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1 0 3 M O U N T S T R E ET L O N D O N


CONTENTS “I’m fascinated by people who mix uncompromising things with extreme popularity”

Regulars 37 Editor’s letter 44 Notices Behind the scenes of the issue

The new old master, page 208

50 Beyond the lens Click on our website for this month’s Vogue video exclusives 90 Checklist The getaway: inspiration for your holiday wardrobe 237 Stockists

Vogue trends 63 Trench revolution Radical updates on a classic 69 High rise Court shoes raise their game 72 Tough it out in pastels Sugary shades with added sass 74 Days in bright satin Don’t wait until dark to shine 80 My mini revelation Amber Valletta on her love affair with the miniskirt 83 Swing vote Shoulder bags are back – with a nod to the 1970s 86 Be the best-dressed guest Vogue’s guide to wedding-season style etiquette

FREJA BEHA ERICHSEN WEARS RIDING COAT AND CROPPED BLOUSE, LOUIS VUITTON

88 Vogue darling Actress Hannah John-Kamen shares some of her favourite things

High rise, page 69

Jewellery 96 Pretty hardcore White diamonds, black leather. By Carol Woolton and Jack Borkett. Photographs by Sean & Seng

COVER LOOK Gugu Mbatha-Raw wears velvet dress, £5,000, Valentino. Orchid corsage, in hair, Flora Starkey. Get the look: make-up by Lancôme. Eyes: Hypnôse 5-Colour Eyeshadow Palette in Brun Adore; Hypnôse Mascara. Lips: L’Absolu Rouge in Berry Noir. Skin: Blush Subtil in Rouge In Love. Hair by Wella Professionals: EIMI Boost Bounce Mousse; Oil Reflections Luminous Smoothing Oil. Hair: Eugene Souleiman. Make-up: Hannah Murray. Nails: Marian Newman. Styling: Kate Phelan. Photograph: Mikael Jansson

Vogue living 102 ON THE COVER Destination: wonder The world’s finest hidden treasures 104 Fire away Hayley Maitland gives a hot new culinary trend a grilling 109 Mermaid tales Helena Christensen photographs her Catskills retreat, just for Vogue. Words by Ellie Pithers

Arts & culture 116 Scandi crush Meet Sigrid Solbakk Raabe, Norway’s ice-cool singer-songwriter

119 Gems of artistic genius Carol Woolton discovers the point where jewellery meets fine art

Viewpoint 123 A bloody disgrace Why Adwoa Aboah backs the campaign to end “period poverty” 125 Special relationship An American married to a Brit, Claire Straw has some timely advice for Meghan Markle

Profile 131 Youth always wins Olivia Singer on Virgil Abloh’s modern vision of luxury

Vogue tech 138 Family matters Model, dietitian and grandmother Maye Musk selects her favourite modern gadgets 27


CONTENTS

The wig idea, page 152

Archive

Outside edge, page 226

Beauty 148 ON THE COVER The Vogue Beauty Awards 2018 Introducing our showcase of the very best in beauty – find out how you can contribute 152 The wig idea Funky hairpieces are a hit on the catwalks, says Funmi Fetto 155 Bullet points Audacious reds for perfect lips 156 Water works Jessica Diner on her number-one beauty ingredient 159 Countdown to summer Your pre-holiday beauty bootcamp starts with our carefully timed plan 162 Take a stand Lottie Winter reports on the health risks of the sedentary lifestyle

Fashion and features

Bullet points, page 155

SUBSCRIBE TO 28

166 ON THE COVER The wonder of Gugu Gugu Mbatha-Raw talks to Bim Adewunmi about her wild ride from the London stage to Hollywood. Styling by Kate Phelan. Photographs by Mikael Jansson 176 Urban legend Victoriana meets street in fashion editor Grace Coddington’s modern fable. Photographs by Craig McDean

“People of colour have existed throughout history – it’s just who has been able to tell the stories”

The wonder of Gugu, page 166

186 Rude girl rock Kate Moss styles three buzzcut models on a day out to a soundtrack of ska. Photographs by Nick Knight 198 Dark star Meet Hollywood’s new queen of scream, actress Anya Taylor-Joy. By Funmi Fetto. Styling by Kate Phelan. Photographs by Craig McDean 204 Stroke of brilliance Turner Prize-winner Lubaina Himid talks to Sarah Crompton about finding herself in the spotlight at 63. Photographs by Paul Wetherell 208 ON THE COVER The new old master Nicolas Ghesquière’s dazzling futuristic retro. By Claudia Croft. Styling by Marie-Amélie Sauvé. Photographs by Stef Mitchell

216 ON THE COVER Love all Is polyamory – aka consensual non-monogamy – the future of intimacy? asks Rowan Pelling 220 ON THE COVER Queen of the night Party like the 1990s? How Donatella celebrated Gianni with the supers. Anders Christian Madsen joined them. Styling by Jack Borkett. Photographs by Sean Thomas 226 Outside edge Sporty silhouettes with an all-weather versatility. Styling by Sarah Richardson. Photographs by Collier Schorr 236 Vogue asks... What would Marc Newson do? The designer takes our quiz

Turn to page 122 for our fantastic subscription offer, plus free gift

VITTORIA CERETTI WEARS DRESS, LANVIN. SOCK, WORN AS BELT, X31 SPORTS. POLONECK BODY, FALKE. GUGU MBATHA-RAW WEARS PLAYSUIT AND BELT, SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO. EARRINGS, DINNY HALL

141 Nobody did it better The day Vogue shot Jerry Hall on the 007 set. By Robin Muir


EDITOR’S LETTER Below, from top: a spot of bovver on Brighton Beach during Nick Knight’s shoot “Rude Girl Rock” (page 186); artist Lubaina Himid, pictured in her Preston studio, is profiled on page 204

NICK KNIGHT; CRAIG MCDEAN; PAUL WETHERELL

As Vogue proclaims on its cover this month, it really is a dream season for fashion. There is a strong element of fantasy running through the entire issue, all courtesy of brilliant talents. I’m so pleased to say that contributing editor Kate Moss has styled her first shoot for me. I love it when Kate turns stylist. In another life she could have been a rock star, and so her work often relates to music. “I made this playlist!” she told me excitedly as she set off for Brighton with her long-term collaborator Nick Knight to shoot “Rude Girl Rock” (page 186). Appropriately, ska, 2-Tone and reggae were the order of the day – “Ghost Town” by the Specials, “The Harder They Come” by Jimmy Cliff – and you can feel how the mood of the music made it into the photographs, as the girls with their buzzcuts dance on the beach or disappear into a seafront hotel. Legendary stylist Grace Coddington is the second cherished colleague to make her debut for me this month, working with Craig McDean on his shoot “Urban Legend” (page 176). This is the first time Grace has styled for this magazine since she stood down as fashion director and moved to American Vogue in 1988. It is beyond exciting to see her back in these pages – and on such typically brilliant form. What I marvel at in her story is how she took the highly sophisticated Victorian trend from the shows and – in > 37


EDITOR’S LETTER

typical Grace Coddington style – made it look so wearable. A 19th-century-influenced blouse worn with sneakers and a frock coat; grown-up clothes given a twist in that inimitable Grace way. But that’s the amazing thing about her: no matter how lavish or esoteric the influences, she always makes it about the girl of today. Welcome back. Personally, I thought I’d returned to the 1990s when, on a quiet Sunday afternoon in London, I stopped by to see how our shoot with Donatella Versace was going (page 220) and found a party in full swing at Annabel’s. Talk about another fantasy moment – to say nothing of a major supermodel one. Having had so many incredible nights with Donatella over the years, it was great to see her back in her element whooping it up with Claudia Schiffer, Yasmin Le Bon and Jourdan Dunn. The music was pumping – that’s how you turn a shoot into a party. Even Ru, my Boston terrier, got in on the action. For a change of tempo, on page 208 Vogue gains exclusive access to the hushed, pristine but no less fantastical world of Nicolas Ghesquière, a designer whom I admire so much. Since he arrived at Louis Vuitton four years ago, his collections have been exciting to watch unfold, and this season’s is an absolute triumph. When he went to Vuitton, everyone expected Nicolas to continue in the vein of his Balenciaga years, but he continues to confound expectations, with experimentations in colour, form and historical influences. I love how he always reinvents his vision. Meanwhile, two women having a breakthrough year are Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Lubaina Himid. The former, this month’s cover star (page 166), is one of the finest British actresses of her generation who is about to have the best year of her career at the age of 34. Similarly, Lubaina, whose beautiful canvases I have long admired, made history by winning the Turner Prize aged 63 (“Stroke of Brilliance”, page 204). They also both happen to be women of colour. Did this, perhaps, have something to do with why they have had to wait longer for their successes? Whatever the reason, it is the sort of question that I’m excited to see more and more of us asking in 2018. And how heartening, in a fantasy season, to see that overdue dreams can come true, too.

Photographer Olivia Rose (right, with model Hailey Baldwin) hit the streets of Hackney to shoot “Youth Always Wins” (page 131), profiling Off-White designer Virgil Abloh

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HAILEY WEARS OFF-THE-SHOULDER JACKET, OFF-WHITE. PARVEEN NAROWALIA; OLIVIA ROSE; SEAN THOMAS

Far left: Claudio Vigilante, general manager of Annabel’s, with Rita Ora and Irina Shayk during the shoot for “Queen of the Night” (page 220)


NOTICES Photographer Sean Thomas (right, with

Journalist Bim Adewunmi (below) interviews cover star Gugu Mbatha-Raw on page 166. Her favourite performance by the actress? “I loved her as Dido in Belle. I was swept away by the romance of a brown girl in a costume drama – at last.”

Lara Stone) captured the ultimate girls’ night out with Donatella Versace (page 220). “It was an evening I will never forget,” he says, “from watching Donatella and her friends going absolutely wild on the dancefloor to a champagne cork flying into my lens.”

Supermodel Helena Christensen (below) photographs her home in the Catskills in New York State; step inside her colourful bolthole on page 109.

Writer Sarah Crompton (below) journeyed north to interview 2017 Turner Prizewinner Lubaina Himid (page 204) at her home studio in Lancashire. Her favourite thing about the space? “The books crowding every available surface – from Nelson Mandela’s autobiography Long Walk to Freedom to EH Gombrich’s classic The Story of Art.”

FIRST LOOK Meet the contributors behind the stories in the April issue Contributing beauty editor – and rise – of the wig on page 152. “For me, it’s less about the quality of the wig itself and more about the powerful narrative it represents.”

Nicolas Ghesquière’s long-time collaborator Marie-Amélie Sauvé (above) styles the Louis Vuitton creative director on page 208.

For “My Mini Revelation”, editor-in-chief Edward Enninful styled Amber Valletta (above) in Versace on New Year’s Eve in Miami; turn to page 80 for the supermodel’s thoughts on why the miniskirt should be your go-to party look this season – no matter what your age. Contributing editor Kate Moss (above) styled “Rude Girl Rock” on page 186, photographed by Nick Knight in cloudy Brighton. The shoot locations included an arcade on Brighton Pier, the Victorian-era Grand Hotel, and bus shelters and cafés along Kings Road.

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For Craig McDean’s shoot “Urban Legend” on page 176, Grace Coddington (right, with Nicolas Ghesquière) dresses fellow redhead Natalie Westling in this season’s most anachronistic fashions.

NICK KNIGHT; CRAIG McDEAN; JASON McDONALD; MIKAEL JANSSON; TERENCE CONNORS; TALENA MASCALI; LEWIS HAYWARD; GRACE CODDINGTON; CHANTAL FOLLINS

Funmi Fetto (right) considers the rise


SERPENT BOHÈME

FIRST JEWELLER OF THE PLACE VENDÔME )N &R½D½RIC"OUCHERONISTHElRSTOFTHEGREATCONTEMPORARYJEWELLERSTOOPENA"OUTIQUEONTHE0LACE6ENDÇME


VOGUE.CO.UK How much do you know about actress Anya Taylor-Joy? Vogue asks her the all-important questions – from her go-to karaoke song to the last film that made her cry

Nobody knows how to party quite like Versace girls know how to party... Irina, Yasmin, Claudia, Jourdan and Rita get dressed up in the spring/ summer 2018 collection for the ultimate night out with Donatella

BEYOND THE LENS

Head to Vogue.co.uk/video to see the pages of the April issue come to life – from a wild night out with Donatella Versace and the supers to hairstylist Sam McKnight’s impressive collection of wigs 50

SOPHIE EDELSTEIN; STELLA SCOTT; SEAN THOMAS

Cover star Gugu Mbatha-Raw shares her personal fairy tale in the beautiful surroundings of Syon House


143, NEW BOND STREET, Mayfair, London W1S 2TP 152-153, SLOANE STREET, London SW1X 9BX

© 2018 Chloé, all rights reserved.

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EDWARD ENNINFUL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOHAN SVENSSON MANAGING EDITOR MARK RUSSELL FASHION DIRECTOR VENETIA SCOTT EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DEBORAH ABABIO FASHION MARKET DIRECTOR DENA GIANNINI SENIOR CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR KATE PHELAN SENIOR FASHION EDITOR POPPY KAIN FASHION EDITOR JACK BORKETT SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANTS FLORENCE ARNOLD, BEATRIZ DE COSSIO, JOSIE HALL FASHION COORDINATOR POM OGILVY JEWELLERY EDITOR CAROL WOOLTON MERCHANDISE EDITOR HELEN HIBBIRD CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS JANE HOW, JOE McKENNA, MAX PEARMAIN, CLARE RICHARDSON, SARAH RICHARDSON, MARIE-AMELIE SAUVE FASHION BOOKINGS EDITOR ROSIE VOGEL-EADES ACTING BOOKINGS ASSISTANT ROMAIN BOUGLENAN CONTRIBUTING CASTING DIRECTOR ASHLEY BROKAW FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR SARAH HARRIS ACTING FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR CLAUDIA CROFT FASHION FEATURES EDITOR ELLIE PITHERS SHOPPING EDITOR NAOMI SMART EXECUTIVE FASHION NEWS EDITOR OLIVIA SINGER FASHION CRITIC ANDERS CHRISTIAN MADSEN BEAUTY & LIFESTYLE DIRECTOR JESSICA DINER BEAUTY & LIFESTYLE EDITOR LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH BEAUTY & LIFESTYLE ASSOCIATE LOTTIE WINTER BEAUTY EDITOR-AT-LARGE PAT McGRATH CONTRIBUTING BEAUTY EDITORS KATHLEEN BAIRD-MURRAY, FUNMI FETTO, VAL GARLAND, SAM McKNIGHT, GUIDO PALAU, CHARLOTTE TILBURY FEATURES DIRECTOR GILES HATTERSLEY COMMISSIONING EDITOR OLIVIA MARKS FEATURES ASSISTANT HAYLEY MAITLAND EDITOR-AT-LARGE CAROLINE WOLFF ART DIRECTOR PHIL BUCKINGHAM ART EDITOR JANE HASSANALI DESIGNER EILIDH WILLIAMSON JUNIOR DESIGNER PHILIP JACKSON PICTURE EDITOR CAI LUNN DEPUTY PICTURE EDITOR BROOKE MACE ART COORDINATOR BEN EVANS ACTING CHIEF SUB-EDITOR VICTORIA WILLAN SUB-EDITOR STEPHEN PATIENCE CONTRIBUTING EVENTS EDITOR SACHA FORBES EDITORIAL COORDINATOR SOEY KIM VOGUE.CO.UK BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LISA NIVEN ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR KATIE BERRINGTON MISS VOGUE EDITOR & SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER NAOMI PIKE VOGUE DAILY EDITOR ALICE NEWBOLD ENGAGEMENT MANAGER ALYSON LOWE ASSOCIATE DIGITAL PICTURE EDITOR PARVEEN NAROWALIA JUNIOR DIGITAL PICTURE EDITOR LAUREN DUDLEY VIDEO PRODUCER MINNIE CARVER CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ADWOA ABOAH, LAURA BAILEY, LAURA BURLINGTON, NAOMI CAMPBELL, ALEXA CHUNG, MICHAELA COEL, RONNIE COOKE NEWHOUSE, TANIA FARES, ALEXANDER GILKES, VIOLET HENDERSON, NIGELLA LAWSON, GIANLUCA LONGO, ALASTAIR McKIMM, STEVE McQUEEN, JIMMY MOFFAT, KATE MOSS, SARAH MOWER, ROBIN MUIR, DURO OLOWU, LORRAINE PASCALE, HARRIET QUICK, ELIZABETH SALTZMAN, NONA SUMMERS, HIKARI YOKOYAMA EDITORIAL BUSINESS MANAGER JESSICA McGOWAN SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES EMAIL SYNDICATION@CONDENAST.CO.UK DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION & RIGHTS HARRIET WILSON

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TRENDS Edited by Naomi Smart Styling by Jack Borkett From left: Celine wears trench coat, £8,290. Silk dress, £6,545. Patent-leather boots, £1,860. Choker, £845. All Alexander McQueen. Adele wears trench coat with detachable hem, £900, Ambush, at Selfridges. Organza trench coat, £1,865, Maison Margiela. Checked skirt, £750. Embroidered silk legwarmers, worn on arms, £295. Both Asai, at Leclaireur.com. Sandals, £715, Gucci. Socks, £11, Falke. Hat with scarf, from a selection, Raf Simons

HAIR: NAOKI KOMIYA. MAKE-UP: JENNY COOMBS. NAILS: ADAM SLEE. MODELS: CELINE BOULY, DANIELLE LASHLEY, ADELE TASKA, AMBER ROSE WITCOMB

TRENCH REVOLUTION Organzas, vinyls, shredded hems… a new wave of deconstructed trench coats blends the everyday and the avantgarde. Photographs by Scott Trindle

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TRENDS “It started with customising trenches and just draping them, playing with them, putting them on the shoulder” 3.1 PHILLIP LIM

Céline’s Phoebe Philo

From left: denim, £580, Elizabeth & James, at Net-a-Porter.com. Cotton, £2,120, Maison Margiela. Gabardine, £125, & Other Stories. Lacquered cotton, £1,380, Sonia Rykiel

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SCOTT TRINDLE; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

LOEWE

VICTORIA BECKHAM

VALENTINO

KENZO

CELINE

MAX MARA

Vinyl trench coat, £395, The Kooples. Leather skirt, £795, MCM. Cotton shirtdress, £420. Bucket hat, £90. Both MSGM. Silk scarf, £330, Hermès. Leather gloves, from £535, Off-White. Jacquard bag, £1,715, Rochas


CONTACT: +44 (0) 20 77 20 97 25 UK@THOMASSABO.COM


regent street covent garden westfield london sloane square bluewater katespade.co.uk


TRENDS Jewelled velvet, £99, Uterqüe

Glitter, £515, Victoria Beckham

Satin, £840, Tom Ford

Embellished satin, £650, René Caovilla

Satin with overlay, £695, Off-White c/o Jimmy Choo

Jewelled satin, £795, Manolo Blahnik

SCOTT TRINDLE. TIGHTS, CALZEDONIA

HIGH RISE

The classic court shoe has undergone a glamorous rebirth. From the plasticprotected to the fully bedazzling, this is footwear to elevate you in every way Satin and crystal shoes, £940, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello


PROENZA SCHOULER

BALENCIAGA

CELINE

TRENDS From left: Celine wears coat, £60, River Island. Turtleneck, from £1,170, Proenza Schouler. Dress, £460, Paco Rabanne. Tights, £11, Calzedonia. Shoes, £475, Mulberry. Bag, £575, MCM. Silver earrings, from £130 each, Alan Crocetti. Pink hoop earring, £220, Marco Panconesi for Peter Pilotto, at Liberty. Danielle wears top, £1,100, Fendi. Trousers, £810, Haider Ackermann. Shoes, £440, Versace. Adele wears blouse, £1,095, Christopher Kane. Earrings, from £510, Balenciaga

Tough it out in pastels Add a bit of sass to the season’s sugary shades to find your sweet spot between prim and defiant

I

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From left: dress, £65, Autograph, at Marks & Spencer. Jersey top, £650, Chloé. Backless suede loafers, £770, Hermès. Crêpe blazer, £1,470, Michael Kors Collection. Resin bracelet, £800, Chanel

SCOTT TRINDLE; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

BOTTEGA VENETA

f you’ve never before considered a baby-blue twinset, we implore you to think again. Pastels are undergoing a radical renaissance, but the new way to wear them is with a twist. That means teaming a dustypink dress with fishnet tights, or wearing your pretty ice-blue blouse with a tiny mini. Take cues from Calvin Klein and Helmut Lang: embrace subversive fabrics like viscose and patent to avoid looking prim, and keep tailoring sharp. If full-look lilac is your worst nightmare, start slow. Build from a foundation of black, or look for suitably saccharine accessories (our favourites are found at Chanel and Loewe). But most importantly, remember: this isn’t the 1950s, and nothing updates a pastel cardigan quite like modern attitude. OS


SCOTT TRINDLE


TRENDS

DAYS IN BRIGHT SATIN Last season, velvet was ushered from eveningwear into the cool light of day – this spring it’s satin’s turn. For effortless elegance, team a ruched dress with polished brogues, or wear your bias-cut skirt with a plain white tee. Shimmer and shine is no longer reserved for after hours: the most indulgent fabrics deserve attention all day long. OS From left: Danielle wears shirt with harness detail, £645, Sies Marjan. Trousers, £600, Mulberry. Mules, £490, Marques Almeida. Amber Rose wears top, £425. Skirt, £450. Both Sportmax, Shoes, from £930, Haider Ackermann. Adele wears dress, from £1,765, Nina Ricci. Mules, £490, Marques Almeida. Bag, £1,020, Chloé. Celine wears top, £565. Skirt, £555. Both Lemaire. Slingbacks, £645, Prada

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TRENDS “Luminous silks in everyday cuts are the chicest way to shine 24/7”

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Clockwise from top right: shirt, £175, Polo Ralph Lauren. Pendant necklace, from £3,195, CVC Stones, at Barneys.com. Skirt, £400, Rochas. Shirtdress, £1,279, Attico, at Browns. Bag, £697, Wandler. Sandals, £175, Michael Michael Kors. Backless loafers, £345, Dorateymur, at Farfetch.com. Earrings, £570, Proenza Schouler. Skirt, £180, Raey, at Matchesfashion.com. Jacket, £700, Acne Studios. Trench coat, £4,350, Ralph & Russo. Dress, £595, Alexachung

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

CALVIN KLEIN

VICTORIA BECKHAM

CATWALK CREDIT

SONIA RYKIEL

PETER PILOTTO

Naomi Smart, shopping editor


READY-TO-WEAR & ACCESSORIES | LONGCHAMP.COM


TRENDS

2018

1997

Left: Amber wears silk dress, from £2,255. Embellished leather boots, to order. Both Versace

Amber Valletta’s micro hems... Then: in Alberta Ferretti, Vogue April 1997 (above). Now: wearing Saint Laurent (right and far right); in Atelier Versace (below)

With hemlines on the up and up, Amber Valletta explains how she found the confidence to go short

K

ate Moss has skinny jeans and Meghan Markle rules in a belted coat. Every woman needs to find the one signature piece that defines her. Mine is the miniskirt – but it wasn’t always that way. When I started modelling, the super with the best legs of all was Naomi. Linda Evangelista and Shalom Harlow had killer legs, too. As for me? For a long time, I didn’t really like my legs and rarely showed them off, but in the last 15 years my attitude has changed completely. Now, at 44, I wear more short skirts than I did at 24. I’ve put a lot of time and energy into working out – hiking, spinning, lifting weights, cardio, yoga and dancing. I wasn’t doing this to intentionally improve my legs, but as a byproduct they look so much better. I have

definition now and I didn’t before. My aunt saw me in shorts one day and told me that she regretted not wearing more short skirts. “You should show your legs while you have them. Use it!” she said. I thought, I’ve done all this work, I might as well enjoy it. I tend to go short at night. I like the simple physical freedom of having my legs out. It feels sexy without trying to be. I love the way Saint Laurent does the mini. The clothes are so empowering, yet feminine and chic. They just feel like me. When you put something on, no matter how short, you want to feel comfortable and confident. Someone told me recently about a school of thought that says women over a certain age shouldn’t wear miniskirts. I haven’t ever heard that and, clearly, I am not listening. Q

SHORT STORIES

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PACO RABANNE

JACQUEMUS

Mesh dress, £2,490, Paco Rabanne

SONIA RYKIEL

Cotton-mix skirt, £175, Sandro

Leather skirt, £570, Rag & Bone Ruched dress, £675, Isabel Marant

PHOTOGRAPH: KLOSS FILMS. STYLING: EDWARD ENNINFUL. HAIR: TEDDY CHARLES. MAKE-UP: NIKI M’NRAY. NICK KNIGHT; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY; PIXELATE.BIZ; REX FEATURES; SHUTTERSTOCK

My mini revelation


TRENDS

Leather, £2,590, Fendi

Velvet, from £1,575, Balenciaga

Canvas and leather, £7,970, Hermès

Leather, £1,670, Prada

Leather, £1,500, Louis Vuitton

Leather bag, from £2,625, Céline

SCOTT TRINDLE; PIXELATE.BIZ. TOP, MONCLER GAMME ROUGE. BELT, ZANA BAYNE. TROUSERS, DKNY. GLOVES, OFF-WHITE

Leather, £1,100, Tod’s

Leather, from £1,570, Givenchy

SWING VOTE

The wear-with-everything 1970s shoulder bag is back – this time tricked out with studs, chains and plenty of polished hardware. Make it your go-to

Leather, £2,790, Bottega Veneta

Leather, £1,700, Marni

Leather, £2,175, Loewe

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TRENDS

From left: Amber Rose wears dress, £1,120, Mulberry. Matching hat, on lap, to order, Noel Stewart for Mulberry. Danielle wears off-the-shoulder dress, £2,230. Earrings, £320. Both Erdem. Adele wears dress with asymmetric straps, to order, Erdem. Hair clips, £75 each, Simone Rocha. Earring, £255, Alan Crocetti. Celine wears dress, £1,790, Mulberry. Clutch, £2,148, Bienen-Davis, at Matchesfashion.com. Tights, £11, Calzedonia

Be the bestdressed guest The new dress code for summer’s weddings? Swot up on a few simple rules then go for gorgeous

1Personal best

Stick to your own style: there’s no need to succumb to the peculiar form of wedding panic that dictates overblown florals and cupcake colours. If you always wear black, go ahead, just make sure your accessories are zingy. And if you do decide to wear florals, toughen them up with metallic jewellery or a fierce pair of shoes.

2 Beyond the pale

Don’t set out to steal the bride’s thunder: never wear white. If you must wear pale colours – or are eyeing up flirtatiously revealing necklines – clear it with your host first, preferably with an accompanying visual sent via Whatsapp. For ultimate style kudos? Name-drop a brand that’s reassuringly niche: the Vampire’s Wife, Brock Collection, Kitri and Sea NY are the names to know for British weddings; if you’re on the Continent, the chicest guests wear Johanna Ortiz, Ulla Johnson and Cult Gaia.

4

Head turners

Avoid fascinators at all costs – they only ever look half-hearted. Take your cue from Simone Rocha and opt for crystal-frosted hair clips, or try Emily London for quietly spectacular pillbox hats.

5Matchless chic

Remember the matchy-matchy rule: never co-ordinate your bags, shoes and belt – unless they’re Chanel, of course.

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6Come clean

Forgo the fake tan. No one wants to be the well-wisher who smears Ginger Nut orange on the bride’s dazzling gown.

7Warmer, warmer

A cardigan is no longer off-limits: pin it at the throat with an heirloom brooch, à la Erdem, and let the arms fly for an instant update. Or invest in a cocktail coat – it will come into its own in the British wedding season. Alternatively, an oversized blazer over a pretty dress looks modern.

8Style trips

Take note of the terrain: stilettos won’t hack it on gravel, cobbles or grass.

Brocade sandals, £295, LK Bennett

Choose platforms or wedges instead, and pack a pair of jewel-tone satin Le Monde Beryl flats for when ankle-ache sets in (do not, under any circumstances, take off your shoes on the dancefloor). Never wear boots – they always look matronly.

9

Leather bag, £1,510, Marni. Clutch bags, begone! Embellished A dinky strap-handle bag from velvet bag, to Bienen-Davis, Dolce & Gabbana order, Dolce or Marni is an instant ice-breaker, & Gabbana

To have and to hold

and will nestle in your elbow as you negotiate champagne.

10 Renew your wows

Yes, you can re-wear a dress to multiple nuptials, as long as you switch up the statement Alessandra Rich or Rebecca de Ravenel earrings.

Drop earrings, £16, Mango

COMPILED BY ELLIE PITHERS AND NAOMI SMART. SCOTT TRINDLE; PIXELATE.BIZ

3 Something new


VOGUE DARLING

Hannah wears dress, £1,525, Stella McCartney. Shoes, £575, Manolo Blahnik. Photographer: Greta Ilieva. Stylist: Jack Borkett

“Strong, empowering female leads are so important in the roles I choose. Girl power is key”

“The women in my family inspire me to follow my ambitions and to put 150 per cent into it. My older sister Anneka is a doctor, and our careers are so different but she’s my best friend.”

“My most treasured possession is my teddy bear, Harry. My dad got him for me when I was three and he’s like my good-luck charm. I take him everywhere.”

HANNAH JOHN-KAMEN Even though this year is bursting with blockbusters featuring Hannah John-Kamen, the Yorkshire-born, east London-dwelling actress still “can’t believe” a Spielberg film now features on her CV. This month the 28-year-old appears in the director’s dystopian Ready Player One, as well as in Tomb Raider alongside Alicia Vikander’s Lara Croft. Come July, the actress will have starred in her first Marvel project, Ant-Man and the Wasp. But John-Kamen’s talents are by no means limited to the action genre: her television credits include Happy Valley and Game of Thrones, while theatre-goers may recognise her from her lead role in the Spice Girls musical Viva Forever. Her career may have taken a different direction, but the feminist message remains: “Strong, empowering female leads are so important in the roles I choose. Girl power is key.” Q

“I grew up watching films like Some Like It Hot and Gone with the Wind. I wished I could be in one of those old Hollywood movies.”

“If I didn’t live in London, I would move to San Francisco. We filmed Ant-Man and the Wasp there, and I fell in love with it.”

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“Chanel’s Gabrielle [£79] is the scent I’m wearing at the moment. Scents smell different on different skin types, and this really works for me.” “So many people have inspired me, but I really love Tilda Swinton’s style. I love suits, and her amazing androgynous look.”

“My favourite recent buy is a big blue furry jacket. I look like Cookie Monster in it.” Faux-fur jacket, £536, La Seine & Moi, at Farfetch.com

“I like to run, and always have music blasting from my iPhone.” Trainers, £150, Adidas. Leggings, £98, Lululemon

TOP 5 TRACKS TO RUN TO…

“White Lines” – Grandmaster & Melle Mel

“Blind Faith” – Chase & Status

“Walking a Line” – Tove Styrke

“Gulf of Mexico” – Dissociates

“Wham Rap” – Wham

INTERVIEW: NAOMI PIKE. HAIR: PHILIPPE THOLIMET. MAKE-UP: NICOLA BRITTIN. NAILS: PEBBLES AIKENS. GETTY; ISTOCK; REX FEATURES

“My most-used emoji is the salsa-dancing lady . I love her – she can say a lot.”


INTRODUCING PANDORA SHINE A NEW collection of 18ct gold-plated sterling silver jewellery

DO SHINE BRIGHT

pandora.net


Sunglasses, £95, Bimba & Lola

THE GETAWAY Take inspiration for your holiday wardrobe from the deep blue Mediterranean Sea

Leather bag, £2,450, Fendi

Sun seekers Jean Shrimpton hits the beach, Vogue January 1963. Opposite, centre: Suvi Koponen in azure swimwear, Vogue May 2016

Embroidered slippers, £295, Furla. Cotton sundress, £45, Superdry

DAVID BAILEY; ARNAUD DE ROSNAY; CHARLOTTE WALES; PIXELATE.BIZ; GETTY

Aqua marine The perfect white and blue tones of the isle of Santorini


CHECKLIST Exotic jewellery and a bejewelled headscarf Margaret Broderick on Vogue’s May 1972 cover, shot in Tunisia

Summer colours The blue-washed walls of the town of Chefchaouen in northern Morocco Charm bracelet, £622, Thomas Sabo

Diamondset watch, £4,650, Tag Heuer

China tray, £175, Asprey

Conch pearl and diamond ring, price on request, Chatila Swimsuit, £215, Asceno

The blackcurrant-and-apple sorbet accord in Versace Dylan Blue Pour Femme, £52, at Harrods, provides instant refreshment

Cotton-mix skirt, £295, Margaret Howell

Boost skin’s natural barrier with a little help from the potent probiotics in Lancôme Génifique Youth Activating Concentrate, £59

Leather sandals, £755, Manolo Blahnik

Relax The spa at the Maxx Royal Kemer resort on Turkey’s southern coast offers authentic Turkish bath treatments, as well as ayurvedic and healing oil therapies. Maxxroyal.com


The new season mood The spirit of spring/summer 2018 plays \W\PMZMÅVMLVI\]ZMWN\PM5I[[QUW,]\\Q _WUIV·J]\_Q\PIUWLMZVÆIQZ


VOGUE PARTNERSHIP

The new Massimo Dutti mood is one not just to buy now, but to wear and channel forever

TOMMY TON

F

or spring/summer 2018, Massimo Dutti explores new ground – both in the oasis of art that served as inspiration for the Limited Edition collection, and in a new business model. At a cinematic show in Paris’s Palais de Tokyo – which proved, once again, that the marriage of art and fashion does not merely endure, it flourishes with the passage of time – the brand explored a see-now-buy-now proposal. As the world’s top models, including Ruth Bell and Natalie Westling, brought the contemporary collection to life in the 16th arrondissement, customers could plot which of the premium pieces to purchase almost straight off the catwalk. The collection itself plays to the Massimo Dutti woman’s artistic, intelligent approach to fashion: someone who radiates confidence, but opts for the most discreet colour combinations and quietly considered tailoring. Immaculately cut summer suits, palazzo trousers, dresses that play with geometry, and light blouses made of almost flyaway fabrics sit alongside structured everyday pieces with clean lines. It was an optimistic power wardrobe for those who know the allure of understated impact. Crafted in a palette of muted hues, the spring/summer 2018 collection builds on tone-on-tone versatility. So, as the seasons shift, the new Massimo Dutti mood is one not just to buy now, but to wear and channel forever. Q The Limited Edition collection is available now at Massimodutti.com


HAIR: JONATHAN DE FRANCESCO. MAKE-UP: LAURA DOMINIQUE. NAILS: PEBBLES AIKENS. MODEL: MATEA BRAKUS. WITH THANKS TO SPRING STUDIOS

Diamonds explode like fireworks across a background of midnight-black silk. Cross earrings, £1,335, Stone Paris. Ear cuff, £5,650, Messika. Bracelet, £9,800. Bangle, £14,000. Both Tiffany T. Ring, on model’s ring finger, £2,623, Diane Kordas. Rings, on model’s little finger, from £3,750 each, Dior Joaillerie. Brooch, price on request, Harry Winston. Silk and leather dress, from £3,995, Céline


With rings on her fingers and hoops in her lobes, she shall have diamonds wherever she goes… Earrings, price on request, Chopard. Necklace and cocktail ring, both price on request, Graff. Watch, price on request, Buccellati. Silk camisole top with bra, £640, Lanvin. Jersey gloves, £75, Cornelia James

PRETTY HARDCORE

Take a long, cool look at the new way to wear white diamonds – with edgy leathers and a rocking attitude. Jewellery editor: Carol Woolton. Fashion editor: Jack Borkett. Photographs: Sean & Seng


Glenn Spiro’s dramatic chandeliers cascade like icy waterfalls. Earrings, price on request, G by Glenn Spiro, at Harrods. Five-row necklace, price on request, David Morris. Long necklace, price on request, Messika. Sautoir necklace with geometric motif, price on request, Harry Winston. Ring, price on request, Cartier. Bra top, from £260. Leather trousers with belt detail, from £880. Both Helmut Lang Seen by Shayne Oliver. Jersey gloves, £75, Cornelia James


armanibeauty.co.uk

Cate Blanchett


Architect Paolo Soleri’s experimental town Arcosanti, in the Arizona desert

DESTINATION: WONDER From the hidden gallery to the untouched beach, Vogue picks the places worth travelling to this year. Edited by Naomi Smart

You don’t have to be an architect to appreciate the vision of Arcosanti, an experimental town built in the middle of the Arizona desert. Conceived in the early 1970s by Italian architect Paolo Soleri, these vast concrete structures house a community of practising architects and volunteers building a sustainable alternative to urban living. Plan your trip around one of the amphitheatre concerts, or take a tour of the sun-bleached estate (the backdrop to this season’s Miu Miu campaign) before staying overnight in the Sky Suite – the highest point in the complex and one of a handful of rooms that visitors can actually book. Arcosanti.org 102

THE VILLA Greece James Turrell fans take note. If the 360-degree views of the Peloponnese weren’t a big enough pull for the recently opened Amanzoe resort, you can now rent Villa 31 with its very own permanent Turrell installation. When not lounging by the 72ft pool, challenge your visual and sensory perceptions through the large ceiling aperture of Sky Plain (above right), the 20ft-high cubic sculpture, and relax under your own, almost meditative experience of Aegean sky. This is Greece in a whole new light. Aman.com

JOSHUA LIBERMAN; ANDREW MOORE; RICHARD JOHN SEYMOUR; SALLY WILSON

THE ARCHITECTURE America


TRAVEL THE SCULPTURE GARDEN Mexico Set deep in the Mexican rainforest, Las Pozas sculpture gardens – created in the 1960s by the British art collector Edward James, a patron of the surrealist movement – will entice even the most travelled. Wander freely within 80 acres of this otherworldly playground and discover the fantastical stone towers and sculptures among a labyrinth of natural waterfalls and pools. Prepare for the pilgrimage, however, as James was never going to make the discovery easy; Las Pozas is the main attraction in the area, and there is little accommodation, so plan it as a 24-hour round trip. The best option is taking two consecutive overnight sleeper coaches between Xilitla and Mexico City, each an eight-hour winding drive; sounds relentless (it is), but worth every minute. Xilitla.org

THE SPA China Fifty Ming- and Qing-dynasty homes were transported 600 miles from Jiangxi and rebuilt brick-by-brick at Amanyangyun Resort on the outskirts of Shanghai. A forest of 10,000 sacred camphor trees – including the thousand-year-old Emperor Tree – was also transplanted from the region. Most impressive of all, however, is the spa, combining ancient remedies (many treatments feature locally grown herbs and flowers) and cutting-edge wellness technology. Aman.com. HM

THE HOTEL Bhutan The five lodges that make up Six Senses Bhutan are designed as resting places on a journey through the enchanted kingdom, with each site taking cues from the landscape around it – from a traditional farmhouse set among the rice paddies of Punakha to a cabin that blends into the woods in verdant Bumthang. Go for the activities as much as the stunning design: from making a pilgrimage to a 16th-century monastery to spotting the endangered black-necked crane in the mystical Phobjikha valley and dining among the ruins of an ancient fortress. Sixsenses.com. HM

THE GALLERY Italy

THE BEACH Portugal Just an hour’s drive from Lisbon, the Comporta peninsula is home to more than 112 miles of Hamptons-esque coastline. For your next group holiday, join the well-connected international crowd on its pristine beaches, which are dotted with designer villas and rustic seafood shacks. Morning trips to the local fish market will inspire suppers at home, while afternoons are best spent hopping between laid-back beach hangouts – think late lunches at restaurant Sal followed by sundowners at Bar Comporta.

Hidden among the medieval buildings of Trastevere, Manhattan gallerist Gavin Brown’s outpost in Rome more than justifies a trip across the Tiber to the city’s oft-overlooked 13th district. Housed in a deconsecrated ninth-century church, the 500sq ft space plays host to beautifully curated installations. On display now? The latest works from cinematographer and artist Arthur Jafa – whose body of work ranges from the groundbreaking Love Is the Message, the Message Is Death to Beyoncé’s music video for “Formation”. Santandreadescaphis.com. HM

THE RESTAURANT Bolivia There are plenty of reasons to travel to La Paz, Bolivia’s high-altitude de facto capital, this year – from the opening of pioneering design hotels Atix and Altu Qala to the new cable network with staggering views of the Andes – but the number-one draw might just be its booming culinary scene. Leading the revolution is Noma co-founder Claus Meyer’s restaurant Gustu, which serves Bolivian dishes based around indigenous produce: think shredded marrow from palm trees deep in the Amazon and llama tartare. Gustubo.restaurantgustu.com. HM 103


FIRE AWAY

What do some of spring’s most exciting new restaurant openings have in common? Grill power, says Hayley Maitland. Photograph by Nacho Alegre

“Lots of explorers departed from Getaria’s port in the 16th century and perfected the art of grilling fish over charcoal at sea, and the technique was then brought back on to land” 104

WITH THANKS TO ROOFTOP SMOKEHOUSE

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ou have to learn how to season a fire,” chef Tomos Parry tells me, deadly serious. “Certain types of wood smoke will balance a dish – cedar goes beautifully with fish; European vine wood with beef; apple wood with pork – while others will ruin it.” We’re standing in the kitchen at Brat, Parry’s first solo restaurant, and perhaps the most eagerly awaited opening of the spring, examining the vast grills that form the heart of his flame-based cuisine. “Working with fire is a balancing act,” he says, “but when it’s done well, the flavour is hard to beat.” Parry first earned his reputation for gastronomic pyromania as head chef at Kitty Fisher’s. On any given night at the fashionable Mayfair haunt, the Camerons might have been spotted perching on the rose-velvet couches, while Kate Moss nursed a Dirty Kitty cocktail at the bar – lured to Shepherd Market by Parry’s famous dishes, from whipped cod’s roe on toast to grilled lamb cutlets with anchovy, mint and parsley. No wonder fans have been impatiently waiting for Parry to launch his own restaurant since he departed in 2016. Set on Redchurch Street in Shoreditch, Brat (the name is a colloquialism for turbot) has a menu inspired by the cooking traditions of the Basque country – specifically Getaria, a tiny fishing village just west of San Sebastian. “Lots of explorers departed from Getaria’s port in the 16th century and perfected the art of grilling fish over charcoal at sea, and the technique was then brought back on to land,” he explains. Parry, however, uses the grill to highlight the quality of British produce – much of which he sources from his native Wales. Depending on the season, diners can expect moreish dishes such as sea trout with Jersey cream and river herbs, salt-marsh lamb or offal hotpot with laver bread. Parry is not alone in embracing fire cooking. Many of Britain’s buzziest chefs are using wood-fire methods from across Europe and Asia to create some of the most exciting dishes currently available. At Nuala, near Silicon Roundabout, a short distance from Brat, a team that includes alumni from Chiltern Firehouse, the Fat Duck and Noma serves Irish-influenced fare prepared over a vast fire pit: think rotisserie goose with barley pancakes; king crab with Pernod butter; and suckling pig and “fireplace” cabbage. Meanwhile, when it opens in the City this spring, Brigadiers (the latest venture from the team behind Hoppers and Gymkhana) will focus on Indian barbecue, including wood-roasted tomahawk steaks. This autumn sees the launch of Shibui – the first restaurant from Elizabeth Allen, who earned a Michelin star while at Hackney’s Pidgin in 2016. On the menu? Japanese-inspired dishes such as buttermilk ramen chicken with miso and caviar, all prepared over fire. It’s not only professional chefs who should be taking an interest in wood, as barbecue season is approaching. If you have a quality piece of meat or fish, it’s a waste to put it over low-grade charcoal, which often includes impurities. Well-prepared British or European wood burns cleanly – and infuses dishes with perfumed smoke. But what to choose? Beech has notes of camomile; walnut has a bitterness to it; alder brings to mind vanilla; plum has a tart quality. As with wine, the terroir affects the flavours: an English oak from Kent will burn differently from an English oak from Hampshire – the former gives dishes a moreish buttery flavour, the latter an almost tropical sweetness. Consider timber the hottest ingredient of the season. Q


LIVING


E M I LY R ATA J K O W S K I , PA L M S P R I N G S


T H E E M I LY B Y


KARLIE KLOSS JASON WU

ATELIERSWAROVSKI.COM


LIVING Christensen in a cheerful nook of the living room, surrounded by cushions from her favourite local store, Little House, in Woodstock. Below: the halfDanish, halfPeruvian model painted the house – which was originally a peeling mustard yellow – grass green

Mermaid tales

Helena Christensen photographs the idyllic weekend retreat she has carved out high in the Catskill Mountains. But why the nautical talk of pirates and mermaids? asks Ellie Pithers. Portraits by Jason McDonald

STYLING: CAMILLA STAERK

S

everal years ago, Helena Christensen was taking delivery of some furniture, purchased from an antiques store near her Catskills home in upstate New York, when she noticed something else in the back of a van. Wasn’t that… a mermaid? She insisted the delivery guys unload the statue, an imposing 1940s Norwegian piece carved out of a single tree trunk, intended for another customer. “I looked at it and said, ‘OK, that is not going anywhere, I must have it. Tell the other customer it’s been stolen in transit,’” she laughs. The mermaid now presides over a cosy corner of the antiques-filled living room in this upstate bolthole, a twohour-long flit from Christensen’s apartment in Manhattan’s

West Village. “I’m obsessed with mermaids: I would definitely choose to be a mermaid if I were given the offer,” the 48-yearold original supermodel says, only half-joking. “I’d happily give up my human existence.” She’d be mad, though, to give up this place: a clapboard house painted grass green, with a barn rendered in a stormy blue, where, thanks to the nearby river, the only sound is of rushing water and the views are all lush green firs, scarlet Japanese maples and a tranquil pool she had built to resemble a natural pond. Christensen still models, of course, and is an accomplished photographer who also co-founded the perfume company Strangelove NYC. She didn’t set out to buy a home in the mountains. It was the photographer Fabrizio Ferri, an > 109


LIVING

Above left: a guest bedroom in the house, with one of Christensen’s many vintage bedspreads. Above right: the carved mermaid is a 1940s piece by a Norwegian artist. Right: the light-filled dining room where Helena serves home-cooked food. Below: the view from an upper window overlooking the pool she had made to look like a natural pond

old friend, who forced her hand, putting a down payment on the house for her in 2007, when Christensen had yet to even see the property, let alone express interest in owning a Catskills home. (She also owns a cottage on the coast of her native Denmark.) “I thought he was crazy. But I drove up alone to take a look,” she recalls. “The house needed a lot of work – you could see the sky through the roof, and the whole layout was illogical – but there was definitely potential.” Having bought it, she set about the renovation with a team of local builders and joiners she fondly calls her “pirate team” – “because they looked like they had been assembled on a pirate ship”. Communication was a little fraught: none of the pirates had email, and Christensen, certain of her vision for the house, didn’t want to use an architect, so outlined her ideas with hand-drawn sketches sent in the post. “I mailed them little pieces of wood or a rock that I liked, my drawings, specifics on things I knew I liked,” Christensen says. “Looking back, I have no idea how it got done. It was miraculous – a virtually silent renovation.” The result is a heavily accessorised four-bedroom house (there are two further bedrooms in the barn) that both

conforms to Christensen’s homely modern tastes and also looks as though it has always been here. The original structure comprised a series of poky little rooms and had no central heating. Christensen conspired to open up the space to create a large kitchen that blends industrial modernism (toughened metal counters, poured-concrete flooring roughed up to look like a French factory floor) with the living room’s mid-century eclecticism (Kaare Klint safari chairs, vintage Turkish and Scandinavian fabrics). It’s quirky without being twee; the perfect balance of vibrant patterns and craftwork, which Christensen attributes to her Peruvian blood (via her mother), and cool blues and hygge corners, which she ascribes to her Danish roots (her father). If her dual heritage has influenced her ad hoc style, however, it is by cultural osmosis rather than any lived experience. “Now, my parents’ house looks very like mine, but when we were growing up in Copenhagen it never did,” she says. Far more formative, aesthetically speaking, were the years she spent in the Basque country as a house guest of the Danish artist Kurt Trampedach. “I would visit him with my friends in my late teens. We’d go trekking in the mountains, live in his home, watch him paint, learning from him,” she recalls. “It was very primitive, like how they live at the beginning of the Braveheart movie. But he had an innate sense of style.” Trampedach’s home, a mix of antiques and hand-crafted pieces – his sink was a giant rock he had hewn himself – seeped into Christensen’s psyche. “I arrived as a chubby-faced teenager with a bad perm. I had a pink bedroom with music posters and a bean-bag chair,” she laughs. “And I left as a different person.” She has a lithograph and two of his oil paintings, and has acquired his gift for unearthing treasure in antiques shops: she has truffled out paintings by the local artist John G Ernst, which now sit above the sofa in the greyish-brown living room, where she is often to be found watching a movie. Christensen drives an SUV from New York up to the house as often as she can, often with her 18-year-old son, Mingus, and a gang of friends in tow for the weekend. She always takes her violet-eyed Australian Shepherd dog, Kuma, with her – “she sits in between the front seats staring straight out the front window, so giddy and excited,” she says – and a stack of comfortable “upstate clothes”, comprising sweatpants and vintage swimsuits. The Christensen weekend line-up >

“I’m obsessed with mermaids. I would definitely choose to be a mermaid, given the offer”

Top: the paint in the TV room is Farrow & Ball Tanner’s Brown. Above: a local joiner completely rebuilt the staircase

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LIVING

In some of the bedrooms, the curtains are still a work in progress. “I press a thumbtack in every night and I think, it’s been almost 10 years, you really should get this done”

Above: Christensen spotted the work of a Russian tradesman in a Brooklyn tattoo parlour and enlisted him to make her kitchen look “industrial”. Below: the decked terrace has a glorious woodland backdrop. Bottom left: Christensen’s upstate wardrobe comprises comfortable T-shirts and sweatpants, but she can’t help adding to it: “There are really great clothing stores nearby”

“The house needed a lot of work – you could see the sky through the roof – but there was potential”

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sounds resoundingly relaxing: if she’s with friends, she’ll have a massage therapist come to the house, “and we’re all lined up, first a trip to the steam room, then a massage, then a swim in the river”. After that, everyone flops down in front of the open fire to watch a good movie and have some home-cooked food. Christensen concedes she’s a “decent” cook, though she sounds like a brilliant one. She’s certainly always been a foodie, and took up boxing in her thirties and, more recently, pole-dancing, with the sole aim of being able to eat what she likes as a consequence. Her gastronomic streak, she says, is influenced by her mother’s South American habit of emptying the contents of the fridge into a pot and seasoning it with delicious spices. Helena’s speciality: tilapia-fish stew. “I basically mix in whatever comes to mind,” she says, characteristically blasé. She spends the rest of her time pottering around the garden – “We have a planted area I call my Monet garden, full of beautiful flowers and a pebble path” – and tending to the herbs on her deck terrace, or shopping for vintage tablecloths, bedspreads and furniture in nearby Woodstock and Kingston. Route 28’s Scandinavian Grace, a shop full of

contemporary Nordic tableware, and Always Neu, a vintage clothing and furniture store, are frequent haunts, as is the Milne Antiques store in Kingston, where she picked up her latest trophy: a giant green marble conch from the 1930s, originally intended as a wedding gift. Her favourite one-stop is Little House, also in Woodstock, where she purchased the zingy cushions and fabrics that litter the beds upstairs and also adorn her velvet sofas and chairs. “You go in and want to buy the whole shop,” she sighs. Mingus – her son by former partner Norman Reedus, an actor – is just as at home as his mother in nature. Still at school, he has the honeyed skin and feline eyes that have made his mother one of modelling’s most enduring faces, and made his catwalk debut last year at Calvin Klein’s spring/ summer ’18 show. Christensen admits she worries about his generation’s obsessively plugged-in nature, but clearly the weekend ritual of escaping to the mountains, where, as a young child, Mingus would spend hours capturing and studying snakes and lizards, has stuck – not least because the West Village apartment currently houses two bearded dragons. “It was paradise for him as a little kid, then there were a few years when he wanted to stay in town with his friends,” she says. “But what I love is that even though there’s a lot of gaming, a lot of computer time, he will push it away and say, ‘Please can we go upstate this weekend?’ I reply, ‘Sure’, all nonchalantly, but inside I am so happy. There’s a basic yearning for nature – and that gives me hope.” Q


DREAM DESTINATION DINING The Maxx Royal Kemer Resort knows the importance of decadent holiday dining – so its K]TQVIZaWMZQVO[KI\MZ\WM^MZaNWWLQMLM[QZM


VOGUE PARTNERSHIP

The Maxx Royal Kemer Resort is surrounded by endless beaches and spectacular natural landscapes

Enjoy seafood dishes from a table in full view of the deep blue Mediterranean

V

ariety is the spice of life, the saying goes – particularly when it comes to where you eat on holiday. At the Maxx Royal Kemer Resort on the southern coast of Turkey, the culinary offering is expansive and eclectic. So while the panorama may be distinctly and breathtakingly Mediterranean, the gastronomy spans the globe, with tastes of Japan, Italy and Russia tempting you from its kitchens. In fact, so dedicated is Maxx Royal to giving guests a mouthwatering choice of menus – surely the key to finding paradise on holiday, along with a picture-perfect setting and impeccable service (incidentally, it has both of these too) – that it has its own avenue of restaurants, Azure Court. A stroll along here will leave you torn between the enticing array of cuisines on offer. And if you really can’t decide between them, you can order from the

various menus while enjoying the nightly performances in the balmy evening air. Azure Turk ensures that guests get an authentic flavour of Turkey, offering a pick of local delicacies. (You’d be forgiven for mistaking the restaurant for one of Istanbul’s specialist charcuteries.) Meanwhile, the Azure Italian ristorante serves pasta dishes and pizzas that will instantly transport you to the streets of Milan, and Azure Fish brings the finest seafood from the deep blue waters to your plate. If you are in the mood for haute cuisine, the Bronze Steak Steakhouse, with its gourmet meat menu and discerning drinks list, may take your fancy. Alternatively, the aptly named Emerald restaurant is considered by many to be the crowning jewel of the resort’s dining selection, with a diverse range of creative dishes overseen by a Michelin-starred chef.

And for afters? The sweet-toothed are far from forgotten. There are artisan patisseries at the boutique Le Melange, fine handmade sweets and chocolates at Chocolatier and a tantalising assortment of ice cream and sorbets around the resort. But why choose? You should really try all three. (You are on holiday, after all.) What makes the exquisite gastronomic experience even more decadent is the environment in which you get to feast. Located in Turkey’s famously beautiful Antalya region, bordering the Beydaglari Coastal National Park and set among pine-covered mountains, glittering beaches and cobalt ocean, the Maxx Royal Kemer Resort boasts spectacular natural surroundings. (Think endless sunsets over shorelines of white sand.) The architecture and design of the fivestar resort blends harmoniously into the landscape, so the views – wherever your dining destination of choice is – will be unparalleled. Q

While the panorama is distinctly and breathtakingly Mediterranean, the gastronomy spans the globe


SCANDI CRUSH

Life is sweet for Norwegian synth-pop sensation Sigrid, as Olivia Marks discovers

“Just because it’s pop music, just because I’m a girl, doesn’t mean I only write about guys” 116

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hen Norwegian singer Sigrid (full name Sigrid Solbakk Raabe) finished writing “Don’t Kill My Vibe” – the defining song of the 21-year-old’s burgeoning career, with its defiant lyrics set to soaring synths – the response from the first people she played it to was, “Is this about your ex-boyfriend?” “I was like, no,” she recalls in her perfect English with its Norwegian lilt. “Just because it’s pop music, just because I’m a girl, doesn’t mean I only write about guys.” Rather the inspiration for

one of last summer’s breakout hits came from a disastrous writing session she’d had with a group of older producers who dismissed her ideas entirely. “I felt I was patronised and they didn’t respect my opinions,” she tells me, irritation creeping into her voice. “I was like, ‘Why did you even invite me to this if you’re going to behave like that?’” Success must have felt even sweeter, then. The infectious track would go on to land her a deal with Island Records and garner more than 30 million plays on Spotify. It says a lot about the singer that even her frustrations turn out

smoothly. Sigrid is disarmingly warm, her face frequently creasing into a smile when we meet in London, the day before she is revealed as the winner of the coveted BBC Sound of 2018. (Previous recipients include Adele and Ed Sheeran, if you need a steer on where her career is heading.) There is nothing pretentious about the latest Scandi-pop sensation (a label she embraces) to reach Britain, from her devil-may-care dance moves, to her functional take on fashion. “Feminism is equality, but it’s also the freedom to choose whatever you want to put on and for me it’s been sneakers and T-shirt and jeans,” she says. Today’s variation on the theme is a grey hoodie over silver trousers, her hair worn loose over flawless skin. “It’s kind of like a uniform. I love fashion, but when I’m on stage the only thing I’m concentrated on is doing a fucking great show, and I can only do that with my ponytail and no make-up.” Sigrid’s idyllic childhood in a small coastal town makes her family sound like the Norwegian Von Trapps. Her father was an economist, her mother an architect, but it was her brother who taught her to play the guitar while her sister gave her singing lessons. Music – Joni Mitchell, Chet Baker, Neil Young – was always on the speakers, whether they were eating dinner or driving in the car en route to hiking in the mountains. Her first stage appearance, aged 16, was with her brother. “I’m very homey,” she says. And popular. Her fans now include Elton John, who recently phoned her out of the blue for a congratulatory chat. Though she won’t be hitting the celeb circuit hard any time soon. “I don’t go out so much. There’s so much I want to do. I don’t want to be hung over.” It bodes well that Sigrid isn’t much of a partier, given how busy the rest of her year looks. This month she’s on a sold-out British tour before the summer festival circuit begins with Coachella. Then there’s that debut album to finish. It’s a lot, come very fast, in an industry not known for always being kind to young women. “I’m not here to be bossed around,” she says, reassuringly. Q

FRANCESCA ALLEN

ARTS & CULTURE


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ARTS & CULTURE Pablo Picasso in 1948, and (inset) the portrait ring he painted for his lover Dora Maar in the 1930s

Gems of artistic genius The tiniest masterpieces by the world’s greatest artists are on show in a dazzling jewellery exhibition in Paris. By Carol Woolton

GETTY; ROBERT MILLER GALLERY, NEW YORK; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; COLLECTION DIANE VENET; PHILIPPE SERVENT, PARIS; GREG FAVRE, PARIS; BRIAN MOGHADAM, NEW YORK; SHERRY GRIFFIN, BROOKLYN

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n the whole these are love stories,” Diane Venet, the celebrated patron, tells me of the artist-created jewellery pieces in her vast collection, currently on show at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, in an exhibition sponsored by Pomellato. “An artist mostly creates a jewel for someone,” she explains. “It’s rarely done for commercial reasons, and it’s this intimacy, combined with rarity, that makes them precious.” That and the calibre of artist. From Pablo Picasso to Anish Kapoor, Venet’s collected gems are extraordinary. But does the exhibition answer the age-old question, can jewellery be considered art? Throughout the 20th century, painters and sculptors turned to jewellery as a fresh and challenging medium. Avantgarde greats such as Picasso, Dalí and Calder experimented with what are effectively small-scale sculptures, whose value is embedded in their artistry rather than their materials. Venet is also bringing together work by contemporary artists such as Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg and Phillip King, while a monumental steel sculpture by her husband, the French conceptual artist Bernar Venet, sits at the heart of the exhibition. For her jewellery, however, Venet’s rule is simple: pieces must be wearable, no matter how fragile or large. For instance, on the day we speak, she is off to the Académie Française wearing what she describes as “a beautiful gesture”, composed of old medals and bracelets compressed into a rose- and yellow-gold pendant necklace by the French sculptor César in the 1960s. Pieces by British artists such as Damien Hirst, the Chapman Brothers and Anish Kapoor, acquired from the Louisa Guinness Gallery in Mayfair, are

also on show. “She’s very picky,” Guinness says, “because she’s passionate about her subject. Her interest lies in where the jewellery sits within the art world, and in relation to an artist’s work.” Guinness’s recent book Art as Jewellery: from Calder to Kapoor suggests renewed interest in artist jewels, as women increasingly search for something unique to wear. Pick the right piece and you will have not only a singular jewel with a strong emotional connection, but a glittering investment. A hand-painted portrait ring that Picasso created for his lover Dora Maar recently sold for a hammer price of £480,000, making it the artist’s most expensive work per square millimetre. The silver spirals and zigzagging wire of Calder’s necklaces, sometimes hand-beaten for friends from the contents of their cutlery drawers, also sell for staggering sums. But is Venet’s collection now complete, I wonder? “I’d love to discover a Brancusi jewel, but as far as I know he never made any,” she sighs. “It’s my dream.” Q “From Calder to Koons: Jewellery by Artists” is at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, until July 8

From top: Salvador Dalí brooch, 1957. Bernar Venet gold ring, 1998, and his 2002 sculpture Three Indeterminate Lines. Brooch by Niki de Saint Phalle, 1973, and one of her monumental figures, from 2005. Frank Stella ring, 2010

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VIEWPOINT

Sanitary care is a human right, says the #freeperiod campaign. In December, a demonstration in Parliament Square called for the government to engage with period poverty; Adwoa Aboah was a speaker on the evening

A bloody disgrace Recent reports indicate that girls are skipping school during their periods because they are unable to afford tampons. Things need to change, says Adwoa Aboah

AMELIA ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY; REX FEATURES

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ne in 10 women and girls aged 14 to 21 in Britain can’t afford menstrual products when they get their period. Last year, the charity Freedom4Girls – which exists to help girls stay in school by providing them with sanitary towels – actually had to redirect a delivery originally destined for Kenya to Leeds, because girls in the North desperately needed sanitary provisions. The idea that in a cosmopolitan country women are left to stuff their underwear with newspaper, and that girls as young as 10 are missing school to avoid bleeding through their uniform, is horrifying. So, when Scarlett Curtis and Amika George got in touch with me to be a part of their #freeperiods campaign, established to address the issue and demand government action, I immediately said yes. Amika is currently in sixth form and, while eating breakfast before school last year, read that girls her age and younger were missing out on an education because of the lack of sanitary support they receive. She went on to set up the #freeperiods campaign, fitting in activism around her homework, determined to make something happen. “I think part of the reason period poverty isn’t being addressed by the government is the fact that, ultimately, it’s a women’s issue and we live in a patriarchal society,” she explains. “There’s this idea that it can just be swept under the carpet because it’s such a taboo subject – and it’s awful.” She’s right: in a world where we feel compelled to hide our tampons in our

sleeves, or come up with excuses for debilitating period pains, or keep struggles with PMS to ourselves, it’s of little surprise that period poverty is something that goes unaddressed. “My brother didn’t even realise girls had to pay for menstrual products until he read it on the #freeperiods site,” continues Curtis, whose activist collective Pink Protest helped facilitate the march I attended, along with hundreds of others, in December. “He was so ashamed that he didn’t know – but why would he ever have known?” The brilliant thing about the campaign is that it opens the conversation to address men, too – and so it destigmatises the issue. I grew up with adverts on TV depicting women jumping for joy when they got their (blue-coloured) period. That’s never been my reality. There is no reason for the truth about a natural function to be considered embarrassing – and, through campaigns and discussions, hopefully things will change. The most urgent issue, though, is that we need to demand direct action for those who are suffering from period poverty. Follow #freeperiods, talk about it, write to your MP, sign petitions. Refuse to submit to the idea that periods are anything to be ashamed about, and carry these conversations into your daily life. We are asking for free menstrual products to be provided to any girl in Britain who is receiving free school meals. After all, menstrual care ought to be a basic human right and the natural experience of having a monthly period should never come at the expense of an education. Q

The idea that women are left to stuff their underwear with newspaper is horrifying 123


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VIEWPOINT

Special relationship With a transatlantic royal wedding weeks away, American Claire Straw reflects on marriage to her British husband, and what the future holds for Meghan Markle. Illustration by Damien Cuypers

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he moment my son, age four, corrected my pronunciation of the word tomato, it hit me. I was officially living in Britain and raising a British child. At the time, I was still travelling all over the world for my job in communications at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, but America was far back in the rear-view mirror. It had been over eight years since I’d left the States for Britain, yet I still felt moving to London was a temporary thing. But there it was: to-mah-to... like a knife to the heart.

There’s a long history of American girls falling for Brits, and vice versa. Edward VIII abdicated for Wallis Simpson; Elizabeth Taylor’s affair with Richard Burton became a Hollywood legend; and Mick Jagger made an expat of Jerry Hall. Even America’s sweetheart Taylor Swift is dating a Londoner. And now there’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, who have spent the last 18 months flying back and forth across the Atlantic in the name of love. Like Prince Harry and Meghan, my husband Will and I had a whirlwind

romance. We met in 2007 at a Hallowe’en party in Washington, DC. I came uninvited, dressed provocatively like all good American twentysomething girls. He was dressed as Jack Sparrow, wearing eye make-up and clutching a bottle of tequila. Although he proceeded to chat me up, I couldn’t get past the fact that he was wearing mascara and, going by my very limited experience of dating only men from below the Mason-Dixon line, it was clear to me that he must be gay. But no, he was just English. >

Our wedding felt like a bizarre and wonderful sociological experiment 125


What I learnt over the coming weeks was that Englishmen can get away with lots of seemingly feminine but amazingly fun things, like making a soufflé, talking at length about Evelyn Waugh, confessing a love for Winniethe-Pooh and dressing like Bubble from Absolutely Fabulous for a party. No Texan boy had ever made me laugh with the witticisms, self-assuredness and unabashed romanticism of my newfound English man. Will, on the other hand, loved my confidence and spontaneity. On our first official date, the two of us were walking through Washington, DC, when I climbed on to the base of a famous statue of an American hero – then quickly jumped into his arms and kissed him. That, he told me afterwards, is something a wellmannered English lady would never have done. I was hooked. On paper, our relationship made no sense. I was a country girl from rural Midland, Texas, a place that’s best known as George W Bush’s conservative hometown. Will, the son of a Labour politician, was born and raised in London. Somehow, though, the two of us balanced each other out. For better or for worse, we just worked. Pretty early on in our relationship Will explained that his visa lasted only a year and asked whether I would come and live with him in London. Most sensible women would think carefully about whether or not to uproot their lives and move overseas, but I thought it was the most romantic idea in the world and jumped in head first.

T I feel like I’m living a bigger life in Britain than I could have back home 126

hose early days in London were a blur. I remember he took me to Ikea in Croydon to pick out furniture and I cried in the bathroom. He tried to make me feel better by saying that Kate Moss was from Croydon, but it didn’t really work. Real life in London was hard. It was before Google Maps and I had to carry an A to Z everywhere just to find my way around. I once got on the wrong Tube in Kennington and got stuck in the sidings for 15 minutes. I thought I was going to die in there. While I was working for the Gates Foundation, flying to far-flung destinations from Seattle to the Middle East and everywhere in-between, Will was working in politics. I felt like we were somehow representative of this so-called special relationship between our two countries. He with his British composure and intellect, me with my optimistic, hard-working ambition to make some little impact on the world.

In 2011, the two of us got married in Austin, Texas. During the reception, conservative Baptists sat next to liberal atheists who had flown in from London for the wedding. There was Texan beef and an English fruitcake. It felt like a bizarre and wonderful sociological experiment. Even after we were married, though, British people still felt different to me. Many of the women I met spoke in shrill, high tones and used big words I’d never heard, like salubrious and accoutrements. They introduced me to vintage clothes and dry shampoo. (Having good fashion sense in Texas meant following trends religiously; in London, I discovered, anything goes – as I was reminded when my most fashionable English friend showed up to a party in a turban.) The British women I became friends with didn’t wear much make-up and

State of the union: Claire and Will married in Texas in 2011

never wore short skirts or high heels unless it was a big party. It was a bit of a relief after growing up in Texas, where girls wore eyeliner and heels to football games and spent much of the winter months on a tanning bed. It was nice being an oddity. I told stories about learning to drive on ranch roads at the age of seven, and would even demonstrate how to do a cheerleading jump if I’d had too much to drink. I was determined to keep saying y’all as much as possible, even if it meant using it in important meetings or in work emails. Being American in Britain means being exempt from the constant focus on class and background. No one has ever asked where I went to school or university. I could get away with not understanding things like the European Commission or knowing who Menzies Campbell was – after I awkwardly

waved at him on the street, thinking he was a neighbour. He kindly waved back. And, even after all these years, dayto-day life is still fascinating. I gleefully listen to people on buses saying things like innit, crumbs and oh my days. I love going all over the country and hearing the different accents and life stories from people who met Gandhi when he toured Lancashire in the 1930s or kissed one of the band members from Blur. Britain often seems like the crossroads of the world, and living here can feel as if I’m living a bigger life than maybe I could have back home. But I do get homesick. Sometimes I stare at the Pop-Tarts and Arizona Iced Tea in the supermarket like long-lost friends. I obsessively watch Real Housewives and Keeping Up with the Kardashians as they make me feel closer to home. I count the minutes until it’s late enough in the day to call America so I can talk to my family and friends about nothing in particular. The feeling of not really belonging here, and yet not really belonging there, only gets deeper as time goes on. There are some things I’ll never understand. Why don’t people use tumble-dryers? Why do I have to bag my own groceries? Why does a cricket match last for days on end? Where are all the drive-through ATMs? Does Punch and Judy promote domestic violence? Why can’t I speak loudly on the Tube without getting glared at? Is tea a meal or a drink? When is it not football season? Why do people re-use tea bags? Were Take That really that famous? It’s all still so baffling to me. But here I am. With a wonderful British husband, two British children and an obscene mortgage on a house with plumbing older than the state of Hawaii. We have free healthcare, Graham Norton, access to some of the most amazing museums and cultural sites in the world, and I’ve become really good at talking about the weather. But I will always define myself as an American – and I will make sure that my sons celebrate Thanksgiving as well as Bonfire Night and eat as many TexMex dishes as Anglo-Indian curries. In the age of Donald Trump, I feel a responsibility to put forward the good side of my country – the optimism and sincerity. After the royal wedding in May, I hope that those American qualities are back in the spotlight. Meghan will never be a “to the manner born” English lady, and maybe that’s for the best. Her confidence, warmth, openness – and perfect American teeth – may be just what we all need. Q

ASHLEY GARMON

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PROFILE

YOUTH ALWAYS WINS Virgil Abloh’s modern vision of luxury is opening doors to a new generation. Olivia Singer sits down with the industry’s hottest ticket. Photographs by Olivia Rose

HAIR: ROKU ROPPONGI. MAKE-UP: LAURA DOMINIQUE. NAILS: LYNDSAY MCINTOSH. SPLASH NEWS

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irgil Abloh is an exceptionally busy man. On the day we meet for this photo shoot, he has flown in to London directly from an event in New York with Jeff Koons, his luggage – Koons’s Louis Vuitton collaboration – in tow. Before he leaves, less than 20 hours later, he will be mobbed by fans at a magazine signing, receive the 2017 Fashion Award for Urban Luxury and host a sticky-floored afterparty at 180 The Strand. He is leaving town at 7am and heading straight to Miami’s Art Basel, where his itinerary includes launching a T-shirt collaboration with Jenny Holzer, playing seven-a-side with Skepta and performing on stage with Drake. He is nothing if not prolific. “I don’t sleep as much as normal people do,” he explains. It is this tireless drive that has marked Abloh’s ascent as a fashion designer. In

2014 he founded Off-White, a label that bridges the gap between streetwear and luxury fashion, and it quickly earned a cult following. It now has more than 280 stockists around the world, selling everything from T-shirts and tracksuits to thigh-high boots and tulle ballgowns. Late last year he released a 10-piece collaboration with Nike, reworking its most iconic trainer styles (it quickly sold out); he has a gargantuan project with Ikea in the works (a collection of urban living essentials ranging from rugs to furniture); and he is prepping for a retrospective of his work next year at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (premature by conventional standards, but we can only imagine how hotly the merch will sell). Meanwhile, women from Beyoncé to Gigi Hadid are proud ambassadors for his designs. “What is Virgil Abloh?” asked a recent

magazine cover. “GOAT,” replied Rihanna on Instagram. Translated, that means: greatest of all time. Unusually, considering the scale of his success, Abloh has no formal fashion training: he studied civil engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (“My dad is a Ghanaian immigrant, and he wanted a son who was an engineer”) and then architecture in Illinois, before graduating to work at a small architecture firm. It was during this period that he orchestrated an introduction to Kanye West, a fellow Chicago native, and promptly started consulting on his creative projects. “I was like a young intern turned art director,” he grins. “Travelling around the world but always coming back to my day job. I sort of just managed to keep things moving.” Abloh’s brand may be a calculated success, but he is remarkably cool when he speaks about how he got here. It is that sense of cool that Abloh has now channelled into Off-White: a sort of disaffected insouciance, heavy-laden with irony, which speaks directly to the Instagram generation. Quotation marks surround every statement he makes or prints on clothes; the trademark symbol appears after his brand name in any official communications; everything comes written in Helvetica. “Illustrating branding in Helvetica, in quotes, is a statement in itself. This is dry humour, dry irony.” He pauses for a moment to note down the phrase “dry irony” on his phone before concluding, “Ironic things are interesting.” Abloh’s fascination with irony, with memes and with context is crucial to his brand, and it mirrors the spirit that reverberates through social media. His phone constantl y flashes with notifications. He explains that, rather than having a desk with a computer, his phone is the base of his business, and he has a Whatsapp group for every project he works on, which swiftly dismantles issues of time zones or locality. He’s an expert multitasker, and a fer vid Instagrammer; in the back of a car together, we talk about Marcel Duchamp (one of his personal heroes, beloved for his manipulation of context) as he scrolls through his feed. If I were my mother, I’d tell him not to be so >

Left: Virgil Abloh in east London with, from left, Hailey Baldwin and Jourdan Dunn. Hailey wears dress, £935. Jourdan wears dress, £9,221. Both Off-White. Shoes, £850. Boots, £1,295. Both Off-White c/o Jimmy Choo. Below left: Bella Hadid in an Off-White Nascarinspired crop top. Below: Jourdan wears top, from £665. Skirt, from £620. Both Off-White. Fashion editor: Jack Borkett

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OLIVIA ROSE; PIOTR NIEPSUJ

PROFILE rude – but he seems more than capable of liking posts as he summarises decades of art theory. That ability, to simultaneously straddle high and low culture, rests at the very core of OffWhite: Abloh uses the same academic phrasing to discuss memes as he does postmodernism. He’s remarkably attuned to the impact of Instagram – and staying abreast of the cultural conversation, connecting with his 1.4 million followers, is of paramount importance to him. After all, he says, “Nowadays, everyone has a voice; everyone can be a critic. You don’t have to get past someone with a clipboard at a fashion show any more in order to be a part of the conversation.” The democracy of the digital age is directly reflected in Abloh’s own trajectory: when, in 2009, he started attending Paris Fashion Week with Kanye, the two of them got into just over half of the shows they tried to attend – two young black men embedded in streetwear culture simply weren’t the people brands wanted at their shows. Then, when he launched RSVP Gallery, a Chicago gallery-cum-retail space, curated to reflect the high-low mix of brands that his friends were wearing at the time, he couldn’t get accounts with all of the labels he wanted to stock. Such refusals only galvanised his resolve – in September, at a free panel event he hosted with Nike, he explained to a rapt audience of teenagers, “My motivation is, in part, a bit of angst that comes from feeling like I don’t belong; that our generation doesn’t belong. I made a conscious decision that I wasn’t just going to be a consumer; that at least one of us would appear at the end of a Parisian runway.” Accordingly, RSVP Gallery became an outlet for his own creations: in 2013 he launched his first brand, Pyrex Vision, there, with a video lookbook that proclaimed “youth always wins”. It exploded online, people started paying attention, and his logo-printed deadstock rugby shirts sold for more than $500 apiece. A year later, the brand closed – it was Abloh and an intern running the production and he “didn’t want a failing business” on his CV – but, rather than dismantling it altogether, he simply changed its name and relocated the base to Italy. “I got those factories to produce what people perceived as streetwear, and eventually it evolved into Off-White.” Smartly seeded products, drip-fed to famous friends who posted them on their own social media, quickly made OffWhite the brand to be seen in.

What has happened since has been an out-and-out phenomenon. The sales of his clothing are nothing short of incredible (Selfridges has noted a 230 per cent increase, year on year; last season, he was one of Matchesfashion. com’s best performing brands), but even more pronounced is his seismic cultural impact. Only a few years ago, the term streetwear was used with derision, but now even the most refined brands are leveraging its lo-fi aesthetic, looking to Abloh (alongside brands such as Palace and Supreme) for inspiration. “I’m incredibly proud of Virgil,” explains Naomi Campbell, a self-proclaimed fan of Off-White and the model who closed his s/s ’18 show. “We don’t have many black designers, and he’s opened the fashion industry to a generation who aren’t couture trained but who have their own way of combining streetwear with ready to wear. He’s shown them that his way of doing things can work – and I think this is only the beginning.” It wouldn’t be a stretch to say that what Abloh has achieved over the past few years has shifted the fashion conversation: now, more than ever, established houses are aware of the power of youth, that it’s not enough to depend on their luxury heritage for cultural cachet (although Abloh himself collects Birkin bags; he likes the fact that

Collaborative experiences: below, from left, Abloh working with Ikea; and trainers from the designer’s 2017 project with Nike

they’re “tied to a historical perspective, and the quality that goes into them is crazy”). He has abolished the industry’s traditional barriers to entry, paved the way for a new generation of young designers, and – on Instagram at least – made it look almost easy. It’s a new era and “the future looks different”, he surmises. But then, backstage after his s/s ’18 show, he was wide-eyed with excitement; his cool, calm, collected persona swiftly dismantled by the tangible reality of success. “Man, I used to not even be able to get into fashion shows!” he repeats, ad infinitum. He takes a breath, picks up a plastic cup of champagne and asks me how it looked. He hardly gets the words out before he stops himself. “I guess I’ll find out on Instagram.” He is certainly a testament to the times. Q

He has abolished the industry’s traditional barriers to entry… It’s a new era and “the future looks different”, he surmises 133


TECH “Creams don’t really come more hi-tech than Olay Regenerist 3-Point Age-Defying Cream [£30]. Harnessing DNA technology, it works wonders at firming, lifting and plumping.”

“The brainchild of my son Elon, all Teslas are now equipped with the hardware for self-driving in the future. I can’t decide between the Tesla Model 3 [from £24,600] and the bigger Model X [from £70,500].” Tesla.com “I am amazed by the quality of Swarovski’s Created Diamonds. Grown in a lab, they are sustainable and conflict-free.” Earrings, £10,000, Atelierswarovski.com

“My son Kimbal’s urban farm programme [Square rootsgrow.com, above] grows crops vertically inside shipping containers using LEDs, climate control and sensors. SproutsIO’s Smart Microgarden [left] would be a great gift for him – he’s a restaurateur, and I’m sure he’d love to grow his own herbs and engineer them to his specific taste.” From £585; Sprouts.io/fresh

PASSIONFLIX “Founded by my daughter Tosca, Passionflix offers a curated selection of romantic films and produces original video based on romance bestsellers.” ACTIVE10 “Ten minutes of brisk walking every day can improve your health. This monitors your pace and sets manageable goals.” SUPERVIZ “A virtual-reality app, by my nephew Russ Rive, where users create 360-degree images and then invite others to interact. It’s like virtual teleportation.” MYFITNESSPAL “Steer clear of fad diets. This app helps define targets, and tracks the nutrients needed to achieve them.”

FAMILY MATTERS

Model, dietitian and grandmother Maye Musk reveals the technological marvels that make her world. Edited by Dena Giannini

“With this postal DNA test, you can learn about your ancestry and even possible health risks, based on a saliva sample.” £149; 23andme.com

SUSAN BOWLUS

MAYE’S FAVOURITE APPS


ARCHIVE

T Nobody did it better

Robin Muir looks back to Jerry Hall’s electrifying visit to Pinewood Studios’ 007 set for a Willie Christie shoot, Vogue April 1977

owards the end of 1976, the 10th official James Bond film, The Spy Who Loved Me, was filming at Pinewood Studios, on what was then one of the largest stages ever constructed. In December, it formally became the 007 Stage, in a ceremony attended by former prime minister Harold Wilson, but a few weeks later, other distinguished visitors dropped by: Vogue photographer Willie Christie, fashion editor Grace Coddington and a towering blondemaned model not long out of Texas – Jerry Hall. She had recently been part of the first fashion-magazine team invited into the Soviet Union; now here she was riding a monorail on the 007 Stage in a swimsuit by Issey Miyake. Over three days she caused a sensation. As Willie Christie remembers, “Jerry

was at her hottest as she hadn’t been in Britain for long. Wherever she went, hardened grips, sparks and gaffers stopped and stared. Roger Moore – James Bond himself – had to be pulled away by Luisa, his real-life wife.” There was a lot riding on Spy. Bond’s previous outing, 1974’s The Man with the Golden Gun, had underperformed, and producer Albert Broccoli had dissolved his partnership with Harry Saltzman to go it alone. At the premiere, as the pre-credits sequence gave way to “Nobody Does It Better”, sung by Carly Simon, the Prince of Wales was on his feet cheering the now-famous Union-flag parachute fall. Broccoli knew then he was on to a good thing. The film grossed nearly $200 million – $87 million more than the last. The franchise was secure. Q

“Wherever she went, hardened grips, sparks and gaffers stopped and stared” 141


VOGUE PARTNERSHIP Paired with a relaxed outlook, feminine florals always go the distance. Avital wears floral ruffle dress, £15. Sofia wears off-the-shoulder top, £5. Denim shorts, £6. All Primark. Hair: Yaniv Zada. Make-up: Shirley Weiner. Production: Amir Feingold. Models: Avital Langer and Sofia Mechetner


A LIFE LESS ordinary Summer wardrobes are best built on carefree foundations. Primark has devised a capsule of laissez-faire pieces that bodes well for chasing setting suns and the open road. Photographs by Yaniv Edry. Styling by Hanna Kelifa


VOGUE PARTNERSHIP Assemble a wardrobe wisely: a co-ordinating colour palette is the smart traveller’s go-to. Opposite: Avital wears bikini top, £2. Bikini bottom, £4. Sofia wears swimsuit, £13. All Primark. This page, top left: Sofia wears white bikini, £8. Avital wears black bikini top, £2. Both Primark. Top right: off-the-shoulder top, £5. Denim shorts, £6. Both Primark. Bottom left: jacket, £20. Trousers, £15. T-shirt, £3. All Primark. Bottom right: floral wrap dress, £15, Primark

Don’t disregard summer suiting on the road: cool textures and relaxed fabrics make them a perfect exploration partner


VOGUE PARTNERSHIP

Destination dressing is a chance to break with routine. Mix and match with newfound freedom. Above: knit dress, £12. Bikini top, £2. Bikini bottoms, £4. Plimsolls, £3. All Primark. Right: dressing gown, £10. Cotton towel, £7. Flip-flops, £1. Ombre trainers, £13. All Primark

Above: bardot top, £10. Denim shorts, £6. Both Primark. Far left: grey hoody, £7, Primark. Bottom left: Avital wears bikini top, £2. Shorts, £2.50. Sofia wears vest, £3. Camo-print bikini bottoms, £4. All Primark. Left: Sofia wears blue jumpsuit, £13. Avital wears lace-trim bralet, £4. Ripped jeans, £15. All Primark


Bikini top, £8. Denim shorts, £6. Hoop earrings, £3. All Primark. With thanks to the Norman hotel and Alena restaurant, Tel Aviv. Visit Primark.com


Hair: Diego da Silva. Make-up: Tom Pecheux for YSL BeautĂŠ. Nails: Michina Koide. Model: Lineisy Montero


BEAUTY

THE VOGUE BEAUTY AWARDS 2018 Showcasing the absolute best in beauty, Vogue’s inaugural beauty awards will be a collaborative process. And here’s how: to kick things off, the Vogue beauty team – including our incredible roster of contributors – have chosen the categories and nominated our favourites, then whittled down a shortlist for each one. But now it’s over to you, Vogue readers, to select the actual winners. The results will be announced later in the year. The choice is yours…

CATEGORIES Lifetime Achievement Award Services to Diversity Best Influencer Brand Beauty Game-changer of the Year New Kid on the Block Champion for Sustainability Most Memorable Ad Campaign Most Instagrammable Packaging Best Beauty Gadget Skin Enhancer of the Year The Make-up Transformer The Multitasker The Eye Definers The Skintellectual Highlight The Natural Phenomenon in Skincare The Ultimate Skin Solution Hair Industry Innovator Textured Hair Hero The Body Transformer Best in Alternative Beauty Best Niche Fragrance Best Blockbuster Scent

SWEATER, ECKHAUS LATTA

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

TO SEE THE SHORTLIST OF NOMINEES AND TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVOURITES, HEAD TO VOGUE.UK/VOGUEBEAUTYAWARDS2018. VOTING CLOSES MAY 20, 2018


BEAUTY

T “With wigs, you no longer have limits on the look you want to achieve. There is no commitment” 152

hat one was a wig. Wig. Wig… Lineisy Montero… That was three wigs. Nicole Kidman… Black wig…” Fresh from the spring/summer ’18 shows, uber-hairstylist Sam McKnight laughs as we peruse his pictorial anthology, Hair by Sam McKnight. “Yes, yes,” he concedes. “I do like wigs.” So, it seems, do others. Duffy – the hairstylist, not the singer – sent models at Haider Ackermann down the runway rocking jaggedly cut pixie wigs. On the Moschino catwalk, the girls – Taylor! Gigi! Adwoa! Bella! Kaia! – were given short crops by Paul Hanlon, his choppy ode to Christy Turlington meets Jean Seberg and Mia Farrow. At Fendi, McKnight’s blue and green “mini wigs” became faux side fringes on the crowns of Kendall et al. There are no two ways about it: the wig is truly back in fashion. This has been no overnight success, however; for the black community, the wig has always played a key role in women’s beauty regimes. The difference is that now it has gone stellar. Its trajectory has been steady. There are the characters (Nicki Minaj, Lady Gaga, Sia), the editorial shoots, social media (Kylie Jenner), television, music videos (that wig-shop scene in Beyoncé’s “Formation”), film ( Jared Leto as Rayon in Dallas Buyers Club), the streets (from Brixton to Brooklyn)… The wig has stealthily worked its way out of the closet and into our conversations. It is no longer a dirty secret.

Walking into McKnight’s west London studio, I was greeted by a row of wigs on polystyrene heads. The candypink bob looked familiar: it was from the Chanel spring pre-collection ’13 show – a major wig moment inspired by “Versailles in Socialist France”. The row of heads also struck a chord. One of my earliest memories of growing up is of my mother’s dressing table, her wigs resting on their polystyrene heads. Every so often, hoping for that inexplicable magic, I would quickly try them on and hold my imaginary microphone because, of course, I was a member of Boney M. I felt beautiful, elegant, sophisticated. I thought the same of my mother and her fellow African friends, all of them immigrants who had settled in London in the 1950s and 1960s. They all wore wigs. As a grown woman, I find it shocking, looking back, to realise that as a five-year-old black girl I had already decided what I thought made a black woman beautiful (a European-style wig) and what didn’t (her own natural Afro hair). Just as most women would never introduce themselves to anyone English by their traditional African names, they and many other African immigrants wore Caucasian-textured wigs in order to be more acceptable in a country and culture that already saw them as “other” because of the colour of their skin.

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; REX FEATURES; GETTY; SHUTTERSTOCK; SAID KARLSSON

THE WIG IDEA Get ahead – get a hairpiece, says Funmi Fetto


Years later, the wig became more about choice and convenience. Certainly that’s what I had in mind when I experimented with a relative’s wig in my teens. It was a striking full-fringed black bobbed number – a bit Uma Thurman in Pulp Fiction, except appallingly synthetic. I convinced myself that I looked like Spinderella from Salt-N-Pepa. After weeks of (bad) weather and the stress of pretending it was mine, I saw it lying on my bed one day and realised it looked like an electrocuted cat. I never considered wearing a wig after that. Until now. The availability of highquality wigs has helped somewhat, but many are still on the fence. Detractors say it is one thing to see wigs on celebrities and catwalks, but surely there is still a teeny stigma attached to normal, everyday women wearing wigs IRL in 2018? Shay Ashual, the wig guru lauded for his Vogue covers and big fashion-house campaigns (he’s known as the Master of Wigs), has been awaiting this new chapter for a long time. He was working with wigs even when the negative connotations were still a challenge to shift. “When I started using wigs in the 1990s, it was a dirty word in the fashion industry,” he recalls. “It was quite a struggle to get people to agree even to look at them.” Like Ashual, revered stylist Eugene Souleiman was a huge wig advocate in an era when it was far from fashionable. Recalling his experience in the mid-1990s, he says, “Most models had an established look, and this was my way to create something new. I wanted to get back into changing colours, cutting hair, creating raw textures with short, sharp fringes cut quite aggressively… Wigs were not acceptable then – people feared change.” So what was the turning point? “Beyoncé,” replies Ashual matter-of-factly. “She made it OK to wear wigs openly, and created a demand for lace-front wigs [more realistic, better

quality] that were normally only available in the film and theatre industries. Wig companies saw this as an opportunity to up their game and make it into the mainstream.” Charlotte Mensah, the award-winning London-based Afro hairstylist, believes the demand has also been galvanised by the move away from relaxers and weaves (notorious for causing damaged hair and receding hairlines) and the rise of the natural-hair movement: “A lot of women wearing their hair natural still want the versatility of hairstyles,” Subrina Kidd, the natural-hair expert at the Collective, agrees. “Plus you can do it without sacrificing your own hair.” So now the market has exploded. Type wigs into Google and you’ll get the gist – it’s an industry worth billions. One person who, arguably, had a hand in the wig resurgence is Beyoncé’s long-time hairstylist Kim Kimble. “With wigs, you no longer have limits on the look you want to achieve. There is no commitment. Celebrities have also helped popularise wigs, in cool colours – like Kylie Jenner.” Jenner said in a 2016 interview, “I started wigs and now everyone is wearing wigs… I just do whatever I want to do and people will follow.” Well, quelle surprise, an internet storm ensued. The outraged black community saw this as yet another form of cultural appropriation. The history books are clear: the ancient Egyptians created wigs for practical reasons (as a shield from the sun), but they also denoted social status. Black women have donned wigs for literally centuries. So, long story short, Kylie Jenner did not start wigs. No, not even the brightly coloured ones – Jamaican dancehall girls owned that look decades ago. The man behind Jenner’s famous wig collection is Tokyo Stylez. He is keen to give credit where he believes it is due. “I would love to say Kylie started the wig trend, but I wouldn’t even know how to make wigs and apply them if it hadn’t been for my black clients at the start of my career,” he says. Still, Jenner’s influence on the elevation of the wig as fashion accessory and talking point cannot be disregarded; and there are many other women outside black culture for KEEP YOUR whom wig-wearing is a significant part of their attire HAIR ON – Stylez cites singer Cher as “my favourite wig inspiration of all time”. Like Jenner, Cher has talked Wig essentials openly about her “wig closet”. Adele, Katy Perry and Beyoncé are also known to have extensive wig wardrobes. Kimble won’t divulge exactly how many wigs the Lemonade superstar has – her collection is rumoured to be worth more than $1 million – but the highest amount she’s known a woman to pay for a wig is a jaw-dropping £30,000. Astronomical? Ashual says it is justified. Hershesons Get A Grip “When you’re looking at those prices, think about Brown Grips, £6 couture: the workmanship, the detailing…” For relatively affordable bespoke wigs, many women turn to Helena Collection in New York and Gina Knight (aka the Wig Witch) in London. And for off-the-peg wigs, Freddie Harrel’s Big Hair No Care range is a worthy contender – if only for the cool packaging designed by artist Jamilla Okubo, who was recently tapped by Dior. And yet, even with the compelling case for the wig, my question of how to successfully don it still remains. As Larry Sims, the celebrity hairstylist behind Zendaya Hair by Sam McKnight and Kerry Washington, tells me, the way to wear wigs Modern Hair Spray, £22 is to “have fun, express yourself and just be unapologetic about the wig you’re rocking”. Sam McKnight echoes this ethos as I prepare to leave his studio – and my wig inhibitions – behind. “So someone’s got a pink wig on? It’s a statement. And that’s the difference about wearing wigs today: you’re not trying to pretend it’s yours. That GHD Detangling Comb, £7.50 old pressure? It’s gone.” Amen to that. Q 153


BEAUTY

BULLET POINTS

DIGITAL ARTWORK: TAPESTRY

The lipstick logo is beauty’s calling card. The name on everybody’s lips? Well, that’s up to you. Photograph by Coppi Barbieri

Clockwise from top left: Tom Ford Lip Colour Matte in Velvet Cherry, £40. YSL Beauté Rouge Pur Couture in Rouge Feu, £28. Dolce & Gabbana Classic Cream Lipstick in Cosmopolitan, £27. Sisley Hydrating Long Lasting Lipstick Rouge in Rubis, £36. Chanel Rouge Allure Luminous Intense Lip Colour in Vibrante, £28. Givenchy Le Rouge Lipstick in Rouge Fétiche, £26.50


DIRECTOR’S CUT

WATER WORKS Beauty director Jessica Diner drinks in the most basic – but brilliant – skincare ingredient of all

Clockwise from top left: SkinCeuticals HA Intensifier, £83; Chanel Hydra Beauty Micro Liquid Essence, £70; Vichy Minéral 89 Daily Booster, £25; La Roche-Posay Hyalu B5 Serum, £37; Sensai Cellular Performance Hydrachange Mask, £87; Estée Lauder Micro Essence Skin Activating Treatment Lotion, £68; Niod Multi-Molecular Hyaluronic Complex, £38; Bliss Fabulous Drench ‘n’ Quench, £29.50; The Ordinary Hyaluronic Acid 2% + B5, £6

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GREG LOTUS/TRUNK ARCHIVE; PIXELATE.BIZ

D

isclaimer: I am a Cancerian. And I am a typical Cancerian: sensitive, family oriented, loyal and completely obsessed with water. I live for holidays when I can be by the ocean; I spend far too long in the bath; and when it comes to my beauty regime, I am dedicated to hydration. Yes, most products contain water as a base element, but the type of water that I am predisposed to is functional and serves a higher purpose. Vichy, Avène and La Roche-Posay lead the charge in thermal-water skincare (French pharmacies know what’s up), with products across the board harnessing the power of antioxidant, mineral-rich spring water – efficacious on even the most sensitive of skins. At entry-level prices, these brands and their offerings are steadfast and dependable pillars of the beauty community. An emerging skincare category that reached our shores after its inception in South Korea is the beauty water, or essence. A distant cousin to micellar water (a cult favourite for makeup removal, with Bioderma Sensibio remaining the best – that’s the French knocking it out of the park once again), they are much more than cleansers: this new breed of products are effectively skincare in water form. Estée Lauder’s Micro Essence and Chanel’s Hydra Beauty Micro Liquid Essence are currently on my rotation for the way they deliver hydration via osmosis directly where it is needed – under the skin’s surface – thanks to their low molecular weight and fluid texture. Go up the beauty water table one step farther, and you will find hyaluronic acid – a buzz ingredient for good reason: if you’re not incorporating it in your skincare in some way, then you should be. Efficacious and gentle, it even complements rosacea and sensitive skin, and options abound for every skin type, age and budget. HA (as it’s known in the industry) can hold up to 1,000 times its weight in water, which – more than just a punchy stat – makes it the most powerful natural moisturiser available, helping skin stay plump and firm. I look for it on all skincare labels, and if I find it, the product will immediately make its way into my cabinet for trial. If you’re looking for neat versions, Niod Multi-Molecular Hyaluronic Complex, The Ordinary Hyaluronic Acid 2% + B5 and SkinCeuticals HA Intensifier are some of the best I have come across, and in her 10-day Radiance Recharge System, facialist Sarah Chapman has included a vial of pharmaceutical-grade hyaluronic acid as the final step to truly luminous skin. In cream or mask form, Bliss Fabulous Drench ‘n’ Quench and Sensai Cellular Performance Hydrachange Mask are staples – in fact, Sensai has HA in every product across its entire range. But it’s not only in my cabinet that you’ll find eau de beauté. I seek it out in treatments, too. Intraceuticals and Profhilo (both at Waterhouse Young) offer some of the best methods of delivering pure HA straight into the skin – to completely radiant results. Both are perfect for before a big event – and you don’t even need to be a fellow Cancerian, or water sign, to seek out their benefits. Q


BEAUTY

COUNT DOWN TO SUMMER

DAVID BAILEY

For best results, begin your holiday beauty regime now. Lottie Winter sets the schedule

4

MONTHS TO GO…

SAVE OUR SKINS

SHAPE UP

Your new secret weapon in the quest for summer skin is the Venus Viva in-clinic device. Its innovative Nanofractional Radio Frequency with Smart Scan technology not only transforms your complexion, tackling everything from acne and rosacea to sagging, but can be applied top-to-toe to reduce stretch marks and cellulite. From £319. Drmichaelprager.com

Long-term lifestyle changes are better than quick-fix fitness attempts. “Steady-state workouts such as Pilates, barre classes and yoga not only build endurance but also use fat as fuel while you train,” says Rosewood London personal trainer Harry Jameson. >


BEAUTY

3

MONTHS TO GO…

PLAY IT COOL

Home in on those stubborn areas of gym-proof fat with a little help from Coolsculpting. A bit like the modern, hi-tech version of liposuction – minus the surgical aspect or any downtime but with the same permanent results – the treatment works by freezing fat cells, which are then naturally expelled by the body over the course of a few weeks. Available from £480. Cosmeticskinclinic.com

SMOOTH MOVE Taking hair reduction to the next level, the Mallucci London clinic uses the state-of-the-art Icon Aesthetic System, which has a built-in cooling function and an intelligent Skintel Melanin Reader to check patient suitability. Flawless results, safely. Mallucci-london.com

SUMMER VIBES Products to get you in the holiday mood...

MONTHS TO GO…

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HIGH BROW Brows that won’t wash away in the waves? Head to microblading expert Suman at Hari’s Hairdressers in Chelsea for unparalleled precision and lasting results. Harissalon.com

Chanel Les 9 Ombres Eyeshadow Collection in Affesco, £67

MONTH TO GO…

HAIR TOMORROW Lock in moisture and get hair ready for the sun with Redken All Soft Mega Recovery Tissue Mask Cap (£12) – plus the individual sachets are super travel-friendly for when holidays are calling.

1

WEEK TO GO…

DO THE LEG WORK Months of neglect leave legs in a less than desirable state. Remedy dryness with a nourishing daily skin treatment such as Ameliorate Transforming Body Cream (£27.50), with AHA to boost exfoliation. Tackle fluid retention with daily massages using Legology Air-Lite Daily Lift For Legs (above, £62), and slip on Masters of Mayfair Compression Socks (£30) in the evenings. You won’t regret it.

Louis Vuitton Le Jour Se Lève eau de parfum, £185

DIOR

EYE OPENERS

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Swap smudgy mascara for lustrous semi-permanent eyelash extensions. Lash queen Daxita Vaghela’s tailor-made extensions allow you to choose your ideal length, curl and colour for a totally bespoke look. If extensions aren’t your thing, try Blink Brow Bar’s lash lift (think of it as a perm for your eyelashes) for eye-opening results. Daxitavaghela.com; Blinkbrowbar.com

Shiseido Synchro Skin Glow Cushion Compact Bronzer, £36

DAVID BAILEY; JAMES COCHRANE

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WELLNESS

TAKE A STAND

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have long believed I wasn’t built to remain upright for prolonged periods. In fact, I was fired from my first job, in retail, for leaning on the shelves. These days, I arrive at meetings five minutes early. I wish I could say this is because I’m a model employee, but really it’s to make sure I get a seat. “You were absolutely designed to stand up,” contests Roger Frampton, author of The Flexible Body and whose TED Talk “Why Sitting Down Destroys You” is about to hit 2 million views. “We all were.” When I protest, he goes on to explain that sitting does not come naturally to us: “Unfortunately, we teach children to sit on chairs for six hours a day. Sitting for long periods freezes the spine into a rounded position, putting repeated pressure on the same vertebrae. It’s not a natural resting position for the human body and causes a more pronounced lumbar curvature and subsequent back pain.” Cheyne Voss, physio director at Ten Health & Fitness, agrees: “The body is a use-it-or-lose-it mechanism, and all forced inactivity will negatively affect our range and freedom of movement, not to mention our cardiovascular systems.” Recent research backs up these claims: a paper published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found sitting down reduces the length of telomeres (protective caps on the end of chromosomes that dictate how long cells live), and a study by the University of Leicester has linked sitting with diabetes and cardiovascular

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disease. Another study, by the University of Columbia, found a strong statistical correlation between sitting and mortality. And if you think the gym is the answer, think again: the fitness industry is equally at odds with our anatomy. “The current focus is on certain muscles – abs, biceps, glutes – rather than a movement-based regime in line with the body’s range of motion,” says Frampton, who advocates working out using movements a child would naturally use, such as an overhead squat (how a toddler would pick something up off the floor). When squatting won’t do, there’s hi-tech to help: take the Varidesk, an adjustable desktop system that allows you to go with ease from sitting to standing while working at a computer – make sure you stand correctly, though, pushing heels together to engage the glutes and support the back – while the Scandi-chic Rockback chair promotes “active sitting” and good posture by rocking back and forth to engage core muscles. Fitbit’s fitness trackers all have a “reminder to move” function to help you stay active throughout the day. And if all else fails, Voss has deskside exercises to counteract the perils of sitting: “Sit upright in your chair and, using your fingertips, push your chin down to your chest, keeping your head straight – you should feel a light stretch in the back of your neck – and release. Try five repeats every two hours. Other than that, the best thing you can do is fidget – a lot.” Q

IRVING PENN

New research suggests sitting down is destroying our health. Lottie Winter investigates


WE USE IT TO FACE CANCER


BANGKOK

DUBAI

KIEV

MOSCOW


LINA HOSS WEARS JACKET AND BASQUE, PACO RABANNE. KNICKERS, UNIQLO. BOOTS, DR MARTENS. ADWOA ABOAH WEARS SWIMSUIT, ISABEL MARANT. SHORTS, LULULEMON. BOOTS, DR MARTENS. JAZZELLE ZANAUGHTTI WEARS SLEEVELESS JACKET, SHIRT AND SHORTS, PACO RABANNE. VINTAGE BOOTS, SHERRY’S LONDON. ALL WEAR SOCKS, FALKE. FASHION EDITOR: KATE MOSS. HAIR: SAM MCKNIGHT. MAKE-UP: VAL GARLAND

THE ART OF HANGING OUT FIRST GET YOUR GIRLS TOGETHER. FOR THIS ISSUE, KATE MOSS STYLES HER FAVOURITE BUZZCUT MODELS IN BOYISH PIECES INSPIRED BY HER LOVE OF SKA, AND DONATELLA VERSACE INVITES FAMOUS FRIENDS TO PARTY, 1990S STYLE. NEXT, SUPERCHARGE YOUR LOOK LIKE OUR COVER STAR, ACTRESS GUGU MBATHA-RAW, WHO DAZZLES IN THE SEASON’S DREAM DRESSES. ELSEWHERE, GRACE CODDINGTON CREATES A HIGH-LOW MIX OF SNEAKERS AND FANTASTIC FINERY, AND LOUIS VUITTON’S NICOLAS GHESQUIERE TALKS ABOUT CLOTHES THAT “REFLECT OUR TIMES”. FROM HOW WE DRESS TO HOW WE LIVE, CONVENTIONS ARE BEING OVERTURNED – ROWAN PELLING WRITES ABOUT POLYAMORY, AND LUBAINA HIMID, A TURNER PRIZE-WINNER AT AGE 63, INVITES US INTO HER STUDIO. BE INSPIRED. PHOTOGRAPH BY NICK KNIGHT


The wonder of Gugu GUGU MBATHA-RAW WAS THE AWARDWINNING ACTRESS IN DANGER OF BECOMING CINEMA’S BEST-KEPT SECRET. UNTIL NOW. BY BIM ADEWUNMI. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MIKAEL JANSSON. STYLING BY KATE PHELAN

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“I PLAYED DOROTHY IN THE WIZARD OF OZ WHEN I WAS 11 AND THAT WAS IT, REALLY.” GUGU WEARS PLEATED CREPE DRESS WITH HANDKERCHIEF HEM, FROM £5,600, GIVENCHY. HOOP EARRINGS, £550, LOUIS VUITTON. GOLD AND LAPIS RING, £16,800, BELMACZ. GOLD-PLATED CUFF, £450, UNCOMMON MATTERS, AT MONNIER FRERES. ORCHID CORSAGES, THROUGHOUT, FLORA STARKEY. HAIR: EUGENE SOULEIMAN. MAKE-UP: HANNAH MURRAY. NAILS: MARIAN NEWMAN. SET DESIGN: ANDY HILLMAN. PRODUCTION: NORTH SIX. DIGITAL ARTWORK: GLOSS STUDIO

ugu Mbatha-Raw and I had plans – highfalutin plans – for when we met. In light of her new role in Disney’s imminent blockbuster A Wrinkle in Time, we were going to stroll around the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, take in some crisp air and chat animatedly about life, the universe and everything. London, that mercurial mistress, has other plans, however. As we take in what should be a panoramic view of the city, the Cutty Sark is barely visible through the deep, shifting mist, the Old Royal Naval College looks less than splendid, and the O2? Entirely unspottable. In the shadow of the statue of James Wolfe, the victor at Quebec, Gugu suddenly points: “Oh, wait – I can see the Thames! It’s that… brown sludge,” she laughs. She turns to me with her woolly black hat pulled low over her curls. “Is there somewhere to get a cup of tea?” So off we go to find a cuppa. “This is cosy,” says Mbatha-Raw, as we settle in at a nearby café and order green tea for her, peppermint for me. She smiles broadly, as well she might. The 34-year-old actress from Oxfordshire has just returned to Britain after an astonishing three-year period of near-constant filming that promises – finally – to transform her into an international star. To be fair, if you don’t know about Mbatha-Raw yet, it’s not for any lack of trying on her part. From supporting roles with Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts in Larry Crowne to playing the feather duster Plumette in last year’s mega-hit Beauty and the Beast, to her captivating turn as the eponymous Belle in Amma Asante’s 2013 film, she has a steadily building fanbase. Her recent lead in the romantic drama Irreplaceable You, released globally on Netflix last month, will no doubt have garnered her a few more. And a particular favourite came in 2016, when she starred in Charlie Brooker’s Black Mirror, playing Kelly in that season’s standout episode, “San Junipero”. (“One of the most compelling pieces of television I’d ever read,” she says.) It helps, of course, that Mbatha-Raw is both Rada trained and almost transcendentally beautiful. Dressed down today in a hot-pink rollneck jumper, black jeans and knee boots, she already looks like a star. But it’s there in her work, too. Next month she’s doing the Hollywood heroine thing in a spooky Cloverfield follow-up, and there’s a busy slate of arthouse films and prestige television on the way. Yet it is A Wrinkle in Time, directed by Academy Award nominee Ava DuVernay, with a screenplay by Frozen writer and co-director >


“People of colour have existed throughout history – it’s just who has been able to tell the stories. To me that became really important”

Jennifer Lee, that looks set to make her. Based on Madeleine L’Engle’s much-loved 1962 American science-fantasy novel about a girl who, as in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, must journey to a fantastical alternative dimension, it is often a set text in high schools. She plays the heroine’s mother, joining an ensemble that includes Reese Witherspoon, Chris Pine, Rowan Blanchard and – drum roll, please – Oprah Winfrey. “I was always intrigued by Gugu, and I really loved her work in Belle,” Ava DuVernay tells me over the phone. “She’s just lovely with a capital L. Not boisterous or wildly ‘on’. She comes in like this sweet little presence – but fully alert and very focused.” Mbatha-Raw is by no means the grand cinema diva. She proves a curious interviewee, in fact, often batting questions of her own back at me instead of answering the ones put to her. For, example, when I tell her my name is Nigerian, she follows up by asking whether it’s Yoruba or Igbo. It’s not that she’s shy per se – this is a seasoned performer – but you can tell that her wide eyes take everything in, from the names of the teas at the café to the kids screaming their heads off, to a connection she feels with a labradoodle we come across (“the hair is just… exactly the same”). She started early, she says. She grew up near Oxford; her father, Patrick, was a South African doctor, her mother, Anne, an English nurse, but they separated when she was young. She was an only child, and Anne, wanting to ensure Gugu (short for Gugulethu) was meeting plenty of other children, signed her up for everything extracurricular. “I loved dance, that was sort of my first love,” she says. “But I played Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz when I was 11 and that was it, really.” State-school educated, she auditioned for Rada at 17 and went at 18, which is unusually young. “It was so intense and amazing,” she says, though it wasn’t without its complications, not least because – out of a class of 34 – she was one of only four non-white students. “I was probably one of the youngest in my year, and, certainly initially, I felt surrounded by Oxbridge people: people who’d maybe studied drama and were very articulate in expressing their opinions about playwrights and theatre, and I didn’t have any of that. But,” here she puffs out her chest, “I was brave. I’d be the first person to volunteer for some strange Stanislavski exercise.” Post-drama school, she became a theatre favourite, cast in roles at the Almeida and the National Theatre. A substantial break came in 2009, when she was cast opposite Jude Law in Hamlet at the Donmar Warehouse. The Daily Telegraph’s Charles Spencer was so impressed he dubbed her Ophelia “the sweetest, most pitifully vulnerable” he’d ever seen. I believe her when she smiles and tells me she doesn’t read reviews, “but,” she says, “the experience for me was very… I

mean, it’s Hamlet!” She honks a laugh. The play’s transfer to New York brought her to America for the first time. “That was my Broadway debut, and it was incredible.” It also changed her world view, sharpening her ambition and putting Hollywood in her sights. Without Hamlet, “I don’t think that would have occurred to me, really, as being practical or realistic. Good British theatre was sort of stimulating enough, and Hollywood sounded faintly ridiculous and very far away.” Everything changed when she booked the lead in Belle, the story of the daughter of a slave and a nobleman, who captivated London high society at the end of the 18th century. “Belle is so, so close to my heart, not just because it’s the first lead role I got to play in film,” she says. “Growing up I’d watch endless Dickens adaptations and I was obsessed with Sense and Sensibility with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet.” But even after Rada, a role in period drama was something she thought she could have only in theatre. “I could play Juliet in Romeo and Juliet on stage [at Manchester’s Royal Exchange, opposite Andrew Garfield], but seemingly in film, there was more of a microscope of ‘historical accuracy’. I didn’t really see how I could be in a period drama without playing a slave, necessarily, or a character in a very subservient or brutalised role.” She warms her hands on her mug before continuing. “As a biracial woman born in the 1980s, if you let popular culture dictate it, you’d think mixed-race people were like a new thing.” She scoffs. “And that’s absolutely not the case. People of colour have existed throughout history – it’s just who has been able to tell the stories. And that to me became really important: to illuminate that. To show that Dido Elizabeth Belle is as valid a story as Elizabeth Bennet.” She nods firmly. “And, you know, Elizabeth Bennet’s fictional,” she adds, laughing again. Mbatha-Raw has been lucky to work with a lot of female directors, such as Belle’s Amma Asante and DuVernay. “It was a no-brainer for me,” she says, of taking the role of Dr Kate Murry in DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time. “There’s just a lot of empowering truths there for young women. As soon as I saw Storm Reid, who plays my daughter in it, I was really excited. I was like, ‘Oh, my God, she’s a mini-me! I have to be in this.’” She’d already worked with DuVernay on August 28, a short film for the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington, DC. (“We shot in this tank outside LA where I think they shot some of Beyoncé’s “Lemonade”, and my character was swimming through her house to try and escape. It was quite terrifying, actually.”) “The chance to work with Ava again, and what it means for a woman of colour to be directing something of that scale and budget for Disney – I wanted to be in that line,” she says. Then there was her “wonderful fairy godmother”, Oprah Winfrey. “We didn’t have any scenes together in Wrinkle,” says Mbatha-Raw, crinkling her nose sadly. “But we were both on the set on the same day and she came and hung out in my trailer for a little bit and we had a chat, in her full character regalia, which is just goddess-like. I hope we actually get to do something where we work together in a scene because that’d be incredible. I feel so thankful to have her in my life and to have had her guidance. She’s a very special human.” That feeling of surprise and wonder is something MbathaRaw wants to keep searching for. “I really am enjoying the journey,” she says of the extraordinary year ahead. “So many things have happened that are unexpected and exciting.” And with that she’s off to get a deep-tissue massage: “I’m feeling on the cusp of some kind of lurgy, and I’m going to get some kinks out,” she says. Later, I realise she’s left me a voicemail from that morning. “Hi Bim,” her recorded voice says. “It’s Gugu. I’m here.” She certainly is. Q “A Wrinkle in Time” is in cinemas from March 23


OPPOSITE: PLAYSUIT, £2,220. LEATHER BELT, £325. BOTH SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO. GOLD HOOP EARRINGS, £240, DINNY HALL. THIS PAGE: CHALK LINEN DRESS WITH BROWN LEATHER TRIM, FROM £1,750, CELINE


MBATHA-RAW HAS A STEADILY BUILDING FANBASE... IT HELPS, OF COURSE, THAT SHE IS BOTH RADA TRAINED AND ALMOST TRANSCENDENTALLY BEAUTIFUL. THIS PAGE: BLACK JACKET WITH CRYSTAL EMBELLISHMENT AND FUCHSIA SATIN BOW, £2,690. COBALT TROUSERS, £885. BOTH GUCCI. CULTUREDPEARL EARRINGS, FROM £850, CELINE. GOLD AND LAPIS RING, ON GUGU’S RIGHT HAND, PRICE ON REQUEST, GRIMA. GOLD AND LAPIS RING, ON GUGU’S LEFT HAND, £5,750, BOUCHERON. OPPOSITE: VELVET AND TAFFETA DRESS WITH HALTERNECK TOP, £5,200, VALENTINO. HOOP EARRINGS, £260. CUFF, £170. BOTH DINOSAUR DESIGNS. ARM BANGLE, FROM £850, ANNINA VOGEL, AT LIBERTY


SILK AND LACE DRESS WITH CAPE DETAIL, £2,310, ALBERTA FERRETTI. LEATHER BELT, £210, RAG & BONE, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM. TWISTED HOOP EARRINGS, FROM £430, CELINE. GOLD AND DIAMOND RINGS, FROM £2,170 EACH, POMELLATO. GOLD-PLATED CUFF, £220, SASKIA DIEZ. BEAUTY NOTE: A BERRY LIP PAIRED WITH GUNMETAL EYELINER IS THE PERFECT MODERN COMBINATION. TRY LANCOME’S L’ABSOLU ROUGE IN BERRY NOIR, £25.50, AND CRAYON KHOL IN GRIS BLEU, £17.50


“GUGU IS JUST LOVELY WITH A CAPITAL L,” DIRECTOR AVA DUVERNAY TELLS ME OVER THE PHONE. “SHE COMES IN LIKE THIS SWEET LITTLE PRESENCE – BUT FULLY ALERT AND VERY FOCUSED.” OPPOSITE: TAFFETA ASYMMETRIC-SHOULDER DRESS WITH RUFFLES, £1,345, STELLA MCCARTNEY. HOOP EARRINGS, FROM £470, CELINE. ARM BANGLE, AS BEFORE. THIS PAGE: PYJAMA JACKET, £3,000. TROUSERS, £890. BOTH DIOR. LEATHER AND CORD BELT, FROM £200, LIZZIE FORTUNATO. SUEDE SANDALS, £865, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS, £150, THEODORA WARRE. GOLD-PLATED RING, ON GUGU’S RIGHT HAND, £300, ANISSA KERMICHE. ROSE-GOLD RING, ON GUGU’S LEFT HAND, £4,550, VHERNIER. FOR STOCKISTS, ALL PAGES, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION


BACKDROP: NEGLECTED OFFICE PLANTS, SAM X, AT NATUREPHILE.DE


URBAN LEGEND

GET READY FOR THE NEW HIGH-LOW MIX: VICTORIAN-INSPIRED FINERY WITH SLOUCHY LEATHER, ELEGANT SATIN WITH CASUAL JERSEY – AND SNEAKERS WITH EVERYTHING. PHOTOGRAPHS: CRAIG McDEAN. FASHION EDITOR: GRACE CODDINGTON

ADOPT A NO-HOLDS-BARRED APPROACH TO RUFFLES. THE CONTROLLED EXPLOSION OF A DECADENT DRESS COMPLEMENTS ON-THE-GO CONVERSE. PVC AND COTTON COAT, COTTON JACKET AND RUFFLE DRESS, ALL FROM A SELECTION, , AT DOVER STREET MARKET. HI-TOPS, £95, COMMES DES Y X CONVERSE


BACKDROP: MISTY SUBURBAN NEIGHBORHOOD, SHANEROUNCE.COM


LEND SIMONE ROCHA’S LIQUID SATIN GOWN SOME BITE WITH EMBELLISHED EBONY TULLE AND A PURPOSEFUL STRIDE. OPPOSITE: SEQUINED DRESS, £2,575. SATIN DRESS, £1,395. BOTH SIMONE ROCHA. SNEAKERS, £150, GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY X ADIDAS, AT DOVER STREET MARKET. LOOSEN THE RULES ON LACE: SLOUCHY LEATHER SHORTS AND SPORTS SHOES SIGNAL THE EASY-GOING MOOD. THIS PAGE: BLOUSE, £8,570. SHORTS, £1,620. LEATHER BELT, £260. HEART PENDANT NECKLACE, £255. ALL SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO. SNEAKERS, AS BEFORE


CHLOE’S MEGA MESH, SEQUIN AND CHIFFON DRESSES ARE ON EVERY IT-GIRL’S WISH LIST. OPPOSITE: SILK AND LACE DRESS, TO ORDER, CHLOE. SNEAKERS, £800, LOUIS VUITTON. MICRO-FLORALS ABOUND IN JONATHAN ANDERSON’S LOEWE COLLECTION, BASED ON A CONTINENTCROSSING BOHEMIAN WOMAN. WEAR TOP-TO-TOE. THIS PAGE: COTTON BLOUSE, £895. COTTON SKIRT, £1,450. SUEDE SNEAKERS, £450. ALL LOEWE


THIS PAGE: COTTON BUSTIER TOP, FROM £1,020. EMBROIDERED SILK TROUSERS, FROM £3,500. SWAROVSKI-CRYSTAL TIARA, FROM £1,640. ALL DOLCE & GABBANA. BEAUTY NOTE: TIMELESS BEAUTY CAN BENEFIT FROM A MODERN TOUCH. A GREY SHEEN ACROSS THE EYE LIFTS A CLASSIC ROSE LIP. TRY MARC JACOBS TWINKLE POP EYE SHADOW STICK IN STARDUST, £23, WITH LE MARC LIP CREME IN GEORGIE GIRL, £25. SET BALENCIAGA’S WASHED-OUT LACE SINGING WITH A 1970S POSY-PRINT JERSEY. OPPOSITE: FLORAL TOP, £850. COTTON AND LACE SLIP DRESS, £2,850. BOTH BALENCIAGA. SNEAKERS, £395, FROM A SELECTION, CELINE


“ANACHRONISM” WAS NICOLAS GHESQUIERE’S BUZZWORD FOR HIS ERA-HOPPING LOUIS VUITTON COLLECTION. TRANSLATION: YOU HAVE PERMISSION TO PAIR YOUR GYM SHORTS WITH A FANTASTIC FROCK COAT. THIS PAGE: SILK/COTTON RIDING COAT, TO ORDER. SILK SHORTS, £300. SNEAKERS, £800. ALL LOUIS VUITTON. THE MODERN WAY TO DEBUT ALEXANDER MCQUEEN’S FAIRYTALE BALLGOWN? WITH UNAPOLOGETICALLY LO-FI SKATE SHOES. OPPOSITE: INSIDE-OUT EMBROIDERED TAFFETA DRESS, TO ORDER, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN. SNEAKERS, £200, ADIDAS ORIGINALS BY ALEXANDER WANG. FOR STOCKISTS, ALL PAGES, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION. HAIR: JULIEN D’YS FOR JULIEN D’YS. MAKE-UP: DIANE KENDAL. NAILS: MEGUMI YAMAMOTO. SET DESIGN: ANDREA STANLEY. PRODUCTION: PRODN AT ART & COMMERCE. DIGITAL ARTWORK: GLOSS STUDIO. MODEL: NATALIE WESTLING


“SKA, 2-TONE, DESMOND DEKKER AND THE SPECIALS...” SAYS STYLIST KATE MOSS OF HER INSPIRATIONS FOR THIS SHOOT. THE LOOK? LEAN, GRAPHIC, UNISEX AND SHARPLY TAILORED. PHOTOGRAPHED BY NICK KNIGHT From left: Lina wears jacket, £3,275. Trousers, £1,395. Both Alexander McQueen. Pocket square, £15, Sherry’s London. Lace-ups, £380, Church’s. Jazzelle wears coat, £3,745. Trousers, £1,395. Both Alexander McQueen. Loafers, £130, GH Bass. Adwoa wears coat, £2,995. Trousers, £2,435. Both Alexander McQueen. Shirt, from £50, Britac. Pocket square, £15, Sherry’s London. Loafers, £665, Christian Louboutin. Hair: Sam McKnight. Make-up: Val Garland. Production: 10-4 Inc. Digital artwork: Mark Boyle at Epilogue Imaging. Models: Adwoa Aboah, Lina Hoss and Jazzelle Zanaughtti


RUDE GIRL ROCK


Add a schoolboy shirt to ladylike tweeds. Opposite: jacket, £4,520. Miniskirt, £1,505. Both Chanel. Poloneck, £145, Wolford. Shirt, £110, Aquascutum. Keep lengths super short and the attitude sporty. This page, from left: Jazzelle wears gilet, £2,700. Top, £650. Shorts, £500. All Louis Vuitton. Polo shirt, £60, Fred Perry. Shoes, £675, Prada. Adwoa wears dress, £1,600, Louis Vuitton. Shoes, £795, Prada. Lina wears sweater, from £760. Skirt, from £1,590. Both Givenchy. Polo shirt, as before. Shoes, £885, Bottega Veneta


From left: Lina wears shirt with trompe-l’oeil sweater, from £975. Trousers, from £1,025. Both Balenciaga. Jazzelle wears cropped jacket, from £1,785. Shirt with lace inserts, from £875. Trousers, from £875. All Céline. Adwoa wears cropped jacket, from £1,960. Shirt, from £965. Trousers, from £875. All Céline


“It’s great that women now feel empowered to shave their heads. They look so beautiful,” says Kate Moss, who chose models Adwoa, Lina and Jazzelle for their bold buzzcuts. From left: Jazzelle wears shirt, £624. Skirt, £2,250. Both Bottega Veneta. Adwoa wears blazer, £1,050. Shirt, £320. Both Burberry


Two tone – look sharp in strict monochrome. From left: Adwoa wears jacket, from £2,655. Vest, from £670. Skirt, from £1,240. All Givenchy. Poloneck, £145, Wolford. Jazzelle wears jacket, £3,070. Cropped trousers, £525. Both Chloé. Shirt, £65, Pretty Green


From left: Lina wears jacket, from £2,175. Shirt, from £490. Trousers, from £445. All Dolce & Gabbana. Lace-ups and pocket square, as before. Adwoa wears jacket, £2,240. Shirt, £355. Trousers, £765. All Gucci. Trouser chain, £480, Tateossian. Pocket square, £50, sold with shirt, Brutus. Loafers, as before. Jazzelle wears jacket, £3,330. Shirt, £625. Trousers, £2,250. All Gucci. Braces, £20, Sherry’s London. Loafers, as before


Meet Miuccia Prada’s tough new Teddy Girl. From left: Lina wears jacket, £1,435. Blouse, £760. Both Miu Miu. Miniskirt, £320, Ashley Williams. Socks, £140, Prada. Poloneck, as before. Jazzelle wears coat, £1,810, Prada. Shirt, £340, Dior Homme. Poloneck and socks, as before. Adwoa wears coat, £1,810. Shirt, £695. Both Prada. Poloneck, as before. Socks, £18, Happy Socks


What lies beneath? Beautifully sleek, no-frills underpinnings. From left: Lina wears jacket, £610. Basque, £360. Both Paco Rabanne. Adwoa wears swimsuit, £150, Isabel Marant. Shorts, £48, Lululemon. Jazzelle wears sleeveless jacket, £460. Sleeveless shirt, £270. Shorts, £260. All Paco Rabanne


JEWELLERY THROUGHOUT: ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, BUNNEY, MARIA TASH, REPOSSI, SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO, SHAUN LEANE, TOM WOOD AND VICKI SARGE. HOSIERY THROUGHOUT: FALKE, HAPPY SOCKS, NIKE, UKTIGHTS.COM AND WOLFORD

Today’s tailoring rests on strong shoulders. This page, from left: Jazzelle wears shirt, from £850. Shorts, from £620. Belt with chain, from £510. All Givenchy. Lina wears sleeveless jacket, from £660. Trousers, from £480. Both Alexander Wang. Adwoa wears jacket, from £880. Trousers, from £480. Both Alexander Wang. Opposite, from left: Lina wears jacket, £42,840. Top, £3,000. Shorts, £2,820. Belt, £260. Shoes, £425. All Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello. Jazzelle wears jumpsuit, £12,855. Belt, £345. Shoes, £685. All Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello. Adwoa wears minidress, from £1,510. Boots, from £1,370. Both Givenchy. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information


Dark star From The Witch to The Miniaturist, Anya Taylor-Joy is a former model with a formidable talent – and Hollywood’s latest Scream Queen. By Funmi Fetto. Photographs by Craig McDean. Styling by Kate Phelan

When we meet outside the Royal Court Theatre in Sloane Square, the young actress Anya Taylor-Joy is so genial – exuding an almost childlike cheeriness – that she greets me with an embrace (“I’m Latin, we are huggers”). As we walk a few doors down to the Colbert café, it’s difficult to reconcile this cheerful ingénue with the woman industry insiders are calling horror’s new It-girl. Even her clothes seem ambiguous; she’s teamed a furry-collared coat with a chunky sweater and nondescript black trousers. She’s breezy about “not really having a personal style – the only thing that stays is my rings”. Of the stacks of rings decorating her fingers, she singles out a lion’s head from Gucci, explaining, “This is the replacement – the first one I lost while dancing in Barcelona.” Taylor-Joy’s perky disposition – and seemingly poreless skin – is all the more puzzling considering she’s just disembarked from a sleepless flight from Los Angeles. She admits to having been an insomniac since the age of seven. “I had this really strange notion of sleep – it was like being dead but not dead – so I trained myself not to sleep for very long.” She smiles as she takes a sip from her cup of iced coffee. “Three, four hours and I’m sweet. It helps with the schedule.” The schedule is something of a beast. Following a fleeting stint as a teenage model, the 21-year-old has been filming nonstop. Her debut role, in the 1630s-set horror The Witch, was a Sundance hit, while in Split, M Night Shyamalan’s 2016 thriller, she played a girl kidnapped and imprisoned by a man with multiple personalities, played by James McAvoy. (They have already filmed the sequel, Glass.) Last Christmas she took the lead in BBC One’s well-received The Miniaturist, adapted from Jessie Burton’s bestseller about a disturbing and mysterious household in 17th-century Amsterdam. But Taylor-Joy seems destined to make the leap from breakout star to major one. She can thank being cast in the X-Men series for the career bump. “I’m playing a crazy Russian lady who is really off the wall, snarky and has magic powers,” she says of her lead role in the forthcoming film The New Mutants. In keeping with the rest of her spooky CV, its release date was recently pushed back a year for reshoots to make it much scarier. Taylor-Joy’s unwavering attraction to dark characters and subjects has not gone unnoticed (“My brother is like, ‘Anya, can you not just make happy movies?’”). Her choices have earned her the tag Scream Queen. “I don’t see genre,” she counters. “I see character, I see world. It just so happens that these worlds happen to be dark.” Yet there’s variety there. Her ability to move seamlessly from, say, cut-glass aristo to Sovietbloc superhero is impressive – a consequence of an itinerant childhood, perhaps, given that she was born in Miami to an Argentinian-Scottish father and an Africa-born SpanishEnglish mother, and was brought up between Argentina >


“MY BROTHER IS LIKE, ‘ANYA, CAN YOU NOT JUST MAKE HAPPY MOVIES?’” STRAPLESS GABARDINE PLAYSUIT WITH FEATHER SLEEVE, £12,855. CRYSTAL BELT, £345. BOTH SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO. SATIN AND CRYSTAL HEELS, £745, MANOLO BLAHNIK. HAIR: DUFFY. MAKE-UP: DIANE KENDAL. NAILS: MEGUMI YAMAMOTO. DIGITAL ARTWORK: GLOSS STUDIO


“I DON’T SEE GENRE, I SEE CHARACTER, I SEE WORLD. IT JUST SO HAPPENS THAT THESE WORLDS HAPPEN TO BE DARK.” OPPOSITE: EMBELLISHED WOOL/SILK DRESS, £2,900, DIOR. THIS PAGE: WOOL CADY MINIDRESS, £2,395, VALENTINO. PATENT-LEATHER SLINGBACKS, £645, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN


“The scariest moment on set was when my notes said, ‘Be incandescently happy’” and London. Her own accent is indiscernible because, she says, “I automatically fit in with the speaking cadences of where I am, which has always made me feel displaced”. She can currently be seen in cinemas in the twisted psychological comedy Thoroughbreds. Described as “Heathers meets American Psycho”, Cory Finley’s directorial debut has been acclaimed by critics. It’s impossible to mention the film without addressing the shocking death of her co-star Anton Yelchin. (The gifted actor, best known for a charming supporting turn in the Star Trek franchise, died in a freak accident, crushed in his driveway by his own car, aged 27.) She pauses briefly, her bright eyes suddenly dimming. “To be honest, it’s the hardest thing that’s ever happened to me. I was very, very close to him and I miss him desperately. It broke me in half.” Promoting the film has not proved easy. “I’m starting to understand the strange side of acting. You’re in this beautiful dress, in giant heels, and have to get on stage and talk and be really happy… It is emotionally difficult.” But Taylor-Joy’s voice lifts. “The best thing is that his performance is incredible, and the film is dedicated to him.” Her optimism peppers our conversation: “I believe everyone has a good heart, and unless proven otherwise, I’m going to

keep believing that.” A reference to when she was bullied in school? Taylor-Joy has spoken previously about the tough time she had at her London school, from being shut in lockers to being ridiculed for having eyes so wide apart. “School just wasn’t my place,” she says. “But I’m starting to get to a place where I’m OK. I’ll always have something I’m insecure about, but I’m also going to be really fierce and own my own space. And it feels really good.” I ask if she has heard from anyone involved since she became famous? “Yes,” she replies evenly. “But I’ve forgiven what happened.” She’s quick to downplay her saintly declaration with a self-deprecating eye roll. “I say that now – it took me a long time to get here.” I beckon for the bill as Taylor-Joy dreamily mulls over what she’ll do once she gets some downtime. “Immersion living – maybe three months in Barcelona,” she muses. No time soon, though – she’s already filming her hush-hush new project. “It’s very happy, upbeat and energetic,” is all she will reveal. “The scariest moment on set was when my notes said, ‘Be incandescently happy.’ I mean, I’m completely at ease crying my eyes out semi-naked in front of a crew. Being really happy? That was a really different experience for me.” Q “Thoroughbreds” is in cinemas from April 6


“IT’S VERY HAPPY, UPBEAT AND ENERGETIC,” IS ALL ANYA WILL SAY ABOUT HER NEXT PROJECT. OPPOSITE: WOOL MINIDRESS WITH FEATHER TRIM, £1,115, DAVID KOMA, AT SELFRIDGES. SLINGBACKS, AS BEFORE. THIS PAGE: WOOL CREPE MINIDRESS, FROM £1,940, GIVENCHY. FOR STOCKISTS, ALL PAGES, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION


STROKE OF BRILLIANCE

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Artist Lubaina Himid in her Lancashire studio. Hair and make-up: Lou Rothwell. Digital artwork: Tablet Retouch

very artist will tell you, if you can keep going you are bound to make it in the end,” Lubaina Himid says with a laugh. “Because other people just die or give up.” We are talking about the way that, at the age of 63, she has become the oldest artist to win the Turner Prize, the ultimate accolade in British contemporary art. She is also the first black woman to be given the award. Yet she has been a pioneer of black British art since the mid1980s, making work that is politically direct and stunningly beautiful, full of pattern, vitality and challenge. The sudden onset of a new kind of fame has left her reeling. “The funny thing is, I didn’t realise how below the radar I was,” she says. “Curators knew my work. It’s in the Tate. But it wasn’t in newspapers. Until the Turner Prize, I didn’t know how old I was, or how invisible.” She laughs again, a broad smile spreading over her face, softening its seriousness. In repose, Himid can look severe, watchful. But the moment she smiles, a rare and expansive warmth emerges. She is simply dressed in a chartreuse cotton shirt and jeans, with elegant flat boots on her feet. You’d notice her if you passed her on the street;

she looks interesting. And since her win in December last year, people in Preston, where she has lived since 1991, do actually stop to congratulate her. “It’s extraordinary and fantastic,” she says. As we talk, the sun streams in through the high, square-paned windows of her studio, on the first floor of the Georgian terraced house in which she has lived and worked for all those years. Outside, the river Ribble runs at the bottom of a bank of trees. Inside, the walls are covered with paintings and prints; there are easels and tables full of works in progress; the floor and shelves are stacked with hundreds of books, neat in horizontal piles. It is a serene and creative space. Certain qualities mark Himid’s art: a range of styles, an ability to conjure a single, striking image, an interest in giving back their place in history to lost stories and forgotten people, a desire to understand the way the past seeps into the present. “Great traumas reverberate still, and we don’t entirely know how they do,” she says. The lineaments of such concerns can be traced in the pattern of her own life. She was born in 1954, in Zanzibar, after her mother (who is still alive) left London to marry her father in his African homeland. Two years later, when Lubaina was four months old, he died of malaria, leaving her mother to >

Her vivid art has brought forgotten stories to life – then last year, aged 63, Lubaina Himid made history herself when she became the first black woman to win the Turner Prize. Sarah Crompton travelled to Preston to meet her. Photographs by Paul Wetherell


“Curators knew my work. It’s in the Tate. But it wasn’t in newspapers. Until the Turner Prize, I didn’t know how old I was, or how invisible” mourn for the traditional 40 days and nights before returning to England. “Utter fear” stopped Himid from visiting Zanzibar in adulthood, she says, “because I had left in a state of trauma. My mother was obviously in real distress. That stayed with me. I didn’t have an unhappy childhood, but there was a sadness in it.” So she postponed a return. “I went to Cuba, to Venice, all places where it seemed I could learn how to be in Zanzibar before being in Zanzibar.” Then in 1997, her late partner, the artist and poet Maud Sulter, insisted she should go. “She felt I needed to,” Himid explains. The moment she set foot in Africa, all the dread was banished. “I got off the plane and thought, ‘Oh yes, I understand.’ It was easy.” Yet this long separation from Zanzibar fuelled Himid’s sense that she didn’t belong anywhere. As she grew up in London, she was inspired by art. Her school, Paddington and Maida Vale High School for Girls, had excellent art teachers. But most of all she had her mother, a textile designer, who taught by osmosis. Every weekend they would go

together to department stores, or to museums and galleries, feeling fabrics, looking at objects. “I have to tell people that when you go to a museum, you have to feel those places are yours,” Himid says. “They are just keeping stuff for you to see and enjoy.” Her political awareness was also growing. She once described her work as “political activism in paint”, which feels reductive but explains her didactic motivation. “I didn’t really encounter the kicking-and-spitting type of racism, but I was very aware of it and I could see the injustice of it. I was hellbent on putting it right,” she explains. At Wimbledon School of Art, and later, at the Royal College of Art, her ideas began to crystallise. “An art school is a place of show and tell. As a black student, you become too much an object of scrutiny because you are showing and telling a world that other art students don’t necessarily think they know. It becomes exotic.” She made art so she could see herself. “Art school is full of people who feel outside, but you feel outside all the time and it’s tedious, because I think one wants to belong. If you don’t see yourself on the TV, in the art gallery or in the newspapers in any form except as a criminal, then that’s hard. If you’re creative then you try to make or sing or build your way out of that. And I think that’s what I did.”

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nspired by radical European theatre, she originally studied stage design – “I thought theatre could change the world” – but she couldn’t land enough work. She began to curate small shows by black artists, trying to bring their thinking to public attention. Struggling to find employment in London, she took a curating post in Rochdale, then moved to Preston to teach at the University of Central Lancashire (a position she holds to this day). Although Himid lives alone, her house is always full of people; she works collegiately with other artists and assistants, and fosters a strong sense of togetherness. When she won the Turner, she announced her intention to use the £25,000 prize to help other artists, something she has done throughout her career. “So much of the time quite a small amount of money, like £1,000, makes a huge amount of difference,” she explains. “It’s easier to live up here,

to feel you have people to talk to, if other artists can do the things they want to do. I want to be surrounded by artists doing things, rather than artists not able to do things. We all benefit somehow.” She gets up at about 5.30am to paint, and then fits in other commitments, such as university lecturing and meetings, around her work. Most days she returns to her studio at the end of the day to work late into the night. “I have always been used to making work and being interrupted. But you need to think about it every day so you know what you want to do when the moment comes.” When we meet, Himid is embarking on two new commissions: one for the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow in April, which will feature “a many-wheeled dragon cart”, and a room full of flags for Gateshead’s Baltic gallery in May, transforming a series of paintings about lost love, inspired by the idea of east African kangas; patterned cloths that have meaning and text embedded in their warp and weft. “I’m coming around again to making pieces where the audience is performing,” Himid also says. This takes her back to some of her earlier work such as Naming the Money, in which visitors walked through an installation of 100 cut-out figures of slaves who worked in aristocratic houses throughout Europe in the 18th century. Colourfully painted, like much of her art it is full of melancholy but laced with hope. Yet after its first showing in 2004 it hadn’t been seen in its entirety until it was exhibited at Spike Island in Bristol last year. “I was sure it was a good piece,” she says. “And I did feel angry that there was all that time in-between.” One advantage of the Turner Prize win is that it will, finally, make people see and engage with her art. “I am painting parts of black women’s lives that nobody paints. Nobody paints our love stories, our ordinary everyday. How our ordinary everyday is touched by enormous trauma and tragedy but we as a whole set of women globally and historically have the capacity to keep going.” As evidenced, of course, by her own persistence. “I think I am a bit of an optimist,” she says, eyes twinkling. “But I don’t tend to let things go.” Q Lubaina Himid’s work will be on show at the Glasgow International, April 20 to May 7, and the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead, May 11 to September 16


The walls, shelves, tables and floor of Himid’s studio – on the first floor of a Georgian terraced house – are lined with paintings and prints, books and ornaments


The new old master Marrying 18th-century brocades with today’s sleek sportswear and tomorrow’s high-tech… Nicolas Ghesquière’s dazzling epoch-hopping designs for Louis Vuitton add up to a look that’s right for now. Claudia Croft meets fashion’s great innovator. Photographs by Stef Mitchell. Styling by Marie-Amélie Sauvé

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hat do you do when audacity is your calling card, but the situation calls for something less ferocious? When Nicolas Ghesquière joined Louis Vuitton in 2013, he was preceded by a reputation for fearless, uncompromising design. A master of futurist fashion fantasy, he’d spent 15 years at Balenciaga creating shock and awe with his daredevil silhouettes. In the process he turned Balenciaga from a dusty heritage brand into the label to which everyone from fellow designers to high-street copyists looked for new direction. In scenes echoed recently by Phoebe Philo’s departure from Céline, Ghesquière’s abrupt exit from Balenciaga in 2012 precipitated panic buying of his final designs and much agonising about the future of fashion. He had become so intrinsic to the trend cycle that his longtime collaborator and former boyfriend, the shoe designer Pierre Hardy, described him as a “national treasure, like Opéra de Paris or Notre Dame”.

Ghesquière took a year out after that, setting up a small studio in his flat by the Louvre and keeping counsel with a close group – including Hardy and the stylist Marie-Amélie Sauvé – he’d first met as a teenage design assistant in Paris. The fashion world awaited his triumphant return, and in 2013 he succeeded Marc Jacobs at Louis Vuitton. At last, fashion’s reigning genius had found a patron rich and powerful enough to indulge his imagination. But rather than continue his wild experiments, Ghesquière did something even more shocking: he ushered in haute normcore inspired by a world in which reality and authenticity had become buzz words. So it was out with fantasy and in with ski sweaters, belted A-line minis and glossy leather coats, with miniature Vuitton trunks carried as handbags. His methodology was simple: he talked to the women in his studio and designed beautifully crafted versions of what they wanted to wear. For a fashion press expecting raging novelty, the idea of “real” clothes from Ghesquière was difficult to compute, as he reflects over tea at Claridge’s during a whirlwind trip to London. “People thought it too commercial, too accessible,” he says of his Louis Vuitton debut, pushing his short dark hair away from his handsome face, still boyish at 46. It says something about Ghesquière that he knew his first collection would confound his critics, but he did it anyway. It’s not acclaim that drives him, but his own audacious logic. “They didn’t understand,” he says of those who expected more Balenciaga-style high jinks. “They would think I lost something.” His mouth curves into the smile of someone who knows something you don’t. In fact, he’d gained the biggest house in luxury fashion with more than 460 stores worldwide, an army of 4,500 highly >


“It’s the real mix of today. It’s the way women dress. It’s very inspiring. It’s quite limitless, in fact,” says Nicolas Ghesquière of his s/s ’18 collection. Embroidered brocade riding coat, £13,350. Cropped silk blouse, £1,350. Trousers with ruffle detail, £1,280. Sneakers, £780. All Louis Vuitton. Hair: Damien Boissinot. Make-up: Christelle Coquet. Nails: Typhaine Kersual. Set design: Valerie Weill. Production: Prodn at Art & Commerce. Digital artwork: Upper Studios. Model: Freja Beha Erichsen


“What did I imagine as a kid? Probably a house with my name on it, but I’m not disappointed,” says Ghesquière, opposite. Embroidered Lurex riding coat, £8,870. Cropped silk blouse, £1,880. Sleeveless top with ruffle front, £1,880. Trousers with ruffles, £1,280. Sneakers, £780. All Louis Vuitton


skilled artisans and 40 atelier staff at his fingertips. A new approach was needed. “It was fun, actually. I knew what I was doing and I knew that I was not going to mimic something that I’d done beautifully in the past. It was important for me to embrace this new phase on a bigger scale.” His time at Louis Vuitton has whizzed by: “You wake up one day and you’re four years on!” In that time, he’s established a pragmatic, sporty aesthetic that marries hand-crafting with the demands of modern living. But a new, more daring era looms. The designer describes a dramatic shift of gear: “I just moved,” he announces. Ghesquière – a sci-fi fan who slept with a Star Wars helmet on his bedroom mantelpiece – turned time traveller for spring/summer ’18, proposing a multi-era, multi-layered juxtaposition of lavish 18th-century menswear and poet’s blouses with “my beloved classics – sportswear and technological fabrics”. And so his models strode a lightbox runway in the crypt of the Louvre wearing intricately embellished frock coats with pastel jogging shorts and bulbous trainers. “They are clothes you can move with,” he says, pointing out that at Balenciaga his woman was “more architectural – it was about a standing woman,” while at Louis Vuitton, “she is in motion, she’s on the go”. But this is Ghesquière, fashion’s great innovator, so it was never going to be a straightforward clash of centuries. On closer inspection, those frock coats are a complex combination of Italian and French tailoring and hand-embroidery, and digital silicone printing that creates an “artificial texture”. For Ghesquière fans, this was the radical extreme they’d been waiting for – a highly crafted mix of fantasy, technology, history, costume and reality. “Let’s say it’s the new comfort,” says the designer. “It’s not only sports clothes, it’s the new casual. Mixed with exceptional creative pieces, I think it reflects our time. I don’t know if it comes from the street or if it comes from designers’ ideas, but it’s the real mix of today. It’s the way women dress. It’s very inspiring. I think that it’s quite limitless, in fact.” For some people – the lucky ones – their trajectory seems so sure, their destiny so set, that they have the aura of a chosen one. So it was for Ghesquière. “What did I imagine as a kid? Probably a house with my name on it. I was not thinking it could be a ‘house’, like Balenciaga or Louis Vuitton, but I’m not disappointed. It’s beyond a dream, actually,” he says. From an early age Ghesquière felt compelled to draw. He grew up in the medieval town of Loudun, in the Loire Valley, where his father ran a golf course. A sporty child (he still starts his day with an hour of exercise), he had an interest in clothes, fuelled by his mother’s magazines, Jean-Paul Goude’s Grace Jones album covers, and catwalk reports on French television. So prolific were his fashion drawings that when he was 14 his parents arranged an internship with Agnès B. After that, Corinne Cobson gave him a holiday job in her studio, and from there, aged 18 and without any formal fashion education, he graduated to design assistant at Jean Paul Gaultier. At last, the small-town autodidact was at the heart of Paris fashion. He joined Balenciaga aged 22. The faded French house had survived on perfume revenues and licensing since the death of its founder in 1972, and Ghesquière saw himself designing funeral clothes for the Japanese market. He was promoted to creative director at 25, but only as a stopgap – he was let go immediately after his first Balenciaga collection. Then, when the glowing reviews rolled in, he was promptly rehired.

Has he changed much since then? “I’m still very spontaneous. I try to trust my intuitions and my instinct. The need for creation and the search for ideas is still in me.” What is he looking for? “What is unknown or what can be surprising for myself,” he says, “because in fashion, everything has been done but you have to believe you are really renewing it.” That pressure is greater now than ever, as catwalk ideas play to a global audience in real time. “The strength of the proposition is now the most important thing. They ask, does he have a point of view? Then they decide to go with it or not.” For Ghesquière, downtime is surprisingly domestic: his simple pleasures include buying food, hunting for design pieces for his new apartment (he moved so his chocolate Labrador pup could have a garden), and relaxing with old friends and their children; he says he’d love to have a family of his own. But for now, the demands of fashion loom large. He describes being a designer as “a lifetime of seduction, in fact, to draw dresses for women”, and he talks about the job and the pressures of success as “the big game”. He takes his cues from his friend and muse Jennifer Connelly, whom he calls his Audrey Hepburn. “It was very constructive for me to meet someone who was popular and in ‘the big game’ but at the same time very independent,” says Ghesquière of the star. “I thought, this is possible. To be recognised for your talent without too much compromise. People might love you even more for that and you can be more free.” That knowing smile returns. “I’m fascinated by people who mix uncompromising things with extreme popularity,” he says. It sounds like a blueprint for his work. Q

“Let’s say it’s the new comfort. It’s not only sports clothes, it’s the new casual. Mixed with exceptional creative pieces, it reflects our time”


“I try to trust my intuitions and my instinct. The need for creation and the search for ideas is still in me,” says Ghesquière. This page: embroidered brocade gilet, £10,500. Cotton/silk riding coat, £3,950. Shorts, £270. Sneakers, £780. All Louis Vuitton. Opposite: cotton/silk gilet, £7,210. Silk blouse with leather detail, £1,880. Both Louis Vuitton


“In fashion, everything has been done but you have to believe you are really renewing it,” says Ghesquière. Opposite: embroidered brocade gilet, £7,550. Cotton T-shirt with chain, £840. Both Louis Vuitton. This page: jacquard gilet, £4,550. Silk blouse, £1,880. Leather jeans, £2,950. All Louis Vuitton


Love all As polyamory enters the mainstream, could a relationship revolution be under way? Rowan Pelling investigates the art of loving – and sleeping with – more than one person. Illustrations by Mats Gustafson

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ne bright spring day last year I was idly browsing Facebook when my friend Dr Kate Devlin (a lecturer in artificial intelligence at Goldsmiths) updated her status from “single” to “in an open relationship”. Since I’m 49 and live in uptight, windswept Cambridge, rather than a sex-positive community in San Diego, this was a socialmedia first for me. It seemed clear the polyamory movement in Britain had finally achieved critical mass. There had been plenty of portents. First, the fact that the term polyamory, coined in 1992, entered the Oxford English Dictionary in September 2006, defined as “having simultaneous close emotional relationships with two or more other individuals… the custom or practice of engaging in multiple sexual relationships with the knowledge and consent of all partners concerned”. Meanwhile, female friends on Tinder kept being asked if they’d consider forming part of a love quadrangle. And I noticed people in my circle citing Dossie Easton and Janet Hardy’s The Ethical Slut: A Guide to Infinite Sexual Possibilities (the bible for consensual non-monogamists). Then there were the celebrity polyamorists. Author Neil Gaiman and his musician wife Amanda Palmer have never made a secret of the fact that they both took lovers, with each other’s consent; although their set-up has reportedly become more conventional since they have had a child. Will Smith’s wife Jada Pinkett Smith once posted on Facebook, “Will and I both can do whatever we want, because we trust each other to do so. This does not mean we have an open relationship... this means we have a grown one.” Which sounds pretty much like your average polyamorist explaining why their ménage is an expansive, loving set of mutually agreeable arrangements, rather than a free-for-all. And Tilda Swinton became the poster girl for every mother who feels that, much as she loves the father of her children, she wouldn’t mind shifting him to another part of the house while she moves in her drop-dead sexy lover. When news of Swinton’s unconventional domestic arrangements first broke, my husband said: “That’s the life you’d like, isn’t it?” I pointed out that John Byrne, the father of Swinton’s twins, has a croft he can escape to on his own, to read books and write: “You’d love that, wouldn’t you?” It seemed an excellent quid pro quo – especially >


for couples who aren’t each other’s gatekeeper and don’t give a fig what curtain-twitching moralists think. Throughout our 24-year relationship, my husband has never attempted to curtail my movements, and confesses himself “infinitely puzzled by men who are physically possessive”. Indeed, I’ve only been able to pursue my line of work (delving into erotic literature and sexuality) because he’s totally unruffled if I say, “I’ve got to go to San Francisco to interview the leader of the Orgasmic Meditation movement.” In similar spirit, I don’t question my spouse’s deeply entrenched desire to do no socialising whatsoever, to eschew travel and to potter round the house pondering metaphysical dilemmas as well as the contents of our two boys’ school lunch boxes. We have lost four parents and a beloved step-parent between us, as well as our first pregnancy (a baby with a terrible chromosomal disorder), so we know what heartbreak means and that profound love entails a level of kindness and support that goes way beyond sex. But then nobody is too surprised when editors of erotic magazines, aristos or bohemians lead unconventional lives. For me, the significant thing about my friend Kate Devlin’s post was that it marked the moment when I first witnessed a bunch of well-heeled professionals all nod and say, “Good for you!”, rather than falling silent or expressing surprise. I sent her a message offering congratulations and suggesting polyamory would make a great article for my magazine The Amorist, which explores passion and sexuality. She replied, “I’m already halfway through.” The finished piece caused a bit of a stir, and a version was reprinted in The Times. Kate explained that she had one lover who occupied more space in her life than the other, who she saw once a month (both men also had at least one other regular partner), but that it worked for all of them, and she concluded, “I am content though. Happy, definitely, in a way that I couldn’t be if I were with just one person. I am fascinated by people and delight in learning more about each one… I know polyamory is not for everyone. There are degrees of it that are not for me. I’m tentatively feeling my way blindly because the familiar social structures aren’t in place, but it’s OK. It’s OK. I remind myself that it’s OK. For every pang of insecurity, I have an equal and opposite panic about being trapped. Then my heart lifts as I remember: I’m not.”

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or decades, the notion of a complex, open-sided set of mostly heterosexual relationships has been associated with the more baroque excesses of the 1970s – along with key parties, pampas grass, shagpile carpets and the bearded man from The Joy of Sex. It’s no surprise that this is viewed as the decade of carefree sexual exploration. Lovers benefited from the advent of the contraceptive pill: the first time an entire generation of women had been freed from fear of pregnancy. It was also an age of relative innocence, before the Aids pandemic and doomy sexual-health ads terrified the populace back into serial monogamy. But it was also an age when the bearded man had the upper hand. The general consensus was that “free love” was imposed by randy men on unwilling women, and that it never really worked; someone was always left

Only the fortunate minority feel a deep, abiding, unconflicted contentment in one person’s arms over an entire lifetime

sobbing and abandoned in the corner. Joni Mitchell spoke for many when she said, “It’s a ruse for guys.” The only problem with that point of view is that monogamy clearly doesn’t work either. One-on-one is clearly the best way to proceed when you’re in those electrifying early years of love: the space when you’re so narcotically in thrall to your beloved that everyone else seems faintly repugnant. And monogamy certainly works while your cultural inhibitions, religious sensibilities, or sense of loyalty and duty to shared family, friends or children outweigh all other considerations. But, eventually, so the statistics tell us, only the fortunate minority feel a deep, abiding, unconflicted contentment in one person’s arms over an entire lifetime. The other 70 or so per cent of humans in the Western world will be unfaithful at least once in their lifetime. Divorce rates now run at well over 40 per cent in Britain and America. The certainty of adultery, heartbreak and pain is the other great inconvenient truth of our times. Which is why New York-based relationship guru Esther Perel recently published The State of Affairs, which attempts to explore the myriad reasons for infidelity and to look at how couples can not only survive betrayal but learn from it and even become stronger. The prevalent myth Perel seeks to dispel is the notion that one person can be everything to another: soul mate, lover, best friend, fellow adventurer and co-parent. In her view, adultery is often about the desire to reinvent the self and become fresh and fascinating in another’s eyes, rather than an active wish to reject the best beloved. So what does a pragmatic, ethical individual do if they don’t ever want to behave like a lying, cheating love rat to the person they adore? For increasing numbers of people admitting to an enduring libido, the logical answer is polyamory. Now if, like me, you’ve knocked about a bit, you’re going to find the concept far older and more familiar than something supposedly invented at the tail end of the 20th century. Many in the LGBT community laugh at polyamory being some form of novel arrangement. The gay writer and comedian Rosie Wilby, whose book Is Monogamy Dead? was published last > 239


Donatella Versace created her spring/summer ’18 collection to honour the life and work of Gianni, “a genius… an icon… my brother”. To celebrate – in vivacious Versace style – she invited her supermodel friends to dress up in her designs and party like it’s the 1990s. By Anders Christian Madsen. Photographs by Sean Thomas. Styling by Jack Borkett

QUEEN OF THE NIGHT


The super squad party at Annabel’s: from left, Jourdan Dunn, Claudia Schiffer, Donatella Versace, Rita Ora, Yasmin Le Bon and Irina Shayk, all dressed in Versace s/s ’18. Hair: Neil Moodie. Make-up: Lotten Holmqvist. Nails: Pebbles Aikens. Digital artwork: Studio RM. With thanks to 360 Production and Veuve Clicquot


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he arrives through the back entrance of Annabel’s in Mayfair, cloaked in a futuristic quilted jacket, with a beautiful bodyguard in tow. Minutes later, and minus the coat, Donatella Versace strides down a staircase in a full skirt adorned with baroque swirls, platinum hair immaculately coiffed, eyes smoky and smouldering. For a few fleeting seconds, the Italian designer forgets she is on camera, swaying to “Rock with You” in a dancefloor trance with supermodels and pop stars, all clad in her brother’s sumptuous prints. This was the 1960s nightclub where myths were born, visited by the likes of the Queen and Mick Jagger, and the timeless stop for fashion’s glamour set through the decades. “I felt like I was back in the 1990s,” Donatella reflects the morning after her Vogue shoot, regally perched on a sofa in a suite at the Dorchester that matches her daytime bling. Her animated gesticulation is accentuated by the e-cigarette continually fixed between her diamond-clad fingers, testimony to the notorious 1990s lifestyle she no longer leads but recreated for the cameras the day before. “Going to parties is very different today. People are very self-conscious about what they’re wearing and how they’re acting. Everything is very controlled now, even for young people,” she laments. “I miss some freedom.” Last year, Versace marked the 20th anniversary of her brother’s death by reuniting the supermodels he helped create. It was an emotional collection spun together from the prints that defined Gianni Versace’s work. But in the folds of those memories were also flashbacks to Donatella’s former life, as queen of the 1990s club scene. “Doing the show, I didn’t want people to think I’m stuck in the past. Because I’m not,” the 62-year-old designer asserts. “I live in the present. I’m very aware of what’s happening in the world. But it was a cultural moment of courage that we have forgotten about a little bit.” Set to George Michael’s “Freedom! ’90”, her spring/summer 2018 show in September was closed by Carla Bruni, Naomi Campbell, Helena Christensen, Cindy Crawford and Claudia Schiffer, draped in gold chainmail dresses revisiting Avedon’s 1994 Versace campaign. “In my heyday, the most fun part was to get ready with all the girls,” she recalls. “Naomi and Kate and Amber, we were all at my house for five hours, doing absolutely nothing. We’d put on a little bit of eyeshadow and talk and shout. You left the party after half an hour, but when you arrived you made a statement.” Retrospective as it was, the show fuelled burgeoning rumours that she plans to take a step back at Versace and leave the house to a new designer. “Riccardo, Kim and Virgil, was it?” Donatella grins, referring to Tisci, Jones and Abloh, who have all been cited by the press as her successors. “They keep talking about you, so let it be. It doesn’t bother me. I love them,” she says of the designer names spinning in the rumour mill. “I have a good relationship with all of them, and at the end of the day, I’m a very open person.” For all her dazzling image, partying had its consequences for Donatella, who took over the creative direction of the company after her brother’s death. In 2004, she openly went into rehabilitation, turned her life around and with it, Versace’s profits. The family still owns 80 per cent of the company. Her daughter, Allegra, 31, who inherited half of her uncle’s business, works on Versus, Versace’s urban line. “We fight but that’s OK. She represents a different generation. It’s not easy for any > 223


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ackstage at her tribute show, Donatella looked on as Cindy Crawford’s daughter, Kaia Gerber, and her peers clapped and cried when the five original supermodels came out of their dressing rooms. “I felt like I was a storyteller for the young,” she reflects. “Back then, it really was about them, their personalities, the real people they were. Now I think it’s happening again, with Gigi, Bella, Kendall and those girls, in a different way – because of Instagram.” In the new girls she recognises the big ideas of the 1990s supermodels. “It’s about their brain, their capacity to become businesswomen without giving in to easier stuff. They said no to things that came easy, but look at the longevity of their work.” Following their example, the ambitions of the new householdname girls reach far beyond beauty. “Look at what we’re doing today,” Donatella says. “Most of the models are activists, doing all these projects. What I like about today is that everyone is getting together to reach something. This is very important for women, to have their voices heard, and fashion is one of the tools we can use.” But in the outlook of the so-called “woke” generation to which millennial models belong, not everything mirrors 1990s supermodel behaviour. “The competition was amazing,” recalls Versace. “This doesn’t exist now. We’re all friends backstage. I said to Gigi, ‘Can you please start a fight with somebody?’ Because I miss the fights! It was a fame competition. One wanted to be better than the other, and why not? I think it’s the same today, but you’re afraid to express it.” With the millennial mindset, of course, also comes a heightened political correctness in the public forum, which must make a feisty Versace miss the 1990s? “Yes, I do. You used to be able to say whatever you wanted, whenever you wanted and it didn’t really matter. Now you have to be more

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controlled. They hide me a lot of the time,” she says, smiling at her publicists. When an alarm goes off in another room, one of them casually quips: “Your jewellery has arrived.” Behind her fabulous façade, Donatella Versace resembles a petite and precious figurine, mighty but also fragile. Her eyes reveal a tension between intensity and vulnerability, encapsulated in an exceptional life, which hasn’t always been the never-ending party her public image would suggest. With the voice of a sorceress, she follows her every statement with a mischievous chuckle, a wink that somehow insinuates there’s more to the story. Her brother would find today’s society “boring”, she admits. “Gianni was a very lively person.” Having founded the house in 1978, by the late 1980s he had become synonymous with glamour. As his muse, Donatella would introduce him to people like Madonna, George Michael and Elton John, who would party it up the Versace way, from Milan to Miami. “You came to a Gianni Versace party, you didn’t leave. You stayed until it was finished,” she says. Following his murder in 1997, the glamour he represented in fashion seemed to fade with him, replaced by an austerity that put an end to the supermodel era and its colourful sense of girl power. “It was as if we were ashamed to talk about it during that period. We were minimalists: everything was toned down, as if people forgot what was relevant just to go with the mood of the moment: to be less,” Donatella reflects, sourly tasting the word. “It wasn’t my favourite time but it had to happen to break, for a moment, all this noise. Now, we’re going through a different kind of glamour. Something is happening again. You don’t need to have huge hair and four pairs of lashes,” she says. “At the end of the day, everyone wants to look better, more glamorous. I’ve never met a woman who doesn’t want to look better than she does.” As Donatella relives her party years for the shoot at Annabel’s, sandwiched between Claudia Schiffer and Rita Ora while a jumpsuit-clad Jourdan Dunn gets her zipped-up back fanned between takes, and a videographer’s shirt buttons pop as he attempts to capture every second of it, the glamour Gianni created seems to have reached a place of timelessness. But Versace has always had her eye on the future, a fact illustrated by the young talents she has nurtured on her design team. In 2016, she snapped up the sequins-centric Michael Halpern fresh from Central Saint Martins to moonlight on her haute couture line. “Looking at him in front of a mannequin, twisting a piece of fabric,” Donatella pauses. “He’s a real couturier. He is fabulous.” She also employed Christopher Kane, Jonathan Anderson and Anthony Vaccarello to front Versus. “It’s important to give space to younger designers in your company,” she says. Would she ever share the spotlight at Versace, the way she did at Versus? “Why not?” Donatella shrugs. “Would I step down? No. But I can embrace different people working with me. I would love that.” Perhaps her destiny is that of any great queen, including our own: a lifetime on the throne? “She’s good at giving space to the young kids,” Donatella retorts, “but she’s still the Queen of England.” Q

CLAUDIA SCHIFFER’S HAIR AND MAKE-UP THROUGHOUT: SEBASTIEN BASCLE AND KIRSTIN PIGGOTT

child to have their mother in the same company,” Versace concedes. “My son is exactly like me: full of life. But he doesn’t like to be recognised.” Gianni bequeathed his vast art collection to Daniel, now 28, who plays in a punk band. He chose to watch the tribute show by live-stream, while Allegra attended. “He was very moved. He was very young when Gianni died but in a way, he remembers. He was little. He was crying and crying all day. Something stays with him.” Not one for looking back, Donatella says she decided to do the show for the young generation of Versace fans, who share their love of the house’s legacy on social media. Perhaps, too, it was to counteract the version of Versace presented in the TV mega-series The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, which the designer’s family have dismissed as “fiction”. Her recent shows have dealt with the freedom movement that’s been filtering through our culture lately, from spokenword feminist show soundtracks to activist slogan garments. “There’s a beginning to everything, and we need to educate the younger generations to understand why we’re at this point. The 1990s were not just parties and hair and make-up. To be outspoken was a huge thing. We fought big battles,” she points out, referring to Gianni’s and her engagement with HIV causes. “Now we have a stronger voice, because you can reach so many people.”


“We’re going through a different kind of glamour,” says Donatella, opposite, with Claudia Schiffer. “Something is happening again”


Outside edge

Mix the sporty pragmatism of rainproof fabrics and fuss-free ďŹ ttings with graceful silhouettes. Photographs by Collier Schorr. Styling by Sarah Richardson


Céline’s drawstring décolleté and Calvin Klein’s slick, A-line raincoat bring a dynamic elegance to any outing. Opposite: hooded leather jacket, from £5,195, Céline. Tulle tank top, £485, Atlein, at Thewebster.us. Cotton/silk shorts, £800, Dior. Suede sneakers, £420, Alexander McQueen. Socks, from £30, X31 Sports. This page: nylon raincoat, £1,445, Calvin Klein 205W39NYC. Poloneck body, £125, Falke. Hair: Holli Smith. Make-up: Thomas de Kluyver. Nails: Casey Herman. Set design: Kadu Lennox. Digital artwork: Two Three Two. Model: Vittoria Ceretti


A bustier or leotard with an athletic jacket – why not? Mix off-duty components from dance with track and field. This page: jersey bustier, £28, Topshop. Track pants, £575. Reversible track jacket, £990. Both Y Project. Leather sneakers, £440, Gucci. Opposite: padded jacket, £2,040, Ermanno Scervino. Vintage Danskin leotard, stylist’s own. Socks, from £30, X31 Sports. Sneakers, as before. Beauty note: a fresh complexion is the perfect match for a sporty look. Try Diorskin Nude Air Serum, £33.50, for an instant glow


The jumpsuit, two ways. Zip up in Marc Jacobs’s retro 1980s overalls or roll down Isabel Marant’s techno-silk onesie. Opposite: jumpsuit, £825, Marc Jacobs. Viscose-knit body, £1,255, Bottega Veneta. This page: ribbed body, £120, T by Alexander Wang. Metallic jumpsuit, £1,010, Isabel Marant. Leather sneakers, £670, Chanel. Socks, £16, Ciele x Stance


A sporty bomber is the ultimate layering piece. Go for Dior’s multistripe version, or pop Chanel’s dew-dropped jacket over concentric squares for a playful take on spots and stripes. Opposite: striped cotton/ silk jacket, £1,800, Dior. Track jacket, £230. Tie-front skirt, £230. Both Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang. This page: vinyl bomber jacket, £3,970. Vinyl hood, £550. Both Chanel. Tank top, £405, Miu Miu. Poloneck body, as before. Shorts, £560, Jil Sander


Amplify the positive: use bold stripes to streamline the torso or create a strong shoulder line. This page: jersey dress, £1,310, Chloé. Poloneck body, as before. Opposite: striped rollneck, £1,200, Louis Vuitton. Beauty note: choppy, cropped hair requires dishevelled texture for full effect. Use Aveda’s Texture Tonic, £16.80, for a separated, deconstructed style. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information


VOGUE ASKS Cars or motorbikes, and which model? “Cars, for sure. The Bugatti Type 59 is beautifully and eccentrically engineered. It’s a sublimely purposeful object.”

What’s the best gift you’ve bought your wife [stylist Charlotte Stockdale, above]? “The Boucheron engagement ring I designed.”

How do you spoil yourself? “Staying at home all morning. And making tea properly – I don’t like teabags.” Marc Newson Collection teapot, from £32, at Noritakechina.com

Whose wardrobe would you raid? “Maybe Lapo Elkann’s or Winston Churchill’s if he were closer to my size. I love his onesies!”

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What would Marc Newson do?

Advice on love, life and fashion from the industrial designer What’s the best-designed object ever? The wheel, or a screw for attaching things. Is there such a thing as bad taste? You bet, and good taste as well. If you could live in any building in the world, which one would it be and why? The house I designed in Greece. I’ve never spent so long labouring over something. What’s the best piece of design advice you have ever been given? Knowing when to stop. You’re at someone’s house and break one of their prized ornaments. What do you do? Tell them reluctantly and hustle like mad to think of a replacement. What’s the worst crime in interior design? I simply hate the term “interior design” the most. It says it all. What was your best excuse for being late? Something to do with the kids. One of the great advantages of having young children is they provide multidimensional excuses.

You know, like “baby-sitter problems”, “meeting with teacher” or “harvest festival”. What’s your most overused catchphrase? If you want something done properly, do it yourself! What gadget needs to be invented? Something to help us communicate with pets, like a device that translates dog barks. Wine or beer? As good champagne is considered wine, then wine. What do you look for in a friend? The usual things that can’t be underestimated: loyalty, intimacy and fun. What’s the most useful thing you’ve designed? The pens I created for Hermès and Montblanc [above left] a few years ago. I use them every day. Is there such a thing as perfection? Not in this world. If there were, I’d be out of a job. Its elusiveness is a wonderful motivation and keeps people like me busy. Q

INTERVIEW BY CLAUDIA CROFT. RICHARD BOLL; GETTY; REX FEATURES

Which of your idols have you met, and what were they like? “Azzedine Alaïa [left, with Grace Jones in 1985]. He was kind, honest and bloody funny.”


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A Acnestudios.com Adidas.co.uk Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang 020 3727 5568 Alancrocetti.com Alberta Ferretti 020 7235 2349 Alexachung.com Alexander McQueen 020 7355 0088 Alexander Wang 020 3727 5568 & Other Stories Stories.com Anissakermiche.com Aquascutum.com Asceno.com Ashleywilliams.com Asprey 020 7493 6767 B Balenciaga 020 7317 4400 Belmacz 020 7629 7863 Bottega Veneta 020 7838 9394 Boucheron 020 7514 9170 Britac.net Brownsfashion.com Brutus.com Buccellati.com Bulgari 020 7872 9969 Burberry.com C Calvin Klein 205W39NYC Calvinklein.com Calzedonia.com Cartier 020 7408 9192 Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 Chanel Fine Jewellery 020 7499 0005 Chatila 020 7493 9833 Chloé 020 7823 5348 Chopard 020 7287 8710 Christian Louboutin 0843 227 4322 Christopher Kane 020 7493 3111 Church’s 020 7499 9449 Ciele x Stance Stance.com Corneliajames.com D David Morris 020 7499 2200 De Beers 020 7758 9700 Dianekordasjewellery.com Dinnyhall.com Dinosaurdesigns.co.uk Dior 020 7172 0172 Dior Homme 020 7172 0172 Dior Joaillerie 020 7172 0172 Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dover Street Market 020 7518 0680 Drmartens.com E Eckhauslatta.com

Ermanno Scervino 020 7235 0558 F Falke.com Fendi 020 7927 4172 Florastarkey.com Fredperry.com Furla.com G Ghbass-eu.com Givenchy.com Graff 020 7584 8571 Grimajewellery.com Gucci 020 7235 6707 H Haiderackermann.com Happysocks.com Harrods 020 3626 7020 Harry Winston 020 7907 8800 Helmut Lang Seen by Shayne Oliver Helmutlang.com Hermès 020 7499 8856 I Isabel Marant 020 7499 7887 J Jilsander.com K Thekooples.co.uk L Lanvin 020 7491 1839 Liberty 020 7734 1234 Lilygabriella.com Lizziefortunato.com Loewe 020 7499 0266 Louis Vuitton 020 3214 9200 Luisacerano.com Lululemon.co.uk M Maisonmargiela.com Manolo Blahnik 020 7352 8622 Marc Jacobs 020 7399 1690 Margaret Howell 020 7009 9009 Marks & Spencer 0333 014 8555 Marni 020 7491 9966 MCM 020 7409 2047 Messika.com Michael Kors Collection 020 7659 3550 Michael Michael Kors Michaelkors.co.uk Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Monnierfreres.co.uk Msgm.it Mulberry 020 7491 3900 N Noorfares.com O Off---white.com Off-White c/o Jimmy Choo Jimmychoo.com

P Pacorabanne.com Polo Ralph Lauren 020 7113 7400 Pomellato 020 7355 0300 Prada 020 7647 5000 Prettygreen.com Proenzaschouler.com R Rafsimons.com Rag & Bone 020 7730 6881 Ralph & Russo 020 8878 5399 René Caovilla 020 7225 0584 Richard Mille 020 7123 4155 Riverisland.com Rochas.com S Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello 020 7235 6706 Salvatore Ferragamo 020 7629 5007 Sandro 020 7434 0246 Saskia-diez.com Selfridges.com Sherryslondon.com Simone Rocha 020 7629 6317 Smythson.com Sonia Rykiel 020 7493 5255 Stella McCartney 020 7518 3100 Stoneparis.com Superdry.com T Tag Heuer 0800 458 0882 Tateossian.com T by Alexander Wang 020 3727 5568 Theodorawarre.eu Thomassabo.com Tiffany T 0800 160 1837 Tod’s 020 7493 2237 Tom Ford 020 3141 7800 Topshop.com U Uniqlo.com Uterque.com V Valentino 020 7647 2520 Van Cleef & Arpels 020 7493 0400 Versace 020 7259 5700 Vhernier.com Victoria Beckham 020 7042 0700 W Wandler.com Wolford.com X X31sports.com Y Yproject.fr

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< 218 POLYAMORY year, told me, “The LGBT community has experimented with forms of non-monogamy for decades. If you’re already doing something that has been widely viewed as ‘deviant’, then trying out another deviance from the norm has never felt like too big a jump. So it’s hardly a new concept for us.” Indeed not. Think of the sexually fluid Bloomsbury set, who Dorothy Parker famously described as having “lived in squares, painted in circles and loved in triangles”. Many Edwardians – generally intellectuals, radicals and the upper classes – thought a free and open pass on fidelity was a practical way to go about things. After all, this was an era where the king himself – Victoria’s playboy son, Edward VII – was known to have taken many mistresses, including actresses Sarah Bernhardt and Lillie Langtry. It was also an idyll, a long-skirted, Arts and Crafts summer of love, which followed the more fixed morality of the Victorian era and flourished before the terrible devastation of the First World War. Proponents of unusual erotic arrangements were everywhere, from Vita Sackville-West (lover of Virginia Woolf ) and her husband Harold Nicolson to the children’s author Edith Nesbit, who shared a house with spouse Hubert Bland and his mistress Alice Hoatson. Nesbit even raised Hoatson’s two children by Bland. Sexual experimentation started at the top. Meanwhile, last winter’s arthouse cinema hit Professor Marston and the Wonder Women dramatised the story of psychologist William Moulton Marston, the creator of Wonder Woman, who lived with wife Elizabeth and mistress Olive Byrne. The modern polyamorist has a host of experts and guidelines to turn to, should they want to be guided. Consensual non-monogamy, 21st-century style, is about parallel loving relationships, rather than swingers’ parties and dogging. The Ethical Slut has been supplemented by Franklin Veaux and Eve Rickert’s More Than Two, which lays out ways to maintain good etiquette with all partners. Meanwhile, those with more anthropological leanings might prefer Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha’s Sex at Dawn, which makes a convincing case that the human ape – our inner bonobo – is not, at its core, a monogamous creature, and that women are just as likely to relish multiple partners as men. There are also numerous websites giving advice, although it basically comes down to ruthless honesty, impeccable empathy, good communication between all parties, respect for preset boundaries and not making any of your lovers feel peripheral. Everyone cautions against men (it is usually men, I’m afraid) who declare themselves “polyamorous” when what they really mean is commitment-phobic. As one good friend says, “The key sign is they mention they’re poly only after going to bed with you: it’s a get out of jail free card for men who want to sleep with all your friends but not be called scumbags.” Proper polyamory involves a lot of fiercely honest negotiations and tenderness for all concerned. I recently attended a conference where I fell into conversation with a married African-American arts practitioner from New York who professed himself polyamorous. We discussed the fact that a strong, long-lived partnership can often accommodate a lover better than lies, scorn or unkindness – provided a couple’s soul-bond is not threatened. I said I wasn’t sure about the term polyamory, which smacks too much of a formal movement to me – something you sign up to, like Scientology or the Lib Dems. My own sense of the matter was that quite a few couples in my circle had quietly evolved to a place where they could accommodate the occasional negotiated exception. “Say that again,” said my new artist friend, turning

the phrase over. “Negotiated exceptions. Yeah, I like that.” I told him about two friends who got hitched in their forties, after previous marriages. They agreed early on that the chances of them being faithful “till death do us part” were negligible, so made a pact that if either ever felt tempted to stray they’d announce it at once. A decade later the wife started a side relationship with one of her spouse’s closest friends, which ran for several years. Meanwhile, neighbours and family had no clue. As the wife said to me, “You don’t open up about this sort of thing when you live in a village and do the flowers at your parish church. Devon isn’t Soho.” One difference between new-style polyamory and old-style couples who have “an arrangement” is that the possibility of side arrangements is often discussed from the beginning of a relationship. Emily Witt’s recent book Future Sex has a riveting chapter tracking polyamory among young tech entrepreneurs in California’s Silicon Valley, where the practice is common. In Britain, I’ve observed a similar phenomenon among Shoreditch techies. When you’re at the forefront of virtual reality and know sex robots are in development, you’re hardly going to find consensual non-monogamy outlandish. Stephanie Alys of Mystery Vibe, a London-based startup specialising in teledildonics (app-controlled sex toys) confirms this. “I definitely see a trend towards non-traditional forms of relationships,” she says. “Entrepreneurs and people within the technology space have been early adopters of new products, industries and lifestyles in the past, so it makes sense that they’re also redefining societal concepts such as fidelity and intimacy over distance.” Academics, writers and artists are given to unconventional erotic arrangements, of course. The most useful insight I’ve heard on the practice came from a journalist friend who’s juggling two men and has just arranged two different birthday parties and romantic escapes. She made the point that polyamory was uniquely suited to freelancers. Who else has that much time and flexibility to give to love? A couple of years ago I met the neuroscientist and sex therapist Dr Nan Wise at her office at Rutgers University in New Jersey, who turned out to be something of a spokeswoman for the poly movement in America. Wise pointed out that you have to be the sort of person who embraces emotional complexity – who’s hungry to give a lot of love, as well as to receive it – to deal with the complexities that consensual non-monogamy throws up. British relationship expert Nichi Hodgson, author of The Curious History of Dating, concurs. She experimented with polyamory in San Francisco some years ago and told me, “It seemed like the natural next step in my sexual journey. Unfortunately, it managed to tap into my deepest relationship-based insecurities – that I am a temporary novelty at best, a penny extra at worst – and sincerely replaceable. I discovered that I am fiercely loyal, inclined to monogamy, and love the intimacy created in a bed made for two.” She cautions, “You need to be made of sterner stuff if you’re going to love in triangles, quadrangles and dodecahedrons.” Indeed you do. It often seems to me that polyamory is a better solution for those couples who have navigated and exhausted every aspect of conventional fidelity, rather than a Tinder-reared generation who are unnerved by the discipline required for exclusivity. If you have managed to love one person well across decades, and perhaps children, too, you’re far more likely to be generous and understanding in your love for another. By then you will know from long experience that the heart’s capacity is not finite, and its terrain is not bounded by rules. Q

“You don’t open up about this sort of thing when you live in a village and do the flowers at your parish church. Devon isn’t Soho”


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British vogue april 2018  
British vogue april 2018  
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