Page 1

THE BEAUTY EXPERT

SASHA LANE is the future of hollywood

agents

of change

M E E T B E AU T Y’S D I S RU P TO R S

makeup goes 3D beauty tech the future is here the doctor will facetune you now


TAKE YOUR LASHES TO PARADISE BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™

©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.

ELLE FANNING


The Makeup Artist Difference

“Glide the brush left and right, moving upwards from the roots for ultimate volume and length on each lash. Paradise perfected, boom!” Val Garland, Make up Artist, L’Oréal Paris.

LASHES ENHANCED WITH LASH INSERTS

LASH PARADISE / MASCARA VO LU P T UOUS VOLUM E. INTENSE LENGTH. F E ATH E RY-SOFT FUL L LASHES . G E T TOTAL LY T RANSPORTED. ■ ■ ■

+9 8% len g t he ni ng e f fe ct 9 1 % s aw in te ns e & vo l um i ze d l as he s* 87% s aw m o re b e aut i f ul l as he s *

* I n a con sume r test for La sh Pa ra dise Wash ab le Mascara .

BEFORE

AFTER

Earn rewards. Join now at: lorealparisusa.com/worthitrewards


SKINCARE HOLY GRAILS Here are the OMG-obsessed-holy-grail-status winners on our Beauty Insider Community. SEPHORA.COM/COMMUNITY


try-this-now omg-feels

e-in-lo vanishes stars

last-drop

LET’S BEAUTY TOGETHER


DISRUPTORS

BEAUT Y REP ORTER 26 Cute-as-a-button sun care 28 ROYGBIV nails • Glow backstage • Scent splurges 30 At-home scar fading • Lift, plump, and moisturize 32 The best skin-care masks 34 Beauty tech • Bespoke hair 38 Makeup artist Thomas de Kluyver loves color • Tidying up 40 Brilliant brows • A new hair-loss remedy 42 The new ink inspiration • Tattoo balms

98 THE RELUCTANT STAR

SCOTT TRINDLE

For Sasha Lane, acting is both a learning and a healing process. See Shopping Guide for fashion credits.


©2018 P&G

NEW

FEEL the CLEAN. SEE the GLOW. Body washes that draw out impurities and draw in hydration for naturally glowing skin. A cleanser’s just a cleanser. Unless, it’s Olay.


Maybelline.com


Now, get brow impact that lasts for days!

NEW TM

UP TO

2-DAY WEAR simulation

BEFORE: Barely there brows.

STEP 1: Apply gel with flocked brush.

STEP 2: Comb & blend with spoolie brush.

4 LONG-LASTING SHADES

#MNYBROWS

©2018 Maybelline LLC.


50 FAMILY TIES

NEWS & TRENDS 44 Oral History. Rocking Out. The story of punk hair dye. 46 My Look. Becoming Halsey. The singer on finding her beauty identity, doing her own makeup, and more. 50 Background Beauty. A family braiding secret for stop-and-stare hair. 54 Phenomenon. Facetune Fillers. Here’s what happens when you mix Snapchat filters, baby Botox, and beauty theories. 58 Making Scents. Feminine Mystique. How women are changing the once maledominated fragrance industry. 70 Talent Show. Beauty’s Newest Stars. Meet five influencers worthy of a major beauty contract. 76 Tech Report. The Speed of Light. How laser advancements have led to more-inclusive treatments. 86 Retrospective. Backstage Beauty: Disruptors Edition. 10 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

The runway moments that changed beauty forever. 92 Identity. Shaking Up Foundation. Witness the color revolution. F E AT U R E S 98 Sasha’s Time. Sasha Lane didn’t choose acting, but her star power couldn’t be contained. By Brennan Kilbane 104 The Bold Ones. The 12 talents reshaping how the world thinks about beauty. 114 Future Shock. Why smart technology could potentially turn into a beauty black hole. By Liana Schaffner 118 Live in 3D. Looks so brazen they almost jump off the page. REGULARS 18 Editor’s Letter 20 Contributors 24 Beauty by Numbers 126 Shopping Guide 128 My Dream Kit. Stem cell scientist Arna Rúnarsdóttir’s bag of tricks.

ON THE COVER Sasha Lane’s look can be re-created with the following: Diorshow Brow Styler in Dark Brown, 5 Couleurs Eyeshadow in Touch Matte, Diorskin Forever Undercover Foundation in Desert Beige, and Rouge Dior Liquid Lip Stain in Jungle Matte by Dior. Attico dress. Sophie Bille Brahe and Zoe Chicco earrings. Foundrae ring. Details, see Shopping Guide. Photographed by Scott Trindle. Fashion stylist: Beth Fenton. Hair: Nai’vasha Johnson. Makeup: Jen Myles. Manicure: Nettie Davis. Set design: Bryn Bowen. Production: Hinoki Group.

FUMI NAGASAKA

{ DISRUPTORS }

The Smiths started a braiding dynasty.


®

,

forevermark.com

and Forevermark Tribute™ are Trade Marks of The De Beers Group of Companies.

A diamond for each of your qualities

© Forevermark 2017. Forevermark ®,

The Forevermark Tribute™ Collection

FOR ALL T H AT YO U ARE


WHAT’S THE LAST BIG RISK YOU TOOK?

EDITOR IN CHIEF MICHELLE LEE

CREATIVE DIRECTOR MARIE SUTER

EXECUTIVE EDITOR DANIELLE PERGAMENT

DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL OPERATIONS AMANDA MEIGHER

B E AU T Y EXECUTIVE BEAUT Y DIRECTOR JENNY BAILLY DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR ELIZABETH SIEGEL SENIOR BEAUT Y EDITOR JESSICA CHIA SENIOR WRITER BRENNAN KILBANE BEAUT Y ASSISTANT KATHLEEN SUICO

V I S UA LS VISUALS DIRECTOR RHIANNA RULE BOOKINGS DIRECTOR TRENT AXELSON SENIOR VISUALS EDITOR JACQUELINE LADNER VISUALS EDITORS HANNAH CHOI, JAMES CLARIZIO, NOELLE LACOMBE

DIGITAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR KELLY BALES

FAS H I O N FASHION DIRECTOR RAJNI JACQUES ASSOCIATE FASHION EDITOR MARION B. KELLY II

A RT I C L E S ASSOCIATE EDITOR LOREN SAVINI

INTO MY ARTWORK

A RT

BY APPLYING

SENIOR ART DIRECTORS NICOLE ARGENTO, ERIN HOVER ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR KATELYN BAKER DIGITAL DESIGNER MARIA ASARE-BOADI

ASSISTANT VISUALS EDITOR PAIGE VITI

DEPUT Y PRODUCTION DIRECTOR MATT CARSON

RESEARCH MANAGERS AMBER ANGELLE, CRISTINA RIVERA

BECAUSE BEING CONTENT NEVER IMPROVES YOU.”

P RO D U CT I O N DEPUT Y MANAGING EDITOR NICOLE STUART

RESEARCH DIRECTOR LORI SEGAL

FOR FELLOWSHIPS—

JUNIOR DESIGNER CORINNA BOURKE

ASSOCIATE VISUALS EDITOR DANA DAVENPORT

R E S E A RC H

FINALLY DIGGING

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT JESA MARIE CALAOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER BRENT BURKET

C O PY COPY DIRECTOR CATHERINE GAMBRELL COPY MANAGERS AURA DAVIES, LESLIE LIPTON

A L LU R E .C O M DEPUT Y DIGITAL EDITOR SAM ESCOBAR DIGITAL DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR SOPHIA PANYCH DIRECTOR OF CONTENT DEVELOPMENT TRACEY ZANE

I GOT MY SEPTUM PIERCED WITHOUT

DIGITAL BEAUT Y EDITOR SABLE YONG DIGITAL WELLNESS EDITOR HAYLEY MACMILLEN

TELLING MY MOM.

DIGITAL EDITORS JIHAN FORBES, SARAH KINONEN

I’M 26, BUT STILL...”

DIGITAL PRODUCTION MANAGER MONICA PERRY BEAUT Y REP ORTER DEVON ABELMAN COMMERCE VIDEO PRODUCER ZACHARY CLAUSE ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR KALEIGH FASANELLA EDITORIAL ASSISTANT SHANELLE DRAKEFORD PRODUCT MANAGER CHELSEA FARNAM ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT LINDSAY SANSONE

RIDING A BULL IN NASHVILLE FOR

SOCIAL

MY LAST BIRTHDAY

SENIOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER RAWAN EEWSHAH

WAS TERRIFYING—

COMMERCE COMMUNIT Y MANAGER LAUREN SWANSON ASSOCIATE SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGERS LARA ADEKOLA, MADISEN THEOBALD

I’D NEVER DONE ANYTHING TO MY BLONDE HAIR—NO DYES, HIGHLIGHTS, TINTS, NOTHING. BUT I’M NOW A BRUNETTE.

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR JAIME MARSANICO CONTRIBUTING EDITORS AMANDA BOHNSON, DORA CAMPBELL, JILLIAN DEMPSEY, DAVID DENICOLO, MOLLY JANIK GULATI, JOELLE HYMAN, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN, SARAH LATIES, JESSICA MATLIN, CHRIS McMILLAN, LIANA SCHAFFNER

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR MAXWELL LOSGAR ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER TAYLOR SHEA

I DO FORGET MY HAIR IS DARKER UNTIL I SEE MY REFLECTION. STILL A BLONDE AT HEART, I GUESS!”

FO U N D I N G E D I TO R LINDA WELLS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR ANNA WINTOUR

THE BAR WAS PACKED.”


SEPHORA

DIOR.COM


©2018 P&G


NEW

finally, SPF PROTECTION that feels LIGHT AS AIR NEW Olay Whips SPF for powerful UV protection with a light as air finish. Feels so light, looks so good. You won’t believe it’s SPF. FEARLESSLY AGELESS


WHAT’S THE LAST BIG RISK YOU TOOK?

CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER ALISON MOORE CHIEF INDUSTRY OFFICER, BEAUTY/HEAD OF REVENUE LUCY KRIZ VPS–REVENUE LAUREN KAMEN, ELIZABETH MARVIN, HEDDY SAMS PIERSON VP–FINANCE & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CHRISTINE DIPRESSO MORRA

A DV E RT I S I N G SALES DIRECTOR FOR COLLECTION ABIGAIL BREENE

I CUT MY HAIR

EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTORS DORENE BAIR, DEBORAH B. BARON, CHAD CARR, KIM CONWAY HALEY, KELSEY KIRSCH, LAUREN DECKER LERMAN

INTO A BOB ON A WHIM—I’D NEVER HAD SHORT

SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR CARLY GRESH PASTERNAK

HAIR BEFORE!”

ACCOUNT DIRECTORS ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY, STEPHANIE LEINBACH ASSOCIATE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR MANEKA MAHAJAN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CASEY TROTTA EXECUTIVE ASSISTANTS RACHEL HERRING, JAY R. MALSKY

BRANCH OFFICES EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTORS, MIDWEST CHRISTINA KROLOPP, ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR, LOS ANGELES KAYTE BENEDICT EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR, BOSTON & CARIBBEAN KRISTIN HAVENS ACCOUNT DIRECTOR, SAN FRANCISCO ALEXANDRA VERBICH ACCOUNT DIRECTORS, ITALY LAURA BOTTA, ENRICA MANELLI SOUTHEAST PETER ZUCKERMAN, Z MEDIA, 305-532-5566 TEXAS CAROL CONTESTABILE, LEWIS STAFFORD COMPANY, 972-960-2889

SALES ASSOCIATES SARAH BARRECA, MANUELA BONGIORNO, GIULIA GIACOBELLI, MELODY HILL, SYDNE KILBERG, ALEXANDRA KOTLER, AMANDA MADISON, SUE WARDA

MARKETING VPS, MARKETING JENNY RYAN BOWMAN, JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS, BRAND MARKETING ERIN BRENNAN, CAMILLE SIGNORELLI SENIOR DIRECTORS, BRAND MARKETING STEFENI BELLOCK, TONI NICOLINO SENIOR DIRECTOR, EXPERIENCES JENNIFER MA DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING KATIE MACK DIRECTOR, EXPERIENCES CHRIS MANCIVALANO ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS, BRAND MARKETING KERRI-ANN OGRUDEK, BETHANY VERDONE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, EXPERIENCES NATALIE GREENFIELD MANAGERS, BRAND MARKETING ABBY ADESANYA, SAMANTHA FOX, HALEY HOOVER ASSOCIATE MANAGERS, BRAND MARKETING MORIAH RAPAPORT, KATE SIENKO DIRECTOR, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY CARA WOLF ERWIN ASSOCIATE, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY MARGARET HALL

SWIMMING WITH

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY LEAH ASHLEY

SHARKS ON MY

MANAGER, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY NICOLE SAFIR

HONEYMOON. IT WAS HALF TERRIFYING

B U S I N E SS SENIOR DIRECTOR, FINANCE TOM MORRIS FINANCE DIRECTOR JESSICA GIVNER LEVINE ASSOCIATE FINANCE DIRECTOR NILSA SERRATA SENIOR DIRECTOR, BUSINESS JENNIFER JACKSON SENIOR BUSINESS DIRECTORS KELLY HWANG, KAREN MANVILLE ASSOCIATE BUSINESS MANAGER CHARLOTTE KWON

DECIDING TO START A FAMILY—CAN’T WAIT TO WELCOME OUR LITTLE ONE INTO THE WORLD THIS JUNE.”

BUSINESS ASSOCIATE CAROLINE GRANGER

D I G I TA L P L A N N I N G & ST R AT EGY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING ED SUMNER DIRECTOR, DIGITAL SALES OPERATIONS ASHLEY TABROFF DIGITAL ACCOUNT MANAGERS KIM FEENEY, GINNY LASKOWSKI, ALEXA PIERRE DIGITAL SALES PLANNERS JENNIFER BRENNAN, NISHA HJARTOY, CHRISTINA NO, CHRISTINA TUOHY

A RT CREATIVE DIRECTOR GILLIAN AVERTICK

SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER TEVI BROWN

AND HALF THE BEST THING EVER.”

VIDEO PRODUCER JOANNE PARK

P U B L I S H E D BY C O N D É N AST PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER ROBERT A. SAUERBERG, JR. CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID E. GEITHNER CHIEF REVENUE & MARKETING OFFICER PAMELA DRUCKER MANN CHIEF EXPERIENCE OFFICER JOSH STINCHCOMB CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER FRED SANTARPIA CHIEF PEOPLE OFFICER JOANN MURRAY CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER CAMERON R. BLANCHARD CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER EDWARD CUDAHY EVP–CONSUMER MARKETING MONICA RAY EVP–RESEARCH & ANALYTICS STEPHANIE FRIED HEAD CREATIVE DIRECTOR RAÚL MARTINEZ

C O N D É N AST E N T E RTA I N M E N T PRESIDENT DAWN OSTROFF EVP/CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER SAHAR ELHABASHI EVP–MOTION PICTURES JEREMY STECKLER EVP–ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMMING JOE LABRACIO EVP–CNÉ STUDIOS AL EDGINGTON

C O N D É N AST I N T E R N AT I O N A L CHAIRMAN & CHIEF EXECUTIVE JONATHAN NEWHOUSE PRESIDENT WOLFGANG BLAU

Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. CONDENAST.COM CONDENASTINTERNATIONAL .COM


ogxbeauty.com |

ogxbeauty


By the time you read this, the world will likely have been thrust into full royal-wedding mania. It feels slightly strange to be writing about a royal wedding in an issue devoted to disruptors. After all, the British monarchy is ultimately a throwback—a reminder of an antiquated, complicated ruling class that feels like the antithesis of modern values. But I’ve got princesses on the brain, so let’s discuss. As the mother of a daughter, I’ve seen firsthand how princess-dom is sold to little girls. Princess parties and Jasmine/ Rapunzel/Anna costumes flew into our lives between preschool and kindergarten. As a woman who was raised on a steady diet of fairy tales, I vividly remember watching Cinderella for the first time at a church in my small hometown. All wasp-waisted and wispy-limbed, she looked like every other delicate-featured Disney damsel who came before and after...for the next two decades. There’s been a movement in the past 20 years to reinvent the animated princess. She’s brave! She’s snarky! She saves her own damn self. (Interestingly, we’ve now entered into a superhero phase in our household, wherein the hero doesn’t just save herself. She saves everyone.) It’s hard to imagine a major film studio releasing a princess movie now in which our heroine doesn’t crush the corny old clichés. We’ve—finally, maybe, hopefully—moved beyond the old-fashioned tale of a fair maiden being rescued by her Prince Charming. Now we have Moana. Or Princess Fiona. Or Mulan. While there’s still more room to stretch, the progress has been a refreshing change.

And in real life, I’m hoping for the same. The media has certainly celebrated Meghan Markle as the great disruptor: the first nonwhite person—and American!—to ever become a British royal. At the same time, I’ve noticed a disturbing thread gaining steam in certain corners. Take a look at some headlines in British media: “Meghan Markle is the most beautiful royal—even more than Kate Middleton—expert claims” “Find out how Meghan Markle is already copying Kate Middleton’s ‘Duchess slant’” “Move over Kate Middleton—Meghan Markle’s Diana-like confidence wins the body language battle, but will it cause a royal rift?” Ugh. Are we really going down this road? While I can understand the urge to compare people, pitting women against one another feels like a big step backward. We welcome the idea of Meghan Markle, and her prince, defying stodgy tradition and helping to usher in a new way of thinking. Good for them. It’s about time. And maybe it’s time we all did the same.

HANNAH CHOI

{ LETTER FROM THE EDITOR }

A R OYA L CHANGE

18 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018


©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.

BRUSH UP

NEW

BOOST & SET BY BROW STYLIST

BRUSH ACROSS

SKINNY ANGLED BRUSH

VOLUMIZING GEL MOUSSE

GET YOUR BROW ON. OUR EXCLUSIVE SKINNY ANGLED BRUSH IS SO EASY TO USE THE VOLUMIZING GEL MOUSSE ENHANCES BROWS DEFINE YOUR BROWS. EXPRESS YOURSELF.

BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT. TM

Earn rewards. Join now at: lorealparisusa.com/worthitrewards


THE A L L- STA R TEAM THE BEAUTY PROS BEHIND ALLURE’S DISRUPTORS ISSUE ON THEIR KIT STAPLES, GUILTY PLEASURES, AND DREAM INVENTIONS. BY LOREN SAVINI

N A I ’ VA S H A J O H N S O N , H A I R S T Y L I S T, “ S A S H A’ S T I M E ,” PAG E 9 8 Hometown: “Memphis.” The product she uses every day: “Oribe Curl by Definition Crème deep-conditions and gives my curls instant shine.” Kit staple: “A blow-dryer with a diffuser creates beautiful voluminous curls.” The most unexpected item in her kit: “A wooden toothbrush to smooth out hairlines—wooden ones look expensive and tend to last longer.” On-set playlist: “Sade.” First job: “At a clothing store, Ashley Stewart, in the Mall of Memphis.” Guilty pleasure: “Reality TV. I would trade lives with Kris Jenner for a day.”

M A K I RYO K E , M A K E U P A R T I S T, “ T H E B O L D O N E S ,” PAG E 1 0 4 Hometown: “Kagoshima, Japan.” The product she uses every day: “Biologique Recherche Lotion P50 to get rid of dead skin.” The most disruptive moment of the past year: “The #MeToo movement.” The thing that inspires her to break boundaries: “Colors—once you understand how they complement each other, the possibilities become endless. There’s so much you can do with something that’s so simple. It always amazes me.” Kit staple: “Alexandra Soveral’s organic skin-care products hydrate so well and smell heavenly. ” The most unexpected item in her kit: “My facial cupping tools. I use them on clients before every shoot to help reduce lines and tighten skin.” On-set playlist: “Justin Bieber’s top hits.” First job: “Waitressing.”

20 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

“I’D LIKE TO SEE A BEAUT Y T O O L T H AT ERASES DARK C I R C L E S .”

VIOLETTE, M A K E U P A R T I S T, “ L I V E I N 3 D,” P A G E 1 1 8 Hometown: “Paris.” What being a disruptor means to her: “Not thinking of makeup in a classic way— using fabric, stones, or anything you have on hand. It’s thinking about what people want instead of what society expects. There’s something very human about that.” The most disruptive moment of the past year: “No longer are we ignoring issues that have been swept under the rug. The conversations around abuse and discrimination make me look at myself and think, Is there anything I do or anything that I’m going through that’s not OK but I’m so conditioned to accept that it’s OK? Is it something I don’t even think about?” The invention she’s still waiting for: “I’d like to see a beauty tool that erases dark circles without taking away the skin’s natural texture.” Kit staple: “Highlighter.” The most unexpected item in her kit: “A turkey baster. I use it to create the perfect explosion of color on the face.” On-set playlist: “Beyoncé’s Lemonade. And Jimi Hendrix. Always.” First job: “Working at my aunt’s bar in Paris. I learned to pour draft beer.” Guilty pleasure: “I feel no guilt if it includes pleasure!”

FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF SUBJECT; STEVEN PAN; COURTESY OF SUBJECT

{ CONTRIBUTORS }

“THERE’S SO M U C H YO U CAN DO WITH SOMETHING T H AT ’S S O SIMPLE. IT A L WAY S A M A Z E S M E .”


PROMOTION

DOUBLEDUTY BEAUTY Get 6 of our favorite beauty innovations—each delivers multiple benefits.

Value: $61 Get your first box for $15 allure.com/signupnow May’s box includes: CLE Lip Powder in Desert Rose, First Aid Beauty Hello FAB Coconut Skin Smoothie Priming Moisturizer, St. Tropez Purity Bronzing Water Mousse, Kenra Dry Oil Control Spray, Wander Beauty Baggage Claim Gold Eye Masks and L’Oréal Paris Elnett Hairspray P.S. New members also get a gift worth $15!


330 B.C. Approximate year Alexander the Great lined his eyes with kohl.

1960

Year John F. Kennedy won the first televised presidential debate against Richard Nixon— with some help from a little makeup. Nixon refused it and looked tired onscreen; made-up Kennedy looked rested and tan.

0

Nu m

ber of b

he attles Alexander t

G re

at l

ost

.

19 Number of times it’s appeared in The New York Times since.

KIM REENBERG/CARTEL AND CO.

A QUICK SNAPSHOT OF THE AGE-OLD TRADITION OF GUYS AND COSMETICS. HERE’S TO THE NEXT FEW MILLENNIA.

MEN IN MAKEUP

Era the word “guyliner” was first used in goth circles.

9,679,310

Views (and counting) of one of Patrick Starrr’s most popular makeup tutorials on YouTube, in which he makes up half of his face, leaving the other half bare and unshaven.

Approximate amount French president Emmanuel Macron reportedly spent on makeup services in his first three months in office (that’s about $330 per day).

2000S

{ BEAUTY BY NUMBERS }

$30,000


Retinol + Hydration The best of both worlds. NEW RoC® RETINOL

NEW

CORREXION® MAX Daily Hydration Crème Visibly reduces fine lines and wrinkles, while also deeply

© Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. 2018

hydrating your skin.

METHODS, NOT MIRACLES


BEAUTY REPORTER Helping Hands This tiny button—yeah, the one that looks like 3D nail art—is like a sun-safety guardian angel. La Roche-Posay created a super small (nine millimeters across), fairly flat (two millimeters thick) device that syncs to an app and reminds you to do all the things you should be doing but probably aren’t, like applying (and reapplying, and reapplying) sunscreen and seeking shade. It’s wearable for up to a few months—you just have to remove it when you switch polish—and it doesn’t need to be charged, because there’s no battery. Find it for free at select dermatologists’ offices across the country this summer. (La Roche-Posay plans to sell it globally in 2019 for less than $50.) —JESSICA CHIA

photographed by joanna mcclure

PROP STYLIST: HAIDEE FINDLAY-LEVIN

La Roche-Posay’s UV Sense tracker (below) prompts sun-safe habits. And yep, we still need help: The American Cancer Society predicts that 91,270 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in U.S. adults in 2018.


What makes this powerful sunscreen the best for your skin? Hint: You’ll love wearing it.

Neutrogena Ultra Sheer 100+ Sunscreen ®

®

Clinically proven Helioplex® Technology provides unbeatable UVA /UVB protection, while our Dry-Touch Technology delivers the cleanest feel. No other sunscreen works better or feels so good.* Take that, greasy sunscreens. See what’s possible. Visit Neutrogena.com/Sun

*Among nationally branded SPF 100 lotions. ©J&JCI 2017


COLORS OF THE MOMENT

FINGER

PAINTS

Take your marshmallow nudes, your ballet pinks, your dove grays, and plug them in. What do you get? Truly electric fingertips in every kicked-up color of the spectrum.

SMELL RICH L I K E B AT H I N G I N DOM PÉRIGNON, ROSÉ, AND PEARL D U S T: E X T R AVA G A N T SUMMER SCENTS T H AT A R E B R I G H T, GRACEFUL , AND T O TA L LY I N D U L G E N T.

NEWS FLASH

Gucci Westman In a perfect, always-fashion-week world, we’d have Pat McGrath on glitter duty, Charlotte Tilbury painting our cat eyes, and—without a doubt—Gucci Westman on glowy-skin patrol. Luckily, we can now get a kind-of-sort-of backstage pass with Westman Atelier, the makeup artist’s own collection of complexion-focused products, like bronzers and foundations. Our favorite is the Super Loaded Tinted Highlighter (shown here), a velvety, peach-tinged cream that blends like a dream and leaves you with a shimmery, iridescent flush (and also works on eyelids). —LOREN SAVINI

28 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

From top: Louis Vuitton Le Jour Se Lève, Chanel No. 5 L’Eau All-Over Spray, Yves Saint Laurent Le Vestiaire des Parfums Blouse, and Clé de Peau Beauté Synactif Parfum Gel-Creme.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JOANNA MCCLURE (PROP STYLIST: HAIDEE FINDLAY-LEVIN); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (6)

{ BEAUT Y REPORTER }

Clockwise from top: & Other Stories Nail Colour in Rouge Bite, Chanel Neon Nail Colour in Ultrasonic, Sally Hansen Miracle Gel in Gigabryte, Christian Louboutin Loubiflash Nail Colour in Dragonflash, Deborah Lippmann nail polish in Boys of Summer, Jinsoon nail polish in Hella, and Deborah Lippmann Gel Lab Pro in A Wink and a Smile.


NEW

COLOR FEARLESSLY Experience the next revolution in hair color

OUR NEW PATENTED PERMANENT HAIR COLOR TECHNOLOGY HELPS BLOCK DAMAGE** • NEW ALLERGY GENTLE* MOLECULE • CONDITIONERS AT EVERY STEP • NATURAL LOOKING COLOR • NON-DRIP COLOR CRÈME • 100% GREY COVERAGE • FRESH FLORAL SCENT WWW.CLAIROL.COM

*ME+ SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES RISK OF DEVELOPING HAIR DYE ALLERGY FOR PEOPLE WITHOUT EXISTING ALLERGIES. SEVERE REACTIONS MAY STILL OCCUR. **VS. OUR PERMANENT COLOR WITHOUT EDDS


LAB REPORT

Disappearing Act

Right, from top: Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Lift and Firm Sculpting Gel, Estée Lauder Perfectionist Pro Rapid Firm + Lift Treatment, and Clarins Extra-Firming Day Cream for Dry Skin.

FIRM ANSWERS T H R E E N E W PAT H S TO TA U T E R , P L U M P E R , SMOOTHER, SKIN. The tightening gel: Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Lift and Firm Sculpting Gel. The gel’s rolling applicator depuffs the contours of your face while acetyl tripeptide-2 stimulates collagen production and polysaccharide Glycolift firms skin. The plumping serum: Estée Lauder Perfectionist Pro Rapid Firm + Lift Treatment. Laced with skin-plumping hyaluronic acid and acetyl hexapeptide-8, which relaxes superficial muscles and spurs collagen production.

SHOCKING NUMBER

2

NUMBER OF HOURS THE WRINKLESOFTENING EFFECT OF ADHESIVE PADS (THE TAPELIKE KIND THAT KEEPS YOUR SKIN FROM FURROWING) LASTS IF YOU WEAR THEM ALL NIGHT.

The emollient cream: Clarins Extra-Firming Day Cream for Dry Skin. Dehydrated skin exaggerates fine lines. This cushiony cream uses shea butter to minimize them by conditioning skin. —J. M. C.

FROM TOP: RUO BING LI/LICENSING PROJECT; JOANNA MCCLURE (PROP STYLIST: HAIDEE FINDLAY-LEVIN)

{ BEAUT Y REPORTER }

Scars are stubborn with a capital S, but if you want to minimize yours, a helper could be in your kitchen cabinet. According to a study in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science, massaging a blend of oils (in this case, safflower and olive oils were the main players) into a nonkeloid scar (the kind that’s not raised—those need to be injected with cortisone if you want results) can improve its appearance by 14 percent in eight weeks. Oils can provide an optimal healing environment for collagen-building and scar improvement by lubricating and protecting skin, says New York City dermatologist Ellen Marmur. —JESA MARIE CALAOR


MULTI

MASKING

The most relaxing, soothing, detoxifying new face masks are serving up moments of zen. (Well, zen and glowing skin.)

2 1

3

4

6

1. Sand & Sky Brilliant Skin Detoxify + Brighten. It’s easy to see why this had a waitlist after it launched last year: The lilac clay toned down our redness and oiliness right off the bat.

7

2. Yes to Carrots Vitamin-Enriched Kale DIY Powder-to-Clay Mask. It’s the boxed brownie of face masks—add water to powder and get a skin-smoothing kaolin clay and kale paste. 3. Kiehl’s Ginger Leaf & Hibiscus Firming Mask. This overnight mask is the richest of the bunch— perfect for making skin extra soft. (Give it 20 to sink in so it doesn’t rub off on your pillow.)

8

4. Chantecaille Gold Recovery Mask. Combines skin-firming peptides with anti-inflammatory gold. 5. Kate Somerville Wrinkle Warrior Pink Plumping Mask. This glittering pink gel (so ’80s Jem) plumps lines with hyaluronic acid and feels nice and cooling. 6. Clean & Clear Night Relaxing Detox Clay Mask. Bentonite and kaolin clays absorb excess sebum as they dry on skin, de-shining your T-zone in 15 minutes. 7. Innisfree Vitalizing Pore Clearing Color Mask. Goes on like a soothing water-gel; comes off like a scrubby paste (those are volcanic particles). 8. Wander Beauty Baggage Claim Gold Eye Masks. Soothing aloe and hydrating calendula make good on the name (gotta love a pun). —ELIZABETH SIEGEL

photographed by joanna mcclure 32 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

PROP STYLIST: HAIDEE FINDLAY-LEVIN

{ BEAUT Y REPORTER }

5


BANISH DRY SKIN Get more an 2x Moisture!

FA BUL ANCE

SAFE FOR SENSITIVE SKIN  ALLERGY TESTED  CRUELTY FREE

o e Rcue...



BEST CREAM EVER “...I LOVE LOVE LOVE this product and will buy it forever!” – MARIA

FIRSTAIDBEAUTY.COM

*Average results of a clinical study on 23 women.

RELIEVES ROUGH, TIGHT, FLAKY, RED, ITCHY SKIN, EVEN ECZEMA!


MOTOR CITY T WO NEW MACHINES MAKE BASIC RITUALS M I N D - B LOW I N G.

Twenty-five questions and three to five business days later, meet your new hair-care routine.

T3 Cura Luxe Hair Dryer. Close your eyes and imagine a hair dryer that pauses when you put it down to adjust your brush. Now open your eyes and marvel because you’ve conjured T3’s Cura Luxe dryer. Five heat levels and a volume setting are nice, too. —BRENNAN KILBANE

ALL

YOURS

Like every custom hair-care thing, Prose’s site has a loooong questionnaire that takes into account your hair type, your scalp’s oil profile, everything else about your life (your fitness proclivities, your wildest dreams), and your favorite scent (yes, “none, thank you” is an option). Unlike every other custom hair-care thing, it also formulates products for you based on the water hardness and humidity at your ZIP code. —B. K.

Welcome to the Robo-Salon Mechanized color mixers and cyborg-enhanced pro tools are just the beginning. (Next: auto-blowout booths on every street corner?) eSalon Polly Chrome. Your new colorist is a computer— her name is Polly and she’s based in L.A. Hair-color company eSalon is running beta tests on an in-store machine that’ll mix up a batch of at-home dye in your dream shade (in the blonde-tored-to-brunette spectrum) based on your current color. Henkel and Schwarzkopf Professional SalonLab. A human stylist is involved here but doesn’t do much: She just runs a tiny flatiron look-alike through your hair. The device measures your cortex’s health and moisture levels via infrared technology and sends the info to a mobile app where you can tinker with your formula (extra conditioning agents, less fragrance). Then a nearby machine mixes up your couture shampoo. —B. K.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: JOANNA MCCLURE (PROP STYLIST: HAIDEE FINDLAY-LEVIN); KRISTINA YENKO (MODEL: MAYA YEMANA); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2)

{ BEAUT Y REPORTER }

Foreo UFO Smart Mask. Snap a custom sheet mask (hyaluronic acid for day, ginseng and olive oil for night) into this Roomba-like device and glide it along your face for a mini massage and skinrejuvenating LED light show.


ARE YOU ONE OF US? Join the movement: them.us | #them | @them

Special thanks to our launch partners:


TRICK OF THE TRADE

Blurred Lines

Here and above right: de Kluyver’s artistry on the fall/winter 2018 runways. “A lot of energy goes into those messy shadows,” he says. “I love getting my finger into paint and doing something strong on bare skin.”

Even the most seemingly offhanded dashes of liner and floatiest clouds of shadow need boundaries. Which is why we love this hack: Instead of removing smears with a traditional makeup remover, dampen a cotton swab or the tip of a blending sponge with an oil-free serum. It cleans up messy bits while treating the thin skin around your eyes (or lips) to moisturizing ingredients, like hyaluronic acid or glycerin, instead of cleansing agents (though you’ll still need those to take it all off at the end of the night, of course). —JESSICA CHIA

38 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF SUBJECT; SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES; IMAXTREE (2); PETER WHITE/WIREIMAGE; IMAXTREE

would wear loads of makeup. Editors from i-D and Dazed came in, told me they loved my makeup, and started booking me to do shoots for their magazines.” There was the time he sketched pink, white, red, and blue eyes all over one model’s face for Dazed; he’s also stuck blue hearts onto every square inch of another’s for Document Journal and ( just recently) smudged orbs of glitter around models’ eyes for an Opening Ceremony show. “The club-kid makeup I was doing in high school is similar to what I do now,” he says. “But even when makeup is conceptual or out of the box, I still want it to be beautiful. I want you to feel happy when you look at it, and I guess it’s worked.” —ELIZABETH SIEGEL

“I’m always looking in art books for unconventional ideas,” says de Kluyver.

Ashley Williams

Jason Wu

Every now and then, a new makeup artist comes along whose work is so whimsical, so color-splashed, so unpretentious that they remind us how delightful makeup can be. And we’re not surprised when they get hired to do 15 shows in a single fashion season. But before makeup artist Thomas de Kluyver was on seemingly every backstage call sheet, he had to hone his craft. “As a teenager, I used to go to warehouse raves and do club-kid makeup on myself and my friends,” he says. “I’d drip blue paint across my eyes and wear smudged lipstick. It was all about being free and having fun.” And after that, he had to get discovered: “I started working the door at an East London club and

Peter Pilotto

{ BEAUT Y REPORTER }

He doesn’t have a fancy makeup contract or a seven-figure Instagram following—yet—but makeup artist Thomas de Kluyver does have raw talent and a fashion-elite fan base. Meet makeup’s dark horse.

Kenzo

THOMAS DE KLUYVER

Sies Marjan

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE


SPRAY AWAY GRAY LIKE MAGIC Eva Longoria

MAGIC ROOT COVER UP 3 SECONDS TO FLAWLESS ROOTS RE

■ QUICK AND EASY GRAY COVERAGE ■ LIGHTWEIGHT, QUICK-DRY FORMULA NO RESIDUE OR STICKINESS ■ LASTS UNTIL YOUR NEXT SHAMPOO ■ NOW IN 8 SHADES

AFTER

BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™

SIMULATION Earn rewards. Join now at: lorealparisusa.com/worthitrewards ©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


HIGH BROW ART We first looked at these shimmery turquoise and pink brow creams and thought: Hahahaha! Haha. Ha. Ha? But then: Maybe these are actually amazing. In fact, maybe putting the words “metallic,” “eyebrow,” and “paint” together isn’t weird at all. Yes, the point of makeup is to feel good and enhance our features, but it’s also more than that. Today, makeup is...whatever the hell we want. And sometimes what we want is a pair of powerful, brilliant, Technicolor eyebrows. —LOREN SAVINI

LAB REPORT

Hair-Loss Pills There’s no “cure” for hair loss, but a prescription from your dermatologist may be on the horizon. An observational study in the International Journal of Dermatology suggests that taking low doses of both spironolactone (a drug used to treat high blood pressure) and oral minoxidil (the active ingredient in Rogaine) can help combat female-pattern hair loss. When testers popped a combo pill once daily for 12 months, their hair became fuller and shed less. And it’s science, not magic: Spironolactone inhibits the effect of hair-loss-triggering androgens, while minoxidil stimulates hair growth, says study author Rodney Sinclair, a dermatologist in Australia. Well, maybe it’s a little magic. —JESA MARIE CALAOR 40 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: HANNAH WHITAKER (PROP STYLIST: RACHEL HAAS); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; FRIDA MARKLUND/LUNDLUND; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

{ BEAUT Y REPORTER }

Not ready for opaque pink brows? Summer’s new brow tints go on subtle, not screaming. Left: Benefit 3D BrowTones in Magenta. Below: Tom Ford Lash and Brow Tint in Turquoise.


{ BEAUTY REPORTER }

M I N I E S S AY

Ink Different A case for the meaningless tattoo. Last month, a big man in an even bigger tank top gave me my first tattoo. I was told it wouldn’t hurt, that it would be “soothing.” (It did; it was not.) Getting a tattoo feels like somebody dragging a needle across your skin repeatedly because that is exactly what is happening. And that was only the second most uncomfortable thing about the whole experience. The first most uncomfortable thing was when people began to ask about my tattoo’s meaning and I had nothing to offer them. My tattoo does not honor a dead relative, a lover’s penmanship, or the Chinese characters for happiness, my favorite emotion. It is an outline of a pair of jeans on my thigh because I wear a lot of jeans and I thought it would be fun. This explanation elicits every-

thing from stupefaction to rage from people who insist that all tattoos should be deeply meaningful. In an era when ink is kosher in the workplace and will not hinder your chances at the Canadian prime ministry (thank you, Justin Trudeau), let’s remember the body is a wonderland, not a scrapbook. Whimsy should be encouraged instead of derided. Also, passing judgment on others’ life choices is a bad look. Sure, profundity is nice, but a life-altering experience isn’t a prerequisite for permanent ink. A tattoo is just an image or inscription you like enough to display, forever, on your naked skin—be it a cherry, your family crest, or a cute pair of jeans. As long as you know you’re ready to commit, I’m for you. —BRENNAN KILBANE

WELL HEALED

The best protectors, from left: EiR NYC Tattoo Balm Aftercare, Brooklyn Grooming Old School Tattoo Balm, and Skinfix Inked Tattoo Balm.

FROM TOP: HANS NEUMANN; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (3)

E M O L L I E N T P O S T- I N K B A L M S A S P L E A S I N G


{ ORAL HISTORY }

It’s not yellow; it’s Electric Banana. It’s not blue; it’s Atomic Turquoise. If Manic Panic hair colors sound like band names, it’s because they probably could be.

ROCKING OUT Tish Bellomo: “We were singing with punk bands like Blondie [in the ’70s] and hanging out at Max’s Kansas City and CBGB in New York City, and everybody always liked what we were wearing. I remember a girl copying my outfit exactly—oh, I was so annoyed.” Snooky Bellomo: “We figured we could sell our look.” T. B.: “It was usually old, refurbished clothes from thrift shops that we’d add embellishment to. Very rock and roll. We opened up the Manic Panic shop on St. Marks Place in 1977. It was so small, we drilled holes in the wall to display the spike heels and put band posters on the ceiling. We sold vintage clothes, 45s.” S. B.: “It was the first punk shop in America. We’d buy semipermanent hair-color cream and wash-off hair-color sprays in all these rocker colors—purple, green, blue, bright red, yellow—from Europe and put our own little stickers on the bottle. There wasn’t anyone making these punk colors in the U.S. The hair color was our passion. We were onstage singing in brightly colored hair. We were friends with drag

photographed by will anderson

queens who taught us about wigs and glitter and glamour. So we sold hair color, and we knew how to wear it.” T. B.: “All the local rockers would come in for it.” S. B.: “Cyndi Lauper is still a Manic Panicker. John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd would come in the [Blues Brothers’] Bluesmobile and buy the colored hair spray.” T. B.: “John Belushi loved us and our band, the Sic Fucks. He told us we had the best asses in New York.” S. B.: “The guys from Green Day. Recently Rihanna.” T. B.: “Katy Perry. Jake Gyllenhaal. He said the reason he got into acting was because Manic Panic hair dye got into his brain. When our supplier couldn’t keep up with our demand in the ’90s, we tracked down the inventor to make colors to our specifications. We don’t have a storefront anymore—we sell online and at retailers like Hot Topic. But we knew we’d really made it when our wholesale office got a soda machine. We were like, ‘Wow!’” S. B.: “‘We don’t have to walk a mile for a soda! This is the big time!’” —LOREN SAVINI

PROP STYLIST: GÖZDE EKER

Before Technicolor hair was mainstream, Tish and Snooky Bellomo, two sisters who grew up in the New York City punk scene, created Manic Panic’s line of high-octane hair dye.


CAUGHT STRIPPING? ONLY WITH THE BEST. *

Shay Mitchell, Actress

Bioré® Deep Cleansing Charcoal Pore Strips Catch your pores in the act with strips that unclog dirt, oil and even blackheads for the deepest clean. Guilty as charged? You be the judge. *#1 Pore Strip according to Nielsen Scanning Data, 52 weeks ending Jan. 2018.


BECOMING HALSEY In a business that’s all about standing out, Halsey stands out. After her featured vocals on the Chainsmokers’ 2016 single “Closer” made her a hit with every pool-party household in America, this radically transparent pop star spent last fall touring for her chart-topping album Hopeless Fountain Kingdom. Earlier this year, she delivered a powerful spoken-word performance at the New York City Women’s March, detailing her own experiences with sexual assault. If you haven’t seen it yet: YouTube. “A Story Like Mine.” Go now; we’ll wait. OK, so there you go: Halsey has no use for falsehoods or obfuscations. In honor of a newly minted collaboration with Yves Saint Laurent Beauty, we asked her to speak her beauty truth and track her evolution from that first major performance to today—with all the victories, blunders, and self-discoveries along the way. Her unfiltered (of course) reflections:

Performance and beauty have a long-standing history. Going back to the Greeks and then early theater and Shakespeare, the whole point of using makeup onstage is to amplify your features and make everything more expressive. When I’m performing, I’m mostly wearing a lot of dark makeup—dark lips, dark eyes. What I look like in person is a lot different than how I look onstage. I’m 23. When I came into the music industry, I had somebody do my makeup, but I flipped out. People forget that a musician and a model are very different. A model’s job is to play a character, but as a musician, I’m just myself every day. I can’t have someone who doesn’t know me coming on board and changing my face. I’m singing songs that are personal, from the bottom of my heart. My fans need to recognize the person singing to them, you know? That’s just how it is for me. So I started doing my makeup myself. I don’t feel like I need to be wearing that much. For me personally, I like to find ways to play up my existing beauty rather than trying to change what my face looks like. I started playing with makeup when I was 12 years old. I was an art kid, so I’ve painted my whole life. Brushes, and color theory, and understanding highlight and shadow and dimension are stuff I knew innately. I also drew realism, so I painted faces all the time. My mom was really tomboyish, and I had two brothers, so I didn’t have anybody in my life who was teaching me about makeup. I became obsessed with it on my own. As soon as 46 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

YouTube became a popular platform for people to post videos about makeup, I was absorbing as much as I could, and I was ripping out pages of magazines and building collages and mood boards and learning as much as I could. And then...I took a left turn and started writing music. I didn’t get super good at figuring out what kind of makeup was best for stage until I played my first headlining show ever. I was at Troubadour in Los Angeles, and I definitely fucked it up bad. I just wanted to do something different, and I was still finding myself then. I had bright, bright, bright blue hair, and I cut up a bunch of Flash Tattoos and layered them across my cheekbones and the bridge of my nose so that from far away, they’d look like a really, really intense highlight. Reflecting gold. Up close, I looked like a mermaid with scales. I’m pretty freestyle when it comes to beauty. I’ve been known to disappear upstairs to get ready to go out and come downstairs with a completely different hair color or with my head shaved. And everybody’s like, “You’ve been gone for 30 minutes.... What happened?” I’m known to be kind of reckless with my beauty decisions. I have to force myself to not be so impulsive. I can’t go onstage late because my makeup is done poorly. And I need to build confidence when I get out there. Obviously I love Yves Saint Laurent products, and that’s why I’ve been working with them—I’m adamant about not working with brands I don’t actually use in real life. I’m not


Eye M by Ileana Makri and Catbird earrings. Makeup colors: Couture Brow in Brun Dore, Touche Éclat All-in-One Glow in Sand, and Rouge Pur Couture Lipstick in Le Rouge by Yves Saint Laurent. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion editor, Rajni Jacques. Hair: Lacy Redway. Makeup: Nina Park. Manicure: Rica Romain.

photographed by jerome corpuz


{ MY LOOK }

Freehand brushstrokes across the lids call for clean, no-drama polish everywhere else. Annelise Michelson and Catbird earrings. Makeup colors: Mascara Volume Effet Faux Cils Le Curler (available in June) and Volupté Liquid Balm in Night Rehab Lip Mask by Yves Saint Laurent. Details, see Shopping Guide.

a very good liar. YSL’s Touche Éclat All-in-One Glow is similar to a BB cream, and on days when I want to have a light look, that works out for me really well. Brow gel is a musthave for big, dark eyebrows. I guess among my fans I’m known for my highlight, and getting it requires a bunch of different products: a priming highlighter, a wet highlighter, a powder highlighter, and a different glitter highlighter over the top. If I ever made any kind of product, it would have to be a highlighter. That’s the thing most people ask me about. And my eyelashes—I wear fake lashes almost every single day. I like the drugstore ones, the Ardell Wispies. Old faithful. I probably have a box the size of a bathtub at my house. I never have any reasoning for why I do anything with my hair. I usually wake up one day and decide I want a change, and then I do whatever is easiest and the most fun and different. I decided on the short blonde style when I was shooting looks for my album cycle—I needed something I could commit to because I would have to keep it when I shot the videos. It’s been the easiest style and the best one for me. There’s something cool about short blonde hair

because you can do anything with it. You can color it; you can add a wig over the top. I like that kind of blank slate. I like to believe that women are constantly evolving. Some days I am that woman who wakes up and wants to wear full glam with eyelashes and a highlight, that full face. Other days I wake up and I’m like, Nah. I put on some Chapstick and leave the house. If you met one of those versions of me and you made some assumptions about me, you wouldn’t know about the other version of me. If you met me with no makeup, in my sweatpants, with my short haircut, you might be like, “Aw, this girl is very clearly a caricature and archetype of the modern feminist.” If you met me in a dress with my push-up bra and full face of makeup, you’d have another mockery to make of me. To me, the root of feminism, which often gets misinterpreted and miscommunicated, is about letting women do whatever the fuck they want to do. If that means buying makeup, it means buying makeup. If that means getting plastic surgery, it means getting plastic surgery. The point is to let me make those decisions. Let me decide if I want to be one or the other. —AS TOLD TO BRENNAN KILBANE

I U S U A L LY W A K E U P O N E D AY A N D DECIDE I WANT A CHANGE, THEN DO W H ATE V E R’S E A S I E S T AND MOST FUN.

48 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018


TRENDING NOW/ METALLIC MAKEUP

ADD LIGHT & LUMINOSITY TO YOUR MAKEUP

METALLIC LIP GLOSS Sheer glittery lip gloss to enhance any lip look. Wear alone or as a top coat.

METALLIC HIGHLIGHTER Glide over cheekbones, brow bones, and high points of the face for a luminous, radiant glow.

METALLIC LIPSTICK Creamy satin lipstick with fine glitter particles. Wear alone or underneath a gloss.


B AC KG R O U N D BEAUTY

Braid Secrets FORGET THAT PINTEREST “BUBBLE BRAID.” THESE SISTERS PERFECTED A WEAVING TECHNIQUE SO SPECTACULARLOOKING, IT HAS ALLURE EDITORS STOPPING THEM ON THE STREET.

It’s all in the family. Meet the Smiths, clockwise from left: Leslyn, Allecia, Shelley, Jasmine, and Glynnis.

Before the three-month waitlists and clients from both coasts, there were just the five Smith sisters, who moved from Guyana to Kansas City. That was over 25 years ago, and the oldest, Glynnis, was beginning to play with a new form of braiding hair. A bubble braid, she’d call it. Her brother’s girlfriend begged her to braid her hair in the same style, and demand zipped through the neighborhood. Glynnis soon found herself braiding for 10 to 12 hours a day, six days a week, and still had to turn away clients. In 2006, she opened Braid Heaven, a five-chair salon on Kansas City’s Lloyd Street.

photographed by fumi nagasaka


©2018 P&G


{ BACKGROUND BEAUT Y }

BUBBLE-BRAIDING C R E AT E S T H E ILLUSION OF A FULL, FLUFFY HEAD O F N AT U R A L H A I R .

The first appointment can take four to six hours, but the technique lasts a month longer than a traditional weave. Above: Leslyn Smith.

Glynnis Smith has only ever shared her bubble-braiding technique with her four sisters (one of whom sees clients out of her Dallas home) and one niece; they remain the salon’s only employees. So what exactly is this family secret? Instead of just pulling their clients’ natural hair into braids, the Smiths braid human or synthetic extensions into the hair in such a way that the natural hair rests, protected, underneath the braids. If you don’t totally follow, it’s OK—we don’t, either. But the secret wouldn’t be much of a secret if they gave us any more information. What we can totally grasp: The technique lets women toss their braided hair up into a ponytail or switch the part without revealing tracks or wefts. It also allows the bubble-braiders to work with hair that has different curl patterns. “With natural black hair, there is no uniformity on a single head,” says Shelly Smith. “With our technique, we can add in several different textures of hair, and that inconsistency makes it look real.” Bubble-braiding, very simply, creates the illusion of a full, fluffy head of natural hair. It’s so dramatic that if you were this Allure editor, you’d have to stop a woman in a restaurant to find out where she got her hair done. (And during your two-minute conversation, another stranger would interrupt to ask the same thing.) There’s word of mouth, and then there’s full-on phenomenon. —JESSICA CHIA

52 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

“Our clientele are like family—we’ve done their hair; we’ve done their kids’ hair,” says Shelley Smith.


©2018 P&G


FAC E T U N E FILLERS

Now that social media has infiltrated our collective consciousness, those seeking cosmetic enhancements have turned to their feeds to inspire their procedures. Brennan Kilbane goes under the needle to explore the trend. 54 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

Lip fillers spiked in popularity after Kylie Jenner said, in May 2015, that she got them.

artwork by thomas lĂŠlu


{ PHENOMENON }

I T E L L H E R I WA N T TO LO O K L I K E A S N A P C H AT F I LT E R , A N D S H E LAUGHS, WHICH IS AN A P P R O P R I AT E R E S P O N S E . Let me start by saying that I think my face is doing OK, looks-wise. It is mostly symmetrical except for the bottom half, which is covered by a beard anyway, so you can hardly tell. If you spin around three times and glance in my direction, I bear a passing resemblance to a budget Ryan Reynolds. Google “nose” and the image results look similar to mine. All things considered, I’m doing fine. Or I was, until I downloaded Instagram for the first time and discovered I was a swamp goblin fraudulently squatting in a Utopian, beautiful-people kingdom. There are infinitesimal angles from which to take a photo of your face, and I look humanoid in almost two of them. Failing to convey my sense of humor and joie de vivre, digital photos of me confirm that I resemble a person but unfortunately cannot say much more than that. The front-facing iPhone camera, once a feature of convenience for users who also do their makeup on their commute, has now become a handheld torture device, inflicting constant selfexamination. What a time to be alive! Disguised as a glimpse into someone’s intimate life, social media usually succeeds in presenting just one version of reality: a portrait of carefully selected assets and details that compose an incomplete, if totally gorgeous, representation of an otherwise real person. We know this, and we opt in anyway because it’s fun. But there’s a danger in catering to our own vanity, and with apps like Facetune (which has reigned supreme in the App Store since launching in 2013) and countless other tools and filters, we can airbrush our lives to perfection. This happens in many ways but is especially true with pictures of people. Smoothing out your complexion or tightening up a jawline is not only acceptable; it’s a common practice. I once observed a woman Facetune her toddler while waiting in line at Starbucks. In a stunning feat of circuity, the desire for filtered faces has infiltrated the offices of dermatologists and plastic surgeons like Dara Liotta, who has been injecting Botox and hyaluronic fillers at the behest of patients who want to look a little bit more like their digital selves. She even developed a Botox-and-filler package, the LitLift, to try to re-create that perfectly balanced highlight-to-shadow filter finish: “I took tons of selfies with the regular unfiltered camera, then selfies with the most natural-looking Snapchat and Instagram filters and compared them side by side,” she tells me of her research methods. “My go-to filters were the rosy-cheek smiling face on Snapchat and the whitesparkle-dust filter on Instagram.” Of her millennial clientele, Liotta estimates more than 90 percent reference social media filters when they consult for injectables. So here I am, at the doorstep of dermatologist Macrene Alexiades’s Park Avenue practice—a series of bleached corridors nestled within a building I cannot even fantasize about affording—asking to be carved into a new form: a 56 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

Snapchat filter. Alexiades is one of the best cosmetic dermatologists in New York City because she isn’t one—or isn’t only one. She’s a trained sculptor with a Harvard education who also happens to be a board-certified dermatologist. Today she still sculpts, but her medium has changed to the faces of those who can afford her services—and me. She’s not so into the abstract stuff; she prefers realism, the natural, Immanuel Kant theory of beauty. This is comforting to hear, if confusing to process. I tell her I want to look like a Snapchat filter, and she laughs, which is an appropriate response because I sound like a lunatic. But she doesn’t laugh because it’s a ridiculous request; she laughs because she’s the perfect person for the job. “You know, some of my clients say that I’m their Adobe Photoshop,” she tells me. Her daughters are on Snapchat, and she’s seen what filters can do for the face. It’s incredible, isn’t it? She’s happy to do it for me. The paradox of the fillers market is this: As the popularity of hyaluronic acid injectables soars, the dosage gets smaller and smaller, as patients request more natural-looking tweaks instead of dramatic changes. This movement toward subtlety picked up steam in 2016 with the FDA approval of Juvéderm Volbella XC, which combines multiple molecular weights of hyaluronic acid for a softer fill. Botox has enjoyed a similar increase in reduction: “Baby Botox” as a search term spiked 5 percent this year on realself.com, a significant figure for a website that averages 10 million monthly visitors. I show Alexiades a photo of myself using the Snapchat filter that washes over your face, chiseling out your features and evening your skin tone as it goes, and she translated it to this: a curve of injections starting at the top of my ear, just behind my hairline, swooping down along my cheekbone. The feeling can best be described literally: It’s six needles to the face. The topography of my face changes slightly but powerfully. “New” cheekbones gleam under the white office lights, casting twin shadow valleys on either side of my nose. The hairline injections tug the skin back over my jawline ever so slightly—for the first time in my life I have a chin and a neck instead of a hybrid slope. Alexiades steps back and marvels like Michelangelo: “I love it!” she says. Another sculpture completed, one you can take home for the price of $1,200. She asks me to sleep on my back for the night to let the clay set. The reality: Fillers are a temporary (and expensive) change and certainly not a long-term remedy for any sort of image-related anxiety. (In my opinion, Instagram should be preserved as a meme gallery only.) But the trend is an interesting digression from the “pumped-up” fillers of yore in favor of smaller, subtler, neoclassical gestures. Whichever you do, find a doctor you trust to do it, preferably one who brings up aesthetics theory in your consultation. Kylie is a fine reference, but Kant might suit you better.


For generations, men have dominated the enigmatic world of fragrance, with sons inheriting classic techniques and prized positions from fathers. Now a record number of women are rising to the top of the field, applying to exclusive perfume schools, and creating an entirely new dynamic. All of which suggests that for the first time in history, the future of fragrance looks female. By Liana Schaffner 58 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

BYRON SPENCER

FEMININE MYSTIQUE


{ MAKING SCENTS }

When she was just 22 years old, perfumer Calice Becker (creator of Tommy Girl and Dior J’adore) consulted a cosmetics executive about breaking into the rarefied world of fragrance. She spoke to him about extraction techniques, raw materials, and the innate sensitivity of her nose. The man listened with a finger poised senatorially against his cheek and then offered some sobering advice. “He told me, ‘You are a woman, not connected to the industry, and way too nice to succeed,’” she says. “‘I can see you are not a bitch. It will be difficult for you.’” The first option (being a man) was out of Becker’s control; the second (being a bitch), out of character. Equally offensive to her purist’s sensibility was the fact that the man’s suggestion displayed a misunderstanding of perfume. At its core, fragrance is a tool of self-expression. How was Becker supposed to telegraph her personal vision if she was pretending to be someone else? That was in 1986, and things have changed. Becker is now a master perfumer at Givaudan and president of the International Society of Perfume Creators. And for the first time in memory, women are occupying a slew of top spots in the fragrance industry. But the notion that female perfumers are less legitimate than their male counterparts still persists—though perhaps in subtler, more nuanced ways. “I think it’s unconscious, but I definitely encounter it,” says Mathilde Laurent, the olfactory trailblazer and in-house perfumer at Cartier. It’s possible, she says, that male perfumers continue to exude a certain “seductive” mystique, while women are viewed as consumers of fragrance rather than creators. This mentality can sometimes leave one feeling invisible. In the fragrance industry, feeling invisible is rooted in historical precedent—and it’s not unique to women. From the late 19th to the late 20th centuries, perfumers, who were trained by fragrance houses, operated behind closed doors, usually mixing chemicals in the dim recesses of a lab in Grasse, France. “Perfumers simply weren’t talked about,” says Karyn Khoury, the creative fragrance director and strategist behind some of Estée Lauder’s most iconic scents (Beautiful, Pleasures). “Consumers were more focused on the company that marketed the fragrance than the person who designed it.” (Case in point: Everyone knows Chanel No. 5. Fewer people know its creator, Ernest Beaux. And almost no one knows the name of the lab assistant who some suspect really created it.) Name recognition in fragrance is a relatively new concept, brought on by a growing appreciation for what many perceive as an artisanal art form and a wave of writers and editors who view fragrance as a rich source of material. “Perfumers are very much exposed today,” says Nathalie Lorson, a master perfumer with Firmenich and the nose behind ALTAIA’s new scent, Tuberose in Blue. “Our sources of inspiration and our creative processes are increasingly covered in the press.” Still, a conspicuously small and disproportionate number of women are out front, doing the talking. “You don’t see many female creators in the public arena,” says Laurent. “It’s very strange because in the press you only see men, and in the perfume companies you only see women.” That isn’t a mere impression (this magazine owns up to not always 60 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

“ I CA N S E E YO U ARE NOT A BITCH. IT WILL B E D I F F I C U LT F O R YO U .” giving female noses equal representation). And it’s perhaps the predictable result of a system that for more than a century discouraged and even denied access to women. Few perfumers can speak to the subject of historically impenetrable glass ceilings with more authority than Patricia de Nicolaï, owner of the acclaimed niche fragrance brand Nicolaï. “I come from a well-known line of perfumers, and I could never, never work in the family business because I’m a woman,” says de Nicolaï. “My family decided I would probably quit to get married and have children, so they didn’t want to invest in me.” That “family business” is Guerlain, one of the oldest and proudest fragrance houses in the world (de Nicolaï is the great-granddaughter of Pierre Guerlain). Founded in 1828, the firm was still being transferred to the men of the family when de Nicolaï began to study the craft in the 1980s. “There were no women family members in the company: no cousins, aunts, grandmothers, wives—none,” she says. With the help of her husband, de Nicolaï built her own fragrance house (incidentally, the couple did have children—four of them). Today, the Paris-based company produces roundly celebrated scents, all created by de Nicolaï in the same independent style as her ancestors. “I work alone in a lab, totally free,” she says. The 19th-century traditions and methods that influence de Nicolaï’s work are part of the institution that wa l l e d o u t m a ny a s p i r i n g fe m a l e p e r f u m e r s i n 20th-century France. “I was told I would never make it in perfumery because I was a girl,” says Anne Flipo, vice president perfumer at International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF), who grew up in Picardy, France, and now creates best-sellers for brands such as Lancôme, Jo Malone London, Chloé, and L’Artisan Parfumeur. To get around the staunch bias that she encountered at the start of her career, Flipo and other trained female noses took risks and looked for opportunities in a place that enshrined newness and innovation, not tradition. “I chose to work for an American company,” she says. Cosmetics companies that were owned and operated by American women, such as Estée Lauder and Elizabeth Arden, recruited female perfumers—a move that proved richly rewarding. Flipo cites one of her role models, IFF legend Sophia Grojsman, who achieved international renown in 1978 when she created White Linen for Estée Lauder, a scent that was clean in its composition and groundbreaking in its message: Not all women want to smell like lusty sex goddesses. (Grojsman went on to create Trésor for Lancôme in 1990, one of the best-selling perfumes in the world.) To Lauder, the runaway success of White Linen and another earlier fragrance, Youth Dew, created by Josephine Catapano, simply reinforced in her mind the business value of the female perspective, and she set out to build an environment that encouraged it. “She


was very focused on providing opportunities to women,” says Khoury, who worked directly with Lauder and now develops top-selling fragrances with the late icon’s granddaughter, Aerin Lauder. “Estée wasn’t the first American fragrance marketer, but she shaped this industry in several key ways,” says Khoury. “One of which was supporting an amazing lineage of women who began their careers with her.” Female perfumers who didn’t get their start with the likes of Lauder had a vastly different experience—even in the ostensibly liberal landscape of American fragrance. “I came up against many, many obstacles,” says Berkeley, California– based perfumer Mandy Aftel of the niche brand Aftelier Perfumes. “I’m entirely artisanal and work only with natural essences, and there was very little of that in the fragrance world when I first started 30 years ago,” she says. “No one understood what I was trying to accomplish, and even 62 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

my friends at the big fragrance houses in New York were condescending. I was dismissed, dismissed, dismissed.” Aftel continued to forge ahead with her personal vision, creating heady natural fragrances and eventually finding courage in a near-magical elixir. “I had just bought my first antique oil [Aftel collects and curates vintage aromatics], and a very well-known perfumer told me to throw it out because he was certain it had gone bad. I figured he knew better and decided to just keep the bottle. And then I opened it—” Aftel pauses and inhales, as though reliving the transformative moment. “It was extraordinarily beautiful, the essence of the richness of cinnamon. It changed something in my head. At that moment, I decided I was going to trust my instincts and figure this stuff out for myself.” And did she ever. Aftel’s artisanal fragrances have earned industry honors and a dedicated global following. She trains aspiring perfumers and recently opened a museum in

WILL ANDERSON (PROP STYLIST: GÖZDE EKER)

{ MAKING SCENTS }

WOMEN’S WORK Clockwise from top left: Une Amourette by Roland Mouret and Etat Libre d’Orange; Rose De Grasse by Aerin; La Panthère by Cartier; Knot by Bottega Veneta; J’adore by Dior; and La Vie Est Belle L’Éclat by Lancôme.


try it!

DIGITAL SAMPLING FROM

PROMOTION

must love beauty Are you obsessed with skin care, lip gloss, fragrance, dry shampoo, mascara, and virtually every beauty product? Then sample them first with our try it! program. Just give us your beauty profile to qualify.* allure.com/tryit *Spaces and samples are limited. Products are targeted to skin and hair types and preferences where applicable.

877.760.6677 rapidlash.com Available at


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (CONTINUED)

{ MAKING SCENTS }

“WE’RE LESS WEIGHED DOWN B Y T H E P A S T. WE’RE MARKING O U R O W N E R A .” Berkeley devoted to fragrance. But Aftel measures her success in more modest, less tangible terms. “When someone reaches out to let me know that one of my scents has affected them, that’s the biggest thrill of all.” Other women have used nontraditional methods to redefine the indust r y, t h e m o s t p ro m i n e n t b e i n g Christine Nagel, the first woman to hold the coveted role of in-house perfumer at Hermès. Born in Switzerland and trained in organic chemistry, Nagel lacked the elite credentials (such as French family connections) needed to study with a master perfumer at school. “The classic route was forbidden to me,” she says. Instead, she learned to leverage her highly technical background to work on fragrances at the molecular level, creating scents that are both finely tuned and deeply expressive. “My analogy is a dancer,” she says. “You need a solid technique in order to soar.” Nagel’s latest collection, Hermessence, certainly reaches new heights. An amalgam of ingredients and concentrations (it includes oil elixirs and eaux de toilette), the line reimagines classic notes in fresh, contemporary ways. While Nagel navigated the industry without formal training, the new hope is that other young perfumers won’t have to. Perfume schools, a relatively new phenomenon, are now accepting candidates based on potential—not pedigree. And gender is no longer an issue or a deterrent. “Last year, the majority of applicants to Givaudan Perfumery School were women,” says Becker, who is the school’s new director. Prestigious programs such as ISIPCA in France are also starting to show glimmers of diversity. It was at ISIPCA that then student Mathilde Laurent first approached Jean-Paul Guerlain about an internship at his company. Perhaps impressed with Laurent’s fiery passion and aesthetic, Guerlain offered her a training position. After three months, he invited her to stay. There’s a certain irony here: Laurent obtained an opportunity that 64 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

had eluded Guerlain’s niece, de Nicolaï, the previous decade. Laurent becomes philosophical about her career. “Mr. Guerlain took a chance on me, and I have to credit him for that,” she says. “But I had no name, no lineage. I frightened no one.” Laurent’s work is hardly unassuming. The daring, multifaceted perfumes she dreams up for Cartier challenge cartoonish notions of femininity. “I try to bring something more complex: a vision of a woman as a human being and not only as an object of desire.” Of course, she says, a perfume can convey depth and intelligence and still be sexy as hell. Take Daniela Andrier’s new creation for Roland Mouret, Une Amourette. The composition is both voluptuous (it’s meant to be worn between the thighs) and gutsy. These fragrances unravel old-world stereotypes—something that perfumer Dora Baghriche believes female noses are uniquely positioned to do. “I think we’re less weighed down by classical themes and the past,” she says. “We’re marking our own era.” That’s not to imply male perfumers are inexorably linked to tradition. While training in New York City, Baghriche learned from master perfumer and industry giant Harry Frémont (Calvin Klein CK One, Estée Lauder Modern Muse). “He gave me my chance and really respected the route I was taking,” says Baghriche, who designs scents for both major labels and niche brands. “We have very different styles, but he was always amazed by the new accords I was creating.” This illuminates a truth that every woman in the field hopes to impress: Self-expression is so much bigger than gender. And fragrance can help carry that message into the mainstream. “Buying a perfume is like voting,” says Laurent. “Don’t ask if the person who made it is a man or a woman. Focus on their vision, their intent. That’s how to make sure all points of view are represented in this industry and beyond.” Let democracy rule.

ADVERTISEMENT

Shop online an unparalleled report a sidefor effect, please call Allergan To at 1-800-678-1605. vintage photography collection. Exquisitely printed and framed.

Please see Summary of Important Information about BOTOX® Cosmetic on next page.

CondeNastCollection.com

BCT112741 03/18

Images © Condé Nast Archive. All Right Reserved.


Buy your Red Nose only at

Hosted by CHRIS HARDWICK

LIVE THUR MAY 24


FIVE ASPIRING INFLUENCERS. A PANEL OF JUDGES. ONE GRAND PRIZE. WELCOME TO THE ALLURE INCUBATOR.

BEAUTY’S NEWEST S TA R S

Vlogger Ivy Kungu always kept her focus during the competition. Above left: One of her many tools, Nyx Glam Liner Aqua Luxe in Glam Azure.

The word “influencer” has become a catchall for anyone with a decent social media following and an area of expertise (or at least interest). But real influence—and the creativity behind it—isn’t neatly measured by follower count. That’s why we joined forces with CoverGirl to find talent you may not have discovered just yet but who have all the makings of major makeup stars. We gathered five finalists at the Allure Incubator HQ in Los Angeles to compete for the grand prize: a contract to become a member of the CoverGirl Collective, an elite group of influencers. (Go to allure.com/incubator to watch the six-part competition series.) “I didn’t expect it to be so tough to choose a winner!” says Michelle Lee, Allure’s editor in chief and a judge in all six of the challenges. “Ultimately we looked for someone who had warmth and relatability, as well as exceptional makeup skills—someone we wanted to watch over and over.” Here’s who made the cut.


THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; NATHANIEL WOOD; COURTESY OF SUBJECT (3); GREG VORE; NATHANIEL WOOD; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; NATHANIEL WOOD

rebekah aladdin, 29 @rebekahaladdin / Los Angeles

Taking care of business: “I didn’t have a lot of money growing up. But as a pro makeup artist, I’m able to work for and provide for myself—I haven’t had a boss since I was 24! I’m so proud that I’ve created this career and that so many of my clients have stuck with me. In a job like this, you depend on their loyalty.” Her specialty: “Deeper skin tones. A lot of makeup artists don’t know how to work with brown-skinned girls. I saw a void in the market and started working with private clients.” The best foundations for women of color: “I love M.A.C., Bobbi Brown, and AJ Crimson for their range of shades. Kevyn Aucoin The Etherealist foundation in 15 and 16 is great for very deep skin tones.” Why she wants her clients to look happy: “I like [them] to walk into the room and have people say, ‘Who is that? I want to be her friend.’ Not intimidating. Even if it’s sexy, it’s captivating; it’s not scary.” How she achieves that effect: “The eyes are bright and lifted. I like using a light eyeliner in the waterline. My favorite is M.A.C. Studio Chromagraphic Pencil in NC4215.” Her mantra: “Be enjoyable to work with, whether you’re making zero dollars or a thousand dollars.”

When Aladdin does a red lip, she reaches for a classic: M.A.C. Retro Matte Lipstick in Ruby Woo (left).

MEET THE JUDGES PA RT C R I T I C, PA RT C O U N S E L , EACH OF THE NINE EXPERTS ENCOURAGED THE RECRUITS TO UP THEIR GAME .

Ukonwa Ojo, @ukonwaojo CoverGirl’s global senior vice president was looking for creativity: “Makeup is a powerful tool of personal expression. You have the opportunity to create who you want to be.”

Michelle Lee, @heymichellelee Allure’s editor in chief reminded competitors that content is a two-way street: “Know who you’re speaking to, what skill level they’re at.”

Ellarie, @ellarie The makeup artist (and Insta star) came by to judge a challenge—and share a tip of her own: Instead of using tape to create sharp eyeliner, use hydrating undereye patches.

From left: Host Jasmine Sanders with judges Michelle Lee, Ukonwa Ojo, and Laura Brinker.

Beau Nelson, @beau_nelson Nelson works with some of the world’s most photographed women (Ashley Graham, Karlie Kloss). Who better to coach the class on sophisticated statement makeup?

Rebecca Minkoff, @rebeccaminkoff The fashion designer’s advice for anyone on the come-up: “Be humble.... You’ll get a lot further if you’re a nice person.”

Dulce Candy, @dulcecandy The Internet makeup sensation popped by to talk about what to do if those coveted brand deals roll in. “Choose the right partner,” she said. “Truly loving the brand and product is key.”

Amanda Steele, @amandasteele

CoverGirl Vitalist Elixir Lip Oil in Grape Juice doses out the perfect balance of color and shine, on camera and off.

With nearly 3 million YouTube subscribers, this beauty vlogger is #goals. How do you get there? “Post frequently and on a schedule. Use video on all platforms, and get your audience commenting!”

Laura Brinker, @laurabrinker26 CoverGirl’s global vice president of influencer marketing outlined what it’s like to actually work with a brand, from getting a brief to how you execute their message. “Always [do it] in your own voice,” she said.

...and host Jasmine Sanders One of the biggest names on Insta right now, Sanders—aka @golden_barbie—was the ever-supportive emcee, encouraging the contestants to go for it in every challenge without losing their vision. DISRUPTORS 2018 ALLURE 71


thania gonzalez, 24

{ TA L E N T S H OW }

@thaniasbeauty / Dallas

How makeup became her calling: “I worked at a makeup counter, and a woman came in asking if I could help cover her bruised eye. I had a sense about what was happening, and we connected. Most women who go through similar situations don’t like to be asked questions. I covered the bruise for her as I touched on happier topics. That’s when I knew this is my purpose.” Her signature accessory (and favorite animal): “On the show, I wore [a sparkly headband in the shape of] cat ears. I have a cat, I love cats, and the headband was a bit of bling. Women get shunned a lot for being out-there and glamorous when it should be embraced.” The secret to the perfect cat eye: “Patience. Do it in four-second increments. I’ve noticed in my work that all of my clients have to blink every four seconds.” The YouTuber who taught her the most: “Wayne Goss.” Her other calling: “Organization. I store my products in those little drawer organizers from Michael’s.” “You could feel the emotional roller coaster the contestants were on,” says Lee.

“I love to accent the things that are different about me, like my pale skin,” says Salmons.

bethany salmons, 30 @bethanyfae / Kansas City

Yes, she believes in magic: “I grew up sketching my own fantasy comic books, so I describe my style as ethereal. I like to add little artistic accents to my work, like chrome and glitter—anything that lends a magical touch.” Her beef with brow pencils: “The ‘auburn’ shades look orange on redheads. I like blonde pencils, like Nyx Micro Brow and the one from L.A. Girls.” A makeup tip that doesn’t involve makeup: “I shave my face! Every other week, I use an eyebrow shaver to remove peach fuzz. It gets rid of any texture in my foundation and concealer.” You wouldn’t know it... “But I used to have cystic acne. When I was Googling for a dermatologist, I saw an ad for Curology [a custom anti-acne system]. I bought it, canceled my pricey dermatologist appointment, and haven’t looked back. In eight weeks, my skin was the clearest it’s ever been.” Salmons loves the otherworldliness of glitter, like Sugarpill Loose Eyeshadow in Goldilux (right).

THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: NATHANIEL WOOD; SVEND LINDBAEK; COURTESY OF SUBJECT (6); CATHY CRAWFORD; NATHANIEL WOOD; CATHY CRAWFORD; COURTESY OF SUBJECT (3); NATHANIEL WOOD; GORMAN STUDIO; COURTESY OF SUBJECT (3)

Sometimes Gonzalez swaps her black liner for a vivid pencil, like Stila Smudge Kajal Eye Liner in Sapphire (left).


For high-impact eyes, Senegal likes Urban Decay Heavy Metal Glitter Eyeliner in Gamma Ray (left).

kenneth senegal, 23 @heflawless / Los Angeles

How he got into vlogging: “I started about three years ago. A lot of people would come up to me on my college campus and say, ‘You do great eyebrows—you should do videos on YouTube.’ So I did a lot of tutorials, and—not to toot my own horn—people fell in love with my personality. That, and I do know how to beat a face.” Why people respond to him: “I think a lot of times people fear being themselves. They’re afraid of being ridiculed; they’re afraid of backlash. It’s really easy for me to show my personality. I live by this quote: ‘Stand outside of the box they try to put you in.’” His beauty inspirations: “Beyoncé and all of the drag queens on RuPaul’s Drag Race.” For the ultimate contour: “You always want to bronze beforehand. It’ll look much subtler, and you won’t have those harsh lines. My all-time favorite contouring kit is Charlotte Tilbury Filmstar Bronze & Glow.” The product that saves the day: “Danessa Myricks Vision Cream Cover. It literally covers everything.”

Kungu’s artsy, utterly original aesthetic clinched her win.

AND THE WINNER IS... Ivy Kungu, whose bubbly personality made her ambitious makeup looks—geometric shapes, glittery eyes, and ombré shadow—feel totally within reach.

ivy kungu, 21 @ivykungu / Plano, Texas

On makeup as therapy: “I got into beauty when I was in a rough place. I was away from home for the first time in college and felt lonely. Makeup was really a medium for me to create with, and that’s what consoled me. It could have been paints, but it was my BH Cosmetics 120 palette.” Her current aesthetic: “I like to take something that seems abstract and make it a little more wearable. For example, I’ll start with the concept of a galaxy, but instead of putting stars all over my face, I’ll darken the creases of my eyelids so they resemble the night sky.” Her secrets to filter-perfect skin: “I really love CoverGirl Vitalist Healthy Elixir Foundation. It has good coverage and a natural finish and doesn’t dry me out. I also love the Beauty Bakerie [finishing] powders—they’re like Facetune for your complexion.” If you do one thing: “Remember to clean your shadow brush between colors. It keeps your look from getting muddy.” Her greatest hope: “That the beauty community can become more inclusive. Seeing narrow shade ranges or scrolling through a brand’s Instagram feed and not seeing someone with dark skin until you’re 10 rows down can be disheartening. We’re making baby steps to improving, and I’d like to see that growth continue.”

Kungu doesn’t shy away from bright color, like Juvia’s Place Blush from the Saharan Vol. 1 palette (above).

DISRUPTORS 2018 ALLURE 73


REMEMBER THE DAYS WHEN LASERS WERE ONLY SAFE FOR TREATING LIGHT SKIN TONES? THOSE DAYS ARE OVER. BY JESSICA CHIA 76 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

ED MAXIMUS (MODEL: NYKHOR PAUL)

THE SPEED OF LIGHT


Help those living and working with cancer to put on their brave faces every day.

Visit QVC.com and search Beauty with Benefits to learn more and show your support.

Tune in THURSDAY, APRIL 26 at 7pm ET • QVC.com/BeautyWithBenefits

bareMinerals / Bobbi Brown / Buxom / Clarins USA / Derek Lam / Dior / Doll 10 / Dr. Dennis Gross / ELEMIS / Givenchy H2O+ Beauty / hairdo by HairUWear / IT Cosmetics / Josie Maran / Jouer Cosmetics / Julep / Kopari Beauty / Kristofer Buckle Laura Geller / Lisa Hofman / MAC Cosmetics / MaCher / Mally / Obliphica / Perfect Formula / Perricone MD / Peter Thomas Roth philosophy / SK-II / Skinfix Inc. / skyn ICELAND / Smileactives / tarte / TULA / Vita Liberata / WEN by Chaz Dean ©2018 QVC, Inc. QVC, the Q, and the Q-Ribbon Logo are registered service marks of ER Marks, Inc. and QVC, Inc.


Somewhere between the Kennedy administration and today, lasers went from being the stuff of Russian-spy novels to a staple in dermatologists’ offices. They can erase blotchiness, soften scars, and tighten skin, and they’re now one of the top nonsurgical cosmetic procedures in the country. In some cities, you can duck in for a “laser facial” that’ll take roughly as long as a blowout—30 minutes, in and out. (Though doctors recommend going to trained dermatologists for the service.) But one of the biggest advances is about color, not convenience: For decades, lasers were recommended, pretty much exclusively, for use on lighter skin tones. The ones that targeted pigment in the skin would 80 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

damage dark skin (or, in the case of laser hair removal, not work at all), and the ones that delivered high bursts of energy and heat put darker skin at risk of scarring and hyperpigmentation. No more: New devices—and smarter ways of using existing ones—are making lasers accessible to nearly everyone and squashing some outdated ideas about dermatology along the way.

FOR REDNESS Rosacea flare-ups aren’t just something paler people have to deal with, says Shereene Idriss, a clinical instructor in dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. “Everyone has superficial vasculature that can dilate and create

unwanted redness,” she says. “I have patients who are half black and half Irish, and they have rosacea.” The Vbeam, a pulsed-dye laser that tackles red pigment, has long been the weapon of choice for rosacea and spider veins, but doctors are now waking up to the fact that it can be used on a wider variety of skin tones. Instead of dismissing the Vbeam as an option for darker complexions, many have learned to dial down the speed and temperature of the laser, making it suitable for deeper skin tones. (If you’re thinking about the Vbeam and have a medium to dark skin tone, ask for a test to be done somewhere unnoticeable, like underneath the jawline, if your dermatologist or plastic surgeon doesn’t suggest it first.)

ED MAXIMUS

{ TECH REPORT }

ONE OF THE BIGGEST A D VA N C E S IS ABOUT COLOR, NOT CONVENIENCE.


STORE

6KRSRXURQOLQHFROOHFWLRQRIH[SHUWO\ KDQGFUDIWHGIUDPHGSULQWVFDQYDV SULQWVDUWSULQWVDQGPRUH'LVFRYHUWKH SHUIHFWDGGLWLRQWR\RXUKRPH

condenaststore.com &OLIIRUG&RIÆ“Q9RJXH


{ TECH REPORT }

YOUR PERIOD, YOUR MOVE.

DOCTORS ARE WA K I N G U P TO THE NEW AGE OF LASERS.

FOR UNWANTED MARKS The pico laser gets the award for most improved. Also known by its brand names—PicoWay, PicoSure, and Pico Genesis—the pico can zap away sun spots, scars, and birthmarks on pretty much any skin tone—something most dermatologists agree wasn’t possible five years ago. Its pulses are exponentially faster and less heat-generating than previous models, which means it’s less likely to cause scarring on darker skin tones, according to Paul Jarrod Frank, a dermatologist in New York City. Years ago, treating pitted acne marks with lasers on those with Fitzpatrick skin types 4, 5, or 6 was difficult, says Roy G. Geronemus, a dermatologist in New York City. (The dermatological Fitzpatrick scale divides skin tones into six shade categories, with 1 being the lightest and 6 being the darkest. For comparison, Michelle Obama is a 5, estimates Zakia Rahman, a clinical associate professor of dermatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.) “Now I can treat them with the PicoSure laser with no downtime and less risk of pigmentary damage,” says Geronemus. For stretch marks, some dermatologists use the Palomar 1540-nanometer fractional laser, which creates columns of light that penetrate a millimeter or more into the skin. “It tricks the surrounding skin cells into thinking there has been a wound, which creates new collagen below and around it, diffusing the look of stretch marks,” says Arash Akhavan, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. It’s an option for darker skin—as long as you take a slow and steady approach. Darker skin requires more than the recommended three to five treatments to see results (count on more like five to eight). Other dermatologists, like Rahman, use a 1550-nanometer fractional laser to tackle stretch marks over six-week intervals for darker-skinned patients and monthly for lighter-skinned patients. “No matter how new and improved a laser is, it’s always safest to deliver energy to darker skin at slower, less traumatic speeds,” says 82 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

Joshua Zeichner, an assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine.

FOR HAIR REMOVAL Traditional hair-removal lasers are still best for people with dark hair and light skin because the light beam targets dark pigment (scientifically known as eumelanin). If the skin also contains a lot of eumelanin, the laser gets “confused,” making it less effective. (Results are just as underwhelming for people with light hair and light skin—there’s not enough pigment to target, period.) For those with darker skin, newer 1064-nanometer Nd:YAG lasers, like Cutera Excel HR 1064 and Sciton Joule 1064, are good alternatives to older pigment-targeting lasers. They still target melanin but zero in on the hair follicle rather than the skin surface above. By penetrating at this specific depth, “these lasers allow me to treat any dark-skinned patient safely,” Rahman says.

FOR SMOOTHER, FIRMER SKIN If you’re looking to put some bounce back in your skin, the pico is as close to a one-size-fits-all as it gets. These lasers produce a pulse of pressure waves deep below the skin’s surface to inflame it, thereby stimulating new collagen growth. That’s why Akhavan says pico lasers, like PicoSure Focus, are his go-to when working with Asian, East Asian, and Indian patients. Fractionated lasers, like Fraxel, are also an option on all skin tones. They trigger inflammation in little spots throughout the skin, rather than evenly covering the entire surface area. You’re still hitting the skin with heat and energy, though, so there is a risk of skin darkening after the fact. Topical therapies can minimize any potential damage. Dermatologists like Zeichner now prescribe hydroquinone, which relaxes pigment-making cells, for a week before and after a fractionated-laser procedure so it won’t trigger pigment production. (This short course of hydroquinone won’t lighten your skin in the long term.) Rahman recommends 4 percent prescription hydroquinone to even out the skin tone.


CENTELLA ASIATICA, THE LEGENDARY PLANT FROM ANCIENT CHINESE MEDICINE.

[ CENTELLA ASIATICA, ALSO KNOWN AS TIGER GRASS ] LEGEND HAS IT THAT TIGERS ROLLED AGAINST THIS UNIQUE PLANT TO HELP THEIR SKIN RECOVER FROM BATTLE. WHEN FORMULATED FOR THE FACE, HELPS REPAIR THE SKIN BARRIER TO RESIST VISIBLE SIGNS OF AGING. IT’S NOT A LEGEND, IT’S A NEW WAY TO FIGHT WRINKLES.

BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.TM ©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


NEW ®

OUR NEW WAY TO FIGHT WRINKLES

HELPS REPAIR THE SKIN BARRIER, STRENGTHENING SKIN TO RESIST SIGNS OF AGING. DERMATOLOGIST TESTED GENTLE ON SENSITIVE SKIN FRAGRANCE FREE • PARABEN FREE


Prada spring 2016

Yves Saint Laurent fall 2008

Dior spring couture 2013

A K B Loud Mouths

When makeup artist Tom Pecheux painted lips black at Yves Saint Laurent in 2008, the look went from mall goth to mainstream overnight. At Dior in 2013, makeup artist Pat McGrath’s ruby-studded lips were first-gen lip art. But it wasn’t until a 2015 Prada show—where McGrath debuted her Gold 001 pigment— that OTT effects fully entered our orbit.

Streaks of Genius

Chanel’s spring 1994 show was ’90s girliness on steroids. The models had pastel highlights, which seemed wild at the time but were a precursor to pop stars like Xtina, who made pink hair more pop than punk. Today rainbow hues are a totally legitimate option, modeling contract or record deal not required. From left: Bumble and Bumble Color Stick in Lilac and L’Oréal Paris Colorista Semi-Permanent Color in Soft Pink.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; JULIEN M. HEKIMIAN/GETTY IMAGES; SONNY VANDEVELDE/VOGUERUNWAY.COM; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; DELPHINE ACHARD/PENSKE MEDIA/ REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; GUY MARINEAU; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Chanel spring 1994

Above, from left: Dior Rouge Dior lipstick in 999 and a Pat McGrath Labs gold shadow from her MTHRSHP Eye Palette.


Chanel fall 1994

Chanel fall 1994

Chanel fall 1994

Hot Tips It was the cheapest thing on the Chanel runway that season—and the one thing everyone wanted (and still remembers). At the fall 1994 show, models wore a nail polish called Vamp, a shimmery blackberry that was somehow as incredibly sexy as it was utterly elegant. When Uma Thurman wore it in Pulp Fiction later that year, the polish became an international phenomenon: Stores had to ration their bottles, and the first real cult nail color was born.

A E G S

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: CONDÉ NAST ARCHIVE (2); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; GERARD JULIEN/PATRICK KOVARIK/ AFP/GETTY IMAGES; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Above and left: Chanel Nail Colour in Vamp.

B E A U T Y: DISRUPTORS EDITION IT’S CALLED FASHION WEEK, BUT OFTEN IT’S THE BEAUTY LOOKS THAT REVOLUTIONIZE THE WAY WE GO OUT INTO THE WORLD. BY ELIZABETH SIEGEL


Gucci fall 2010

2

1

3

TREASURE HUNT

Gucci fall 2010

GAME CHANGERS WE D I S C O V E R E D B AC K STAG E .

Skin in the Game 1

2

The product that launched 1,000 micellar waters, Bioderma lets you remove makeup when there’s no sink.

Before face rollers went viral, makeup artist Val Garland was using the Refa S Carat to depuff models before shows.

We fell hard for holographic hair color when hairstylist James Pecis used L’Oréal Paris Colorista Spray at Issey Miyake’s fall 2017 show.

’Sup, Supes Linda Evangelista, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, and Christy Turlington weren’t household names until they walked Versace’s fall 1991 runway together, lip-synching George Michael’s “Freedom.” Right then, they became more than models. “They had balls, they had brains.... [They] were a revolution,” said photographer Peter Lindbergh in The Telegraph. Their business savvy and glamour have been a template for so many models today. 88 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

Dior’s Diorshow wand was modeled after the toothbrushes McGrath used to apply mascara at Dior shows.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GREG KESSLER (2); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (5); PAUL MASSEY/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

1. Estée Lauder Double Wear foundation in Nutmeg 2. Milani Conceal + Perfect Foundation + Concealer in Natural Beige 3. Make Up For Ever Ultra HD Foundation in R530

Versace fall 1991

{ RETROSPECTIVE }

Foundation was once just that: a base for the main attractions. Until the fall 2010 shows, when McGrath kept going on about “hyperperfect skin.” Layering foundation, highlighter, and powder for “a new, extreme version of natural skin,” she taught us that base is a look in its own right and helped ignite an obsession with #flawlessskin.


Available at


Bright Eyes We used to darken our lashes in order to define them, but then Stella McCartney gave us a much cooler (and way brighter) idea. Her fall 2012 show’s ultraviolet lashes were created using “really strong blue pigment,” says McGrath. It wasn’t long before we saw a resurgence of cobalt-blue mascara at both department stores and drugstores. Now we have so many intense green, hot pink, and vivid purple mascaras on offer that colorful lashes are no longer the least bit shocking.

The New Boy Cuts

For Perry Ellis’s spring 1993 show, the brand’s then designer, Marc Jacobs, sent models out with baggy clothes, disheveled hair, and hardly any makeup—he was influenced by the Seattle music scene of the time. Critics were horrified, the look was panned, and Jacobs was swiftly fired. But maybe you’ve still heard of the guy? That show started a movement: Jacobs’s come-as-you-are cool (aka “grunge”) would define mid-’90s minimalism, and frankly hasn’t truly gone out of fashion (or beauty) since. Above: Marc Jacobs Beauty Remedy Concealer Pen in Past Curfew.

90 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

Alexander Wang fall 2017

A State of Nirvana

Alexander Wang fall 2016

Perry Ellis spring 1993

Pe rry Ell is sp rin g

19 93

Hairstylist Guido has a history of starting trends any time he picks up scissors (which is often). When he chopped models’ hair into short cuts minutes before they walked Alexander Wang’s runway (in 2016 and 2017— it’s become a thing), he liberated us from the idea that haircuts had to be textbook pretty. “It’s all about personality,” he said in 2017. “I think it’s a political statement subconsciously.”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; IMAXTREE; MARCUS TONDO/VOGUERUNWAY.COM; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; GEORGE CHINSEE/PENSKE MEDIA/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; ERIKSEN KYLE/WWD/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

{ RETROSPECTIVE }

Stella McCartney fall 2012

Stella McCartney fall 2012

Below: L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Mascara in Cobalt Blue.


SO CHIC. SO PRO. AND IT WON’T LET GO. BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™ BARBARA PALVIN

INFALLIBLE / PRO-LAST LINER UP TO

24HR WEAR. WATERPROOF COLOR. EASY, CREAMY GLIDE-ON. NO SMUDGE. NEW

SUITABLE FOR WATERLINE

IN 6 SUPER-LASTING SHADES

Earn rewards. Join now at: lorealparisusa.com/worthitrewards


92 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018

INÈS LONGEVIAL

SHAKING UP F O U N DAT I O N

Never before has there been makeup to match so many skin tones. But there’s still a long way to go—and a rich history to honor. We talked to three black makeup artists and beauty entrepreneurs—AJ Crimson, Danessa Myricks, and Cynde Watson—about the past, the present, and the power of inclusion. By Jessica Chia


©2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


Cynde Watson: “I started as a model—that’s really how I got into makeup artistry. I would be with other models of color, and I would do their makeup because the makeup artists couldn’t. I launched my own line in 2007, and then I moved on to working with Becca. I want to wake up other brands, make them hear our voices, understand what our skin looks like and what it needs in terms of [foundation] tones and formulas.” Danessa Myricks: “I started as a makeup artist back in 2000, when there was [almost] nothing in the store for women of color outside of Flori Roberts and some Black Opal.” AJ Crimson: “When I was doing Estelle’s makeup. I realized, Wait, I’m gonna need something warmer, something richer [for her complexion]. I need to make this.” Which brands led the charge in serving all skin tones? Myricks: “I mentioned Flori Roberts, but also Dermablend, Fashion Fair, Black Radiance.” Watson: “Bobbi Brown, who I worked for in the ’90s, had rich, lush shades and an orange powder called Golden Orange that was incredible for women of color.” [Editor’s note: It’s still in the line today.] Crimson: “Some [other] brands that had dark shades in the early ’90s stopped carrying them over time. M.A.C. had some of the darkest shades when I began my career in makeup in the early 2000s.”

What was your earliest foundation memory? Myricks: “As a teen I had acne, and my mother couldn’t find anything that I could use [as concealer], so she was like, ‘I’ll take you to the costume store because I think they’ll have something for you.’ I had to go to a costume store to find my shade of makeup. And because it was theater makeup, I actually looked worse with it on.” What would shock people most about your experience creating foundation for dark skin tones? Watson: “The first time I worked in product development, and I will not say the brand, I was in a boardroom and we were looking at shades, and there was a separate box of dark foundations labeled ‘exotic shades.’ It was shocking.” Crimson: “I went to this one product manufacturer, and I saw ‘Indian 1’ on a foundation shade and some other shade called Oriental.” Myricks: “I’ve seen Negro 1, 2, and 3.” Watson: “Are you serious? I’m glad I’m not the only one.” Myricks: “A lot of brands develop their shades in Italy and Asia, where there are very few people who have dark skin. So the people actually making the products don’t know how to formulate colors that work for those skin tones, even when they try to get it right.” Watson: “Nor do they see color. So I’ll say, ‘I see green in this foundation,’ and they’ll say, ‘Green? You see green?’” Myricks: “Can I tell you how hard I fight for the orange and green [undertones]? They’re the main thing that we need.”

MADE IN THE SHADES From left: Danessa Myricks Beauty Vision Cream Cover in W03, Bobbi Brown Skin Long-Wear Weightless Foundation in Almond, AJ Crimson Beauty Crème Foundation in 5, Black Radiance Color Perfect Liquid Make-up in Cashmere, Flori Roberts Foundation Stick in Sable, Vera Moore Crème Foundation in Golden Bronze, Blk/Opl True Color Creme Stick in Carob, L’Oréal Paris True Match Super-Blendable Makeup in Espresso, and AJ Crimson Beauty Crème Foundation in 8.

FROM TOP: INÈS LONGEVIAL; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

{ IDENTITY }

There’s been a lot of talk about black-owned and inclusive makeup as a new phenomenon, but the three of you were doing it 15 and 20 years ago. What inspired you?


MATTE WITHOUT THE FLAT BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™ BARBARA PALVIN

INFALLIBLE PRO-MATTE UP TO 24HR MATTE FOUNDATION WITH AN AIR-LIGHT TEXTURE. NOT MASKY OR SHINY.

Earn rewards. Join now at: lorealparisusa.com/worthitrewards

© 2018 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


Myricks: “When you are developing for women of color, there are so many microshades, like orange and green, that must be a part of the foundation. It’s not a maybe—they must be there. My chest is yellow, my ears have blue, my face is red, and underneath my eyes is yellow, so there are so many more considerations than people think.” Watson: “You also need to think about women with mixed racial heritage. I used to work with Rachel Roy; she’s got a subtle olive-green undertone. One of her daughters has golden orange in her skin, and the other has a fairer caramel-y tone—this is how brands need to start thinking.” Myricks: “Beyond that, it’s also an economic issue. What I’ve learned consulting for a lot of brands is that they always look at what [performed] last year. So if they didn’t have that shade last year, and there is nothing to compare it to, then they see no reason to add it. They make an assumption that that shade will not sell.”

{ IDENTITY }

Watson: “Yeah, and there are cultural differences. Most black women find the skin on their forehead and the perimeter of their face is darker than the center, so they might use two foundations. So they don’t use them up as quickly [or buy them as often] as women with completely even complexions. So it looks like, ‘Oh, we don’t need this color.’ But we do—we just need it differently.” Myricks: “Another issue is that the level of pigmentation in makeup has to be very different for women of color than other women, so even when people develop a shade that looks darker, it’s irrelevant because it’s not pigmented enough and it’s ashy on skin. We still can’t wear it.” Watson: “That’s marketing, not artistry.” We’ve talked a lot about foundation, but is it the only cosmetic that needs to be inclusive? Myricks: “Everything—shadows, blushes—works perfectly [on skin tones] up to Beyoncé. After that, it doesn’t translate

because they didn’t adjust the formula base the way you need to as skin tones get deeper.” Watson: “It’s something I talk about all the time when I’m consulting. So now you have undergarments that work, but what do you wear with it? Like, ‘I got your foundation, but I don’t have your eye shadow, your blush, or anything else for you.’ That doesn’t make me feel included.” You are all entrepreneurs in this space, but is it hard to be a minority and launch a successful beauty line? Myricks: “What you just said really resonated. The opportunity isn’t there for independent, black-owned cosmetic brands to shine. So many times makeup artists send me messages: ‘Thanks for all that product, but don’t be mad, I [did an interview] and I had to credit another brand instead.’ The editors want to hear the high-end brands of the world; they don’t want to hear ‘Danessa Myricks Beauty.’ I hear that every day.” Crimson: “I have a celebrity makeup artist who uses my makeup all the time, and he says, ‘AJ, I want you to know I used your stuff on this girl. But she always makes me say I used another prestige brand in interviews.’” I launched a lip gloss line called Kissable Couture in 2007, six years before I launched AJ Crimson Beauty. I had somebody tell me, ‘I would invest in this if you told me this is a line for black girls.’ And I said, ‘It’s lip gloss; how can I tell you that? It works for everybody.’ The thing I love about what has happened with Fenty Beauty is that it’s opened the conversation. Women of color shopping for makeup are becoming more aware of their options.” Watson: “Mix in Danessa Myricks, a little Fenty, AJ Crimson, a little Black Opal to get to your end result.” Myricks: “In this room there are three of us. And [outside of it] there are a lot more who are not people of color but have the same passion about creating for us, and that makes me excited for the future.”

THE DEEP END Balanda Atis is a cosmetic chemist at L’Oréal who couldn’t wear L’Oréal foundation. “I didn’t have my shade until I created it specifically,” Atis says. She brought the issue to the higher-ups: “I said, ‘I should be able to [buy] the right foundation.’” Now she creates shades for many of L’Oréal’s brands; she also made a custom color for Lupita Nyong’o, the face of Lancôme (it’s Lancôme Teint Idole in 555). “We found a way to use an unstable pigment called ultramarine blue to achieve depth without muddiness.” And today Atis can find her foundation shade in any drugstore: “I wear L’Oréal’s True Match—I’m number 8, Cocoa.”

INÈS LONGEVIAL

Watson: “Green and orange, please!”


upward bound Cecilie Bahnson dresses and shorts. Walt Cassidy Studio earrings. Opposite page: Anna Zwick sweater. Necklace (worn as headpiece) from New York Vintage. Makeup colors: Brow Stylist Boost & Set Brow Mascara in Dark Brunette, Infallible Pro Sweep & Lock Setting Powder, and Colour Riche Shine Lipstick in Glossy Fawn by L’Oréal Paris. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion stylist, Beth Fenton. Hair: Nai’vasha Johnson. Makeup: Jen Myles. Manicure: Nettie Davis. Set design: Bryn Bowen. Production: Hinoki Group.


photographed by scott trindle

s a s h a’s t i m e ON THE CUSP OF BIG-LEAGUE FAME, ACTRESS SASHA LANE STAYS TRUE TO HER RENEGADE SPIRIT. BY BRENNAN KILBANE


Sasha Lane is a total Libra. Astrology is a nonsense system that I wholly buy into, and everything about Lane being a Libra is true: She would disagree with this characterization, as she does when we meet, because that is a classic Libra attitude: They have a steel sense of self. Libras are empathetic souls who spend their days wading waist-deep through intellectual swamps while the rest of us are breathing and sleeping. They are affable and brooding. They are charismatic teachers who speak very quietly. This is everything you need to know about Sasha Lane before moving forward. From here on out, she ceases to be predictable. Our interview takes place after her Allure cover shoot, so Lane arrives displaying the handiwork of a team of grooming artisans. Rose gold gleams from her eyelids to her cheekbones; her nails are geometrically perfect green ovals; her eyes and lips and skin invite additional metaphors. Her laugh pierces your body and injects it with sunlight. A mane of earth-brown locs cascades down onto her shoulders. She is tiny, but her frame is balanced by a fatigue jacket that is 16 sizes too big because Libras unquestionably crave balance, even sartorially. We meet at a shoebox-size bar in west Los Angeles at this critical time in Lane’s life—smack-dab in the middle of a seismic shift that took her from Texan psychology student to Cannes critical darling. She and I are sitting in what probably will be her last months of relative anonymity, as her film career barrels ahead, through two premieres this summer and one huge one early next. The demands will mount, and the events will increase exponentially, and the attention-getting roles will reproduce into more and more and more. It’s exciting. But it’s a lot. The narrative that follows Lane often focuses on her discovery by director Andrea Arnold, who spotted her sunbathing on spring break in Florida and cast her as the lead in the road movie

American Honey with Shia LaBeouf and Riley Keough. What that narrative fails to include is what happened right after American Honey: A young woman who never asked to be an actress was suddenly receiving abundant praise from nearly every film critic in America, plus some in France (American Honey won the Jury Prize at Cannes in 2016). Two and a half years ago, she was a sunbathing psychology undergrad. Now spring break is over. We are drinking clear liquor and eating fried pickles while I am trying hard not to freak her out about this. At times, reminding the introverted Lane of her 90-degree ascent into the fame industry feels like taking the role of an oracle foretelling doomsday. “Yeah, I’m terrified,” she admits. “I’m so happy, and I thank God every single day, but I damn near cry every single day, too, because this is so much. I was never the person who was like, I want to be famous. I pray for people to leave me the fuck alone for five seconds, and I keep my hair in my face because I don’t like to be open.” After Arnold arcade-clawed her from obscurity, she moved to Los Angeles on the advice of her managers (who produced the film). “I smoked a lot of weed. I cried a lot. I would go from the bed to the window to the floor, just move in that triangle continuously. I wrote a lot, I wrote a lot of poems, and I fucking went crazy. I talked to the pigeons at the park....” I would like to follow up about the pigeon thing. She laughs, and her laugh lights up the bar. “It was wild. I literally went to the park specifically to hang out with the pigeons because they’d get really close to me. I’d give them part of my bagel, and that was it.” She is extremely funny without intending to be. Even when she is reflecting on one of the most challenging parts of her career—this stall between finishing American Honey and its debut at Cannes—she radiates mirth and


l i f e’s a b r e e z e Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, Gabriella Sardena, and Cloe Cassandro dresses. R13 boots. Ryan Lo x Stephen Jones hat. Simone Rocha earrings. Coach 1941 ring. Opposite page: Poncho from Resurrection Vintage. Phoebe Kime dress. R13 boots. Marlo Laz and Saskia Diez earrings. Details, see Shopping Guide.


candor. This summer, she’ll appear in The Miseducation of Cameron Post, set at a Christian gay-conversion camp in Montana. The film stars Chloë Grace Moretz as the eponymous Cameron, who is sentenced to an indefinite stay at God’s Promise after being caught smooching (et cetera) the “incorrect” gender to smooch after a high school dance. Lane costars as Jane Fonda, a character whose name is never thoroughly explained to me and who is one of the wokest campers at God’s Promise—she more or less ignores the teachings and smokes weed instead. In the movie, Jane and Cameron are victims of circumstance and spend their time at the straight farm slightly more than inconvenienced while their peers writhe against the competing forces of passion, self-acceptance, and a religion that condemns both. Jane is a self-assured confidant of Cameron and a messenger of comic relief. It is not easy to make gay conversion camp funny (the movie is not a comedy), but Jane is hilarious, a hawk-eyed commentator with perspective inside and outside of her current situation, not unlike Lane herself. The Miseducation of Cameron Post won the U.S. Dramatic Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Lane’s other upcoming film, Hearts Beat Loud, a comedy with Nick Offerman and Toni Collette, also premiered at the festival. She took the role because she thought the movie was very funny, but she also liked the story line: Lane plays the biracial girlfriend of Offerman’s daughter, who is also biracial, but it’s “not a message, throw-this-in-your-face thing. It is what it is.” (Lane is also biracial and queer, and it is what it is.) In 2019, Lane is set to star in her first superhero franchise, Hellboy. Her character, Alice, hears the voices of the dead and is British. “When I’m filming, I’m either learning or I’m healing,” she says. Hearts Beat Loud was the latter, a comedy she could smile throughout, but most of her roles touch on the former—pulling out pieces of her identity and magnifying

them by 1,000. In The Miseducation of Cameron Post, it was her queerness. American Honey’s Star reminded her of how she took care of her sisters at a young age. “My work gets to be therapy. My work gets to be fun. It gets to be something I can put all of my thoughts and pain into. And when it stops doing that for me, I’ll be done. And I’ll go write poetry on an island and say ‘Deuces’ to everyone.” She is the opposite of a cinema buff. On film: “Jurassic Park is my shit. I don’t know about that other stuff, but I know when I like it.” Part of her success is attributable to her authenticity (a buzzword these days meaning both “honest” and “endearing”), and part is attributable to the fact that Hollywood is not sacrosanct to Lane. In fact, it’s the opposite: It’s kind of the enemy here. “Something about it makes my skin crawl, it’s weird,” she says. “It’s never been my vibe. I’ve never cared about it. Being in it now, it’s even more like, ‘What the fuck is this?’” Though it’s not her vibe, Lane has famous friends. She’s gone to a party thrown by an A-list rapper that I would love to tell you more about, but I’m bound to secrecy. She wore Céline to a movie premiere. But she’s also a homebody who talks to pigeons. She struggles daily, she says, with a particularly gnarly case of obsessive negative thinking, that, no, does not go away just because she gets to be an actress. The institution of Hollywood caters almost exclusively to gorgeous rich white people and is not particularly kind to anybody else. Lane, in her Céline dress or her oversize fatigues, is a symbol of a new American starlet—talented, driven, complex, and yes, a little fucked up. At one point, I do a bad journalist thing and I turn off my recorder so Lane and I can just hang out. We are both several drinks deep, and as it is a weeknight, we mutually decide to do the responsible adult thing and adjourn to another bar for even more drinking. Los Angeles is soaked in nighttime while we amble single file down a narrow sidewalk. We do not stop laughing. Even in the dark, I’d follow her anywhere.


rainbow connection Missoni coat. Attico dress. Sophie Bille Brahe, Paige Novick, and Lane’s own earrings. Foundrae ring. Makeup colors: Crayon Sourcils Sculpting Eyebrow Pencil in Brun Naturel, Le Gel Sourcils Longwear Eyebrow Gel in Brun, and Rouge Coco Lip Blush in Burning Berry by Chanel. Opposite page: Makeup colors: 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Mainline, Brow Tamer Flexible Hold Brow Gel in Neutral Brown, and 24/7 Glide-On Lip Pencil in Snitch by Urban Decay. Details, see Shopping Guide.


BRACE YOURSELF. YOUR WORLD IS CHANGING FOR THE BETTER, THANKS IN NO SMALL PART TO THE BRAVERY OF THESE 12 PEOPLE. UNFAZED BY BARRIERS, HATERS, OR SELF-DOUBT, THEY FOLLOWED THEIR PASSIONS AND SHOOK THINGS UP.

On Iskra Lawrence, left: Sonia Rykiel dress. For jewelry credits throughout, see Shopping Guide. Makeup colors: Hydro Boost Hydrating Concealer in Light and Hydro Boost Hydrating Lip Shine in True Nude by Neutrogena. On Lily Nova, right: Marc Jacobs dress. Makeup colors: Beyond Perfecting Foundation + Concealer in Linen and Pep-Start Pout Perfecting Balm in Clear by Clinique. Details, see Shopping Guide. These pages: Fashion editor, Coquito Cassibba. Hair: David Colvin. Makeup: Maki Ryoke. Manicure: Honey. Set design: Juliet Jernigan.

T H E BOL D ONES photographed by matthew kristall


THE PIONEER “It always felt like I was the only person on earth with vitiligo,” says Winnie Harlow, a 23-year-old model who was bullied so mercilessly as a child for her skin condition (which causes patches of depigmentation) that she dropped out of school. “I thought my skin wasn’t beautiful enough to wear shorts or open-toed shoes, but my idea of ‘beautiful enough’ came from not seeing enough representation of someone like myself; that would’ve been so powerful for me.” As a teen, she went on America’s Next Top Model, which led to a Diesel campaign, and her success is history. “I hope to offer all young women a sense of hope and change, that one type of look is not better than another.... It’s OK to be different, [and seeing that] is massive for a child.” —ELIZABETH SIEGEL Eckhaus Latta jacket. Tom Ford bra top. Lacoste jeans. Makeup colors: Diorshow Brow Styler in Universal Dark Brown and Diorshow On Stage Liner in Matte Black by Dior. Details, see Shopping Guide.

THE FIGHTER + THE MUSE Body-shamers and comment trolls beware: This model is not afraid to take you on. Iskra Lawrence (opposite page, left), 27, deemed somewhere between “not skinny enough” and “not big enough” by several modeling agencies, decided: You know what? That is totally normal. “Once you accept yourself—and find beauty in that—you have all the power. I want to inspire people who don’t feel accepted,” she says. Now she’s giving beauty standards the middle finger by daring to be shot unfiltered. “Retouching made me feel like there were problems with my body that I hadn’t even thought about—the size of my thighs or a random freckle,” she says. You’ll spot her in her underwear, unretouched, in Aerie ads. Or running her own app that offers her tips for healthy, forget-the-haters living. —LOREN SAVINI Australian model Lily Nova (opposite page, right), 20, looks like a John Currin painting come to life. Her exaggerated features are simultaneously impish and pure, with an originality that inspired Alessandro Michele’s renaissance of Gucci. It’s hard to believe that someone as influential as Nova was once mocked for her career-making features. “I was told by my classmates to gain weight and to get a tan,” she says between shows in Milan. Luckily, the self-proclaimed dork and full-time Harry Potter enthusiast never let the bullies get under her skin. “I think it’s cool to not look like everybody else,” she muses. Since leaving her hometown of Adelaide, Nova has found she’s not alone. “Every girl I’ve met has shared a similar experience of being the odd one out,” she says. “It’s good having that kind of solidarity.” —MAXWELL LOSGAR


THE ACTIVIST If the word “intersexuality” is new to you, Hanne Gaby Odiele would like to meet you. In January 2017, the Belgian model, who’s fronted Vogue and W, came out to USA Today as intersex, which the Intersex Society of North America defines as “a person born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male.” Doctors have historically responded to these individuals by surgically altering their anatomy to be male or female, often without the informed consent of the patient or their guardian. It’s what happened to Odiele at age 10, and the United Nations now considers this a human rights violation. “We’re subjected to surgeries because nobody knows about [intersexuality],” she says. “Every child has the right to decide about their own body.” Odiele works with interACT, an intersex-rights organization. “It’s time for the binary to be over. It’s 2018—we can do this.” —BRENNAN KILBANE Acne Studios top. Makeup colors: Velvet Shadow Stick in Grande-Large and Velvet Matte Lip Pencil in Intriguing by Nars. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE INGENUE Maye Musk appeared on her first Times Square billboard years before CoverGirl discovered her. In fact, she celebrated her fifth decade of modeling by inking her contract with the makeup company, one of the largest in the world. This in an industry that sees retirees as young as 23. “As I’ve gotten older, they’ve chosen me for older jobs—mother of the bride or grandmother—and now they’re making me quite high fashion, which is so much fun,” she says, with an enthusiasm that could bleach your hair. Part of her allure is just that: a charm that’s impossible to ignore. (On Instagram: “You have to be a personality.”) But if anything, her success points to a new demand for diversity, and she’s ready to shatter the standards. You could say disruption is in her blood—her son Elon had to get it from somewhere. —B. K.

Gucci dress. Makeup colors: Vitalist Healthy Concealer in Light and Melting Pout Matte Liquid Lipstick in All Nighter by CoverGirl. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE HEIR APPARENT When you think about Joan of Arc, you might picture armor and horses, but you probably don’t picture Condola Rashad, the 31-year-old actress who’s playing her in Saint Joan on Broadway. “We’re not sitting here trying to say Joan of Arc was a black American woman. The director went for the actor they wanted, and that was me. And for young girls of all cultures, that’s highly inspiring— make it about your work,” says Rashad. “My mom’s best advice: Let your work be the brightest thing you offer.” That from a woman who was America’s mom in the ’80s (Phylicia Rashad, aka Clair Huxtable). And when someone in the industry disparaged her, implying her only prospects were prostitute or stripper roles, Rashad abided by her mother’s words. “He was condescending and cocky. I was not offended in my heart. Young people: Don’t stand for things like that.” —E. S.

Elizabeth and James jacket. Makeup colors: Master Precise Metallic Liquid Eyeliner in Teal Galaxy and Total Temptation Mascara in Blackest Black by Maybelline New York. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE ACTION STAR “When I was little, I didn’t have female superheroes to think of [in movies]. It was just the guys, and the girl was just the girlfriend,” says 32-year-old actress Pom Klementieff. Now she stars as Mantis, a self-conscious, misfit empath, in the kind of franchises (hello, Guardians of the Galaxy) that make other summer blockbusters look like film-school indies. Her latest movie, Avengers: Infinity War, is out this month, and in it, Klementieff digs deeper into what it means to be a superhero. “We need a rainbow of characteristics represented [in female superheroes],” she says. “I meet people who have trouble communicating, who feel a connection to Mantis. Little girls make the Mantis costume perfectly. I just look at you and I start tearing up.” —E. S. Acne Studios jacket. Makeup colors: Sourcils Styler Brow Gel in Brun and Ombre Hypônse Stylo Shadow Stick in Amethyste by Lancôme. Details, see Shopping Guide.


T H E

I N N O VA T O R

Guillermo del Toro, if you’re reading this, we’d like to introduce you to your newest fantasy muse: makeup and visual artist Ryan Burke. His sweet spot is when he can let his creativity run wild. Really wild. Like that-can’t-possibly-be-a-humanbeing-behind-that-makeup wild. “I started playing with makeup when my friends got into drag, only I didn’t know how to do proper makeup. So I would cut out pieces of appliqué— eyebrows, lips, geometrical shapes—and my style evolved from there,” Burke says. Since then, he’s learned his beauty ABC’s, but his aesthetic is the same. You won’t recognize him when he’s done gluing rhinestones and feathers and moss— and whatever else he can find—to his face. “I want people to look at my work and not totally understand what’s going on. I want it to be an emotional thing.” —L. S. Valentino dress. Makeup colors: PermaGel Ultra Glide Eye Pencil in Xtreme Black and MTHRSHP Subversive La Vie En Rose Palette by Pat McGrath Labs. Makeup: Ryan Burke. Details, see Shopping Guide.

THE VANGUARD

+ THE MIX MASTER

There’s your baseball cap. The fedora. The sun hat. And then there are Heather Huey’s designs (featured on magazine covers on totally casual humans like Rihanna and Karlie Kloss). They aren’t really like hats at all. In fact, they’re more like 3D couture. “I love drama, but I’m very shy. So creating these big, sculptural designs is very voyeuristic for me,” Huey (opposite page, left) says. In order to get a sense of her drama-loving alter ego, you’d have to look to her designs: S&M-esque body cages that levitate around your shoulders and towering headpieces that could easily be mistaken for a raven taking flight from the top of your head. It takes a hell of a lot of moxie to pull off one of these category-redefining pieces (maybe for a royal wedding...), but rest assured, you’ll be the center of attention. —L. S. Portrait of a pop star: long hair, bedazzled microphone, and a smile that says she’s never burped out loud. Yawn, rinse, repeat. Enter Morgan Saint (opposite page, right), the 24-year-old hybrid of Lana Del Rey and Ellie Goulding (if either of them had a black mullet and shopped in the men’s section for clothes). “I love pop, but it’s lacking depth in a lot of places. And I love stripped singer-songwriter stuff; it’s so strong lyrically, but it’s never as catchy. I wanted to find a middle ground.” It’s in that gap that Saint secured her place. Her debut EP, 17 Hero—half dance track, half indie-movie love song—is optimistic but without Top 40 clichés. Plus, she’s taking total control over her brand, from the videos to the album art to working with only one producer. “I want it to feel honest all the way through. A complete picture of who I am.” —L. S. Opposite page, on Huey, left: Gucci dress. Heather Huey headpiece. Makeup colors: Eyebrow Pencil in Dark Brown and Instant Light Natural Lip Perfector in Rosewood Shimmer by Clarins. On Saint, right: Paco Rabanne top. Makeup colors: Mister Brow Filler in Brunette and Rouge Interdit Vinyl Lipstick in Beige Indécent by Givenchy. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE VOICE Melissa Jefferson is on the front lines of a cultural revolution fueled by self-love, self-confidence, and the power of selfactualization. Growing up, Jefferson—who goes by the stage name Lizzo—used comedy as a way to cope with now-bygone insecurities about her size. She’s still got jokes, but the former class clown is no longer using laughter as a defense mechanism. Instead, the 29-year-old recording artist is infusing her genre-defying music with a sense of humor and a body-positive attitude in hopes of helping her growing fan base find their inner joy. “Our standards of beauty are societal,” she says. “If someone doesn’t like me for my physical characteristics, I reeducate them.” It’s evident that a pioneering spirit hell-bent on challenging the constructs of beauty has replaced any shred of the singer’s adolescent worries. “Mass media tells people that having a double chin, stretch marks, or dark areas on their skin is unsavory,” she says. “But I’m here to change the narrative.” —M. L. Asos dress. Makeup colors: Aqua XL Color Paint Cream Shadow in M-72 and Ultra HD Soft Light Liquid Highlighter in 30 by Make Up For Ever. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE REFORMER As of this writing, Teddy Quinlivan is in France, probably exhausted. Her origami cheekbones are at Paris fashion week, bobbing in and out of slumber because she’s spent the last 100-some hours walking every runway: Dior, Saint Laurent, and many, many others. Quinlivan began her ascent when Louis Vuitton creative director Nicolas Ghesquière discovered her in 2015, but her profile soared in 2017, when she came out to CNN Style as transgender. She had worked as cis female for many years but decided to come out to give visibility to trans people in fashion, where she also calls for reform in the modeling industry in the age of #MeToo. “I would like to see a safer work environment free of harassment and sexual assault, and I’d like to see new creative visionaries leading the way.” —B. K.

Alexander McQueen jacket. Makeup colors: Brow Sculpt in Spiked and Chromacake in Primary Yellow by M.A.C. Details, see Shopping Guide.


PROP STYLIST: DAVID DE QUEVEDO

Mirror, mirror on my phone. Who’s the fairest in my zone?


F U T U R E

photographed by crista leonard

A NEW GENERATION OF TECHNOLOGY—INTERACTIVE MIRRORS, SKIN-CARE APPS, SMART HAIRBRUSHES— HAS THE POTENTIAL TO TRAP US WITHIN OUR OWN BEAUTY ECOSYSTEMS. EXPERTS WEIGH IN ON THE PERILS AND THE PLUSES OF LIFE INSIDE THE BUBBLE. BY LIANA SCHAFFNER

Talking mirrors are nothing new. They’ve been hanging around, offering blunt appraisals since the year 1812. That’s when the Brothers Grimm first published their shadowy, too-menacingfor-children children’s story about a virginal beauty, a vindictive queen, and an autonomous reflection on the wall. The tale of Snow White has been revisited and reimagined countless times since the early 19th century, with one fictional element kept faithfully intact: Things never end well for the person who consults the magic mirror. Also, no one ever blames the mirror; it assumes zero responsibility for helping a serial narcissist fly into a jealous rage. One has to wonder—with all its omnipotence and insight, why couldn’t the glass just have glossed over some details? (“The fairest of them all? That’s a really subjective question....”). But the mirror is a purely objective device, unfiltered and unbiased. It doesn’t judge; it declares truths. This, we’re told, is the basis of its appeal. The queen finds comfort and vindication in its candid, incorruptible voice. Until, of course, she doesn’t.

This is the stuff of fairy tales. Until, of course, it isn’t. There’s strong evidence to suggest that we’re quickly moving into a realm where gadgets that evaluate our appearance and modify our behaviors are no longer simply theoretical. “This is not fantasy. This is happening,” says Martin Lindstrom, a branding expert and the author of Small Data: The Tiny Clues That Uncover Huge Trends (St. Martin’s Press). Lindstrom is referring to a wave of technically enhanced tools that collect slivers of our personal data in order to help us optimize our daily lives and routines. The trend has officially landed on the beauty scene, often to surreal effect. Take, for example, new voice-enabled “smart mirrors” that adjust lighting to your needs or mirrors with embedded cameras to scrutinize your skin in microscopic—and sometimes merciless—detail. The idea is that by using this data to track the status of every fine line, rough patch, blackhead, and blemish, you can accurately assess if your products are doing the trick—or if they need to be tossed out. Also in development are hairbrushes and 115


T E L L E R . ” T R U T H U L T I M A T E T H E I S “ T E C H

styling tools fitted with tiny sensors that detect damage and dryness from your roots to your ends and then link to an app to prescribe restorative tips and customized treatments. On the surface, a beauty invention that points us in the direction of souped-up retinols and coddling conditioners seems perfectly harmless and flat-out appealing. But when you look closer, the implications take the shine off the apple, so to speak. Some of these tools attempt to eliminate human flaws by eradicating human error. They signal a future that appears just a little less...human. Still, plenty of people seem willing—and even excited—to let their beauty products boss them around. “I hate to say it, but I think people are going to love this stuff,” says consumer psychologist Kit Yarrow, a note of buyer’s fatigue in her voice. Beauty products that analyze our features at close range don’t just satisfy our mania for self-care; they give us permission to lavish attention on our favorite subject: ourselves. “We have an unquenchable thirst for knowledge about ourselves,” says Yarrow. “People want to know all of the minutiae, from how many steps they take in a day to what’s going on when they sleep to the types of food they can tolerate to their genetic makeup. There’s no end to the obsession. And this new beauty technology fits right into that mentality.” While self-obsession is hardly a new phenomenon (you can trace it all the way from Tiberius to Trump), Yarrow believes it has reached unreal proportions, as though a magnifying mirror has been fixed on our egos—as well as our pores. Did something happen to place each person squarely at the center of his or her own universe? In a word, yes. “Our self-absorption is linked to worry,” says Yarrow. “People are dealing with unprecedented amounts of stress. Faster news cycles, busier lives, longer workdays, and superficial relationships have made us incredibly anxious. And the natural antidote to anxiety is control. There’s something calming and stress-reducing about information. Even if it doesn’t offer solutions, it helps us to feel more in control.” In other words, we find comfort in data because the future is freaking us out. Not only are we tightly wound, but the vast majority of people are also highly skeptical. (We sound like a fun bunch, no?) “Consumer trust is at an all-time low,” says Yarrow. “Buyers don’t just accept what brands tell them anymore.” This is exactly why the cynics among us (so all of us) are drawn to the idea of beauty gadgets that promise precision and deliver results that leave no room for interpretation. “Tech is the ultimate truth teller,” says Sharon Profis, an executive editor at CNET, who believes discriminating technology can help hold skin-care products and companies to account. “It’s so hard to really know if a skin-care product is working over time. Tech can be that objective voice.” Equally enticing: Many of these devices allow us to exist permanently inside our comfort zones by putting our everyday habits to productive use. “We look at our front-facing cameras to touch up makeup, take selfies, and analyze our skin,” says Profis. “This is behavior that we’re already exhibiting. If you’re looking into a camera and drawing your own conclusions, a skin-care company can help you

to draw better, more accurate conclusions.” In addition to providing dependable feedback, some of these beauty inventions give us power over our own environment, allowing us to create a space that’s refreshingly free of variables. Profis points to smart mirrors that harness machine learning to finetune the lighting around your face. “These mirrors work with Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant, so you can tell Alexa that it’s time for a skin check and it will give you the same exact lighting every time,” she says. “Right now, if you analyze on the bus one day and in a bathroom the next, you’re not getting consistent results.” There’s a chance, however, that our environment is already too governed by metrics. And instead of making daily life more predictable, we’re becoming less and less secure in it. “We’ve never been more insecure than we are right now,” says Lindstrom. “The reason is transparency. We can see what everyone else has, and we want to match that.” As social media offers us a distorted, through-the-lookingglass glimpse into other people’s lives, we feel increasing pressure to stack up. According to Lindstrom, the way we determine our value and selfworth is through quantifiable statistics, such as how many ‘likes’ or followers we accumulate on Instagram. “People measure themselves today the way marketers track the popularity of global brands,” he says. “People are their own brands now.” The biggest concern with some of this burgeoning beauty technology is that it plays directly into this mind-set, creating new ways for us to compare and contrast ourselves with friends, neighbors, and perfect strangers on an intimate, nearly cellular level. Just consider a new scanner that will capture magnified images of your skin and then plug into your iPhone, sifting through user data to let you know how your skin measures up against other people in your age group. “The human mind is simply designed to compare itself to others,” says Profis. “Tech can’t be blamed for this, but it does enable it on demand and more than ever.” There are some obvious benefits to receiving these kinds of benchmarks and finding out where you land on the bell curve. “If it looks like you have 70 percent more wrinkles than the average 25-year-old, then it’s possible you’ve had too much sun exposure and are at greater risk for skin cancer, so I can see skin-care apps becoming an arm for our personal health,” says Profis. Some systems seem to be fulfilling that potential already, such as La Roche-Posay UV Sense, which monitors air quality and UV exposure and reminds you when to reapply sunscreen. “That’s the Utopian scenario,” says Profis. The alternative is less cheerful. “The biggest danger is that these apps could potentially make the next generation incredibly insecure about their skin.” There’s a subtler, more unsettling side effect to all of this. “The more time we spend thinking about our own appearance, the less proficient we become at focusing on and relating to others,” says Yarrow. “It’s important that people understand the ramifications of that.” As we become the center of our own beauty ecosystems, our most meaningful relationship could


CHRISTOPHEL FINE ART/UIG VIA GETTY IMAGES

very well be the one that we have with our own image, while other faces in the crowd simply function as a baseline for us to score ourselves against. It’s very possible that we’ll soon be asking our smartphones to determine who’s the fairest in the room when we’re sitting in a restaurant or riding the subway. “That’s already happening,” says Lindstrom. “There are apps right now in China, Japan, and Korea that rank and qualify your appearance.” Beyond the existential threats, there are practical dangers, too. As smart beauty gadgets continue to capture more information on us, we could be opening the door to a breach of privacy. “Your mirror is your first point of contact in the day. It’s as vulnerable as a situation gets,” says Lindstrom, who can envision a scenario where smart mirrors learn to sync up with our other devices to collect a frightening amount of data. “It allows an insight into who you are, and the bad news is there are no data-integration laws in the United States to prevent this.” Still, many consumers, millennials especially, don’t necessarily view that as a deterrent. “The trend is, we’re willing to give up some privacy if there’s enough value being added in return,”

says Profis. “For a person who wants to get better at makeup or is really passionate about makeup tech, it’s a small price to pay.” To help us to understand where our precarious relationship with technology may be headed, Lindstrom provides a visceral analogy. “You may have heard the story about how there are two ways to kill a frog,” he says. “If you put it in boiling water, it will hop out immediately. But if you place it in cold water and slowly raise the temperature, it will stay put and adjust to a dangerous situation. We’re in lukewarm water at the moment.”

“ P E O P L E W A N T T O K N O W M I N U T I A E , A N D T H I S N E W T E C H N O L O G Y F I T S R I G H T I N T O T H A T


LIVE IN

3D

Thinking of makeup in two dimensions is so last millennium. At the fall shows, we saw plastic triangles of “eyeliner” on brow bones, gold leaf on lids, chunky glitter and crystals...everywhere. There’s no one better to help us learn to break through the boundaries of boring, flat planes than makeup artist Violette, whose kit contains much more than lipsticks and liners. By Loren Savini


UNCOMMON BONDS “Makeup” today can be a piece of jewelry or an accessory or anything we want it be—even a few dozen pearls glued from nail to wrist to create the coolest white glove you will ever see. Or how about swiping some puffy fabric paint across your brows, then striping it onto a plastic-wrap wig? That’s OK, too. (We weren’t kidding when we told you we were breaking through the boundaries of flat planes.) Makeup colors, this page: Shake It Fresh Mascara and Kate Sculpting Palette in Golden Sands by Rimmel London. These pages: Fashion stylist, Angelo DeSanto. Makeup: Violette. Hair: Ward. Manicure: Honey. Models: Mayowa Nicholas (opposite page) and Saffron Vadher (this page).

photographed by daniel jackson 119


LOUDER THAN WORDS Not feeling particularly chatty? Not a problem. These looks can make statements for you. All you need is some bare skin and a little Ben Nye Glitter Glue (a staple in Violette’s kit). And when you want to talk with your hands, you’ll be relieved to learn that the amazing wire nails above require little to no artistic skill—they’re brilliant new decals from Sally Hansen. Makeup colors: Complete Salon Manicure in Sheer Ecstasy and Salon K-Design by Sally Hansen.


T H E E Y E S H AV E I T Black eyeliner = classic. Blingy, three-dimensional black eyeliner = space-age rock and roll. Above, Violette adhered chrome-colored crystals and studs along the rims of the eyes with more of that Ben Nye Glitter Glue. At right, she created hands-down the freshest take on Breton stripes we’ve ever seen, and with only a single tool: metallic-blue nail-striping tape. The key here is to apply the tape with your eye open so you know the placement won’t compromise your ability to blink (or see). “You never want to be handicapped by your makeup,” says Violette. Makeup colors, opposite page: Eyebrow Pencil in Brunette and Glossy Lipstick in Peony Dew by Burt’s Bees.


LESS OR MORE Minimalists: Are you still with us? Would you consider a 3D accent like these pretty, translucent tears? Violette used her hot-glue gun to make drops, dried them, and then placed them over a sultry flush of powder blush. Maximalists: Don’t worry. We would never forget about you. Head to the craft store and pick up as many sheets of wild, puffy, glittery, bedazzled stickers as you can find. Choose matching ones— or don’t. Stick some to your forehead and work back onto hair slicked down with plastic wrap (it’s the beauty tool of 2018—you heard it here first). Makeup colors, this page: Natural Eyebrow Pencil in Deep Brown and Rouge Rouge lipstick in Rose Crush by Shiseido. Makeup colors, opposite page: The Brow Multi-Tasker in Black and Pure Color Envy Sculpting Blush in Wild Sunset by Estée Lauder.


SHOPPING GUIDE

Cover: Attico dress, $1,212. Opening Ceremony stores. Sophie Bille Brahe earrings, $5,880. Dover Street Market, NYC. 646-837-7750. Zoe Chicco earrings, $350. Zoechicco.com. Foundrae ring, $3,495. Foundrae.com. Table of Contents, page 6: Simone Rocha dress, $2,020. Simon Rocha, NYC. 646-810-4785. Marques’Almeida boots, price available upon request. Nordstrom stores. Crown from New York Vintage, price available upon request. Newyorkvintage.com. Becoming Halsey, page 47: Eye M by Ileana Makri earrings, $265. Eye-m-ileanamakri.com. Catbird earring, price available upon request. Catbird nyc.com. Page 48: Annelise Michelson earrings, price available upon request. Annelisemichelson.com. Catbird earring, price available upon request. Catbirdnyc .com. Sasha’s Time, page 98: Cecilie Bahnson dresses and shorts, prices available upon request. Hlorenzo.com. Walt Cassidy Studio earrings, $225. Waltcassidy.com. Necklace from New York Vintage, price available upon request. Newyorkvintage .com. Page 101: Preen by Thornton Bregazzi dress, price available upon request. Preenbythorntonbregazzi.com. Gabriella Sardena dress, price available upon request. Showroom@1granary.com. Cloe Cassandro dress, price available upon request. Cloecassandro.com. R13 boots. Ryan Lo x Stephen Jones hat, price available upon request. Ryanlo.co.uk. Simone Rocha earrings, $550. Simone Rocha, NYC. 646-810-4785. Coach 1941 ring, $195. Coach stores. Poncho from Resurrection Vintage, $1,800. Resurrectionvintage.com. Phoebe Kime dress, price available upon request. Showroom@1granary.com. R13

boots, $1,195. R13denim.com. Marlo Laz earrings, $3,225. Nordstrom.com. Saskia Diez earrings, $325. Saskia-diez.com. Page 103: Missoni coat, price available upon request. Missoni, NYC. 212-571-9339. Attico dress, $1,212. Opening Ceremony stores. Sophie Bille Brahe earrings, $5,880. Dover Street Market, NYC. 646-837-7750. Paige Novick earrings, $1,780. Paigenovick.com. Foundrae ring, $3,495. Foundrae.com. The Bold Ones, page 104: Sonia Rykiel dress, $1,260. Sonia Rykiel, NYC. 212-396-3060. Marc Jacobs dress, $4,800. Marc Jacobs stores. Page 105: Eckhaus Latta jacket, $475. Opening Ceremony stores. Tom Ford bra top, $1,090. Select Tom Ford stores. Lacoste jeans, $175. Lacoste.com. Mounser earrings, $250. Barneys.com. Page 106: Acne Studios top, $260, and earring, $230. Acnestudios.com. Page 107: Gucci dress, $21,000. Select Gucci stores. Page 108: Elizabeth and James jacket, $1,785. Bloomingdales.com. Sarah & Sebastian earrings, $850. Sarahandsebastian.com. Annelise Michelson earrings, price available upon request. Annelisemichelson.com. Page 109: Acne Studios jacket, $1,150. Net-a-porter.com. Charlotte Chesnais earrings, $395 to $625. Dover Street Market, NYC. 646-837-7750. Page 111: Gucci dress, $13,000. Select Gucci stores. Heather Huey headpiece, price available upon request. Order@heatherhuey.com. Paco Rabanne top, $11,890. Justoneeye.com. Valentino dress, $11,000. Select Valentino stores. Edgar Mosa earrings, $360. Edgarmosa.com. Page 112: Asos dress, $135. Asos.com. Page 113: Alexander McQueen jacket, $2,995, and earrings, $1,595. Alexander McQueen, NYC. 212-645-1797.

ALLURE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 28, NO. 5. May 2018 ISSUE. ALLURE (ISSN 1054-7771) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Pamela Drucker Mann, Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617, call 800-678-1825, or email subscriptions@allure.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within eight weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to ALLURE Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please email reprints@condenast .com or call 717-505-9701, ext 101. For reuse permissions, please email permissions@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at www.allure.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit www.condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617 or call 800-678-1825. ALLURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY ALLURE IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE. 126 ALLURE DISRUPTORS 2018


Stem cell scientist Arna Rúnarsdóttir’s necessities in and out of Bioeffect’s Reykjavík lab.

Top row, from left: L’Occitane Dry Skin Hand Cream; Make Up Store Lip Brush Medium and Eyeshadow Brush Medium; Moleskine Classic Pocket-Size Notebook in Willow Green; Moleskine Classic Roller Pen Plus in Sage Green. Second row, from left: Apple AirPods; Urban Decay Eyeshadows in Midnight Cowboy, Midnight Rodeo, Chase, and Punk. Third row, from left: Blistex Lip Medex; Bioeffect EGF Eye Serum; M.A.C. lipsticks in Angel, Velvet Teddy, and Taupe. Fourth row, from left: Wet Brush Detangle in Pastel Green; Mario Badescu Drying Lotion; Bioeffect EGF Serum; Bioeffect Volcanic Exfoliator; Icelandic Glacial water. Fifth row, from left: OmNom Milk of Madagascar Chocolate; Gucci Bloom Eau de Parfum; Bioeffect 30 Day Treatment for skin.

PROP STYLIST: GÖZDE EKER

{ MY DREAM KIT }

photographed by will anderson


Target 100% of toxins and decongest pores without stripping. Want skin that’s beyond soft and glowing? Start purifying.

© J&JCI 2018

Neutrogena®. See what’s possible.

neutrogena.com/purify


A RADIANCE BOOST. EVERYBODY NEEDS ONE.

© J&JCI 2018

And this is yours. New AVEENO® Positively Radiant® Body, with the power of soy. In just 1 week, our targeted spot corrector helps improve the look of dark spots and uneven tone, while our body wash and lotion instantly transform dry, dull skin. Get your body ready for radiance.

Allure usa may 2018  
Allure usa may 2018  
Advertisement