Fridays it’s back to the Cotton House for happy hour.” But even when she’s woozily immersed in island life Hoffmann is always on call. As well as juggling her various commitments in different time zones she is part of a committee – alongside Adams – that is working to restore the coral reefs which keep the startlingly clear water teeming with tropical fish. “I love what I do, so not being able to switch off isn’t a problem. I answer emails in the morning then take some time to stare out into the sea; I do my thinking and always come back refreshed.” Q


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VOGUE PARTNERSHIP

Left: Allegra midi-dress, Boden Icons. Below: Cressida tassel dress, £300, Boden Icons

The shape of summer

With indulgent fabrics and clever cuts, these are alleyes-onme buys

I

rresistibility usually begins with a small detail. A perfectly placed pocket that makes a pair of trousers appear instantly flattering. A gently ruffled collar that makes a cosy knit feel contemporary. The cut of a shirt, slightly longer at the back; or the substantial size of a button, weighty and expensive-looking. Details-oriented? You’re in luck: Boden’s Icons collection is full of those nifty features that will make your wardrobe work 10 times harder – leaving you free to project an air of effortless cool as temperatures soar. The culmination of seriously good-quality

fabrics and an elevated, fashion-forward spirit, this season the 14-piece limitededition collection is a spin through summer’s classic hits, all seen through fashion’s modern, exuberant lens. Think of Icons as Boden at its most special: how else to describe the Mariana, an immaculately cut, jeweltoned two-piece jacquard trouser suit that will see you through summer wedding season – and beyond? Or how about the Jemima dress, a 24/7 confidence-booster of an item, in soft blush and inky blue, its floralpatterned panels gently clashing to pretty, polished effect?

Then there’s those details: the elegant kimono sleeves on the vintage-hued Carlotta dress; the instant-zing of the tasselled belt that sets the Cornelia wrap dress singing; the leg-lengthening stripes on the wear-anywhere Catriona culottes; the sophisticated handkerchief hem on the Beatrix dress; and the handembellished finish on a pair of bestselling Gilly slippers, back this season in supersumptuous gold. Eye-catching doesn’t cover it: with indulgent fabrics, pulsating colours and fabulously clever cuts, these are all-eyes-on-me buys that will continue to dazzle for years to come. Q Visit Boden.com to see the full collection

POMPOM SANDALS, BODEN

Eclectic, colourful, contemporary – the modern woman has an idiosyncratic checklist of requirements, yet she always wants to wow. But how? Try on Boden’s latest Icons collection for size


LIVING There aren’t many women at the top in garden design, acknowledges Sarah Price, photographed in her greenhouse in Wales. Hair: Ben Jones. Make-up: Kristina Ralph Andrews. Styling: Julia Brenard

SARAH WEARS SHIRT, VICTORIA BECKHAM. SKIRT, LOEWE. DIGITAL ARTWORK: STUDIO RM

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here’s got to be some sort of mystery or magic in a garden,” says Sarah Price, the landscape designer tipped to be the talking point of this year’s Chelsea Flower Show. It is a rare sunny morning at the tail end of winter, and the softly spoken 37-year-old, whose horticultural designs are now in great demand all over Britain, is staring out the window of her quaint farmhouse overlooking the Brecon Beacons. Her own garden is rather bare today, though the greenhouse is full of potted plants wrapped in fleece to keep them alive during the chill. Yet there remains the majestic, unruly quality of nature characteristic to Price’s aesthetic – achieved, she says, by “letting plants form their own natural shape”. Price is no newcomer – in 2012, her exquisite, unusual planting at the Olympic Park in Stratford grabbed gardening headlines – but surely this will be her biggest year yet. Between May 22 and 26, she gets her shot at what is, perhaps, still considered the pinnacle of a star gardener’s career: designing the M&G Garden at Chelsea. Returning to the show after six years, and designing for its main sponsor, she’s feeling the pressure. “I push myself to experiment outside my comfort zone,” she says, adding, “I get high on the creative challenge.” So what can we expect? M&G has given her free rein to devise a “romantic”, Mediterranean-inspired garden, which celebrates raw, sustainable materials and a “vibrant colour palette”. She is unassuming talking about her work. Though her knowledge rivals the gardening world’s biggest names, she is the opposite of a Monty Don type. Growing up in suburban London, hers was a childhood dotted with memories

FIRMLY ROOTED Set to be the star of the Chelsea Flower Show, Sarah Price’s painterly garden designs are in great demand, says Katie Berrington. Photographs by Samuel Bradley of rural walks on holidays in Abergavenny and weekends helping on the family allotment as a way of bonding with her father (precious alone time, for the fourth child out of five). “Even though it was in suburbia, the allotment was right beside the green belt so you could walk through raspberry plots and woods and see horses and fields. It was magical.” Her first foray into design came as a painter, when she did a degree in fine art at Nottingham Trent University. (She is often commended for the painterly quality of her gardens.) But she eventually turned her attention outdoors. Without any contacts or much experience, her natural ability to conceptualise and create won her a competitive slot in the grounds of Hampton Court Palace. Price has since found herself increasingly in the spotlight. In 2016, she received rave reviews for

her art-inspired urban sanctuary for Manchester’s Whitworth gallery in collaboration with Jo Malone. She acknowledges there aren’t many women at the top. Figures from previous years at Chelsea suggest women make up around 70 per cent of the visitors, while the designers on show have been predominantly male. Things are changing, however, as a record number of women will compete for gold medals this year. Gender parity in garden design is still a way off, but there are advantages, she counters. Since she was last at Chelsea, she has had two children, which she believes has given a new depth to her working life. “When you have a young child and you take them for walks in the pram, you look more closely at your surroundings,” she says, smiling. “I think that’s enriched me as a designer.” Q

There remains the majestic, unruly quality of nature to Price’s aesthetic 97


The story of us

For Irish women, abortion remains both illegal and taboo. As the country faces a historic referendum, Lynn Enright reflects on a nation’s changing mood, and a past decision of her own

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into the Irish constitution. For the past 34 years, the law has stated that an unborn child and the mother have an equal right to life, outlawing abortion even in situations of rape and incest. But this May, in a historic referendum, Irish people will be given the chance to vote to repeal this amendment, and ultimately to allow parliament to draw up a law permitting abortions in Irish hospitals up to 12 weeks into pregnancy. Growing up in Ireland in the years following the introduction of the Eighth, abortion was not a word you heard often. Occasionally, a high-profile case would be mentioned on the news or during radio debates: the 1992 “X Case”, for example, in which the Irish state tried to stop a 14-year-old suicidal rape victim from travelling to the UK to have her pregnancy terminated. But generally, in homes and schools, the word was taboo. The only time it came up during my secondary-school education was when we were shown an American anti-abortion video. A mousy-haired woman stared out of the TV, addressing 30 Irish schoolgirls, trying to convince them that even in cases of rape, abortion was not the answer. One girl left the room, crying and upset. “She’s probably had an abortion,” another girl whispered. The room buzzed, not with concern, but with prurience. I wondered at the time: why did they bother showing us these videos? And why were there billboards with pictures of foetuses by the roadside? Abortion was already illegal; what more did they want? I realise now that the constant murmur of anti-abortion rhetoric ensured the stigma was

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was 31 and living in London when I had an abortion. On a grey morning, I took the Tube to the hospital and afterwards, I got an Uber home. My then boyfriend (who is now my husband) gave me a hot-water bottle and my flatmate brought me a cup of tea. My best friend texted me. “I love you,” she said. It was an everyday abortion but it hadn’t been an easy decision. I’d always wanted children and I’d hoped to be in a situation to have them at 31. But I wasn’t. The website I worked at had shut down the previous month and I was broke. I lived in a rented flat, sharing with two others. And my relationship was young and unsteady on its feet. So I had an abortion. Because it wasn’t the right time. Because it felt impossible to be pregnant, impossible to be a mother. If I had stayed in Dublin, where I was born in 1983 – an early baby, small, jaundiced and covered in downy hair, my mother tells me – my experience would have been different. Sometimes, I think that if I had faced a crisis pregnancy while still in Ireland, I would have continued with it, unhappily giving in to the unsuitability. Or, more likely, I would have been one of the women who travel. Around 10 women make the journey from Ireland to the UK every day to have an abortion. Women who, for lots of reasons, do not want to – or cannot – continue with their pregnancy. Perhaps I would have been one of them, making the same surreptitious arrangements – booking days off work, telling the necessary fibs to employers and family, boarding a cheap Ryanair flight at 6am as if going on holiday. I would find the hundreds of pounds necessary to pay a private clinic in Liverpool or London. Later, my abortion fund not stretching to a hotel room, I would bleed and sweat in a cheap hostel, many miles from home. Abortion has been illegal in Ireland since 1861, but a few months after I was born, the Eighth Amendment was written


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maintained. I grew up with my own sense that abortion was necessary – I have always felt pro-choice – but the silence surrounding the subject meant I kept those views to myself. Even at university in the early 2000s, abortion rights did not seem to be a priority for most of us. Sometimes, when we were drunk, somebody would confess – that’s what they were, confessions – about the abortion she had in London, and we would stroke her hair and say, “Shush, poor thing.” Afterwards, another girl would whisper, “God, I could never have done that.” Eighteen-year-olds who did ecstasy at the weekends and were prescribed the contraceptive pill by the campus doctor during freshers’ week still turned squeamish at the thought of “killing unborn babies”. Of course, there were stalwart pro-choice campaigners working hard to bring about change, people who recognised that Ireland’s punitive abortion law affected the poor and the vulnerable – the women who couldn’t travel – most adversely. But most people, it seemed, preferred not to acknowledge the abortion problem; they didn’t want to “get into all of that”. The repercussions of that avoidance tactic came sharply into focus in 2012 when Savita Halappanavar, a 31-year-old dentist who had moved from India to Ireland, died in a Galway hospital. Halappanavar had begun to miscarry a longed-for baby at 17 weeks and when it became obvious that her life was in danger, she requested an emergency termination. But a faint foetal heartbeat had been detected and because – according to the Eighth – the mother’s and baby’s lives are judged equally important, she was denied a termination. I was living and working in Dublin when the news of her death broke. I cried in the shower thinking about how my country had let her down, but once at the office, I didn’t broach the subject. Abortion still felt too controversial for the workplace. By the end of the week, though, the death of Halappanavar had galvanised people. There were marches on the Irish parliament and people tweeted their outrage, sympathies and regret. Her death began a reckoning and, finally, Irish

people – not just campaigners, but Irish people everywhere – began to discuss abortion. Of course, Irish women had been having abortions all along. We knew that, though we’d pretended we didn’t. We’d been looking the other way. Then, in 2015, the leading newspaper columnist Róisín Ingle shared the story of her abortion in The Irish Times. It wasn’t a story about teenage pregnancy, fatal foetal abnormality, rape or incest. It was a story about a woman facing an unplanned pregnancy and taking practical steps to make her situation better. It was a pivotal moment, and a loosening of the lies began. A fortnight after Ingle told her story, I was in Dublin for the March for Choice. On a sunny September day, I ran into old friends and vague acquaintances. At the pub afterwards, we shared our stories. We spoke of details in a way we hadn’t before: of the pain and fear that can take hold after the abortion pill is administered; of the sanitary towels, thick as paperbacks, we wore for days. Amid the stories, anger swelled. Our government had been failing thousands of people a year, exporting a problem, forcing women to travel, causing expense and grief. In our newfound frankness, we finally recognised that. Over the coming weeks, every day until the morning of the referendum, there will be more stories. Women will hope that by sharing their own experiences they can show that abortion isn’t an abstract problem and that those who have a termination are not wicked or evil or fallen. It won’t be easy. A fortnight after Leo Varadkar, the Irish prime minister, announced the referendum, I told my parents about the abortion I’d had almost four years ago. It was nerve-racking: they’re Irish and have always lived in a country where abortion is illegal. Besides that, Irish or not, it’s just plain difficult to talk about sex and pain and tears and blood with people who yearn to love you simply and easily, as though you are still a child. In the end, they were loving and supportive because that’s the kind of people they are. But they seemed sad as well. They certainly worried about me sharing this story openly. Perhaps they thought it isn’t the right kind of abortion story – that it’s not sympathetic enough. But as the possibility of the Eighth Amendment being repealed approaches, all Irish women’s stories are essential. I needed to add mine too. Q

Across the decades in Ireland, campaigners for both sides of the argument – pro-choice and anti-abortion – have made their voices heard; writer Lynn Enright, opposite

Irish women had been having abortions all along. We knew that, but pretended we didn’t 99


The platonic ideal Can men and women ever be just friends? Of course, says Salman Rushdie, as he reflects on his deep and lasting rapport with the late Carrie Fisher

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orty-one years ago, while driving from Chicago to New York, Harry Burns (Billy Crystal) told Sally Albright (Meg Ryan), “men and women can’t be friends because the sex part always gets in the way”. Well, it was 41 years ago – 1977 – in the movie. Rob Reiner’s romantic comedy When Harry Met Sally was released in 1989. When I saw the film, I felt strongly that Harry’s assertion was wrong. I grew up with three sisters and no brothers and consequently I’ve always had at least as many women friends as men. I say “consequently”, because I’ve always thought that that family circumstance was the reason for my many female friendships. Then, in 1997, I met one of the co-stars of When Harry Met Sally, and the closeness that developed between us became perhaps the best rejoinder to Harry’s proposition. That actress – that extraordinary individual – was Carrie Fisher. We met as guests on Ruby Wax’s late-night talk show Ruby, sitting around a dinner table talking and pretending to eat, and we got on so well that soon afterwards Ruby invited the two of us to dinner at the River Café. Now, it’s

possible that Ruby thought she might be matchmaking (I don’t know, I’ve never asked her), but I was happily married and my son Milan was about to be born, so that wasn’t an option. At the restaurant I put my “banana phone” down on the table and said, “If that phone rings, I’ll have to leave because it will mean the baby is on the way.” That took care of romance. Instead, we became, and remained, the closest and deepest of friends. I have so many happy memories of our friendship. I remember a dinner in New York with Peter Farrelly of the Farrelly brothers at which I told Carrie and Peter about a urologist who had recently died in New Jersey, leaving behind a macabre collection of arcane objects including the bloodstained shirt worn by President Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre; and, even more wondrous, the penis of Napoleon Bonaparte, with a full provenance authenticating it. Immediately Carrie imagined a documentary. We would acquire the detached organ and bring it ceremoniously to Paris and place it with all due solemnity on Napoleon’s tomb in the Hôtel des Invalides, making the Emperor whole once


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VIEWPOINT more. It would be our gift to the French people in return for There were days when I visited her gloriously eccentric home the Statue of Liberty. We tried to acquire the penis. We failed. on Coldwater Canyon and found her manic bad-Carrie side When Chiwetel Ejiofor and Ewan McGregor were playing in charge. (To see her, you usually went to her place; she often Othello and Iago at the Donmar Warehouse, Carrie got us seemed reluctant to leave that gated redoubt.) I recall one a couple of hard-to-get tickets by calling Ewan and using afternoon when I was sitting on her bed, as her friends did, the Star Wars connection. Afterwards Ewan, Carrie and while she soliloquised about whatever was eating at her for I had dinner at the Ivy, and Ewan suddenly asked her about two long (very long) hours. Then abruptly she stopped, the famous speech in the original Star Wars, the one hidden grinned wickedly at me, and said, “So! And how are you?” inside R2-D2. “Do you remember it?” he asked her. “Of She befriended my sons as well as me. She met Milan course I fucking remember it,” she said. “Can you do it, then?” when he was still very young but already a major Star Wars he asked her, and without missing a beat she went into aficionado, and she started sending him the most delightful Princess Leia mode and did the speech with full dramatic gifts – a Chewbacca rucksack, a flip-top R2-D2 dustbin; she intensity. “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only ho!” showed up at Zafar’s engagement party. She showed up for she finished. “You see,” she explained, “the recording was cut us all as if we were family, and that’s how we thought of her. off before I could say hope.” Carrie was family. Another time in London we were photographed coming In October 2016 I sat with her at the New York Film out of a restaurant and the next day a newspaper Festival premiere of the documentary Bright Lights, about ran the photo with the headline, “Salman dines with her relationship with her mother, Debbie Reynolds, who in blonde”. I can’t remember why her hair was blonde then, her later years would telephone her daughter every morning but it was, and amazingly it meant the newspaper failed from her house at the bottom of Carrie’s garden and say, to recognise her. She was overjoyed, got hold of a copy of “Good morning, Carrie. This is your mother, Debbie.” the paper, framed the article and put it in pride of place As if she needed to introduce herself. There’s a clip in in her home. After that for a the documentary that shows time she signed her messages the teenage Carrie being to me “Mystery Blonde”. summoned on stage by Debbie And… we had dinner and told to sing; whereupon together in New York on she sings “Bridge over Troubled Halloween, and, because Water”, revealing a great, neither of us felt like dressing powerful voice. “I never knew up, we told people we were you could sing like that,” I said there as each other. And… we to her. “ Why haven’t you went to George W Bush’s done it more?” “Oh,” she said, White House together during “I always thought singing was the National Book Festival in my mother’s thing.” After Washington, DC, and Carrie the film Carrie complained was magnificently, regally that she didn’t look good in it, disdainful, as if she were Leia but eventually conceded that scorning Jabba the Hutt. it was a touching record of an And… she practised her exceptional mother-daughter material on me, so that long bond. Now, of course, the film before I saw her triumphant seems even more precious than Carrie Fisher with Salman Rushdie in 2004. “Behind the one-woman show Wishful it did then. comedy was fragility,” says the author. “Her close friends Drinking I knew, for example, She had a love-hate all felt very protective of her” that when she asked George relationship with Los Angeles. Lucas why there weren’t any bras and panties for her to try In some ways she was the ultimate Hollywood insider – she on during her first Star Wars costume fitting, he answered, knew everything about everybody – but she also hated all as if he knew: “Carrie, there’s no underwear in space.” the bullshit. She loved London, and wanted to spend more Behind the comedy was fragility, and her close friends all time there, rummaging about on Portobello Road. Just two felt very protective of her. She was open about her difficulties months after that New York premiere we were both in – a history of drug abuse as well as acute bipolar disorder – London, she breaking the journey on her way back to LA, using comedy to triumph over adversity. She had shock therapy I to see my family for Christmas, and she summoned me to regularly, and even though that disturbed me, and others, she her hotel, the Chiltern Firehouse. It was Thursday, December swore by it and said it helped – though, as her answerphone 22. I found her in the residents’ bar with Sharon Horgan, message told us, it meant she probably didn’t remember who with whom she had been making the television series we were. So, fragility, yes, but also immense courage. Catastrophe. I remember thinking that she seemed really We were a motley crew, the princess’s courtiers – Bridget well, in fine, lively, good-Carrie form; and that she was very Jones creator Helen Fielding, the filmmaker Griffin Dunne, excited about having bought herself a London base, a house the actors Craig Bierko and Tracey Ullman, the novelist and on Old Church Street, and was full of London plans. Then screenwriter Bruce Wagner, the comedian and comedy writer she went to bed because she had to catch a plane the next Kevin Nealon, several more – but we all loved her and guarded day. And the next day, she caught her flight to nowhere. her fiercely. It wasn’t always easy. Sometimes she was I loved her, and I believe she loved me. But it had nothing despairing and wild. Sometimes she was at the bottom of a at all to do with what Harry Burns called “the sex part”. It dark well. Often she ranted, and we had to hear her out. went much deeper than that. Q

She showed up for us all as if she was family, and that’s how we thought of her. Carrie was family

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Sober girl’s guide to partying

ADWOA WEARS SWEATER, JOSEPH. BRA TOP, PRADA. MAKE-UP: CELIA BURTON. NAILS: PEBBLES AIKENS

Giving up alcohol doesn’t mean cancelling your social life, says Adwoa Aboah. Here are her tips for teetotal happiness. Portrait by Scott Trindle. Styling by Jack Borkett

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ithout wanting to get boastful, there’s one skill I’ve acquired that I’m proud of: I am the don of sober partying. In September, I’ll have been sober for four years and, yes, there are lots of reasons for me giving up drugs and alcohol, but the basic truth is that it was simply time. Now, like lots of people of my generation, I have friends who are stopping drinking and taking drugs and they often ask me how they can have fun without it. Here are some tried and tested methods that have kept me sane through everything from industry events to birthday celebrations. Honestly, it can be done.

Follow the music I used to be the first person on the dancefloor, but when I stopped drinking and taking drugs I became hyper-aware of my surroundings and felt like everyone was watching me. Then, one night, some really great disco came on and I threw myself into it. Now, you can’t stop me. As soon as Madonna’s “Vogue” comes on, I perform an entire dance routine. If you want to dance sober, ensure that you can depend on the DJ.

Embrace the benefits These days, I like being in situations that are a bit uncomfortable, like going to new places with new people. Before, I’d have

been terrified to do that, but when you aren’t drinking you can start to challenge yourself in different ways. When I first went into treatment, we used to go on these weird outings, to bowling or karaoke. Doing that made me realise I can do anything sober, which was empowering. I have met some incredible people at parties while I’ve been sober – and I’ve remembered them, and our conversations, the next day.

Invest in yourself When I went sober, I bought myself a Prada coat in celebration. I never used to have any money because I spent it all on drugs and alcohol. Now, I invest in myself. I just had a really good year and celebrated by buying a beautiful ring from Solange Azagury-Partridge. Use what you save to do something for yourself: it gives you a tangible reason why it’s worth it.

Know when it’s time to go home In the old days, I would go out and stay out just for the sake of it – even if I was having a bad time, or the energy was off-key. Now, if I stop enjoying something, I get straight out of there; if I miss out, I miss out. So don’t be ashamed to call it a night, or get FOMO. And when you’re scrolling through social media the morning after, always remember that things often appear far better on Instagram than in reality. Q 103


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ARTS & CULTURE

Drama queens From reinvented musicals to a new take on Strindberg, this will be an excellent season for women in theatre. Olivia Marks pinpoints the highlights

CECIL BEATON; JULIA HETTA; SARAH LEE/EYEVINE; JAMIE SIMONDS/BAFTA/CAMERA PRESS

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his year, as women directors and actresses continue to fight for space in the male-dominated worlds of film and TV, a multitude of exhilarating, female-led theatre openings will prove how change can take hold in the performing arts. First up: Michelle Terry, whose inaugural season as artistic director at the Globe begins this month with her hotly anticipated take on Hamlet. Terry, whose predecessor, Emma Rice, is to take up residency at the Old Vic with her new company Wise Children, is committed to female helmers, and five of her first season’s offerings are directed by women. Among that talent is awardwinning Blanche McIntyre, who is overseeing The Winter’s Tale in June. (Head to the Almeida to see her direct Ella Hickson’s eagerly awaited work The Writer.) Still, it would be wrong to assume that it doesn’t take a concerted effort for women to get their voices heard. Natasha Gordon was moved to write her debut play, Nine Night, after the death of her grandmother four years ago. But her transition from actress to National Theatre playwright was also born of necessity. “I have a group of friends who were all approaching 40 and we were frustrated not only at the lack of parts for women, but the lack of representation,” she says. “We set each other projects and created work ourselves to make it happen.” Further north, actress Maxine Peake ensures great parts keep coming by drawing on the real lives of four women for her new play Queens of the Coal Age, directed by Bryony Shanahan, at the Royal Exchange Theatre from June. Meanwhile, theatrical wunderkind Polly Stenham will bring a younger perspective to bear on Julie – her adaptation of the 1888 Strindberg tragedy, updated to contemporary London. “I had a desire to look at the play through a feminist lens because quite often these ostensibly female-led plays are written, directed and adapted by men,” Stenham says of her reimagining of Miss Julie. Her take, at the National from June, will be directed by Carrie Cracknell and star Vanessa Kirby. That isn’t to say the modernisation of Strindberg’s melodrama was easy. “In the original, Julie kills herself out of class shame. I don’t think that works now. The challenge was investigating what shame

means in a modern context and what would make a young woman do that today.” War Horse director Marianne Elliott will perhaps have a more straightforward time with her feminist revision of Stephen Sondheim’s musical Company, which, this autumn (at the Gielgud), will see 35-year-old bachelor Bobby replaced by Bobbi, a single woman juggling three boyfriends, surrounded by married couples. Sound familiar? “I’m 51, but I feel it could be me,” says the Tony- and Olivier Award-winner. “When you tackle a play like this you’ve got to find what it can mean for an audience today, and this feels relevant. I know many women in their midthirties who are struggling with where they go next: should they get married, have babies? Bobby in Company is an attractive, successful, independent man who has three girlfriends. If you transplant that to now, everyone would just think: ‘Great, have a lovely life!’ But if you transplant it to a woman I think everyone has something to say.” In fact, the feminist musical might become a genre of its own: Joan Littlewood, the anarchic theatre revolutionary, will be celebrated in song at the Swan Theatre in June; Alison Bechdel’s Tony award-winning musical Fun Home comes to the Young Vic, and, in September, Sylvia Pankhurst’s life will be set to a score at the Old Vic. Music to our ears. Q

From top: Vivien Leigh, 1936; Polly Stenham, whose modern retelling of Strindberg heads to the National Theatre in June; Michelle Terry, artistic director of Shakespeare’s Globe; Vanessa Kirby, star of Stenham’s Julie

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“I had never seen a woman like that before. It was like looking at someone from another planet,” Mapplethorpe said of Lyon

The power of the muse Robin Muir looks back at an anomalous shoot of the bodybuilder Lisa Lyon by the photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, Vogue May 1984

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y 1984, American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe was one of the art world’s most controversial figures. His polished, sometimes bloodless portraits were much admired, while his nudes, just as elegant, possessed a shock value that followed him to his death in 1989, and resonated for years afterwards. This set of photographs, Mapplethorpe’s only commission for British Vogue, was half fashion shoot, half portrait sitting, and in the end the magazine found it difficult to place. Laid out on single pages at the front of book, it is flanked by advertisements and you have to look hard to find it. The model was also unconventional for the magazine – although not for Mapplethorpe. Bodybuilder Lisa Lyon, shot wearing the latest in swimwear, was his current muse. They had met at

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a party in a Manhattan loft, where he had admired her form encased in black latex. “I had never seen a woman like that before. It was like looking at someone from another planet,” he later recalled. In 1983, the year before this shoot, they had collaborated on the cult book Lady: Lisa Lyon. A commercial assignment by Mapplethorpe was a rarity. While keen to work for magazines, he was often a hard sell. Anne Kennedy of the Art & Commerce agency told his biographer that magazines “wanted things that were funnier and lighter, more amusing, and Robert was not really about that”. Defiantly not. He was hardcore, emotionless, transgressive, shocking. This shoot for Vogue was a one-off. It remains an anomaly, a brave choice of photographer and a stunning set of images – even if they confounded the magazine at the time. Q


REOPENING

OCTOBER 2018

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Fashion travel Helena Christensen in Venice, Vogue September 1995. Opposite: Marisa Berenson in Sardinia, Vogue January 1968

Embroidered slippers, £150, Boden

Travel notebook, £45, Smythson

Suede bag, £2,070, Gucci

NEAR OR FAR Whether you’re seeking a local minibreak or far-flung escape, we present the pieces and services you shouldn’t be without...

Dress, £89, Studio by Preen, at Debenhams

Canvas overnight bag, £590, Ettinger

Marvellous Milan Milan’s famous furniture fair – the Salone del Mobile, April 17 to 22 – is just one more reason to visit this fabulous city. And there’s no better place to stay than the Baglioni.

Denim jeans with diagonal hem, £190, 7 For All Mankind


CHECKLIST Daily Firming Hydrator, £195, Lucia Magnani, at Harvey Nichols

Trench coat, £525, Marc Cain

Diamondset watch, £26,150, Omega

Square SQ10 camera, £249.99, Instax

Snakeskin box bag, from £2,631, Dolce & Gabbana

Backgammon set, £495, Aspinal of London

Fly right Wherever you choose to travel, British Airways’ new premium check-in, transfer service and security lanes make sure you get there with minimal drama.

Gold-plated rings, from £90 each, Pandora

NEIL KIRK; HENRY CLARKE; GETTY

Cotton top, £249, Luisa Cerano

Shanghai game, £990, Armani Casa

Trainers, £99, Kurt Geiger London


CHECKLIST

Cotton dress, £865, Philipp Plein

Mother-of-pearl earrings, £264, Aurélie Bidermann, at Matchesfashion.com

Leather sandals, £175, Michael Michael Kors

Sunglasses, £345, Marni

True blue Staying cool in smouldering heat can be as simple as pulling on a sky-blue dress. Take Philipp Plein‘s flirty fit-and-flare example for balmy days and breezy nights; it’s made for adventure. Set your status to out-of-office – and skip into the azure.

Lazy days California, Vogue June 2014 Silk scarf, £390, Philipp Plein

Leather sandals with ribbon tie, £610, Prada

Leather bag, £1,470, Philipp Plein

JOSH OLINS

Straw hat, £275, Eugenia Kim, at Net-a-Porter.com


COURSES World-class fashion education in the heart of central London

MA Fashion Media Programmes Starting October 2018

IMAGE STYLED BY BA degree students at the CondĂŠ Nast College of Fashion & Design

Photography: Dan Williams, Hair & Make-up: Bethany Rich, Model: Kanani Abdillahi

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BEAUTY

It’s about to unlock more than just your phone: your face is set to reveal your health issues, your bank balance… and, of course, your beauty. Nicola Moulton reports. Photograph by Richard Burbridge

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It makes sense that our faces should come to be our calling cards; our digital handshakes 114

our future is written all over your face – that much we know. Even before Apple launched its iPhone X with facial-recognition security late last year – apparently your thumb is no longer bulletproof enough, so this phone comes with an inbuilt camera that projects and analyses more than 30,000 invisible dots to create a “depth map” and an infrared image of your face – we were studying, photographing and altering our faces like never before. Faces are the new social currency: forget that image of an envy-inducing sunset; studies show that on Instagram, pictures are 38 per cent more likely to receive likes and 32 per cent more likely to receive comments if they feature a face – regardless of its age or gender. People talk endlessly about social media affecting our ability to create meaningful human connections, yet there is also huge evidence to show the involuntary surge of emotion we can feel when we see an image of a face we love. Even Facebook, that love-

it-or-loathe-it behemoth of social networking, has “face” in its very name. Would it have caught on to the same degree if it hadn’t been inviting us to put our best face forward? This is music to the cosmetics companies’ ears. Sales of make-up are booming: at last count they were nudging close to £1 billion in the UK for the first time ever. And rather than the increase coming from the show-stopping lipstick or glittery eyeshadow, it is “perfecting products” that are driving the boom – the concealers, brow products and tools, such as brushes and sponges, born of a need to enhance all those details we obsessively critique when faced with staring back at our own image on Instagram. And why wouldn’t your face be your future? There’s almost nothing you can’t convey just by using your face – ask the third of millennials who now say they’d rather use an emoji to convey their feelings than a word. Because what is an emoji if not a graphic representation of a wink, a raised eyebrow, a grimace, a smile? It’s no coincidence that, prior to the emoji revolution (is there an emoji for a revolutionary?), it was thought there were only six distinct human expressions: happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. Now, scientists have increased the number to 21 – including specific countenances such as “sadly surprised” and “happily disgusted”. (Feel free to practise those at your leisure.) It makes total sense, then, that our faces should come to be our calling >

STYLIST: ANNE CHRISTENSEN. HAIR: JAMES PECIS. MAKE-UP: DIANE KENDAL. PRODUCTION: JESSICA DALY. MODEL: MAARTJE VERHOEF

FACE: THE FUTURE


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BEAUTY cards; our digital handshakes. Your face is personal, but it is also public. It is uniquely yours; yet you can alter its expression to suit your needs – via make-up, via filters, via simply screwing up your face in mock horror, or raising a sarcastic eyebrow. And, generally speaking, most of it is normally on display. It can be recognised near or far. As ready-made, access-all-areas ID cards go, it’s pretty perfect. Why travel with a credit card, a driving licence, a medical history and a passport if it can all be right there staring you in the… face? What the new iPhone shows us is that we’re at the intersection of face plus technology. It cranked into life a few years ago when the facial-recognition scanners began appearing in airports. Still clunky, even when they do work, there’s nothing worse than staring up at the exhausted, dehydrated you, bathed in fluorescent strip lighting. Perhaps Instagram could collaborate with them on a filter to make weary travellers feel better about themselves. And the rumour is that because they work by capturing your facial topography – the unique bone structure of your face – the over-enthusiastic use of collagen and fillers can throw the results off, leading some border authorities to consider asking people to declare any invasive work they’ve had done on arrival. You’ll soon need your game face when you go shopping, too: already, in China, “smile-to-pay” technology involves paying for goods by staring into a camera, which then links up to your bank details and completes the transaction. And in America, schemes are being trialled where in-store security cameras capture your image and then access your contact details to serve you adverts for similar things to the ones you were filmed browsing. But in the future, your face could unlock a whole lot more than just your PIN. Medical research is now so advanced that machines such as Face2Gene claim to be able to diagnose up to 4,000 rare genetic conditions just by analysing your face. And even beyond the medical, some claim that computers can also now make an attempt at knowing whether you’re gay, straight and even how you vote. Researchers at Stanford University found that when shown pictures of one gay man and one straight man, humans guessed correctly 61 per cent of the time; the computers scored 81 per cent – but some say the algorithms are still a long way off being usable. The ramifications for such technologies in countries with, for example,

more questionable human-rights records are fraught. Being able to determine such characteristics could be problematic to say the least. “It’s a double-edged sword,” says James Temperton, digital editor of Wired. “Facial recognition is powerful in terms of convenience but also in terms of surveillance.” But what does it mean for your own attitude towards your face if it starts to become something not just aesthetic but transactional – like your signature or your fingerprint? Will it change the way we think about our faces? Will we alter our expressions? Will we wear more or less make-up? (Apple says its facial recognitions are not fazed by changes in make-up, and, in fact, even hats, scarves, glasses, contact lenses and sunglasses won’t throw it off.) We’ ll certainly become more experimental. Artificial intelligence (AI) is finding its way into beauty faster than almost any other sector, with the ability to create, “try on” and adapt new looks an obvious advantage. Meitu is the

Artificial intelligence is finding its way into beauty faster than almost any other sector industry leader, with apps installed on more than a billion devices around the world already – including its latest filter, a hand-drawn anime effect that went viral after Jimmy Fallon, Kate Beckinsale and James Corden all shared pictures of themselves created with it. Its managing director, Frank Fu, says beauty customers will “increasingly look to lifestyle and beauty brands to leverage this technology and give them more opportunities to try on and experiment with products from the comfort of their own phones”. Meanwhile, Smashbox has partnered with the AI tech company ModiFace to become one of the first beauty brands to use eye-tracking technology to see which areas of the screen you’re giving most attention. The trouble with beauty apps that tell you what make-up will suit you, however, is that at some point, a judgement has been made on what “beautiful” really looks like. “You’ve got to think of the technology that’s lying behind these things,” says Temperton. “Who’s to say what will suit you? Why

should a computer know more about what’s right for you than a human being?” But there’s also a strong argument to say that, as facial recognition becomes more ubiquitous, we’ll get less hung up about our looks, if our images are to be captured hundreds of times in a day. Of course, the opposite might also be true. Who wants terrible photos of themselves hanging around in digital archives for eternity? And isn’t facial recognition yet another technology that favours men over women, since they are generally less concerned about how they look on camera? THE BEST Maybe we’ll start to embrace IN BEAUTY TECH our “augmented reality” facial features, moving away from thinking about our faces solely in terms of beauty and instead considering them as an extension of our digital devices, the human interface – quite literally – of our phones and tablets. That’s what I was thinking when I road-tested the HiMirror, a hi-tech dressingtable mirror that captures your image when you peer into it and, helpfully, superimposes a HiMIRROR PLUS+, £319, terrifying map of your pores, can spot skin issues, wrinkles and dark spots on specify care and let you your face. I now know that try on make-up, what I lack in wrinkles (just virtually 11, thank you, accounting for a mere 0.28 per cent of my complexion), I certainly make up for in enlarged pores, with a “pore count” of 1,135. (A friend, a good decade older than I, came with me to try out the gadget, and had half as many, which I mutteringly pointed out must be because she has “so many more laser treatments than me”.) The TOM FORD One thing’s for certain: now, MEMOMI mirror records more than ever, our faces need your in-store consultation and sends our attention. Not in a vanityit to your phone obsessed, youth-chasing way, but in a way that understands their unique abilit y to represent us and, by the same token, to allow us to search for honesty in the faces of others. Maybe it’s the face cream that makes your skin glow. Maybe it’s the kick-ass red lipstick that gives you your game face. Or maybe it’s the dimple you get when you laugh. In a world NATURA BISSE of fake news and altered THE MINDFUL TOUCH reality, it feels like your face FACIAL, from £160, uses might just be the one thing a VR headset to put you you can rely on. Q in a tranquil state 117


condenastjohansens.com Anantara Siam Bangkok, Thailand


BEAUTY

Erdem’s exclusive make-up collaboration with Nars was two years in the making

From top: Lip Powder Poison Rose Palette, £35. Lipsticks (from left) in Bloodflower, Wild Flower and Larkspur, £22 each. All Erdem for Nars. Available at Selfridges from April 15 and nationwide from May 1

IN FULL BLOOM

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JAMES COCHRANE; PIXELATE.BIZ

When Erdem and Nars collaborate, only good things can come of it. Jessica Diner has an exclusive preview

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lower decals on the inside of the packaging, flowers printed on the palettes, floral-printed sheets to protect the powders inside the palettes, an array of odd but beautiful colours… Strange Flowers, the new Erdem for Nars collaboration, is everything you might imagine it could be – and more. Talking of the inspiration for the make-up, Erdem Moralioglu says, “I’ve always been fascinated by the contrast you get with flowers: they can be beautiful and soft, but also poisonous, dangerous and odd. That tension is something I like to explore in my work.” At 13 pieces strong, it’s the biggest collaboration

Nars has done to date, and comprises unique items such as a lip-powder palette, a holographic highlighter pencil and pretty blotting papers. An extension of his ethereal, eccentric aesthetic, the project has been hugely personal. “I love the idea of bringing someone into my world; there’s a little part of me in every aspect,” he says. Case in point: the music box (below) he had made to send the products to friends and family. Even the duck-egg-blue packaging – a total departure from Nars’s usual matt black – is particular to Erdem, as it’s the exact same shade as the bespoke paint in his South Audley Street store. “Would I do it again?” he says. “Yes, in a heartbeat.” Q 119


DIRECTOR’S CUT can have an in-between shade mixed up on-counter. Brands such as Mac Cosmetics, Bobbi Brown, L’Oréal Paris and Lancôme have long had an impressive range of shades, but the fact that diversity of skin tone is becoming part of our beauty vernacular is game-changing. Personalised packaging has also become of the moment. This month, Guerlain launches 14 new cases for its Rouge G Lipsticks, ranging from leather to rose gold or marble, so that how you present your lipstick can be suited to your mood. So, too, at YSL Beauty, where you can choose one of two limited-edition lipstick cases, like a fashion talisman for your chosen shade. At Estée Lauder’s Lip Lounge in Selfridges you can not only custom-engrave your lipstick case, but also mix up a bespoke formula of its popular Pure Color Envy. When Trinny Woodall launched her Trinny London brand, the Match2Me technology on-site was key, with an extensive questionnaire that ensures you’re getting the right shades of her stackable make-up. I’ve tried it, and the colour matches were spot on. Where skincare is concerned, nothing is more pleasing than seeing diagnostic tools at the counter becoming best practice for brands such as Elemis, Dior, Carita and Clinique, making it possible for anyone to have a professional level of expertise to diagnose skincare concerns and remedies. The launch of the Experimental Perfume Club sees bespoke fragrance blends with entry-level prices starting at £95, while a new haircare brand, Function of Beauty, allows you to choose everything from the scent to the treatment, all online through its brilliantly guided service. And this is just the tip of the iceberg. There are too many projects to mention in one column, but what we are witnessing is a watershed moment in our beauty purchases having a real and an authentic personal touch. Long may it continue. Q

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Personal effects

Bespoke products for all? We’re making progress, finds beauty director Jessica Diner

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have always loved personalisation. A monogram on a new handbag, a shirt, a notebook... it’s the ultimate luxury. And while this isn’t particularly new in fashion, the beauty industry has long been trying to find its own way to make things personal: DNA-dictated skincare regimes, bespoke fragrance consultations, engraved make-up compacts… Such offerings, while wonderful, have more often than not been prohibitively expensive. But times have changed, and brands are now really tapping in to the fact that, whether we are selecting a foundation or a lipstick case, we all want choice – something that feels personal to how we look and that’s also to our taste. And why shouldn’t we? With so many beauty launches a year, knowing that we can tailor something to our specific wants and needs is compelling. What we are seeing now is personalisation becoming democratised, with online diagnostic tools and on-counter bespoke initiatives becoming mainstream. Indeed, the launch of Fenty Beauty by Rihanna has been a big wake-up call, with its strong messaging about its wide range of foundation colours. If your complexion doesn’t conform to any of the 40 shades on offer, no matter: you

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ARIS JEROME/ART PARTNER; PIXELATE.BIZ

1 Experimental Perfume Club bespoke fragrance, £180. 2 Function of Beauty shampoo, from £36. 3 Guerlain Rouge G Double Mirror Cap, £12.50, and Lipstick, £24.50. 4 YSL Rouge Pur Couture in Le Rouge, £28. 5 Lip2Cheek in Pia, £25. 6 Lip Glow in Thea, £16. 7 Cheekbones in Kate, £25. All Trinny London. 8 Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy in Rebellious Rose, £27

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BEAUTY

In-house spin

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here may now be a spin studio on practically every corner, but if you can’t commit to classes, TechnoGym has recently launched MyCycling (£1,790). An at-home static smart trainer, it’s a stand that allows you to fix your own bike in one place and a Neuromuscular Training system to personalise your training over 18 weeks, building power and endurance levels. The MyCycling App, which connects to your bike, then offers feedback on workouts, well-known cycling routes, tests and expert-led training. Technogym.com

BEAUTY MUSINGS Lauren Murdoch-Smith reveals the newest products, launches and trends that you need to know. You heard it here first

CERTIFIED NEON

Models Own Cover It Full Coverage Concealer, £9

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Hourglass Veil Retouching Fluid, £25

Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Flawless Filter, £30

Bareminerals 16-Hour Full Coverage Concealer, £23

Laura Mercier Flawless Fusion Ultra-Longwear Concealer, £24, available in 12 shades

Concealers revealed Concealers have had a revamp. Not satisfied with just covering dark circles and blemishes, they are now filters, concealers and glow-givers in one. Taking on a fuller consistency with innovative technology, they have added value. Charlotte Tilbury’s Hollywood Flawless Filter can be used as a concealer over foundation or on its own; its underlying glow acts like a soft-focus filter. Hourglass’s Veil Retouching Fluid gives skin sheer but illuminating coverage, and Laura Mercier’s Flawless Fusion Ultra-Longwear Concealer is so brilliant at hiding imperfections you’ll forgo your foundation.

HELMUT NEWTON; PIXELATE.BIZ

VANILLA NICE

Erase any preconceptions you have about vanilla – the new instalment of the love-it-or-hate-it note is subtle. Tom Ford’s latest Private Blend, Vanille Fatale (£158), is a warm mix of Madagascan vanilla, while Armani Privé Bleu Turquoise (£240) has salty, spicy, woody notes. Jo Malone’s Jasmine Sambac & Marigold Cologne Intense (£75) uses amber and vanilla, and By Kilian Love The Way You Feel (£185, refillable) balances vanilla and coconut with neroli and bergamot.

Remember when Essie launched neon nail polish back in 2013? The first true neon shades, many more followed but since then neon polishes have been on a hiatus. The ingredients used to create true neon pigments are banned, but skilled chemists have now created a way around it and Chanel and Christian Louboutin have come up with chic shades that are guaranteed to be this summer’s must-have hues. Christian Louboutin Crosta Meteor Nail Colour, £23; Chanel Le Vernis in Rose Néon, £22


C LUB

CA L L I N G ALL B E AU T Y A D D I CT S! Sign up to the GLAMOUR Beauty Club today and be first to receive samples of the latest beauty, skincare and fragrance products, delivered straight to your door. No fee, no subscription, just a chance to join the GLAMOUR beauty conversation online by leaving reviews telling us what you think. R E G I S T E R N OW AT G L A M O U R B E AU T YC LU B .C O M


WELLNESS

Plant life

Is veganism the healthiest way to eat? Lorraine Pascale, chef and Vogue contributing editor, finds out. Illustration by Nicola Kloosterman

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ood is my ever ything. It preoccupies me. It’s what I do for a living. It’s my passion, and I take it very seriously. Once a year I have 30 vials of blood taken by Aidan Goggins, a nutritional medicine consultant and pharmacologist who analyses the findings, and then we adjust my diet accordingly. It might sound excessive, but I’m adopted and don’t know my medical history – as a result, I lean towards the paranoid side of health. Normally, nothing serious comes out of it; we make a few tweaks. But this year’s results were a bit different. They showed my mercury levels to be so high I was advised to steer clear of fish for the foreseeable future, which led me to explore other options. I’ve never been much of a meat-eater and, as much as I love dairy, it has never agreed with me – so did this mean I should go vegan? The arguments for it are compelling: vegan newbies often report they feel on top of the world when they first make the switch. This is most likely because they’re eating more vegetables, fruit and nuts, which contain those energy-inducing, phytochemical-rich antioxidants. These magical beauties are anti-inflammatory, blood-stabilising, fat-metabolising wonders. They are also in things such as wine, coffee, tea, cereals and legumes. All the good stuff. I considered this way of eating and went back to consult Goggins to see if it is for me. “Veganism is a great way of eating,” he explained. “But you can’t be a lazy vegan. If you’re going to stop eating meat and just chomp away on cornflakes and chips, you will land yourself in nutritional trouble.” Even if you go the healthy route and eat three Instagram-worthy meals of veg every

HOW TO SUPPLEMENT YOUR VEGANISM

day, unless you’re supplementing correctly, after six months your deficiencies will begin to take over and the post-vegan glow will start to wear off. When you reduce your intake of omega-3s, iron, B12, iodine, protein and calcium there can be consequences. I’ve decided to become an occasional vegan. On those days, I sleep better, feel lighter and my skin is so much clearer. I would love to go all in, but giving up my camembert on a baguette with salty French butter? No, I don’t think I am there yet. But is a vegan diet healthier than a meat-eating one? For me, I would say a resounding yes. Q

Source Naturals Vegan Omega-3s EPA-DHA, £16 for 30 softgels Fatty acids essential for good hair, skin and nails, plus optimum brain health Floradix liquid iron and vitamin formula, £11 Avoid anaemia by supplementing with iron, most commonly found in meat Doctor’s Best Fully Active B12, £7 for 60 capsules Often confused with iron, B12 is just as essential for healthy blood cells Iodised salt Iodine works to regulate the thyroid, so season meals with this Citracal Maximum Calcium supplement with vitamin D3, £16 for 180 caplets For bone, muscle and teeth health

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DIOR HAUTE COUTURE

DIOR HAUTE COUTURE

VIKTOR & ROLF COUTURE

RALPH & RUSSO

CHANEL HAUTE COUTURE

BEAUTY

BOLD BEAUTY When fashion fantasy is on the catwalk, beauty is sure to follow. Lottie Winter looks at couture hair and make-up

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BENOIT PEVERELLI; JAMES COCHRANE; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVE ELIE SAAB HAUTE COUTURE

ALEXIS MABILLE HAUTE COUTURE

GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVE

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here were many standout moments at spring couture: netted hats at Chanel; holographic crowns at Maison Margiela Artisanal; heraldic flags at AF Vandevorst and neon tulle at Giambattista Valli. But one thing shone out overall: the boldness of the beauty presence. As always, the collections exuded glamour and ethereal elegance, and the craftsmanship was as impressive as ever (see Elie Saab’s beading) but perfectly juxtaposed with this whimsical fashion daydream, this season’s beauty had bite. Dior’s slogans had been transferred onto the skin with poetic one-liners on models’ chests and fingers, and with the fierce, phoenix-feathered eyeliner by Peter Philips, creative and image director of Dior make-up, they served to cement the striking surrealism of the show. “It’s important to celebrate the artistry and fantasy that differentiates haute couture from ready-to-wear,” says Philips. “This look was graphic, in line with the collection, and we made it painterly to elevate it.” Viktor & Rolf showcased glittering eyes in attentiondemanding shapes. Then there was a rainbow of structural, space-age up-dos showcased at Jean Paul Gaultier by Stéphane Marais, and cloud-like pastel eyeshadow at Giorgio Armani Privé, by Armani international make-up artist Linda Cantello. More striking still was the seamless way that beauty interacted with the fashion. At Alexis Mabille, hairstylist Damien Boissinot clipped jewelled earrings to the ends of braided hair; at Chanel Sam McKnight draped delicate veils over models’ faces to mysterious, alluring effect; and at Dior floating, cutout masks effectively framed Philips’s intricate eye make-up. It’s safe to say couture has never looked so beautiful. Q


BANGKOK

DUBAI

KIEV

MOSCOW


HAIR: CYNDIA HARVEY. MAKE-UP: LUCIA PICA

From left: Karly Loyce wears jacket, to order, Gabriela Hearst. Top, £245. Skirt, £245. Both Longchamp. Sandals, £675, Stella McCartney. Orange bag, from £670, Balenciaga. Python bag, £2,625, Loewe. Earrings, £130, Katerina Makriyianni, at Browns. Lineisy Montero wears jacket, £995. Skirt, £660. Both Longchamp. Shirt, £680, Charvet. Sandals, £580, Tod’s. Earrings, £75, Cloverpost, at Shopbop.com. Necklace, £195, Kenneth Jay Lane, at Merola. Bag, stylist’s own

HAPPY DAYS WARM SUNSHINE, SHORT SKIRTS, COOL GIRLS: LAYERS ARE SHED, SILHOUETTES LIGHTEN UP AND SPRING BRINGS A BURST OF PURE OPTIMISM. FROM THE DYNAMIC NEW GENERATION OF MODELS CHANGING THE FACE OF FASHION TO THE JOYOUS GOWNS THAT SYMBOLISE THE PURE PLEASURE OF DRESSING UP, THERE’S PLENTY TO LOOK FORWARD TO. ALSO IN THIS ISSUE, VOGUE CELEBRATES STRENGTH: SPOTLIGHTING REI KAWAKUBO’S POWERFUL CREATIVITY AND THE FIERCELY FUNNY PHOEBE WALLER-BRIDGE. GOOD TIMES ARE COMING. STYLING AND PHOTOGRAPH: VENETIA SCOTT.


GENERATION NEXT THE NEWEST FACES IN MODELLING ARE REBELLING AGAINST INDUSTRY NORMS. ELLIE PITHERS MEETS NINE BRILLIANT WOMEN – WITH SINGULAR BACKSTORIES – DETERMINED TO MAKE 2018 A TURNING POINT FOR FASHION. PHOTOGRAPHS BY CRAIG MCDEAN. STYLING BY EDWARD ENNINFUL


Faretta Faretta Radic, 21, has been modelling for three years, but has a back-up plan: pharmacology. “I’ve done all my diplomas. I can sell drugs,” she says. Cut from the same smoking-hot cloth as the 1990s supers, she won’t be leaving fashion any time soon though, unless it involves flitting back to her native Croatia. “I’ve just bought a house by the beach. If I’m not near the sea, I go crazy.” OVERSIZED COTTON SWEATSHIRT, FROM £820. BLANKET, WORN AS SKIRT, FROM £760. MOLESKIN TROUSERS, FROM £700. SUEDE AND LEATHER TRAINERS, FROM £580. ALL CELINE


OPENING PAGES, FROM LEFT: HALIMA WEARS SOCKS, £14, PANTHERELLA. SHOES, £595, JIMMY CHOO. NECKLACE, £12,600, TIFFANY CITY HARDWEAR. FRAN WEARS BOOTS, £1,390, ALEXANDER McQUEEN. ADUT WEARS BOOTS, £1,450, LOUIS VUITTON. RADHIKA WEARS SOCKS, £25, FARLOWS. WATCH, £11,900, CHOPARD. BANGLES, PRICE ON REQUEST, NIRAV MODI. YOON WEARS EARRINGS, FROM £260. RING, FROM £200. BOTH JENNIFER FISHER. VITTORIA WEARS BOOTS, £740, PACO RABANNE. EARRINGS, £5,150. BRACELETS, FROM £6,850 EACH. ALL DIOR JOAILLERIE. FARETTA WEARS EARRINGS, £4,050, CARTIER. PALOMA WEARS BOOTS, £1,060, GIANVITO ROSSI. WATCH, £22,600, CHOPARD

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hree o’clock on an icy New York afternoon and high up in a studio, Selena Forrest has commandeered the sound system. This is not out of character for the 18-year-old Louisiana native. Possessed of the easy confidence of a natural ringleader, Forrest has a habit of blasting out R&B and hip-hop bangers backstage before catwalk shows to get her fellow models in the zone. As she hits play on NERD and Rihanna’s feminist body-popper “Lemon” – “The truth will set you free/But first it will piss you off ” intone the opening lines, borrowed, incidentally, from Gloria Steinem – she dances her way back to the set, calling out to the other girls as she goes. It’s clear she’s lit the taper that will ignite Vogue’s cover shoot. Today’s cast comprises nine of fashion’s freshest new faces, all remarkable individuals; all confidently flying their own flags; all asserting, with little trace of self-advertisement, the unequivocal need “to be myself ”. Hailing from seven different countries, and with backstories that include refugee camps, hurricane displacement centres, poverty-stricken homes or mere small-town boredom, the girls are currently twerking and sashaying in sync, shrieking with laughter and emanating a camaraderie that would make Steinem proud. Post-couturesalon mannequins, post-supermodels, post-waifs, post-Victoria’s Secret and post-Insta girls, this is modelling’s defiant new generation, keen to challenge, rebel and reform an industry whose dark underbelly – eating disorders, substance abuse, sexual coercion – is in the process of finally being exposed. If models were once seen but not heard, this new cohort is resolutely noisy. Take Paloma Elsesser, 26, who sways her body with the self-possession of someone who knows she is spectacularly attractive, yet who also admits that “as a woman of colour, as a curvaceous woman, I am dealing with historically being told that I am not worthy”. Next up is Italian Vittoria Ceretti, at 19 a sleek femme fatale whose backstage pep talks to sleep-deprived modelling pals have led her to believe a career in psychology beckons if the Vogue covers dry up. Across from her is 20-year-old Korean Yoon Young Bae, freckle-faced and Bambi-legged, all giggles and slightly awkward wiggles as she links arms with Faretta Radic, also 20, a dewy-skinned, angular-faced, preternaturally confident Croatian who insists on mononymous status, like any other self-respecting super. (“I have amazing skin, right?” she remarks, early on during hair and make-up. “That’s because I live near the sea.”) Add to the mix Radhika Nair, at 26 one of the oldest of the group, and a mop-haired, strong-browed Indian beauty and wannabe DJ. She dances with born-and-bred Yorkshire girl Fran Summers, 18, baby-faced and high on the recent discovery that Morrisons is to launch a Yorkshire-pudding pizza, while Adelaide resident Adut Akech, 18, a South Sudanese émigrée with an adorable Australian twang, declares that she marked her recent birthday with tattoos of her parents’ names on her wrists “to stop me getting homesick”. Lastly, shimmying around delicately, is the diminutive but dazzling Halima Aden, 20, the former >

IF MODELS WERE ONCE SEEN BUT NOT HEARD, THIS NEW COHORT IS RESOLUTELY NOISY

OPENING PAGES, FROM LEFT: HALIMA ADEN WEARS PARKA, £1,760. SHIRT, £1,230. CROPPED TROUSERS, £2,290. FRAN SUMMERS WEARS SWEATER, £700. MINIDRESS, £1,140. BELT, £490. ADUT AKECH WEARS DRESS, £1,405. BELT, £490. RADHIKA NAIR WEARS POLO SHIRT, £790. SHIRT, £875. CROPPED TROUSERS, £660. BOOTS, £880. YOON YOUNG BAE WEARS DRESS, £1,490. SHIRT, £670. BOOTS, £1,140. VITTORIA CERETTI WEARS SLEEVELESS KNIT TOP, £490. SHIRT, £1,230. SKIRT, £1,239. FARETTA RADIC WEARS DRESS, £2,250. PALOMA ELSESSER WEARS DRESS, £1,230. SHIRT, £1,105. SELENA FORREST WEARS BLOUSE, £2,200. TROUSERS, £700. BOOTS, £970. ALL CHLOE. HAIR: ORLANDO PITA. MAKE-UP: DIANE KENDAL. NAILS: MEGUMI YAMAMOTO. SET DESIGN: PIERS HANMER. DIGITAL ARTWORK: SILHOUETTE STUDIO


“I’M PUTTING A FACE TO MUSLIMS BESIDES WHAT YOU SEE ON THE NEWS ABOUT ISIS,” SAYS HALIMA. “I FEEL LIKE IT’S MY JOB TO SET A PRECEDENT FOR OTHER GIRLS”

refugee whose refusal to remove her hijab for the 2016 Miss Minnesota USA beauty pageant catapulted her into the spotlight, and ultimately fashion’s major leagues: she is the first hijab-wearing model to be signed by a major modelling agency, and the first to appear on the cover of British Vogue. Halima – first on set this morning, along with her chaperone – has challenged industry norms since day one. Born in Kakuma, a refugee camp in Kenya, to a Somali mother, she moved to Missouri aged seven, then finally settled in Minnesota. The pageant was a turning point, a chance to address misconceptions about Muslims that, as in Britain, continue to plague America in a fractious, often anti-immigrant climate. “I’m putting a face to Muslims besides what you see on the news about Isis,” says Halima, who is earnest and articulate. “Even though we have bad people within the faith, there are also a lot of good people.” At her first meeting with her agency, IMG, she laid down her conditions. “This girl with zero modelling experience!” she squeals, marvelling at her own tenacity. “But I do a very good job of saying what I am comfortable with.” Halima’s unique requirements included wearing her hijab at all times, being styled in clothes that do not reveal any skin, a cordoned-off changing cubicle, and female-only fashion, make-up and hair assistants to work with her. She also stated that she wanted to build another career in tandem, by working with Unicef. In fashion – an environment, especially during show season, in which girls are expected to change their clothes in full view of strangers, and where charitable work is often an afterthought to world domination – this is tantamount to revolution. To her surprise, IMG agreed to everything. “I never had a reference for somebody to look up to, but I feel like it’s my job to set a precedent for other girls,” she says. Strikingly, that sentiment is repeatedly echoed by her peers today, most of whom seem supremely comfortable with their role-model status. Perhaps that’s because social media has given them a hotline to the very people they set out to inspire. “I was recently made the face of Australia’s biggest department store, David Jones,” says Adut – who, it transpires during the course of the fittings day, was born in the very same refugee camp as Halima. “It was the first time they’ve used any model of colour. I don’t want to sound ‘up myself ’, but people say I’m making a positive impact, and I get a lot of dark-skinned girls messaging me for advice.” “It’s about re-establishing a conversation – that’s why Instagram is so powerful,” agrees Paloma, whose start in modelling came via what she calls “the curve space”. “Your imagery, your commentary can be your activism. And it doesn’t always have to be a post that’s all, ‘Today, I’m body-positive!’ It can also be, ‘Today I’m wearing this top.’” For Vittoria and Selena, it’s as simple as being open about their sexuality. Even Radhika, who admits to feeling uncomfortable with tokenism, “because India is a very diverse country, and I’m not trying to make a statement,” knows >


Vittoria With her classic decadent beauty, it’s no wonder Vittoria Ceretti, 19, was signed immediately after having sent snapshots of herself to the Elite modelling agency in Milan – or that she subsequently snared a Dolce & Gabbana beauty campaign. Unflappable and easygoing, she is the cool, calm type comforting tired, emotional models backstage before shows. “I like helping people with their problems,” she says. SILK DRESS WITH WOOL CAPE, £3,105, VALENTINO. LEATHER GLOVES, £45, DENTS. SILVER AND GOLD VERMEIL EARRING, £385, CHARLOTTE CHESNAIS, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM


Yoon Yoon Young Bae, 20, could hardly have a more Instagram-friendly name, nor a more beautiful quirk: a cluster of moles on her left cheek has made her Korea’s latest It-girl. Keen to dispel any notion of rivalry, she says her generation of models are “very kind and friendly”. After walking in all the major shows, she enjoys dining out with model friends. “They’re French, German, Italian, so there are a lot of cuisines we can enjoy.” SLEEVELESS SILK TOP, £850. JACKET WITH FLORAL SLEEVES, WORN UNDERNEATH, £1,150. WOOL JOGGING BOTTOMS, £800. HI-TOP TRAINERS, £450. ALL LOUIS VUITTON


Paloma Paloma Elsesser, 26, calls her modelling career “a resistant burn”. “I always thought I was too short, too big, too this, too not that.” After Instagram propelled the Los Angeles native into the path of make-up supremo Pat McGrath, and growing stardom, she’s changed her tune. Now, she leads by example. “So often, sample-sized clothes don’t fit me. They’ll put me in lingerie and throw a designer jacket over my shoulders. But it’s important for other girls that I don’t look out of place – it helps them to believe.” METALLIC RIBBED KNIT DRESS, £2,135, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION. HOODED CAPE, £945, SONIA RYKIEL. GOLD AND DIAMOND RING, £1,650, MESSIKA


Adut Adut Akech, 18, got a taste for the catwalk when she walked in an amateur fashion show in an Adelaide mall, aged 12. Five years later, she was shooting the Pirelli Calendar alongside Naomi Campbell – now a surrogate big sister. “She calls me, checks I’m eating.” But her biggest inspiration? “My mum – she’s a single mother with six children who works super-hard as a supervisor at a laundry. I just want to make her proud.” NYLON AND DENIM JACKET, FROM £1,150. SILK BLOUSE, FROM £755. FRINGED WOOL SKIRT, FROM £710. ALL BALENCIAGA. CORDUROY BASEBALL CAP, £95, LOCK & CO


that a fellow countrywoman seeing a brown-skinned girl on a magazine cover is a positive thing. “A lot of girls are not aware of this job as a career and how it opens doors. I love being independent. To be able to do whatever I want with the money I’m making is great. There’s so much freedom,” she says, before extolling the virtues of club nights in Peckham, where she currently lives. With freedom comes responsibility – but this generation is keen to give back. Selena, who has so far appeared to be the shoot’s bullshit-free version of Miss Congeniality, quietly remarks that “there are lots of kids from broken homes, and they take that hurt into their adult life. It’s not healthy. I want to break that cycle. Start a foundation.” Adut intends to found a modelling agency for girls from her native South Sudan. Halima, who visited detainment centres in Mexico last summer as part of her ambassadorial role with Unicef, is determined to go back to the camp in Kenya where she grew up. “I want to say, ‘I’m here! I’ve lived a day in your life, but I grew older and wiser and now I’m doing this.’ A dream beyond the border – kids don’t see that. You don’t dream like that.” How will their generation shape the future of fashion? They’ll be kind to each other – that’s a given. From sharing face masks (Yoon) to Cheez-Its (Halima), trading favours (Selena, concealing an e-cigarette in her back pocket on set for Vittoria) and cultural tics (Radhika and Halima huddling round Fran’s iPhone, looking surprised as she shows them pictures of British girls who are addicted to fake tan), they’re a gang that looks out for each other. “Modelling is competitive, for sure,” says Vittoria, who comes across as hyper-focused and far older than her years – she began modelling, she says, at 14 – “but it’s important to be nice to everyone.” They’ll also educate each other. “Your mom is forcing you to cook?” Halima asks Radhika. “I learnt a long time ago that if you make bad food – put loads of salt in it, burn it – then they won’t want you in the kitchen,” she advises, laughing. Meanwhile, Yoon trades Greenwich Village restaurant recommendations with Adut, as Paloma explains to Faretta the differences between her native Los Angeles and New York. “My neighbourhood is blindingly hip,” she elaborates, of her digs in Chinatown. “I mean, I’m grateful – it’s a cool place where a lot of people want to live – but sometimes I want to just drop off my laundry anonymously.” Most of all, they’re aware that 2018 is vibrating with possibilities. “I feel lucky to be coming into fashion when it is a safer space for individuals across the board,” says Paloma. “I’m so grateful for the models, the editors, the creators who have come before me, to allow me to be in a space where I can say, ‘I’m not OK with this,’ and not be fired because of it.” Radhika agrees: “I stand for individuality – equal chances no matter where you come from.” And as for Halima? “What a great time to be yourself – it’s the year of female empowerment, it’s the generation of uplifting young women, finally getting our voices heard, from all different backgrounds and walks of life.” Watch this space. Q

“I FEEL LUCKY TO BE COMING INTO FASHION WHEN IT IS A SAFER SPACE FOR INDIVIDUALS ACROSS THE BOARD,” SAYS PALOMA


Fran Like all good Yorkshire girls, Fran Summers, 18, has a hearty sense of humour. Case in point: her secondary “Funstagram” account, @fransfeasts, where she details her culinary adventures – including all the questionable backstage buffets she sees – with typically dry commentary. She’s feisty about the future: “My generation is about inclusivity – there are no restrictions on who you can be.” OVERSIZED DENIM SHIRT, £1,190. RIBBED KNIT SLEEVES, £325. JERSEY VEST, £235. ALL CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC


Selena “When you first get into modelling they try to teach you, make you walk in a certain way – it’s whoever they want you to be. I don’t do that.” Selena Forrest, 18 and from Louisiana, has a fierce, uncompromising attitude – which is arguably why she ended up opening Proenza Schouler, her first catwalk show, at 16. Now living in New York, she hasn’t let success go to her head. “If you don’t speak up for yourself, who will?” EMBROIDERED DENIM COAT WITH DETACHABLE HOOD, £4,450. DENIM TROUSERS, £550. BOTH FENDI


Halima Halima Aden, 20, from Somalia via Minnesota, is the current poster girl for “modest” fashion – not that she likes the term. “It immediately implies something derogatory about other women. We shouldn’t be judging people on their wardrobes.” With a burgeoning public speaking career, how does she switch off? “I love watching videos of weird facts on YouTube. Top 10 animals that will be extinct by 2020. Is that a thing?” MOHAIR/SILK CAPE, £2,400. COTTON BLOUSE, £1,100. WOOL TROUSERS, £910. ALL DIOR. LEATHER BELT, £290, ALTUZARRA. LEATHER BOOTS, FROM £1,095, REDEMPTION. LEATHER GLOVES, FROM £170, CAROLINA AMATO


Radhika For Radhika Nair, 26, a life of accountancy, tax and finance beckoned – until she was scouted by Balenciaga, and became the first Indian woman to walk its catwalk. Now based in London, she’s an infectiously funny, down-toearth presence at the shows. “Modelling was a fluke, so I don’t take it seriously. The money is good – not rapper money, but enough that I can do whatever I want.” GORE-TEX WINDBREAKER, £1,760. ZIP TOP, WORN UNDERNEATH, £640. SKIRT, £735. ALL PRADA. FOR STOCKISTS, ALL PAGES, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION


Opposite: patchwork leather and crochet coat, from £10,160. Jersey top, from £700. Python trousers, from £8,825. Python shoes, from £895. Hoop earrings, from £410. All Céline. Leather belt, £119.50, Elliot Rhodes. Leather bag, £485, Carven. Vintage necklace, from a selection, Elizabeth & James. Cuff, £305, Dinosaur Designs. This page: silk shirt, £680, Charvet. Ponyskin skirt, £2,350. Suede jacket, under arm, £1,995. Both Roberto Cavalli. Leather belt, £105, Elliot Rhodes. Faux-leather sandals, £675, Stella McCartney. Sunglasses, £180, No 21 x Linda Farrow. Gold earrings, price on request, Ana Khouri x Narciso Rodriguez. Rings, from £145 each, Pebble London. Tote bag, stylist’s own

heat wave Set the temperature to max on your summer wardrobe with an audacious mix of exotic fabrics, kaleidoscopic prints and exhilarating colour. Photographs and styling by Venetia Scott


This page: embellished velvet jumpsuit, £6,390. Crocodile belt, £2,250. Both Bottega Veneta. Ponyskin sandals, £720, Gabriela Hearst, at Matchesfashion.com. Earrings, from £410, Céline. Opposite: silk dress and matching trousers, £2,025. Embellished sandals, from a selection. Both Marc Jacobs. Jewelled silk turban, from £735, Stephen Jones for Marc Jacobs. Ring, on model’s right hand, £8,900, Victoria DurrerGasse for La Galeria Elefante. Ring, on model’s left hand, £360, Bounkit, at Merola


This page: cloqué gown, £2,900, Emilia Wickstead. Yellow turban, made by stylist. Green cashmere/ silk scarf, £930, Hermès. Vintage earrings and gold-plated choker, from a selection, Elizabeth & James. Multistone choker, £65, Nectar Nectar. Chain necklace, £129, H Samuel. Tassel earring, worn as pendant, £260, Elie Saab. Labradorite ring, £165, Pebble London. Opposite: leather blouson jacket, £5,310. Wool/cotton sweater, £675. Silk shirt, £1,170. Python skirt, £8,820. All Gucci. Shoes, from £895, Céline. Leather bag, £1,250, Marni. Sunglasses, £440, Pomellato. Lapis ring, from £370, Aurélie Bidermann


From left: Karly wears jacquard playsuit, £2,300, Emanuel Ungaro. Leather sandals, £495, Jimmy Choo. Hoop earrings, from £400, Annelise Michelson. Cuff, £447, Elizabeth & James, at Luisaviaroma.com. Lineisy wears coated linen jumpsuit, £1,070, Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini. Leather sandals, from £620, Derek Lam, at Galeries Lafayette. Earrings, £255, Katerina Makriyianni, at Browns. Bangle, £810, Roberto Cavalli. Ring, £121, Sylvia Toledano, at Monnier Frères


Opposite: embellished towelling dress and turban, to order. Towelling beach bag, £2,250, as part of a set. Satin sandals, £460. All Emilio Pucci. Tassel earrings, £45, Nectar Nectar. Bangles, from £82 each, Elizabeth & James, at Shopbop.com. Gold vermeil cuff, £370, Pippa Small. This page: chenille dress, from £690, Véronique Leroy. Leather sandals, £630, Stuart Weitzman. Enamel earrings, from £180, Lizzie Fortunato. Tassel choker, £44, Nectar Nectar. Gold-plated cuff, £21, Saskia Diez. Beach towel, £425, Hermès


This page: swimsuit, £205, Michael Kors Collection. Faux-leather sandals, £675, Stella McCartney. Earrings, from £385, Aurélie Bidermann. Tourmaline ring, £3,000, Pippa Small. Beach towel, £175, Goyard. Opposite: swimsuit, £150, Kenzo. Leather tote, from £2,240, Balenciaga. Leopard-print headband, £315, Gucci. Earrings, £210, Katerina Makriyianni, at Browns. Bangles, from £82 each, Elizabeth & James, at Shopbop.com. Cuff, £450, Pippa Small


LIGHTING DIRECTOR: RYAN O’TOOLE. COLOUR PRINTING: DAREN CATLIN AT BAYEUX

This page: leather windbreaker, £3,500. Suede top, £550. Leather shorts, £1,320. Leather loafers, £380. All Tod’s. Enamel earrings, £150, Jane Koenig. Bangles, from £310 each, Aurélie Bidermann. Opposite: suede jacket, £4,410. Snakeskin skirt, £2,575. Crocodile belt, £2,250. All Bottega Veneta. Silk shirt, £220, Equipment. Sunglasses, £510, Elie Saab. Earrings, from £850, Céline. Hair: Cyndia Harvey. Make-up: Lucia Pica. Production: Bellhouse and Steel Productions. Digital artwork: Idea Digital Imaging. Models: Karly Loyce and Lineisy Montero. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information


OF GOWNS & GLORY Perhaps it’s the uncertainty of the times, but the grand, expressive statement of a ballgown somehow feels right again. Harriet Quick welcomes its return. Photographs by Paul Wetherell. Styling by Gianluca Longo

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had my hair dressed up in a huge chignon. It was so big that I could not fit it through the neckline of the gown. It took three people 10 minutes to squeeze me in. I got stuck!” says jewellery designer Sabine Getty. Disaster was narrowly averted and Getty did go to the ball – the surrealist ball, hosted by Dior at the Musée Rodin during January’s haute couture shows. She wore a treasured black velvet gown by Alexander McQueen with a low lace-covered back, balloon sleeves and an intricate-painted “lace” mask. Getty joined the throng of light-footed beauties shielded in masks that ranged from discreet lace bands to gigantic peacock headdresses, wearing outfits as diverse as a Gucci chinoiserie-embroidered mint-green floor-sweeping cape (the stylist and blogger Tina Leung) to numerous variations of Maria Grazia Chiuri’s tulle ballet gowns, flashing Diorbranded big knickers and bras (an ingenious redux of the house’s epic New Look princess gowns). Chiuri’s daughter, Rachele Regini, looked a picture in a black leather corseted gown and tulle mask. “Every single time I wear haute couture, I feel like I’m a different person,” says Regini, who studies art history at Goldsmiths. “I feel at ease, caressed by the dress. And it does not end when you get out of it and slip back into your jeans. The feeling stays – it’s a powerful, emotional memory to have.” In our hyper-accelerated lives, the gown might seem an anachronism – a relic of bygone times when displays of pomp and power counted for all. Gowns were part and parcel of the débutante’s rite of passage. Young beauties, enrolled by their mothers, were trained in dancing and etiquette, attended a season of costly, flamboyant events with the mission of finding a husband and ascending the social hierarchy. “On the whole, my mother was more interested in my clothes than my morals. ‘I am determined you shall wear a pink dress,’ she said, so I did, pink chiffon with rose petals which soon got dirty,” wrote former débutante Philippa Pullar in Gilded Butterflies, her 1978 book about the rise and fall of the London Season. Back then; the big gown was all about propriety. Now, it is about self-expression, and joy. We are as likely to see a neon tulle Molly >


DIGITAL ARTWORK: TABLET RETOUCH

Grand designs: wearing a beaded tulle confection by Chanel Haute Couture, actress and muse Ellie Bamber poses on the staircase in Coco Chanel’s apartment at 31 Rue Cambon. Hair: Sebastien Bascle. Makeup: Karin Westerlund


Rachele Regini – daughter of designer Maria Grazia Chiuri – wears a surrealist-inspired trompe-l’oeil Dior Haute Couture gown in the house’s Paris atelier


Left: Lady Gaga in Armani Privé at the Grammy Awards. Right: Meghan Markle wore Ralph & Russo for the official photographs marking her engagement to Prince Harry

GETTY; ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI

Left: Rihanna in tiered tulle by Molly Goddard, styled with trainers and shades. Above: entrepreneur and ballgown aficionado Wendy Yu surveys the Seine in Alice Temperley

Goddard frock in an East End dive bar or at a protest march as we are on a red carpet or at the palace. Perhaps it is because we have become so reliant on clothes that expedite our lives – multitasking, hybrid, seasonless clothes that can be rolled into a Rimowa and pulled out for black-tie banquets and boardroom showdowns alike – that the novelty and absurdity of a ballgown is making a comeback. Real “numbers” look desirable again – a symbol of empowerment, and a flag-waver for dreaming and optimism in these often discombobulating and distressing times. They give us wings, transforming us into otherworldly beings. Fashioned in metres of crystal-spangled tulle, in embroidered silks, with their tiny waists and shape-altering silhouettes they allow you to float through space to alternative galaxies of glamour. Check Meghan Markle in her engagement gown (a gold-embroidered bodice with a cascading ruffle skirt by Ralph & Russo); Lady Gaga in an Armani Privé lace-topped taffeta skirt at the Grammys; and singer Janelle Monáe at the opening of Black Panther wearing a bustier top, huge skirt and contrasting sapphire and white silk sleeves by Christian Siriano. Or take a look at Charles Jeffrey Loverboy’s handpainted leg-o’-mutton-sleeve gown that closed his spring show – it was a statement of exuberant rebellion. Elsewhere, Mary Katrantzou created empire-line bubble gowns featuring embellished exotic floral prints, techno nylon panels and toggle fastenings. Burberry paired tulle ball skirts with graffiti-daubed hoodies, and even players as unexpected as Virgil Abloh at Off-White ventured into big dress territory. A one-shoulder exploding tulle gown in marshmallow pink with a just-seen corset featured in the spring collection. These are pieces with vitality that leave the old twee “seen but not heard” princess clichés in the dust. Not since the 1980s, when the club scene generated the New Romantic movement and men and women dressed up in punkish grandeur (Westwood mini-crinis or Lacroix puffballs) and legions of teenagers flocked to Laura Ashley to buy taffeta meringues for sixth-form balls, has the gown been so poignant. “A great gown should have a spectacular

effect and make you feel immediately like a princess, a Madonna or a queen. I think we are drawn to that as women. For me (and I don’t want to sound pretentious) the gown is an art form, a masterpiece – and it should take up a lot of space,” says Italian-born stylist and fashion editor Giovanna Engelbert. “Luckily today you can fit a big dress into an SUV, even if sometimes you have to lie down,” she laughs. With her taste for flamboyant froth and finery (including Giambattista Valli gowns that are made of more than 350m of tulle; Richard Quinn’s stately floral swing coatdress; Carolina Herrera and Valentino) her joy in glamour is infectious. Modernity does impact on the new breed of gowns, however big the dimensions. “You want to feel powerful, elegant and upright, but not wooden. I love a pocket, too!” says 21-yearold actress Ellie Bamber, who looks like a Pre-Raphaelite muse with her long marmalade locks and big doe eyes. “My first big dress-up was for the premiere of Nocturnal Animals in a Chanel Métiers d’Art dress, beautiful but with an edgy aspect, too. For the Vanity Fair Oscars party, I wore a plungeneck Chanel gown with gold and silver embroideries until 7am. I did not want to take it off.” The picture of young debutantes fainting in overly constrictive corsets has been banished by a new breed of super-lightweight construction, something at which Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia of Oscar de la Renta excel. “I’m a brat at night. I’ll be kicking and screaming unless the dress is really comfortable and light,” says Kim. “If you’re not comfortable, you are not exuding confidence throughout the night, and that’s not a modern gown,” adds Garcia. “We put a lot of research into fabrics and now there are jacquards and fils coupés that are airy and use elevated heat-pressed techniques and laser cuts.” The duo sent out ethereal creations for spring, including painterly ombré tulle gowns that make the wearer look airborne. For Tamara Ralph of Ralph & Russo, too, a sense of dynamism is supreme. “I always seek a lively air, grace and modernity in a ballgown.” Rather than being dressed by their mothers, a new generation of collectors and wearers are choosing and paying for >

“The gown should take up a lot of space. Luckily today you can fit a big dress into an SUV” 161


Left: Janelle Monáe in graphic Christian Siriano couture at the premiere of Black Panther. Right: Giovanna Engelbert wore a McQueen princess gown for her wedding in 2016

“I never want to tone it down. I grew up idolising Catherine Deneuve – that is the pinnacle”

gowns themselves. Entrepreneur Wendy Yu first discovered her love of dressing-up watching Leighton Meester flaunt her beaded Matthew Williamson in Gossip Girl. “Growing up in China, we were not encouraged to be creative – it was all about studying hard. At school you did not wear make-up and your hair was cut short. Now the culture has changed, and I am happy for that,” says Yu, who threw a Chinese New Year party at Kensington Palace wearing a poppy-red eyelet cotton ruffled frock by Huishan Zhang. That dress will join a collection of more than 200 gowns, including 10 couture pieces. Dresses by Giambattista Valli, Roksanda, Dior, Ralph & Russo, Valentino, Elie Saab and Temperley are all in Yu’s collection. “One of my dreams is to open a fashion museum in China, so I want the collection to be an archive, part of fashion history,” says Yu. Her criteria? “I want something refreshing, that’s inspiring on a creative level,” says Yu, who attends eight big-gown events a year. Wearing a gown takes daring, learning and imagination. “I never want to tone it down,” says Getty, who married in a Schiaparelli couture gown, embroidered with more than 500,000 sequins, that took six months and six fittings to finalise. She also has pieces by Peter Dundas and Alexander McQueen in her collection, alongside vintage Yves Saint Laurent, Loris Azzaro and Pierre Cardin. “I grew up idolising Catherine Deneuve. If I wanted to define glamour, that is the pinnacle.” While gowns are a big public statement, they also have an intimate personal history, with tastes and obsessions often formed in childhood. “My first gown moment? It must have been my baptism robe. I probably thought, ‘I like this!’” says Engelbert, who in girlhood staged an annual Barbie-doll gala with her sister Sarah. It was Sarah Jessica Parker in Sex and the City who influenced Laura Kim. “I remember wearing a huge pink silk ballgown aged 20,” she says. Meanwhile, Regini grew up surrounded by gowns. Her grandmother, like her mother, worked as a dressmaker. “I love to wear my mum’s clothes and keep the tradition going. There’s a sense of continuity and a sense of love. One of the most treasured is a lace skirt, blouse and a cashmere coat that my grandmother

made for my mother’s wedding day. She refused to wear a dress and had shaved hair,” says Regini. For her Vogue portrait, Regini donned a Dior couture design with a trompe-l’oeil effect of bare breasts fashioned in metallic sequins, as if seen through X-ray eyes. “I was thinking about how much time women spend in front of the mirror,” says Maria Grazia Chiuri, who is fascinated by our personal and public faces. Getty discovered her passion through endless games of dress-up and themed parties as a child. Not that the habit has faded with age. She held a Liaisons Dangereuses engagement party (her hair took four hours of preparation) and last year staged an Auntie Mame ball, based on the 1958 film with Rosalind Russell. In tribute, Getty wore a vintage purple and pink patterned marabou-trimmed gown by Pierre Cardin. “Everyone made such an effort. Charlotte Dellal came with fully set hair in a pink feather-trimmed peignoir,” says Getty. For Auntie Mame, as for Cosette in Les Misérables (Ellie Bamber is playing the part in the forthcoming BBC production) and for every variation of Cinderella, the gown marks a blossoming, a triumph of glamour and exuberance – often in the face of adverse circumstances. “I have always been obsessed with the way models wore haute couture in Richard Avedon and Irving Penn images from the 1950s, and the way cut and proportion can really change the way you look,” says Richard Quinn, winner of the Queen Elizabeth II Fashion Award, who interprets that extreme elegance with a macabre touch. “It is a sort of poetry, because of the use of rare materials and savoir-faire. It is also a sort of resilience,”says Bertrand Guyon, creative director of Schiaparelli. And so the gown persists, and evolves to suit each new generation. “This period in fashion has been dominated by the Vetements effect – hyper-real clothes,” says Engelbert. “But the dream is at the very essence of fashion and the gown is the dream. It’s fascinating to see how teens and twentysomethings will influence its future. Maybe a giant hoodie gown or a giant bathrobe style?” Whatever its permutation, today the wearing of a gown offers up a thrilling, unbeatable experience to be enjoyed in real time. Consider it a love letter to fashion. Q

ALEX BRAMALL/KINTZING; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; GETTY

Above: stylish Tina Leung takes Gucci couture to the beach. Right: FKA Twigs in baroque, full-skirted Versace at the British Fashion Awards in December 2017


Sabine Getty reclines in feather-strewn Schiaparelli Haute Couture, beneath a screen painted for Elsa Schiaparelli by Marcel Vertès in the late 1930s


DIOR MARIA GRAZIA CHIURI PAID HOMAGE TO SURREALIST ARTIST LEONOR FINI IN A MONOCHROMATIC COLLECTION THAT DREW ON THE MOVEMENT. FROM LEFT: MARYNA WEARS CASHMERE COAT WITH POINTD’ESPRIT SHIRT AND TIE. HE CONG WEARS SATIN COAT WITH DOTTED TULLE SHIRT AND TIE. SIGNE WEARS SILK AND VELVET DRESS WITH VINYL MASK. ALYSSA WEARS ORGANZA BUSTIER DRESS WITH EMBROIDERED FEATHER CAPE. JEWELLERY, FROM A SELECTION. ALL TO ORDER, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. HAIR: ANTHONY TURNER. MAKE-UP: LYNSEY ALEXANDER. NAILS: ANATOLE RAINEY. SET DESIGN: EMMA ROACH. SEAMSTRESS: CAROLE SAVATON. PRODUCTION: PRODN PARIS. DIGITAL ARTWORK: TRIPLELUTZ TEAM. MODELS: XIE CHAOYU, HE CONG, SELENA FORREST, JONAS GLOER, PAUL HAMELINE, MARYNA HORDA, LEA JULIAN, HIANDRA MARTINEZ, ALYSSA TRAORE, SIGNE VEITEBERG, SARA GRACE WALLERSTEDT, KIKI WILLEMS, ANOK YAI

A HAND-MADE TALE No longer the preserve of the elite, haute couture is transforming – reaching a younger generation in tune with its celebration of diversity, uniqueness and craftsmanship. Not to mention its magic, says Anders Christian Madsen. Photographs by Willy Vanderperre. Styling by Venetia Scott


B SCHIAPARELLI BERTRAND GUYON PROCESSED SCHIAPARELLI’S LEGACY THROUGH AFRICA AND ASIA, EMBELLISHING TULLE DRESSES WITH FANTASY JUNGLE NEEDLEWORK AND DELICATE FLOWERS. ABOVE, FROM LEFT: MARYNA WEARS PLEATED TULLE DRESS EMBROIDERED WITH LEATHER FLOWERS. HE CONG WEARS TULLE AND CHANTILLY LACE DRESS. SIGNE WEARS EMBROIDERED TULLE DRESS. ALL TO ORDER, SCHIAPARELLI HAUTE COUTURE

etween massive sets, monster trucks and live performances, designers go to great lengths to create epic show experiences in the age of social media. And yet the most rock’n’roll fashion moment I’ve had in recent seasons took place in the small gilded salons of the Valentino couture show in January, where splendid taffeta ballgowns brushed against my knees, their ruffles rustling to the violins of Puccini and Bach. I felt as if I were inside some exquisite Deborah Turbeville fashion image. On Instagram, my fellow thirtysomethings gushed at videos from the show, the number of “likes” soaring by the thousands. Quite the reaction for this supposedly archaic branch of fashion so rooted in elitist exclusivity. In recent years, haute couture has gained new momentum. In the dream world embodied by the enchanting eveningwear of this old craft, young people find the pure creation they crave and miss on a commercialised ready-to-wear platform. After all, exuberant creativity is what attracted us to fashion in the first place. Take the Maison Margiela spring/summer 2018 couture show, at which John Galliano conjured up a sensory overload of knitted coats forged in rubber and dark fabrics that turned into rainbows with the flash of a camera phone. It was trippy, mind-boggling and rare. In a corporate fashion world that panders to retail figures, haute couture can seem like the last bastion of honesty. Here, garments follow the strict rules of a Parisian federation, which currently acknowledges just 14 bona fide couturiers, including designers from Valentino, Givenchy, Dior and Chanel. Each look they create can only ever be sold to one person, and every handcrafted garment must tick a string of boxes to be granted the hallowed stamp of haute couture.

Ironically, this obsession with exclusivity isn’t far off the contemporary streetwear scene. On social media, my own generation proudly posts pictures of their newest trophy T-shirt or trainers from hyper-coveted brands such as Supreme, Palace and Yeezy. It’s a desire for limited-edition pieces in which haute couture – that fusty old dinosaur – represents the ultimate dream. “Now people speak about the human touch; about something that is one of a kind; about craftsmanship,” Dior’s Maria Grazia Chiuri told me, reflecting on her haute couture. “There’s a different conscience about what’s happening in fashion, in food, in everything.” You only need to look at the personalised phone cases launched by fashion insider brand Chaos last year to see her point. Around the fashion landscape, every young person now has their initials embossed into the leather of their case. It’s a more affordable take on the individuality offered by haute couture, but our fascination with this artisanal institution isn’t necessarily about owning it. Rather, it’s the comfort in knowing that the wild creative expression, which enthrals fashion fans in the first place, is still free to flourish. “I’m seeing this normality in the world that’s kind of being lionised and deified,” Rick Owens said after his spring/ summer 2018 men’s show, where boys in otherworldly couture tailoring descended from the roof of the Palais de Tokyo like alien angels. “I need to be surprised. I need effort. And I need things to be rare and not banal. Celebrating the prosaic and conventional is amusing, but it’s not the spirit of my spirit,” he continued. Owens is one of few designers – Rei Kawakubo, Marc Jacobs and Galliano included – who are increasingly imbuing their ready-to-wear with a creation level inherent to haute couture, rebelling against a fashion climate that’s largely going the other way and, in turn, jading a young generation of fashion fans who yearn for magic over reality. We can’t buy into couture, but its presence in fashion is more invaluable than ever. Designers such as Chiuri and Galliano inform their readyto-wear through the haute couture they design. At Givenchy, newly baptised couturier Clare Waight Keller conferred with her couture ateliers to finesse her ready-to-wear silhouettes last season, and when it came to her first haute couture collection in January, the process was a creative epiphany. “I was working in the best laboratory in the world. In the beginning the amount of endless choice was overwhelming,” Waight Keller admitted after the show. “It’s a little bit of an old soul in a new incarnation,” she added, basically summing up the newfound relevance of haute couture. “As a couturier – and I never use this word – I think you have to face your past and all the dreams of couture and make it contemporary for the future,” Pierpaolo Piccioli said after his Valentino show that same week, echoing the sentiment. The designer doesn’t see haute couture as an exclusive extravagance for the elite, but as a manifestation of the present-day values of the youth. “Couture talks about a one-of-a-kind uniqueness. It’s not something that belongs to a beautiful past. It’s about valuing diversity,” he told me. “And in this moment I think it’s super-important to talk about diversity as beauty.” Q


GIAMBATTISTA VALLI THE SAVAGE NATURE PORTRAYED IN VICTORIAN HORTICULTURAL MANUAL THE WILD GARDEN INSPIRED VALLI’S COLLECTION. FASHIONED IN THE COLOURS OF HIBISCUS, BOUTON DE ROSE AND ABSINTHE, HIS CREATIONS USED SOME 350M OF SILK TULLE PER DRESS TO CREATE THE THREE MULTI-RUFFLED TULLE GOWNS THAT CLOSED THE SHOW. FROM LEFT: ALYSSA, XIE AND ANOK ALL WEAR SILK-TULLE BALLGOWNS. ALL TO ORDER, GIAMBATTISTA VALLI HAUTE COUTURE


VALENTINO PIERPAOLO PICCIOLI WANTED TO FREEZE-FRAME THE WAY HAUTE COUTURE APPEARS IN FASHION IMAGERY AND GIVE MAJESTIC GARMENTS A CONTEMPORARY SENSE OF EASE. HE USED LIGHTWEIGHT FAILLE FOR A GOLD RAINCOAT WHILE RIGID TAFFETA ADDED CLASSIC COUTURE DRAMA TO COATS AND DRESSES. FROM LEFT: MARYNA WEARS FAILLE TOP, GABARDINE TROUSERS AND LEATHER GLOVES. HIANDRA WEARS TAFFETA COAT, SATIN TOP, GABARDINE TROUSERS AND LEATHER GLOVES. LEA WEARS MOIRE DRESS AND EARRINGS. HE CONG WEARS TAFFETA DRESS. ANOK WEARS TAFFETA WRAP DRESS AND SANDALS. ALYSSA WEARS FAILLE RAINCOAT, MIKADO TOP WITH BOW, GABARDINE TROUSERS AND HAT. ALL TO ORDER, VALENTINO HAUTE COUTURE


VIKTOR & ROLF THE DUTCH DESIGN DUO DEDICATED THEIR ENTIRE COLLECTION TO THE FABRIC MOST EMBODIED BY COUTURE: HAND-WOVEN DUCHESSE SATIN. ONE DRESS WAS CRAFTED WITH NO SEAMS, EVERY CROSS LINE FASTENED BY HAND. FROM LEFT: SARA GRACE, HIANDRA AND MARYNA ALL WEAR DRESSES AND MASKS IN TECHNICAL DUCHESSE SATIN. ALL TO ORDER, VIKTOR & ROLF COUTURE. SHOES, TO ORDER, REPETTO


JEAN PAUL GAULTIER THREE SPECIALISTS, 200 HOURS AND 25M OF THE FINEST FABRICS WENT INTO GAULTIER’S FUTURISTIC FOLKLORE GOWN, WHICH PAID TRIBUTE TO PIERRE CARDIN, THE LEGENDARY COUTURIER WHO GAVE A 17-YEAR-OLD GAULTIER HIS FIRST JOB IN FASHION. TAFFETA, LAME AND RADZIMIR GOWN WITH LEATHER BUSTIER AND JEWELLERY. ALL TO ORDER, GAULTIER PARIS


GIVENCHY CLARE WAIGHT KELLER, WHO JOINED GIVENCHY LAST YEAR, APPROACHED HER FIRST COUTURE COLLECTION WITH CONTEMPORARY EYES, EMPLOYING CLASSIC COUTURE FABRICS – TIERS OF SILK GAZAR, FAILLE AND DOUBLE SATIN – IN HIGHLY STRUCTURED DRESSES. FROM LEFT: ANOK WEARS SILK-FAILLE BUSTIER DRESS. KIKI WEARS ASYMMETRIC WOOL COAT, AND SILK-GAZAR DRESS. SELENA WEARS DOUBLESATIN BUSTIER DRESS EMBROIDERED WITH VELVET AND SEQUINS. JONAS WEARS EMBROIDERED EVENING COAT, SILK SHIRT AND LEATHER TROUSERS WITH HAND-LACED SEAMS. ALL TO ORDER, GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE. JEWELLERY, BOUCHERON


CHANEL AT KARL LAGERFELD’S COMMAND, THE CHANEL ATELIERS DEVOTED 324 HOURS TO EMBROIDERING AN A-LINE SILK-TULLE DRESS WITH OSTRICH PLUMES AND PINK PEARLS, WHILE A WHITE SATINTWEED JACKET WAS EMBROIDERED WITH MORE THAN 14,000 BEADS. FROM LEFT: HE CONG WEARS IVORY MINI TRAPEZE DRESS EMBROIDERED WITH PEARLS AND PINK FEATHERS, PINK EMBROIDERED BOOTS AND LACE VEIL. LEA WEARS SEQUINED AND BEADED WHITE TWEED JACKET WITH CULOTTES, TWEED BOOTS AND LACE VEIL. ALL TO ORDER, CHANEL HAUTE COUTURE


GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVE ARMANI BASED HIS COLLECTION ON THE NUANCES OF THE SKY, DRAWING ON NATURE’S OWN MATERIALS AND PATTERNS. HIS BESPOKE MEN’S EVENINGWEAR MATERIALISED IN A HAND-STITCHED VELVET TUXEDO WITH SATIN SHAWL REVERS. ALYSSA WEARS CROCODILE JACKET, SILK-CREPE SHIRT AND SILK-SATIN TROUSERS, TO ORDER, GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVE. PAUL WEARS VELVET TUXEDO SUIT, TO ORDER, GIORGIO ARMANI


ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER VAUTHIER BASED EACH OF HIS LOOKS ON CHARACTERS FROM ART AND CINEMA, INCLUDING CATHERINE DENEUVE’S MIRIAM IN THE HUNGER, BLADE RUNNER’S RACHAEL AND THE FIFER BY MANET. FROM LEFT: SELENA WEARS LEATHER DRESS, CAP AND BOOTS, ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER HAUTE COUTURE. NECKLACE AND RING, CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY. HE CONG WEARS EMBELLISHED GRAIN DE POUDRE JACKET, BUSTIER, TROUSERS AND HAT, ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER HAUTE COUTURE. NECKLACE, PIAGET. SIGNE WEARS TWILL DRESS WITH BROOCH, ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER HAUTE COUTURE. BRACELET, DE BEERS. ANOK WEARS EMBROIDERED VELVET JACKET WITH BROOCH, LEATHER TROUSERS, SUNGLASSES AND HAT, ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER HAUTE COUTURE. RING, DIOR JOAILLERIE. FOR STOCKISTS, ALL PAGES, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION


THE LINE OF DANGER W

The delicate work of the government’s CounterTerrorism Unit has never been more crucial. Helen Lewis meets four Whitehall women fighting to keep us safe. Portraits by Bastiaan Woudt. Styling by Julia Brenard 178

henever there is a serious terrorist attack in Britain, a sleepy basement underneath the Foreign Office in Whitehall becomes a hive of activity. Specialists from across the government gather to watch the news roll in and to talk to their contacts on secure lines, co-ordinating the national response. “Half the time you don’t even know each other’s names because you’ve never seen each other before,” says Shubline Ghuman, who has worked as a maritime and aviation threats officer since 2015. “You don’t have time to stop and think. It’s quite a surreal feeling when you see all the big screens, stuff going on, real people calling in asking about their loved ones,” she says, when we meet several floors above the “crisis centre” in a quiet room overlooking an impressive Victorian courtyard. “I’ve seen quite a lot of trauma. It doesn’t hit me as quickly as it does some others, but it does hit you.” Jane Marriott – a former acting ambassador to Iran and ambassador to Yemen, who, as director of the Joint International Counter-Terrorism Unit, is now one of the highest-ranking professionals in British intelligence – maintains the terrorist threat to Britain is “not existential”. By which she means it doesn’t threaten to overwhelm the country. But that doesn’t mean it’s nonexistent. There were five terror attacks in Britain last year, including the Manchester Arena bombing, which killed 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert. Four of the attacks were linked to Islamic extremists, and one was carried out by a far-right sympathiser against worshippers at a north

London mosque. “What’s really important is how we respond as a society to terrorist incidents,” Marriott tells me, cradling a cup of mint tea in a café under a converted church in Westminster. “If there is fear, or reaction against a community, because of the actions of one person, then the terrorists win.” Marriott and Ghuman are part of a generation of trailblazing women working in counter-terrorism roles at the Foreign Office. The once-stuffy Whitehall department is undergoing a profound change as it becomes less pale, male and stale – and has allowed Vogue a rare glimpse into the lives of its employees, who normally shun all publicity. In 2008, there were just 22 female “heads of mission” – ambassadors, consuls and other senior representatives abroad – out of 200. Today, there are 66. Across all grades, women now make up 45 per cent of employees and can be seen taking on roles that would have been unthinkable a few decades ago. They are smashing both the stereotype of what Christopher Meyer, a former ambassador to the United States, called the “aristocratic diplomat, clad in pinstripes, quaffing champagne” and the James Bond cliché of a devious, superior Brit turning up in other countries to cause trouble before making a quick exit. Kate Shaw is a prime example of this new generation. Over coffee in the Foreign Office’s canteen, she occasionally stops herself to check she’s not revealing any classified information. It’s clear that – like most employees of this secretive department – she isn’t used to talking to journalists. There’s a good reason for that. As a “kidnaps manager”, Shaw >


DIANE WEARS SHIRT, SHARON WAUCHOB. HAIR: KOTA SUIZU. MAKE-UP: REBECCA WORDINGHAM. NAILS: PEBBLES AIKENS

Diane Smith,

counter-terrorism and counter-extremism officer, Baghdad


Shubline Ghuman,

transport threats officer (aviation and maritime security)

“You have to develop resilience. It can be tougher when you meet families of hostages and it’s not just a case any more”

Kate Shaw,

kidnaps case manager

co-ordinates efforts to recover British citizens and dual nationals taken hostage abroad. It’s a high-stress, high-risk job, where lives are at stake every day. Nonetheless, when we meet she looks calm and composed. Shaw heard about the job from her former flatmate, who held it during the reign of “Jihadi John”, a British man who joined so-called Islamic State, also known as Isis or Daesh. Jihadi John, whose real name was Mohammed Emwazi, appeared in many of the group’s propaganda videos, beheading at least four hostages on camera. (He was eventually killed by a drone strike in 2015.) “It sounds strange, but I just knew then it was the right job for me,” she says. “You are doing something to help. You are doing something interesting – I don’t mean that to sound callous.” Based in London, Shaw’s job is to chase down leads, liaise with local police and security services and keep victims’ families informed. One of the first pieces of information she tries to discover is whether the kidnap has been driven by the desire to raise money or to make propaganda using a Western hostage; the latter reduces the chances of a successful negotiation. Thanks to growing up in Dubai, she speaks fluent Arabic, which is useful because so many kidnaps occur in the Middle East. (There are other hotspots where Isis-affiliated groups operate. “We have a huge number of people who go to dangerous places on holiday and there’s only so much you can do to stop them,” Shaw says. “Every year we go to the Adventure Travel Show and we have a stall and try not to be po-faced”.) Although Britain does not negotiate with terrorists, the truth is that, as Shaw puts it, “we will talk to anybody who can help solve the case”. What the British government does not allow, however, is ransom payments to terror groups: families would only be funding the next kidnap, or the next terror attack, goes the reasoning. However, although not

encouraged, if a hostage is taken by a criminal group, it is not illegal for their family to pay for their release – which is what happened in a case that was resolved just weeks after Shaw took the job. An Australian-British woman in her sixties, who had worked for 20 years on girls’ education in Afghanistan, was kidnapped in November 2016. Her family mortgaged their house, withdrew their life savings, and paid the criminals half a million dollars. With the help of the kidnap team, the woman was released in March 2017, and they soon received a picture of her, back at home with her family. Shaw remembers thinking: “This is why we do it.” Inevitably, the arrival of so many women, from a range of backgrounds, has changed the culture of the Foreign Office – which once had a reputation as the natural home of the kind of former public schoolboys who wore double-breasted suits at home, and safari suits abroad. In the early days, even Marriott’s accent raised eyebrows. “People would go, ‘Oh, you’re not from round here’, because I have the slightly flat vowels of a Doncaster girl. But now it’s not commented on.” With her brisk diction and quick answers – and her office uniform of impeccably tailored grey herringbone dress and knee-high boots – it’s hard to imagine anyone talking down to Marriott these days. One-quarter of the cases dealt with by her current unit are far-right terror groups. At the same time, Islamist groups such as Isis not only plot attacks themselves, but specialise in radicalising British Muslims through the internet. Marriott estimates that 30,000 to 40,000 foreign nationals (including about 850 from Britain) travelled to fight in Iraq and Syria and are now returning to their home countries: “And are they content to go stack shelves in Sainsbury’s?” she says, raising an eyebrow. As it has become less male-dominated, the workplace has become less macho, though it remains an incredibly tough gig.


Because of the stress of working in counter-terror operations, Ghuman and her colleagues in the Terrorist Response Team have the chance to see a psychologist every couple of months. “It’s a chance to offload and have a cry if you want to,” she says. For Kate Shaw, the job was hardest when Isis was at its most brutal – burning captives alive and drowning them in propaganda videos. “One particular video was of a guy who was being slowly stabbed to death, and it was utterly horrific, and I couldn’t tell anybody – not because it was secret but because I didn’t want to burden other people,” she says. “You have to develop resilience. It can be tougher when you meet families of hostages and it’s not just a case any more.” But though the work is challenging, it’s also fiercely interesting. Jane Marriott says, “I have three criteria for any job: is it going to make a difference? Is it going to be interesting? Is it going to be fun?” Though, naturally, “everyone assumes you’re a spy, which gets a bit tedious, because you can’t give an answer that works”. In 2011, she was working in the British embassy in Tehran when protesters stormed the compound in response to the sanctions imposed on the country. “The building was set on fire, and we all had to hunker down and try not to be found by the large mob who were looking for us,” she says calmly.

SHUBLINE WEARS TOP, MM6 MAISON MARGIELA, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM. EARRINGS, SARAH & SEBASTIAN. KATE WEARS COAT DRESS, TRUSSARDI. EARRINGS, ALIGHIERI. JANE WEARS JUMPSUIT, RALPH LAUREN

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ometimes, the challenges are more mundane. In countries gripped by civil wars or regular terror attacks, simply staying safe is a priority. Diane Smith, 32, is a counter-terrorism and counter-extremism officer in Baghdad, teaching Iraqi police to combat local threats. Over a scratchy phone line, she tells me that she lives in a “pod” – a bedsit, essentially – in the British embassy compound, working for six weeks at a time before getting two weeks off. Her office is two minutes’ walk from her bedroom and all the meals are provided on-site because the security situation makes nipping to the shops impossible. She was greeted on arrival at Baghdad airport by a close protection officer because it is too dangerous to take a local taxi. Naturally, the conflict between the glamour of globetrotting and the demands of family and relationships is a common one. Ghuman is single and lives with her parents – “normal working-class folk” – in south London. “I’ve been able to do what I wanted to do because I’ve not had responsibility for kids, or a man hanging around,” she says. It’s a situation that has traditionally been easier for men to navigate than their female colleagues. In foreign postings, Shaw says, “generally the men are attached, and the women are single… It’s still much more acceptable for a man to have his family back in the UK, and a woman to look after them.” The 35-year-old doesn’t have children, saying that for the moment, she has “itchy feet”. But Jane Marriott feels that expectations are evolving – not least because there is no longer an automatic expectation that a woman who gets pregnant on a tour overseas has to come home immediately. “The model when I joined was that it was either a childless single woman, or a woman who parked her family somewhere and then got on with it,” she says. “We have lots of good role models now where the couple has compromised, but it’s still not easy.” Do women get treated differently – particularly in countries that are more socially conservative than Britain? “Rightly or wrongly, I have higher standards for what equality looks like in my own country than I do in a ‘dusty boots’ environment,” says Marriott. “I always say that you probably get more invitations to things as a female, because people are curious about you. There’s a kind of knocking off 20 points from your IQ when you walk in the door... One of my BME [black and

Jane Marriott,

director of the Joint International Counter-Terrorism Unit minority ethnic] colleagues said – yeah, and if you’re black, take another 20 points off that. But the guard sometimes feels a bit more let down if people feel they’ve underestimated you.” Still, it’s a minefield. In conservative environments, even deciding what to wear is more fraught than the usual 8am panic over what’s clean and ready. Shaw speaks fondly of a quilted three-tone pink dress – “everyone called me the Queen Mother when I wore it” – which she reluctantly decided was not the right thing for meeting camo-clad army officers. “I suppose there is a certain degree of self-censorship, but I’ve never felt the need to blend in,” she says. Marriott says she can remember only one occasion when she lost her temper because of a conservative dress code. Walking round Tehran in 45-degree heat in a hijab and manteau – the long black cloak mandated for women by sharia law – a male Iranian contact complained about the heat. “I rarely do it, but I just turned round and gave him both barrels: ‘I, too, am quite hot, but you are able to take clothing off,’” she fumed. Still, it’s complicated. Smith says that in her early days in Baghdad she got used to being treated as a secretary or sidelined as a junior member of the team. “How I deal with that is that I embrace it,” she explains. “It gives me the opportunity to observe who it is we’re meeting.” Often, male colleagues push her to the front when meeting Iraqi police officers, and she enjoys “the look of shock and surprise on their faces. ‘Oh right, you’re not the PA.’ By that time, they also become quite charming.” Yet she cautions against any simplistic view which positions women purely as victims in counter-terror work. In this profession, nothing is straightforward. “Last week in Baghdad there was a suicide bomber who was female,” she says, her voice crackling on the line from the heart of the danger zone. “They also play a frontline role in this fight sometimes.” Q


“I MAKE CLOTHES FOR STRONG WOMEN” Over her 45-year career, Rei Kawakubo has radically transformed fashion. However, as the famously reclusive Comme des Garçons designer tells Olivia Singer, hers is an agonising creative process – and the only way to move forward now is to never look back. Photographs by Tim Walker. Styling by Kate Phelan

I

n Place Vendôme, amid some of the world’s finest jewellery houses and just across from the Ritz, is a discreet passageway that leads to Comme des Garçons. Tucked between the glittering façades of Piaget and Cartier is the brand’s European headquarters, where, contained within a splendid 18thcentury building, its very ordinary décor is in stark contrast to the historic glamour of this Parisian square. Here the floors are unlacquered, lighting comes by way of neon strips, and tables are of that plain wooden sort found in classrooms around the world. At the end of the room, raised a few feet above the rest of us, is a big glass window that gives a glimpse into the main office. When editors and journalists come to inspect her creations in the days after she presents them on the runway, this is where Rei Kawakubo sits, her chair precisely arranged so that while you examine her designs, you can just glimpse her silhouette. She is omnipresent yet removed. This is, of course, the perfect analogy for the way that she operates. Kawakubo is famous for her deliberate detachment from fashion’s conventions, as well as for her profound impact on the industry at large. When, in 1981, she started showing her collections in Paris instead of Japan, she provoked interest and outrage in equal measure: then,

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continental fashion was defined by the material-girl flamboyance of Thierry Mugler and Gianni Versace – but Kawakubo defiantly rejected those high-octane aesthetics in favour of an anarchic unglamour. Her first Parisian collection, titled Destroy, comprised dishevelled black garments loosely draped around the body, and was crudely dubbed “Hiroshima chic” by the press. When she sent her version of “lace” on to the runway, it was not the precious sort, but fabric distressed into near-oblivion: perforated by malfunctioning machinery, distended and laddered and torn. In the 1990s, when bodycon silhouettes and Tom Ford’s highly sexed Gucci were all the rage, she designed Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body – a groundbreaking collection that distorted the female form and padded it with tumorous goosedown appendages. Hers is a revolutionary vision of womanhood, unbound by idealised femininity. “I make clothes for strong women,” she says. “Women who wouldn’t necessarily care what their husband thinks – or a lot of other people.” Statements like these, made by Kawakubo herself, are few and far between. She grants interviews only rarely; in lieu of the traditional post-show explanation of a collection, she offers a few sparse words to the journalists trying to decode her creations. (This season, those words were >


“THE WEIGHT OF EXPERIENCE IS HEAVY ON MY SHOULDERS,” SAYS REI KAWAKUBO. SCULPTURAL PATTERN DRESSES AND SHOES THROUGHOUT, ALL S/S’18. HAIR: SHON. MAKE-UP: SAM BRYANT. PRODUCTION: PADBURY PRODUCTION. PRINTING: GRAEME BULCRAIG AT TOUCH DIGITAL. MODELS: PRIMROSE ARCHER, XIE CHAOYU, LILY NOVA, AYOBAMI OKEKUNLE, AMELLEAH THOMAS, DUCKIE THOT


“The only way to try and make something new is to do something extremely personal”

“multidimensional graffiti”.) In the mid-1990s, journalist Susannah Frankel interviewed Rei about Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body and asked her to explain the collection; Kawakubo sat down, drew a black circle on a scrap of paper and summarily departed. When I am invited into her glasswalled office to speak with her, I am nervous – but as soon as she shakes my hand and pre-emptively apologises for how difficult she will find our conversation, it is clear that she is more nervous still. She is tiny and birdlike, with high cheekbones and an angular, greying haircut, and she sits down with her arms protectively curled around her body, the collar of her black blazer pulled high around her neck. It is disarming to see a woman whose proposition of womanhood is so fiercely radical appear momentarily so vulnerable. Last year, the Metropolitan Museum of Art staged a gargantuan exhibition of Kawakubo’s work – a 115,000sq ft exploration of the recurrent themes that have arisen throughout her career. That exhibition, curated by Andrew Bolton, was only the second ever granted to a living designer there (the first, in 1983, was for Yves Saint Laurent) and was universally acclaimed for its powerfully emotive presentation of her work. Kawakubo was involved in everything from the selection of pieces to the exhibition space itself; she had a full-size recreation of the space installed in Tokyo to ensure it would accurately reflect her vision. Before it opened, Kawakubo was worried that nobody would attend, claiming that she was not particularly famous in America: instead, more than 560,000 people did. I ask her whether she feels proud of its success, but she says, “I enjoyed nothing… Recently, I haven’t been much enjoying anything about work. I have been doing it for so long that the enjoyment has gone out of it… The weight of experience is heavy on my shoulders.” When Rei speaks, it is through Adrian Joffe – her husband of 25 years, and the president of Comme des Garçons. He lives in Paris and she in Japan, but their partnership is remarkably effective nonetheless: where Kawakubo is cautious and clipped, her voice quiet and low, he is charming and effusive, her perfect foil, all smiles and rows of kisses at the end of emails. For the purpose of this interview, Joffe operates as his wife’s translator: she speaks only Japanese (at least supposedly, she can certainly understand plenty of my questions), and he elucidates concepts to her that appear outside her realm of understanding. When she tells me how

Rei Kawakubo photographed by Paolo Roversi in 2017

she hated looking back through her work for the exhibition, he tries to explain to her that “most people love retrospectives”. She doesn’t seem to believe him. “Each time I do something, there’s never total satisfaction and so it is painful to be reminded of the things that I was dissatisfied with,” she says. “She thinks everyone is like that,” he explains, and smiles apologetically. Part of the problem at hand is that Kawakubo’s ambition with Comme des Garçons is, she says, “to attempt to create things that didn’t exist before”, which paradoxically means that “there can never be success because as soon as you’ve done something, it’s not new any more”. Nine seasons ago, in 2013, she reached a breaking point: paralysed by the aforementioned weight of experience, she realised that “the only way to do something that didn’t exist before was not to do it”. So she stopped sending clothes on to her runways and instead presented a collection titled Not Making Clothes, which set out a blueprint for her new mode of creation. What she has been offering in lieu of clothing ever since is explorations of form and fabrication, magnificent processions of sculptural silhouettes. These avant-garde abstractions then filter down to inform the more easily wearable pieces that later appear on shop floors the world over: their graphics or details applied to everything from A-line coats to embellished T-shirts. Incidentally, Kawakubo explains that this method is far from foolproof: it is now causing her the same level of trauma as her former collections. “I will have to have another idea as good as that, it has to have another change,” she says. “Each thing has a time limit; things get old, I get tired of them. There will have to be another way in.” But, in the meantime, we still have not-clothes – and this season they incorporated the works of 16 different artists, >


“The process is not something I understand. It’s things that come from everywhere, something from inside, something from a dream – often I don’t remember”


“I do it in order to move people, to make them feel something… But what you feel is free: there is no right or wrong”

from Renaissance masters to manga cartoonists, collaged into prints, while artefacts of girlhood – plastic trinkets and stuffed animals – were tangled into wigs and turned into breastplates. Huge dresses were exploded into torn folds and frills, or exaggerated with oversized horsehair bustles and foam-padded petticoats. Sent out to the teenage lullabies of FKA Twigs and Aisha Devi, they felt painfully melancholic, like a meditation on lost innocence. For the finale, as Samuel Barber’s agonisingly emotive Adagio for Strings played, all of the 15 models walked on to the runway together and stood, completely still, facing the audience. Rei asks me how the collection made me feel, and I tentatively tell her: that the still lifes and the wide-eyed cartoons and these giant overblown dresses, some with wings protruding from their backs or sides, felt like a heartwrenching memento mori, and that I wanted to cry. I ask if that was what she had intended. “If people didn’t feel anything, there wouldn’t be any point doing it,” she responds bluntly. “I do it in order to move people, to make them feel something… It is important for humanity, for the progress of humanity, to feel things and to see things that didn’t exist before. I hope that each person, in feeling whatever they feel [about the collections], would then have their own progress. But what you feel is free: there is no right or wrong.” This sense of freedom exists in part, it seems, because Kawakubo has no singular inspiration in mind when creating the collections: they are born from instinct. “The process is not something I understand, so it’s not easy to talk about,” she explains. “It’s things that come from everywhere, something from inside, something from a feeling, something from a dream and so it’s very hard to go back and unravel – often I don’t remember. The only way to try and make something new is to do something extremely personal.” This painstaking intimacy is, perhaps, why it is so hard for her to talk about her work: she is notoriously private when it comes to her personal life. I have heard rumours, of course – that she has a wicked sense of humour; that she is fascinated by horoscopes; that someone once saw her buying bundles of >


“The people who make that kind of distinction of whether you’re a feminist or not are already the problem. Everyone is equal, everyone is a human being”

Toblerone at an airport duty-free – but, for whatever reason, her personal proclivities are closely guarded. She will concede, however, that she vehemently dislikes Donald Trump, that she likes London for “the feeling and the trees”, that she particularly enjoys visiting White Cube and is rather fond of Gilbert & George. She has an Instagram account and, although she neither posts nor follows anyone, she likes looking at animals and landscapes. She has enjoyed holidays to “strong, exciting places” like Yemen, Vietnam and Ukraine – but when I ask where she’d like to visit next, she retorts, “Have I ever told you the amount of work I have to do?” While with a different designer it might be tempting to push further, or to try to investigate and decrypt their autobiography (Kawakubo is 75 years old; was born in 1942 in wartime Japan; has two younger brothers; worked as a stylist before becoming frustrated with the clothes available to her and evolving into a designer), the mystery that enshrouds Rei is, in part, what makes her world so fascinating. You cannot ascribe a personal narrative to her collections if you do not know what that narrative is: instead, her work provokes internal reflection, and an astonishingly personal connection with the pieces themselves. In a world of celebrity culture and extreme exposure, her silence is refreshing – even more so the reverence she commands, which makes further interrogation feel intrusive. However, there is one aspect in Kawakubo’s work that begs biographic reference: that of gender. Mutated archetypes of femininity are some of the most frequently recurring themes in Kawakubo’s oeuvre: crumpled frills and ragged ruffles, Peter Pan collars and the polka dots that are now a Comme des Garçons signature. Even the logo for Play – one of the 19 lines under the brand’s umbrella – is an illustrated heart drawn with sweet cartoon eyes. Her vision of women is staunchly self-determined, and these malformed tropes serve

as visual reminders of her consistent subversion – but she directly refutes the idea that her gender has anything to do with her work. She considers herself a strong woman, yes, but not a feminist – in fact, “the people who make that kind of distinction of whether you’re a feminist or not a feminist are already the problem. Everyone is equal, everyone is a human being, but the person asking that question is the problem by the fact of them asking.” Kawakubo herself is resolutely independent: she stands at the head of a $300 million-a-year business, refuses to acquiesce to any sort of industry demands (regular interviews, cocktail parties or celebrity-dressing, to name but a few) and, while she is married to Joffe, she has no children – although she has often referred to her 1,200 employees in that way. They are, as with many parents, where she finds her drive. “I am responsible for all of the staff at Comme des Garçons and I have a sense of responsibility,” she explains. “If I were on my own, I would stop.” When I ask why she continues to expand, then, she explains, “Nothing is static, everything moves on. I want to increase their wages, to give them raises… to grow, little by little, so that people can grow themselves. It’s a natural process of business. There’s no choice.” Only once during our hour-long conversation does Kawakubo concede to feeling happy – in fact, such a word appears so unfamiliar in her vocabulary that Joffe double-checks his translation with her – which is when she talks about seeing the women who wore her pieces to the Met Gala. There was Rihanna, dressed in the opening look from Kawakubo’s 18thCentury Punk collection, which fused couture fabrications with the spirit of revolution (“I love it – it feels fucking awesome!” she said); Stella Tennant in deep-blue ruched and ruffled velvet (“I felt at home – defiant, and like I was wearing the armour of a tribe”); Caroline Kennedy in a voluminous layered gown patterned with floral prints. (“In today’s world, where we each need to figure out what we believe in, and how to stand for something, this exhibition has a lot to teach us,” she stated in a press preview to the show of Kawakubo’s work.) “What I like to hear most is when somebody buys something in the store and tells me that it makes them feel good,” Kawakubo explains now – and whether that thing is an avantgarde ballgown, a perfectly formed leather jacket or a Converse collaboration seems beside the point. After all, to buy and wear Comme des Garçons – no matter how extreme, or how apparently ordinary – is to invest in, and proclaim affinity with, Kawakubo’s boundless and defiant originality. Hers is creation in its purest form and its transformative impact reverberates through every person who wears her designs. You’d be hard pressed not to feel good about that. Q


When Kawakubo first brought Comme des waves through the industry: the rejection of conventional glamour in favour of her own, renegade aesthetic was a radical statement of intent. That defiant creativity has defined her work over the decades – from the transformative silhouettes of her early years to the sculptural artworks of recent seasons. From far left: 1994; a/w 2012; 1993. Right: s/s 1983. Second row, from far left: s/s 2016; 1983; 1983; s/s 1997; s/s 1992; 1991

Comme des Garçons through the years

ARTHUR ELGORT; PETER LINDBERGH; PAOLO ROVERSI; HANS FEURER/TRUNK ARCHIVE; TERENCE DONOVAN; GUY MARINEAU; DAVID SIMS; MICHEL HADDI; SARAH MOON; RAYMOND MAIER; TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS; JUERGEN TELLER; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

A visual history of Rei Kawakubo’s radical creativity

“Everything is about trying to do something that didn’t exist before” – Rei Kawakubo. Left: 1990. Above: 1997. Above right: 1998. Far right: a collaboration with choreographer Merce Cunningham translated the Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body collection into dance costumes, 1997

“It has not been a deliberate decision to grow the business; it has just happened… The main objective… is the fact of wanting to make things” – Rei Kawakubo. Above: 1996. Near right: a/w 1984. Right, centre: 2012. Far right, top: 1995. Far right, bottom: 18th-Century Punk collection, a/w 2016


Quiet by design For one of the world’s most influential men, Apple’s chief design officer, Jony Ive, is also one of the most humble, says Naomi Campbell, who travelled to California to meet him. Photograph by Mikael Jansson. Styling by Jack Borkett


Naomi Campbell and Jony Ive at Apple Park, the company’s new headquarters in Cupertino, California. Naomi wears suit, Alexander McQueen. Shoes, Saint Laurent. Jewellery, her own. Hair: Peter Savick. Make-up: Fran Cooper. Digital artwork: Gloss Studio NY


I

’m on the outskirts of Cupertino in California, visiting a gargantuan building that looks like a spaceship: a newly built, glass-walled office that has recently become home to the £650 billion Apple empire. There’s also a 175-acre campus with a forest of drought-resistant trees that, they tell me, are designed to encourage morning jogs, a 100,000sq ft wellness centre and a canteen where you can place your lunch order using iPads and facial recognition. Everything here is custom-made: even the pizza boxes are engineered to prevent the crusts from going soggy. It might have cost £3.6 billion, but as I head to the canteen for a very special audience, Apple Park looks exactly like the friendly face of a tech revolution – after all, that’s what has made it the most valuable brand in the world. The architect of the Apple universe is Jony Ive: a 51-yearold industrial designer from Essex, who has become a part of every Apple consumer’s life. He joined the company in 1992, rising to his current position as chief design officer in 2015. He is the man who encouraged Steve Jobs to turn everything white; who developed the touch-sensitive swipe screen; who designed the iPod, the iPhone, the iMac. His brilliant eye has overseen all the elements of every Apple device, which probably makes Jony one of the most influential figures on earth, whose power now goes beyond smartphones into the worlds of fashion, art, commerce and politics. He’s

loved. Ironically, not being very good at other things helped me focus. I think I was fortunate in that I found not only what I loved to do early on, but also what I was able to do. N: So were you a good boy? J: I was very quiet, because I was – and remain – very shy. One of the things about drawing and making is that it can be a very solitary thing… I don’t know if one reinforced the other, but it felt comfortable to do because I could do it by myself. N: What do you do to overcome your shyness? J: Avoid people! My area of focus is quite deep, but it’s not very broad. I’m just aware of the things I can do and I’m very aware of the majority of stuff, which is what I can’t do. N: Are there any examples of design from your childhood that stand out? What was the first thing you ever made that you were proud of? J: Aged around 10 or 11, I liked making very simple things from card. I remember making a box with a lid, and trying to do it as perfectly as I possibly could: making and remaking it, being completely unforgiving with the result. But it wasn’t really about the object – it was about the process and seeing if I could make something perfectly. N: So how many did you make? J: Half a dozen? That’s a lot of boxes. N: What is it about objects that interests you? Is it the way people use them; how they can make people feel?

Far left: the blueberry iMac, 1999. Left: Ive (centre left) with Steve Jobs (centre right) and Apple colleagues, 2007

Left: the iPod, 2001. Above: the Apple Powerbook, 2001

likely to be spoken of in the same breath as design greats such as Azzedine Alaïa or Zaha Hadid, but I’ve always felt the most amazing thing about Jony is that he’s so normal: friendly, without airs and graces, and actually a bit shy. Yet, to appropriate the Apple lexicon, he is a genius. Here’s what happened when I sat down with Jony in the Cupertino canteen to talk about his incredible career and the power of seeing things differently.

“I think I was fortunate in that I found not only what I loved to do early on, but what I was able to do” 194

Naomi Campbell: I’d like to start at the beginning – what did you want to do when you were growing up? Jony Ive: Well, I always liked drawing and making things. The reason I would draw was to help me make something – not drawing for its own sake, but as a means to an end. I later found out that was called design. N: And did your parents encourage you? J: My father was a really good craftsman – he was a silversmith – so I grew up understanding how things were made. That’s something that’s easy to take for granted, but everything that has been made has been thought about, designed, and I think that growing up with an appreciation of the nature of objects was hugely influential to me. N: What was school life like? Were you a high achiever? J: I wasn’t very good at anything else, but I was competent at drawing and making: it’s where my heart was, what I

J: You and I might see the same things, but what they mean to us is based on so many historical and cultural references. There isn’t this universal truth to a single object. I was interested in how you go from what you see to what you perceive, what something might mean to you. N: Your relationship with Steve Jobs is often talked about as the ultimate creative partnership. What was it like when you met? What did you have in common? J: We looked at the world in the same way: we’d struggle to perceive things, we’d argue in our own heads, and we were very conscious about the conclusions we came to. We started working together in 1997, and he was just remarkable. As time goes on, I appreciate him more, and miss him more; how truly extraordinary he was becomes clearer. Steve understood the creative process in a way that’s extremely rare, but he also understood how you make a company with lots of people. N: And what did you learn from him? Are there any ways that he worked that continue to inspire you? J: There was an incredible liberty in the way he would think. He wouldn’t obey rules that were perceived to be accepted wisdom, and he had an extraordinary optimism and enthusiasm. He was so inquisitive – and very supportive of me. N: How involved are you in the manufacturing process? I heard a rumour that you slept on factory floors when you were making the first iPhone…


J: One of the key characteristics of how we work is that we’re very involved in how you make something: you can’t just design in abstract and then tell someone else to make it. You know that from the fashion designers whose work you love: they are there for every step. I’ve stayed for months in places where we make products. I don’t know how you can be an effective designer and not do that. N: Everything you work on is kept top secret – is it hard not discussing what you’re up to? J: I don’t really see it as being secretive – if I’m working on something and it’s not finished, I don’t want to show somebody! One of the defining things about the nature of ideas is just how fragile they are: when you’re not sure whether something is going to work, the idea is vulnerable. Part of protecting the idea is to be careful about who you show it to; premature criticism can shut something down that perhaps deserves more of a chance. N: Do you not get stressed and want to talk about it? J: I’d say I would be characterised as an anxious person, so yeah, I do worry about work a lot… You know, Heather [Ive’s wife of 30 years] knows roughly the products I’m working on, but I don’t talk about it specifically, which I’m sure she’s enormously relieved about. N: How do you balance your life and work, then? J: Appallingly!

he worked – his process. I was in utter awe watching him, and I loved that he let me watch. I thought that was so generous. It was incredible to see the way that he understood material, and the way he would be frustrated with material and so create new ones. And then these beautiful forms would emerge. N: If the pin didn’t go through, he knew it wasn’t going to work. J: He wouldn’t impose anything: the shape would appear because of his mastery of his materials, because he understood them so profoundly. N: Exactly – sometimes I’d put on a dress and think it was going to be fitted a certain way, but instead it would flare out in a particular area. I’d always wonder, how does he know it’s going to fall like that? J: Yes, he had such a purity of creation: he wouldn’t just say “This is the shape”, but it would be built into the way the garment was made. N: The only people I’ve seen work with fabrics to that degree are Japanese. Are there any cultures you think have been particularly influential on design today? J: In most cultures, if you engage enough and look beyond what’s obvious, there’s incredible beauty. That’s a good practice. I love travelling, I love Japan. I hadn’t even been on a plane until I was 21. N: What went through your mind on the plane? Were you thinking you could design it better?

“Alaïa was the consummate craftsman. I was in utter awe watching him, and I loved that he let me watch”

Below: the Apple Watch, 2015. Right: Ive received his knighthood at Buckingham Palace in May 2012. Far right: the current-model iPhone, 2018

Left: Ive with his wife, Heather, at the Met Gala in 2017. Below: the first-generation iPhone, 2007

GETTY; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; JONATHAN SPRAGUE/REDUX/ EYEVINE. THANKS TO THE ST REGIS SAN FRANCISCO

Left: the Duchess of Cambridge meets Ive in 2012. Above: the iPad, 2009

N: Can you sense when you’ve overworked yourself and have to take some time out to get inspired again? J: The difficult thing with being a designer is that it isn’t something you just do in the studio. If you walk around with your eyes open and truly see, and think about what you see, then you’re constantly wondering, “Why is that like this? Why could it not be like that?” Or, “That’s fantastic, that’s interesting.” I don’t know if “working” is the most accurate description, but the very way you engage in the world is atypical. That feels like designing. N: Is there anything you’ve been particularly proud of designing? I never thought I’d be alive to see something like Facetime exist – when I first heard of it, I thought it was just too futuristic. To be in the middle of somewhere like Nairobi or Delhi and be able to talk to my mum, to actually see her face, is like magic. J: I agree. I would say that Facetime is one of the most lovely examples of communication – connection can be very transactional, like with a text message, or incredibly nuanced and intimate like it is with Facetime. Seeing someone’s eyes is really important. N: You’re sponsoring an exhibition of Azzedine Alaïa’s work at London’s Design Museum next month. What was it about his approach to the world, and design, that resonated with you? J: He was the consummate craftsman. I loved the physical studio in which he worked, I loved the way, and how directly,

J: I was like a kid, I was just so excited to be going on a big plane. And also, in that predictably odd way, I thought, “How can this fly?” Because my suitcase was really heavy… N: Last year, you were appointed chancellor of the Royal College of Art – how did that come about? Why did you take on the role? J: I’ve always had a real affection for the Royal College, and I think it’s a particularly special place in terms of the diversity of its creative disciplines: from painting to sculpture to graphic design and architecture. It has a very particular sort of energy. I’ve worked with some great people, and I’ve been doing this for a while, and I like to think that some of what I’ve learnt would be useful to other people. That’s the primary reason: to try and share some of the things I’ve learnt – although I don’t presume that it’s all relevant. Also, you sort of think, “Well if I can describe what I’ve learnt, it somehow makes sense of some of the personal pain of learning.” N: I’m sure. One last question: when you hire a new team member, what are you looking for? J: The main thing is how they see the world. Ultimately, Steve’s legacy is a set of values and, I think, the belief in trying. Often the quietest voices are the easiest to overlook, but he was brilliant at listening as well as leading and speaking. A lot of communication is listening – not just listening to figure out what you want to say in response. Q 195


FURIOUSLY FUNNY Phoebe Waller-Bridge is about to hit superstardom. And rage has a lot to do with it. By Eva Wiseman. Photographs by Scott Trindle. Styling by Jack Borkett

I

t seems appropriate to meet Phoebe Waller-Bridge in the evening, as darkness falls over London. We are sitting in a Soho attic office, the walls of which Waller-Bridge has quickly scrubbed of Post-it notes detailing season two of her dark, award-winning and much-loved sitcom Fleabag. All that is left is a sharp little envelope on the table, labelled “Jokes”. Can they really be called jokes, though, these pointed diamonds of pain she’s mined from her life? Her insights into the female condition make you laugh, but they also make you cry a bit, and reach for someone’s hand. It’s a skill, and one that has seen her join that rare group of voices – your Lena Dunhams and Nora Ephrons, your Helen Fieldings – that expose the sometimes uncomfortable truths of what it is to be a woman today. At almost 6ft tall, Waller-Bridge has the face of a silent movie star, but one that’s maybe two seconds away from cracking up. There’s a clownish elegance to her, and she sits with her legs everywhere – she leans in affectionately when she talks, like everything’s a secret. Until now, stylists have always dressed her in boyish tailoring, a severe red lip, but that belies her Pre-Raphaelite beauty, and her lightness too

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– she laughs a lot, and generously. Today she is wearing a jolly yellow T-shirt that says Mac & Cheese, a gift from her friend, the actor Jessica Knappett, who made the shirts for a group of them – all women in film and television – who get together once a month to eat macaroni cheese and talk about their lives. “We have these aggressive chats till 4am, but we’ve started switching from booze to tea around 11pm because we need to remember the conversations,” Waller-Bridge says, with an accent that could cut crystal. “It’s one of those really lovely trusted groups where you can just go, ‘Am I crazy or…?’ If you’re lucky, it might turn out that you’re not.” Her life sped up in 2016, when Fleabag was picked up by the BBC after a sell-out Edinburgh run, knocking another of her scripts, Crashing – on which Channel 4 had been sitting – swiftly into production. Suddenly, Waller-Bridge, who writes and performs in both, was famous. She was hired to adapt the Villanelle novellas about a female assassin for BBC America, she won a Bafta, and for a while there was a lot of fuss online about whether or not she would be the Thirteenth Doctor in Doctor Who. She would not. >


OPPOSITE: CHECKED WOOL JACKET, £1,525. TOP WITH FEATHERS, £1,100. BOTH MAISON MARGIELA. EARRING, £355. RING, £360, BOTH CHARLOTTE CHESNAIS, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM. THIS PAGE: ASYMMETRIC LINEN-MIX DRESS, £2,160, YOHJI YAMAMOTO. LEATHER SANDALS, £565, HELMUT LANG SEEN BY SHAYNE OLIVER. RING, AS BEFORE. HAIR: JAMES ROWE. MAKE-UP: LUCY BURT. NAILS: PEBBLES AIKENS. DIGITAL ARTWORK: IMGN STUDIO. WITH THANKS TO KO PRODUCTIONS


THIS PAGE: EMBELLISHED LEATHER JACKET, £7,890, PRADA. TOP WITH FEATHER TRIM, FROM A SELECTION, DAVID KOMA. WOOL TROUSERS, £79, COS. EARRING, AS BEFORE. OPPOSITE: WOOL JACKET, £1,675, BALENCIAGA, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM. SILK-GAZAR DRESS, £960. LEATHER SANDALS, £565. BOTH HELMUT LANG SEEN BY SHAYNE OLIVER. FEATHER BOA, £500, ANN DEMEULEMEESTER. RING, AS BEFORE


“I think rage can be harnessed. I find it exciting in women. That’s something that goes through my work, for sure” She will, however, appear as a droid in the new Star Wars film, Solo – invited to audition after the directors saw Fleabag. Her agent called her up, chuckling. “I remember thinking, ‘I must watch Star Wars first.’” She didn’t. “So I wasn’t entirely sure what a droid was, and I was just performing it like a human. And they were like, ‘Wow, you’re really loose with the whole droid idea. Maybe you could just try it again a bit more… like a droid?’ Luckily, one of them did a tiny robot thing with his arms when he said ‘droid’, and I was like, ‘It’s a fucking robot. It’s a robot. Thank you.’ Strangely, I think it worked in my favour, because they thought my humanness was a choice.” When she was cast in the role, she quickly watched the films. “It’s a really moving story, as well as being a kind of hysterical adventure romp. It’s very surreal to suddenly go into that world.” Surreal for her fans, too, more used to hearing her nihilistic commentar y about sex and failure than watching her fl y the Millennium Falcon. It ’s difficult to overstate the impact Fleabag had on its audience. The story of a woman in pain, it is a mordant black comedy in which the eponymous heroine (she has no other name) pours sex over every agony, breaking the fourth wall to talk to her audience while clues as to the source of her distress – the violent loss of her best friend – unravel. It is profoundly sad, dark as tar, and very, very funny. But while it feels like it’s about sex, the comedy is about platonic love – it’s the very darkest valentine. Why does this speak to us today? Why does Waller-Bridge’s work, with its sex and fury and jokes about death, ring so clearly for her international audience, gaining her an embarrassment of awards and accolades? The answer, or part of it anyway, is folded away in the envelope on the table. Writing series two, she has been thinking a lot about female rage. “It feels like, recently, a lot of female anger has been unleashed. Articulated anger. Which is exciting for me because I’ve always found female rage very appealing.” Now aged 32, Waller-Bridge was in her third year at Rada when she ranted to a director that she didn’t want to play any more “passive princess parts”. “I was like, ‘Why can’t I do a role where she’s the agent of her own violent destiny? Where are those parts?’”

Soon after, he wrote her the part of an angry young woman. “He said, ‘It’s because you have the gift of rage.’ I realised that’s what I’m always looking for, because I don’t think it necessarily has to be a negative thing. I think rage can be something that motivates and galvanises and changes things, and I think that’s what’s happening now.” While anger stews, she says, rage is active: “It has a forward motion to it. When I was in my twenties I used to have these flash rages all the time, I would just get really, really ragey for, like, five seconds, and then it would pass. And it was always a weirdly positive feeling. I think rage can be harnessed. I find it exciting in women. That’s something that goes through my work, for sure.” Luckily, then, for a woman inspired by rage, she is writing in a time that vibrates with it, when years of insults, forced intimacies and hidden abuse are finally being discussed. Nowhere more noisily than in her own industry where, post-Weinstein, daily news of historical harassment seems to emerge. The worlds Waller-Bridge writes are populated with women who are dealing with their own furies, whether focused inwards or out. “The #MeToo and Time’s Up movements have been a roar on behalf of women, and the voices are genuinely empowered now. I really feel that.” Does she think we’ll see change? “I really hope so. But I suppose there’s a risk that it’s all just so much talking, when we need to see the actual fundamental system change. I know that the more work I make and the more powerful I get, the more outspoken and controlling I’m going to be about that sort of stuff.” This bodes well. She is on the verge of superstardom. The Bafta-winning writer of This Is England, Jack Thorne – who is a huge fan of her acting, having worked with her a number of times – tells me, “She is our generation’s Maggie Smith, and she will still be glorious in 60 years.” But her next project, the high-budget thriller Killing Eve, is unusual in that she doesn’t star in it – she’s written her glittering dialogue for two women: Eve (Sandra Oh), a bored MI5 security officer drawn towards darkness, with fantasies of being a spy, and Villanelle ( Jodie Comer), a mercurial psychopathic killer. The genre is subverted by Waller-Bridge’s focus on the shadowing and obsession between them. Telling a story about a woman who has no >


The audience shouted that she was a slut. “It was then I realised you just have to talk about penises as much as you can” guilt, she says, was very liberating. “That was what was glorious about writing Villanelle, who looks at the world and goes, ‘Hmm, all these little rules you guys have created – they aren’t really that interesting to me.’ Our laws and moral codes don’t apply – she lives totally fearlessly and absolutely without fear of consequence. I haven’t seen a character like that before.”

W

aller-Bridge began acting at the age of eight. Growing up in Ealing, the middle child of parents who divorced when she was in her teens, she was constantly performing, singing, playing, reciting monologues about car crashes. Looking at old photos with her brother recently, she found one of her as a teenager, two Smirnoff Ices in her hand, dancing up against what appeared to be a child. “I asked him, ‘Was I a lot as a teenager?’, and he was like ‘Yeah… you were a lot.’” It was meeting Vicky Jones, who would later become her co-creator on Fleabag that shifted her direction to writing. She was cast in a theatre project that ended when Jones was humiliated and fired from the set. In solidarity, WallerBridge walked out, too. They created their own theatre company, DryWrite, in 2007 and spent two years staging short experimental plays by new writers. Under Jones’s direction, Waller-Bridge wrote her first play – about a girl and boy breaking up because every now and then the girl (played by WallerBridge) said she needed to have sex with someone really wellendowed. By the end, the audience were on their feet shouting that she was a slut. What did that teach her about writing, about storytelling? “It was then that I realised you just have to talk about penises as much as you can,” she grins, winningly. Next up for the pair is a new comedy-thriller series, Run. In person, Waller-Bridge is far gentler than the women she writes. For someone famous for playing with the likeability of female characters, she is furiously nice. And though she believes in honesty to an almost religious degree, it’s when she gracefully bats away questions about the recent break-up of her 2014 marriage to Irish documentary producer Conor Woodman (“I’d rather… not?”) that the difference between her and her oversharing characters is most clear. She veers

away too, from discussing her new boyfriend – even though he’s director Martin McDonagh, even though there are photos of them at the Golden Globes (and later, at the Oscars) him with his barrel of awards for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, her grinning in a gown with toothy pride, even though the two are already being stamped a cultural “power couple” – instead telling me about the real romance of her life, her female friendships. The great thing to come out of these months of busy heartbreak is that she is currently looking for a flat with Jones, a second chance at being young. Free. She pauses briefly with a dazed smile, to consider it. The question, then, is how Waller-Bridge will maintain focus on the things that make her work so resonant – the domestic details of feminine competition and obsession – when busy managing her new Hollywood career. She returns to her muse, her best friend. “Whenever Jones and I see each other, that’s when we analyse our lives for each other’s entertainment. And if either one of us says something particularly interesting, the other one is like, ‘Stop, write it down; that was really poetic, darling, write it down.’” These moments that they write down, though, those truths they lived – they will surely change, post-divorce, post-Star Wars, post-30. It’s clear we’re meeting at that moment just before her entire life turns inside out, that calm before the stardom. Currently, she can walk down the street largely unbothered, she can still make notes on strangers’ conversations on the Tube. But the next time we see her might be on a billboard; after that, surely, a fashion campaign. Already, breathy details of her new relationship are in the gossip magazines. What if the path she’s on leads only to cash and sunshine? What if she’s exhausted all relatable truths? Her grin flickers a moment, a slight panic. Her breathing speeds up, theatrically. “Oh God, you’re right. What if that was all of the truth? What now?” She looks towards the envelope on the table, a loaded gun. “I’ve learnt that I just need to keep being honest” – about femininity, anxiety, the struggle for human connections. “But if you’re telling the truth, you’re likely to be frightened by it.” She smiles darkly, with teeth. “I suppose that’s when I’m most enjoying it.” Q


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The merchandise featured editorially has been ordered from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. We suggest that before visiting a shop you phone to make sure they have your size. In case of difficulty, contact Vogue’s Merchandise Department (020 7499 9080). Where unspecified, stockists are in London or general enquiry numbers are given. A Akris.ch Alancrocetti.com Alberta Ferretti 020 7235 2349 Alexander McQueen 020 7355 0088 Alexandrevauthier.com Alighieri.co.uk Altuzarra.com Amazon.co.uk/fashion Ana Khouri x Narciso Rodriguez 020 7518 0680 Anndemeulemeester.com Annelisemichelson.com Asprey 020 7493 6767 Aureliebidermann.com B Balenciaga 020 7317 4400 Bally.co.uk Bergdorfgoodman.com Bertacabestany.com Bienendavis.com Boodles 020 7235 0111 Bottega Veneta 020 7838 9394 Boucheron 020 7514 9170 Brock-collection.com Brownsfashion.com Buccellati.com Bulgari 020 7872 9969 Burberry.com C Calvin Klein 205W39NYC Calvinklein.com Carolina Amato Amatonewyork.com Cartier 020 7408 9192 Carvela 020 7781 7480 Carven 020 7225 7110 Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 Chanel Fine Jewellery 020 7499 0005 Chanel Haute Couture, Paris 00 33 1 44 50 70 00 Charvet, Paris 00 33 1 42 60 30 70 Chloé 020 7823 5348 Chopard 020 7287 8710 Christian Louboutin 0843 227 4322 Comme des Garçons 020 7518 0680 Cosstores.com Cushnieetochs.com Cynthiarowley.com D Davidkoma.com De Beers 020 7758 9700 Dents.co.uk Dheygere.com Diane von Furstenberg 020 7499 0886 Dinosaurdesigns.co.uk Dior 020 7172 0172 Dior Haute Couture 020 7172 0172 Dior Joaillerie 020 7245 1330 Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dorothee-schumacher.com Driesvannoten.be Duro Olowu 020 7839 2387 E Elie Saab 020 8173 5000

Elizabeth & James, New York 001 877 706 5800 Elliotrhodes.com Emanuel Ungaro Ungaro.com Emilia Wickstead 020 7235 1104 Emilio Pucci 020 7201 8171 Emily-london.com Emporio Armani 020 7491 8080 Equipmentfr.com Ermanno Scervino 020 7235 0558 Etro 020 7493 9004 F Farlows.co.uk Fendi 020 7927 4172 Fenty Puma by Rihanna Puma.com Fenwick 020 7629 9161 Fernfans.com G Gabrielahearst.com La Galeria Elefante, Ibiza 00 34 971 197 017 Galerieslafayette.com Ganni.com Giambattista Valli Haute Couture couture@giambattistavalli.com Gianvito Rossi 020 7499 9133 Giorgio Armani 020 7235 6232 Giorgio Armani Privé, Paris 00 33 1 56 89 01 18 Givenchy Haute Couture laila.easum@givenchy.com Goyard 020 7478 9900 Gucci 020 7235 6707 H H&M Hm.com Helmut Lang Seen by Shayne Oliver Helmutlang.com Hermès 020 7499 8856 Hsamuel.co.uk J Jacquemus.com Janekoenig.co.uk Jenniferbehr.com Jenniferfisherjewelry.com Jimmy Choo 020 7493 5858 Johannaortiz.co Johnlewis.com Johnstonsofelgin.com J-w-anderson.com K Kenzo.com L Leon Max Maxstudio.co.uk Lespetitsjoueurs.com Liberty 020 7734 1234 Lizziefortunato.com Lock & Co 020 7930 8874 Loewe 020 7499 0266 Longchamp 020 7493 5515 Louis Vuitton 020 3214 9200 M Maison Margiela 020 7629 2682 Manolo Blahnik 020 3793 6794 Marc Jacobs 020 7399 1690 Marni 020 7491 9966 Matthewadamsdolan.com Merola 020 7351 9338 Messika.com Michael Kors Collection 020 7659 3550

Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Monnierfreres.co.uk N Nectarnectar.com Nike.com Ninaricci.com Nirav Modi 020 7499 7100 No 21 Numeroventuno.com P Pacorabanne.com Pantherella.com Pebble London 020 7262 1775 Perrinparis.com Philip Treacy 020 7730 3992 Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini 020 7235 2349 Piaget 020 3364 0800 Pippa Small 020 7792 1292 Pomellato 020 7355 0300 Prabalgurung.com Prada 020 7647 5000 Preenbythorntonbregazzi.com Proenzaschouler.com PS Paul Smith 0800 023 4006 R Ralph Lauren Collection 020 7535 4600 Redemption.com Repetto.com Roberto Cavalli 020 7823 1879 Rochas.com Russell & Bromley 020 7629 6903 S Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello 020 7235 6706 Salvatore Ferragamo 020 7629 5007 Sarahandsebastian.com Saskia-diez.com Schiaparelli Haute Couture, Paris 00 33 1 76 21 62 59 Sea-ny.com Shrimps.co.uk Sonia Rykiel 020 7493 5255 Stellaluna.co Stella McCartney 020 7518 3100 Stephen Jones for Marc Jacobs 020 7242 0770 Stuart Weitzman 020 7287 2692 Swarovski.com T Tibi.com Tiffany 0800 160 1837 Tod’s 020 7493 2237 Tom Ford 020 3141 7800 Topshop.com V Valentino 020 7647 2520 Valentino Haute Couture, Paris 00 33 1 55 35 16 00 Van Cleef & Arpels 020 7493 0400 Véroniqueleroy.com Vhernier 020 7629 4685 Victoria Beckham 020 7042 0700 Viktor & Rolf Couture, Amsterdam 00 31 20 41 96 188 Y Yohji Yamamoto 020 7491 4129 Z Zadig & Voltaire 020 7201 8684 Zimmermann 020 7952 2710

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VOGUE'S FASHION DIRECTORY

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VOGUE’S TRAVEL COLLECTION This quintessentially Swiss hideaway promises classic Alpine luxury in an off-radar location 2,000 meters above sea level.

LUXURY ACCOMODATIONS MANAGEMENT

Crafting Bespoke Holidays and Events in Croatia

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COLLECT MOMENTS, NOT THINGS LUXURY PROPERTIES GREECE - CUBA


VOGUE’S TRAVEL COLLECTION Opening March 2018

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Holly Lodge is discreetly positioned moments from the Fulham Road in a quiet and secluded location, with tranquil green views over the communal gardens of Evelyn Gardens. Dating EDFN WR WKH V WKLV VSHFLĆŒF neighbourhood was a small village called Old Brompton with Thistle Grove originally being the name for Drayton Gardens. Nowadays Little Chelsea and Old Brompton have merged into a bustling metropolis with a multitude of fantastic restaurants and shops within walking distance. With its own private entrance on Thistle Grove, Holly Lodge EHQHĆŒWV IURP SULYDF\ DQG D grand entrance hall leading LQWR WKH UDLVHG JURXQG Ć?RRU entertainment rooms. Created and designed for the current RZQHU WKH UDLVHG JURXQG Ć?RRU is made up of a large open plan kitchen dining room with elegant Victorian features and a bay fronted window to the rear.

This double fronted building enables the owner to live with fabulous lateral space; a grand living room and secret study ĆŒWWHG ZLWK FOHYHU SRFNHW GRRUV enables you to have the entire rare opportunity to own a turn-key home, situated in a discreet and quiet position Leo Russell Ć?RRUSODWHRSHQSODQRUVHFWLRQHG RĆ‹IRUSHUVRQDOXVH Every inch of the apartment has EHHQ ĆŒWWHG DQG GHVLJQHG ZLWK the best quality in mind and the attention to detail makes for an exquisite home. A large master bedroom suite is followed by two further good sized bedrooms and bathrooms. For sale ÂŁ4,250,000 Joint Sole Agents – Savills

020 7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk


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Harley Gardens is set within the highly desirable Boltons Conservation Area – one of the most historic parts of Chelsea. The Boltons was built, along with St. Mary’s Church, during the 1840s, which was soon followed by the terrace of houses at Harley Gardens starting in 1851. 7KHVHPDJQLĆŒFHQWO\ZLGHVHPL GHWDFKHG KRXVHV ZLWK RĆ‹ VWUHHW PDJQLĆŒFHQWO\SURSRUWLRQHG VHPLGHWDFKHGIDPLO\KRXVH Lara Askew parking and front gardens, still to this day carry an air of elegance with the beautifully JUDQG URRPV DQG ĆŒQH 9LFWRULDQ period features throughout. Harley Gardens is a quiet and secluded enclave moments from the Fulham Road where there is a multitude of buzzing cafĂŠs, restaurants, shops and bars. The current family have enjoyed the house for the past ten years

taking advantage of a large rear garden, fantastic raised ground Ć?RRU GUDZLQJ URRP DQG ĆŒYH bedrooms. Combining the JUDQGHXU RI D ODUJH 9LFWRULDQ house with the modern way of living, this home enables you to live in an open plan manner on the garden level with a kitchen, dining room and conservatory leading directly to the fabulously tropical garden. This house is sold with the added EHQHĆŒW RI SODQQLQJ SHUPLVVLRQ granted to extend via a basement level increasing the size of the house by over 1,000 square feet, approximately 30% growth in size should an incoming family feel the necessity for more room at a later stage. For sale, asking a price of ÂŁ9,700,000

020 7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk


S U P E R YAC H T C H A R T E R

cecilwright.com


FIVE 2-3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS & THE 4 BEDROOM PENTHOUSE AVAILABLE

A COLLECTION OF SEVEN LUXURY RESIDENCES

For more information please contact Joint Sole Agents:

Oceanic House presents the rare opportunity to purchase a unique apartment at the heart of London’s West End, in an exclusive new development steeped in history. The imposing former White Star Line headquarters (the booking office of iconic ocean liner RMS Titanic) has been sensitively redeveloped to provide six apartments and a triple aspect duplex penthouse for private sale.

Paul Finch paul@beauchamp.com +44 (0)20 7022 9831

Simon Fernandes simon.fernandes@struttandparker.com +44 (0) 20 7318 4677

LOCATED IN ST JAMES’S, LONDON


Views from rooftop terraces

Nine grandly proportioned townhouses with stunning Georgian facades, Octagon’s latest London launch incorporates the highest specification and finishes as befitting the developer’s name. Offering views towards the River Thames and Barnes Wetland Centre from private roof terraces and balconies, these unique new homes range between 4,375 – 6,150 sq ft. With 4/5 bedrooms, an impressive kitchen/breakfast room and 4 formal reception rooms across 5 storeys, the lower ground floor is dedicated to leisure - including a gym, cinema/TV den and a covered courtyard garden. Each property features a private west backing walled garden with rear pedestrian access to the Thames towpath. Located within the Bishop’s Park Conservation Area, Bishops Row is just a short walk from Fulham’s vibrant centre, tube stations, bus services, and an excellent choice of local schooling.

SHOWHOUSE OPEN THURSDAY TO MONDAY 10AM – 4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT

GUIDE PRICES From £4.995m BISHOPS ROW STEVENAGE ROAD, FULHAM, LONDON SW6 6PB

020 8481 7500 | OCTAGON.CO.UK

020 7731 7100


FROGNAL END HAMP S T EAD V ILLAGE, N W 3

ONE OF THE FINEST VILLAGE HOUSES TO COME TO THE MARKET IN MANY YEARS ON A PLOT APPROACHING HALF AN ACRE

On the market for the first time in over 75 years, ‘Frognal End’ is a magnificent double-fronted detached, Victorian house, currently arranged as two separate apartments, now in need of modernisation. Discretely located at the end of a long gated private driveway, the property comprising almost 6000 square feet (556 sq. m.) arranged predominantly over three floors, occupying an elevated site approaching half an acre. The extensive gardens encompass the house on three sides and in addition there is off street parking for numerous vehicles. The property offers the opportunity for a discerning family to acquire this rare and exquisite home, which could be restored to its original state as a single dwelling, or alternatively, there is the possibility that the existing property could be replaced with a new bespoke home, subject to the usual local authority consents.

TERMS Tenure: Freehold | Sole Selling Agents Guide Price Upon Application


London is our city Embassy Gardens is our home Eg: life, captured on Instagram

To view the newly released suites, 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments, contact our sales team on 020 3930 4574 Prices start from ÂŁ750,000 embassygardens.com

Claimer: These are real residents, who really do live in Embassy Gardens! Images from Instagram @embassygardens #embassygardens


VOGUE ASKS

You spent your youth in nightclubs. Do you still love to dance? “Every New Year’s Eve I go dancing at the Cotton House in Mustique [above]. I like disco music – Gloria Gaynor’s ‘Never Can Say Goodbye’, Sylvester or A Taste of Honey... the old stuff.”

Which item of clothing should every woman own? “A tuxedo. I have a YSL one from Yves, as well as some by Anthony Vaccarello, Hedi Slimane, Haider Ackermann and Jean Paul Gaultier couture.” Tuxedo jacket, £1,965, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello

The film that changed your life? “Koyaanisqatsi [above], the 1982 film directed by Godfrey Reggio – an ex-seminarian with a totally different point of view.”

What would Farida Khelfa do?

What’s the best outfit you’ve ever worn? “My wedding dress [above]: a white guipure gown by Jean Paul Gaultier. It originally featured in his couture show, when it was orange [above right].”

How do you feel about being called a muse to designers such as Azzedine Alaïa [right, with Farida]? “My relationships are about friendships. I do not feel I am a muse.”

What is your idea of bad taste? There is no bad taste. What was ugly yesterday is beautiful today; and what is beautiful today will be ugly tomorrow. You’ve modelled in numerous fashion shows. Whose was the wildest? I do not know if it was the wildest, but the most unforgettable was when I walked with Tina Turner for Azzedine Alaïa in the early 1990s. What’s your worst habit? Sorry, I can’t tell you. What makes you laugh? I laugh easily, but right now I am into Key & Peele, which my son introduced me to. Jordan Peele was also the director of Get Out. Great artist! Of all the people you’ve met, who has surprised you the most? Arletty, the great French actress from Les Enfants du Paradis. We had a three-hour lunch. She was 90 years old and blind, but full of life – her voice was like a teenager’s. She was marvellous – so

elegant in a white suit dress – and she was very funny, regaling me with stories. What makes a great model? A particular face. Not necessarily a beautiful one, but a face you remember. An expression you catch. How do you deal with creeps? I do not see them. They do not appear in my field of view. Who taught you to pose? Nobody did, actually. I learnt by myself. And I’m still learning. How do you know when to trust someone? You never know when you can trust someone, you have to take the risk. It is always a risk. What’s your approach to getting older? It is a chance; to grow older. You are less scared, you feel better, but you also feel that you are losing something – it’s indefinable, but it’s lost. To live with someone you love helps you grow old gracefully. What is the last thing you do at night? I put in my ear plugs. Q

INTERVIEW: ELLIE PITHERS. TOM MUNRO; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY; GOFF PHOTOS; PIXELATE.BIZ; REX FEATURES/SHUTTERSTOCK

Advice on love, life and fashion from the model, actress and documentary filmmaker


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Documented by Steven Meisel


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THE NEW FRAGRANCE FOR MEN

British vogue may 2018  
British vogue may 2018  
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