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SAINT LOUIS

BRIEF Memories of

Morrissey

A BRIEF HISTORY O F THE SCHOOL OF

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SAI NT LOU IS U NIVE R SIT Y SCH O O L O F LAW ALUMN I MAG A Z I N E VO LU M E 1 4 ISSUE 2


M E SSAG E F RO M th e

DEAN

Dear Alumni and Friends,

Let me begin by expressing my sincere gratitude for the heartwarming support that so many of you have sent since I took over as dean in March. I am truly overwhelmed by your good wishes and warm feelings toward the School of Law. I’m trying to respond personally to each of you, but in the event you’ve not yet heard from me, please accept my sincere thanks here. By the time you receive this issue of Saint Louis Brief, your law school will be in the midst of moving into our new home at 100 North Tucker Boulevard, next to the Civil Courts Building in the heart of the downtown legal community. Thanks to the impressive coordination and collaboration within the law school, and to the generous support of the University, we’ll welcome the Class of 2016 for orientation in mid-August. But before departing, we want to pay proper respects to the building and campus that we’ve all called “home” for so many years. When I joined the faculty in 1975, our classes were in the law building at 3642 Lindell, the School of Business and Lewis Hall (now the Coronado apartments). The classrooms at 3642 Lindell were particularly memorable for having windows open most of the year, either because of the St. Louis summer heat or the uncontrolled radiators. I remember standing by the windows and shouting to my classes whenever buses roared by on the street below. Needless to say, our place of learning has progressed greatly in the last 37 years – thanks to the support of our outstanding alumni, plus the faith and leadership the University has shown over so many years. That faith and support are enabling us to move to a splendid new home, a place where we will continue to reaffirm the values and principles at the core of a SLU LAW education. Those values are centered upon:

What’s new? Well, in the not too distant future we’ll be inviting all of you to our new home to see for yourselves. Our building will be a striking symbol of the continuation of our law school’s principles and achievements, while re-emphasizing our engagement with a complex world that needs well-trained leaders in the law. And since our new home is equipped with the latest technology for teaching, learning and practice – and has been designed with the aid of acoustical engineers – I can assure you that the days of shouting over bus noise are over. Also in this issue of the Brief, we’ll reflect on the history of this wonderful institution and a few of the memorable people that embody the spirit of our community. We’ll celebrate some of the many leaders who’ve made SLU LAW an outstanding place. As you’ll see, our old friend and former dean Rudy Hasl (’67) retires this year as the nation’s longest serving law school dean. I have a long way to go to match his 32 years of leadership. Rudy was the assistant dean when I came here in 1975. He’s been a constant inspiration to us. And in my new position, I’m gaining an even greater appreciation for all that he achieved. As you read about his service in this issue, I know you will, too. Beginning in the fall, we will have many opportunities for you to explore our new space and see firsthand how the SLU LAW spirit, values and community continue at our new address. If you are celebrating your 50th (1963), 25th (1988) or 10th (2003) reunion, you will be hearing from us soon. And if you graduated in any other year, drop by anyway. You’ll be impressed, and inspired. I again thank you for your continued support of our students, our school and our future. Best wishes,

+ advancing the understanding and the development of the law; + preparing students to achieve professional success and personal satisfaction through leadership and service to others, while + adhering to a tradition of academic excellence, honesty, integrity, freedom of inquiry, respect for individual differences and a Michael A. Wolff genuine care for the whole person. Dean and Professor


on th e

O N T H E COV E R MOR RI SSE Y H A L L P H OTO GR A PHY BY JAY F RAM

DEA N MI C H A E L A . WO L F F DIREC TO R OF CO MMU NI CAT I ONS JE SS I C A C ICCO N E EDITO R L AURE N B R U C K E R

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A BRI E F H I STO RY OF TH E SCH OOL O F

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GRA P H I C D E S I G N E R JOS H B O OTH CO N T R I B U TO R MA RY M c H U G H P H OTO G RA P H Y ST E V E D O L A N , JAY F R A M , BI L L SAWA L ICH , C HA D WIL L IA M S S P EC IA L T H A NKS W illiam B rown (’ 9 8 ), R udy Hasl (’ 67 ), S h eridan Haynes , Jeffrey L ewis , An tonia M iceli , B ill O’N eill (’ 9 9 ), P e ter Salsic h (’ 6 5 ), E ileen S earls , St ewart Sh ilcrat, Josep h S imeone , E liz abet h Stookey, D iane Todd, A nders Walker

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A N I N T ERVIEW WI TH D E A N MI CH AEL WO LFF

TA K I NG SLU LAW TO NE W HE IGHTS

MEMO RI ES O F MORRISSE Y

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DEV ELO P ME NT AND A LUMNI RELATI ONS UPDATE

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STUDENT SERV I CE SPOTLIGHT

R U DY HASL (‘67)

A N TO NIA M ICELI, DI R E C TO R O F B AR EX AM PREPARATIO N VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2 CO PY R I G H T © 2 01 3 SA IN T LOU I S U NI V E R SI TY S C H O O L OF L AW A LL RIG H T R E SE RV E D. SAI NT LO U IS BR IEF I S PU BLIS HE D T W IC E A N N UA L LY BY SA INT LOU I S U N IV E R SI T Y S C H OO L O F L AW. TH E OFF IC E O F COM MU N IC ATIO N S IS LOC ATE D IN Q U E E N ’ S DAUG HTE R S H A L L , 3730 L I NDE LL B O U L E VA R D, ROO M 3 2 0, SA IN T LO U IS , MI SS OU R I 63 1 0 8 EM A IL: BRIEF @ L AW. S LU. E D U

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L AW Honors and Distinctions S upreme Court R esolution H onors Professor E meritus S imeone Eleven judges of the Missouri Circuit Court, Court of Appeals and Supreme Court presented a program with retired judge and SLU LAW professor emeritus Joseph J. Simeone at the Gatesworth Retirement Community in St. Louis County on Jan. 16. Missouri Supreme Court Chief Justice Richard Teitelman presided and presented the Court ’s tribute to Simeone for his many contributions to the law and judiciary in Missouri, including his drafting of the Judicial Article of the Missouri Constitution in the 1970s. Paying tribute to Simeone and participating in the educational program on Missouri courts for Gatesworth residents were Circuit Judges Mark Neill (‘74), Robert Cohen (‘71), and Robert Dierker Jr. (A&S ’71), and Court of Appeals Judges Kathianne Crane (‘71), Gary Gaertner Jr. (‘90), Robert Dowd Jr.,and Larry Mooney (‘74), Supreme Court Judge Mary Russell and Dean Michael Wolff. About 100 residents attended the program and reception following the program. Judge Simeone has served as a School of Law professor, judge of the Missouri Court of Appeals and judge of the Supreme Court of Missouri. He also is a retired United States Judge of the Executive Department in the Department of Social Security. Simeone began teaching at the law school in 1947. He served as legal counsel to two governors of Missouri and legal advisor to the Judiciary Committee of the Missouri House of Representatives. In addition to drafting the Judicial Article of the Missouri Constitution, he also drafted the original Missouri Public Defender Act, the Controlled Substances Law, various environmental laws and other legislation. Simeone has authored more than 60 legal articles, published in various legal journals and written more than 300 judicial opinions.

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T en Y ears at the Top For the 10th consecutive year, the School of Law’s health law program was named the best in the nation by health law scholars, according to the 2014 U.S . News & World Report Best Graduate Schools Rankings. These rankings come after a year of heated national discourse on the health care system, further emphasizing a need for well-educated lawyers working in health care reform and regulation. In addition to another year of successful programs, the Center for Health Law Studies established a J.D./Master of Science in Health Outcomes Research degree program with the Center for Outcomes Research to further enhance the school’s curriculum.

T hanks , M adison County B ar ! On Jan. 24 the Madison County Bar Association (MCBA) presented the School of Law with a check for $4,745 for its scholarship fund. Each year the MCBA hosts a contest between members to donate to their alma maters; whoever receives the most donations ‘wins’ the money for the year. John Soucy (’97) (pictured, left), executive director - special projects for Saint Louis University Development, was on hand to receive the check.

SLU LAW Women R ecipients of Multiple Women ’ s J ustice Awards Eight women of the SLU LAW community were celebrated for being leading professionals in Missouri at the 15th Annual Women’s Justice Awards on April 25. Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Instructor Kelly Dineen (’04) received the Legal Scholar award and 3L Rachel Berland was awarded the Leader of Tomorrow award. Additionally, many SLU LAW alumnae were honored. Raven J. Akram (’08),


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attorney, Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard, received the Rising Star award; Kristine H. Bridges (’00), associate, Thompson Coburn was given the Litigation Practitioner award; Karen R. McCarthy (’90), president and CEO, The Bar Plan, was awarded the Enterprise award; Mary Dahm (’60), law librarian, St. Louis County Law Library, received the Public Service Practitioner award; and both Jennifer Joyce (’90), circuit attorney, St. Louis, and Angela T. Quigless (’84), judge, Missouri Court of Appeals Eastern District, received the Public Official award. The awards are sponsored by Missouri Lawyers Media.

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Faculty Member of the Year award. This great recognition is voted on by all graduating students. McGraugh addressed the Class of 2013 at Hooding on May 16 (see photos on page 32). McGraugh was also awarded the University’s Faculty Commitment to Experiential Learning Award at the Annual Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony April 18. She was honored for her work supervising the Criminal Defense Clinic which now includes a social worker and provides holistic services to indigent clients.

W riting Excellence Awards

 Students H onored for E xcellence On April 12 at the Xavier Grand Ballroom, nearly 200 SLU LAW students were honored at the Excellence Awards Ceremony, honoring student achievements in the Spring, Summer and Fall 2012 semesters. Additionally, several students were highlighted for their remarkable leadership and volunteer work outside the classroom: Joshua Bradley, The Jaime Ramirez Student of the Year Award; Elizabeth O’Brien, Award for Leadership; Shantel Battee, Award for Diversity and Cultural Competency; Nina McHugh, Award for Pro Bono Legal Service; and Chelsea Harris, Award for Community Service. Also honored was the Hon. E. Richard Webber, senior district judge for the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. The Public Interest Law Group presented Webber with the Clarence Darrow Award for his lifelong service and commitment to public interest. On May 16, the David Grant Clinic Student Award was given to Aerial “Shay” Irby.

Students F ê te the Faculty Associate Professor Marcia McCormick and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor Elizabeth Pendo were both recipients of Academic Excellence Awards from the Student Government Association on April 23. McCormick received a Faculty Excellence Award, recognizing her outstanding teaching and service, while Pendo was awarded the Diversity and Social Justice Award, a new award that recognizes her dedication and service to the SLU community, living out the Oath of Inclusion and integrating issues of social justice and diversity inside and outside the classroom. Associate Clinical Professor Susan McGraugh was honored with the

On April 29 the SLU LAW community paused to recognize the scholarly works of faculty and students. St. Louis law firm Thompson Coburn presented its awards for faculty scholarly excellence. First place awards for 2011 and 2012, respectively, were presented to Chester A . Myers Professor of Law Thomas (Tim) Greaney’s “The Affordable Care Act and Competition Policy: Antidote or Placebo? ” 89 Oregon Law Review 811, and Assistant Professor Karen Petroski’s “Iqbal and Interpretation,” 39 Florida State University Law Review 417. The second-place winner for 2011 was Vincent C . Immel Professor of Law Joel Goldstein’s “Choosing Justices: How Presidents Decide,” 26 Journal of Law and Politics 425; the 2012 second-place winner was Associate Professor Sam Jordan’s “Reverse Abstention,” 92 Boston University Law Review 1771. The same afternoon, three student scholars were recognized with SLWA Writing Excellence Awards: 2L Abby Duncan, 1st place, “A Tale of Two Districts: Lessons Learned From Missouri’s Human Trafficking Task Forces”; 2L Ashley Diaz, 2nd place, “The National Football League, Concussions, and the Player’s Role: Blocking the Litigation”; and part-time 4L Jessica Sindel, 3rd place,“The Path Not Travelled: Challenging DOMA’s Constitutionality via Its Denial of the Fourth Amendment Rights to Privacy and Intimate Association and the Fourteenth Amendment Privacy and Marriage Rights of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Citizens.”

 Baris B ecomes New BA MSL President On May 1 Assistant Dean for Student Services Jon Baris was sworn in as president of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis (BAMSL). Despite being out of the active practice

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of the law since joining SLU LAW in August 2005, he has remained connected to the practicing bar through the organization. Over the years he has worked his way through various positions with BAMSL, serving as chair of the Young Lawyers Division, member-at-large of the Board of Governors and then into the rotation that would lead him to president: treasurer, secretary, vice president and president-elect. To read more on Baris’ plans for his year-long position, visit http://www.slu. edu/colleges/law/slulaw/news/sidebar.

Public Service Initiatives PI LG Auction S ets R ecord This year’s PILG Auction was held March 22 at the Moto Museum. Thanks to the generosity of students, alumni, faculty and staff, this year’s PILG Auction raised a record amount of more than $28,500. These funds will be added to the Dagen Fellowship Fund, and along with other donations to the Fund, will be used to provide $94,000 in stipends to 60 students working in unpaid, legal positions this summer. This year’s event was co-chaired by 2Ls Srishti Miglani and Rachel Harris, with Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor Anders Walker, Associate Professor Sam Jordan and Assistant Dean of Student Activities and Leadership Shannon Morse serving as auctioneers. In continuing tradition, the PILG Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Service Awards were handed out to honor St. Louis area attorneys, law firms and nonprofit organizations that have shown a commitment to servicing the pro bono legal needs of those within the St. Louis community. Presented this year by the Hon. Lisa Van Amburg (’75) of the Eastern District of the Missouri Court of Appeals, the Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Service Awards, recipients were: Individual Michael A . Becker (’87), of counsel at Waltrip & Schmidt, LLC , focuses his practice on financial insolvency and distress for both businesses and individuals. After working for many years in the large law firm environment, he has volunteered for the last three years working with students in the Clinic in representation of individuals below the poverty line in bankruptcy proceedings. He also is doing similar work for Lutheran Family and Children’s Service and Catholic Family and Children’s Services. Nonprofit Every Child’s Hope (ECH) is a private not-for-profit child care agency voluntarily affiliated with the Council

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for Health and Human Services Ministry related to the United Church of Christ. ECH in St. Louis offers, among other things, residential care for troubled boys and girls ages 6 to 18, safe-intensive residential treatment program for boys and girls in severe crisis, school for residents with special educational needs, day treatment for troubled children who remain in their homes, affordable child care for preschoolers, an independent living program for older teens ages 17 to 21, family counseling and family reunification services. Law Firm Greensfelder, Hemker and Gale has been a leader in pro bono representation in the St. Louis area for many years. Its lawyers take numerous referrals through the Volunteer Lawyer Program at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri, representing low-income clients in landlord-tenant matters, domestic violence situations and numerous other types of cases. The firm also regularly participates in community activities such as working to build houses with Habitat for Humanity. Lawyers from Greensfelder, many of whom are SLU LAW alumni, serve as mentors for students, serve as judges for competition teams and work with the Office of Admissions in recruiting new students.

Student Experiences ACS C hapter of the W eek The National Office of American Constitution Society selected SLU LAW’s chapter as Chapter of the Week for Feb. 22. The organization recognizes a student chapter for exceptional programming, relevant and interesting events and great speakers during a particular period


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of the current semester. Pictured, left to right, are the chapter’s officers: Alexander Muntges, Liz O’Brien, Rachel Berland, Erin Burton, Professor Eric Miller (advisor) and Chris Jump. To read more about the chapter’s work this year, visit acslaw.org/studentchapteroftheweek.

M oot Court R eaches N ationals SLU LAW’s Frederick Douglass Moot Court Competition team placed second in the Midwest Regional Competition in February, qualifying them for the National Competition in Atlanta April 6-9. The team is comprised of 4L dual-degree student Jamille Fields and 2L Aujsha Weeden. Adjunct Professor Sheena Hamilton (‘10) coached the students again this year.

 Trial A dvocacy B oot Camp On March 8 members of Clinical Professor Thomas Stewart ’s Trial Advocacy II class set up a service project seeking to put the skills they learned in law school into practice by helping high school students. They coordinated a “boot camp” exercise to coach two YMCA Youth in Government teams from two inner-city St. Louis high schools, Northwest Academy of Law High School and Carnahan High School of the Future. The teams compete regionally in mock trials and are graded on their performance and grasp of rudimentary trial skills. Thirty high school students rotated between sessions led by SLU LAW students where they learned the basic elements of a trial and oral advocacy with the goal of building their confidence and improving their competitiveness.

SLU L AW H its the Capitol for Medicaid Lobby Day Health law students in the Grassroots Health Law, Policy and Advocacy class participated in Medicaid Lobby Day April 17 in Jefferson City, Mo. Pictured are (left to right): Rossanna Madrigal, Rep. Kevin McManus

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(‘06), Health Law & Policy Fellow Lisa D’Sousa, Professor Sidney Watson, Claire Flores, Health Law Practitionerin-Residence Margaret Donnelly, Chandrika Christie and Rep. Kimberly Gardner (’03). Associate Clinical Professor Susan McGraugh, Clinical Professor John Ammann and 20 clinic students were also on hand assisting clients with advocating for the expansion of Medicaid benefits.

Conferences, Symposia and Events T eaching E mployment L aw The William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law and the Saint Louis University Law Journal hosted the symposium on “Teaching Employment and Labor Law” on Feb. 15. Leading teachers and scholars of employment and labor law, including SLU LAW’s Professor Matthew Bodie, Professor Miriam Cherry, Associate Professor Marcia McCormick (pictured) and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor Elizabeth Pendo, discussed their methods for innovative, effective teaching of labor and employment topics.

R egulating D ual-U se R esearch in Life S ciences At the 25th Annual Health Law Symposium hosted by the Center for Health Law Studies and the Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy on Feb. 22, national experts examined the necessary regulations in life sciences research. Life Science research is intended to benefit society; yet, at times, it also creates the potential for uses that threaten public safety. Research that can lead to both benevolent and malevolent uses is known as “dual-use research.” Concern over National Institutes of Health-funded, dual-use research in 2012 refocused public attention on the need for an appropriate balance between scientific discovery and biosecurity. In response, the federal government issued a new policy defining “dual-use research of concern” and requesting agencies to identify their dual-use research projects and manage the security risks associated with them.

Saving the C ities On March 1 Saint Louis University Public Law Review hosted, “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the 21st Century,” a symposium bringing together academics, practitioners, governmental officials and nonprofit leaders to engage in an honest discussion about how cities can be revived through sustainability efforts and a focus on building a modern infrastructure for

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camaraderie, including SLU LAW alumni Judge Sherri B. Sullivan (‘81), Judge Lisa Van Amburg (‘75), Judge Kurt S. Odenwald (‘79), Judge Mary Kathryn Hoff (‘78) and Judge Angela Turner Quigless (‘84). As the Adler Rosecan Jurist in Resident, Dowd Jr. presented “Appellate Advocacy and Tid Bits from the Bench,” on March 22. Later that afternoon, students competed in the Regina and William H. Kniep Moot Court Competition final argument, with second-year students Rob Gerlach and James Ribaudo selected as winners of the Judge Robert G. Dowd Sr. Appellate Advocacy Award. The judges presiding over the competition were Dowd Jr.; Judge David Dowd, 22nd Judicial Circuit; and James M. Dowd, attorney, Kell Lampin, LLC , all brothers whose father the award is named after.

P reparing ‘J ustice R eady ’ L awyers For March 21’s 3rd Annual Vincent C . Immel Lecture on Teaching Law, Professor Jane Aiken of Georgetown Law discussed, “Preparing ‘Justice Ready’ Lawyers.” Aiken works as associate dean of Clinical Education and Public Interest and Community Service Programs and director of the Community Justice Project. The focus of her lecture was on how to train students to be sensitive to justice issues.

O ur S elf - M edicating C ulture The Center for Interdisciplinary Study of Law held its second annual symposium, “Our Self-Medicating Culture,” on April 5. Leading scholars discussed the sociological and cultural features of American culture and society that contribute to a trend of self-medication. The symposium also provided an opportunity for discussion of how our legal and social systems have addressed the potentially dangerous aspects of the self-medication trend.

 My F ellow A mericans On April 12 the School of Law hosted a naturalization ceremony welcoming 26 people from 11 countries as new American citizens. Dean Michael Wolff provided remarks and SLU LAW alumna Maribeth McMahon (’87) sang “God Bless America” before U.S. District Judge Rodney Sippel administered the oath of allegiance. For more photos from the event, visit the SLU LAW Facebook page.

Hello, Goodbye N ew H ealth L aw and P olicy F ellow

 Court Week in S ession The School of Law hosted the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District on March 20. The panel of judges, Judge Robert G. Dowd, Judge Lawrence E. Mooney (‘74), Judge Kathianne Knaup Crane (‘71) and Chief Judge Gary M. Gaertner Jr. (‘90), heard three cases. Following the hearings, a faculty luncheon was held for the judges in Queen’s Daughters Hall, where eight additional Appeals judges joined in the

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Lisa D’Souza joined the School of Law in March as a Health Law and Policy Fellow. D’Souza will be providing legal and policy analysis to support the work of the Missouri consumer health advocates and co-teaching the Grassroots Health Advocacy class along with Professor Sidney Watson and Practitionerin-Residence Margaret Donnelly. This two-year


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instructor position is made possible through generous funding from the Missouri Foundation for Health.

# SLU L AW

Social Scene

P rofessor R ohlik R etires Professor Josef Rohlik, a member of the School of Law faculty for 41 years, will retire at the end of the 2012-2013 academic year. An internationally recognized scholar, Rohlik ’s career began in 1962 as an attorney with an import/export corporation in Czechoslovakia, where he was born. In pursuit of intellectual freedom, he entered academia at Charles University School of Law in Prague in 1963. In 1965, he earned a diploma from The Hague Academy of International Law. Rohlik came to Columbia University in 1968 with the intention of staying a year or two before returning to Czechoslovakia. However, when his country was invaded that summer, he decided to remain in the United States. He was a commercial tribunal administrator with the American Arbitration Association in New York City before joining Saint Louis University in 1971. As a faculty liaison to the Brussels Seminar, Rohlik organized and participated in a variety of international programs for the School of Law. He was a panelist at the Summit on Constitutional Adjudication both in Florence in 1995 and in New York in 1997, which involved U.S. Supreme Court justices and constitutional court justices from Russia, Germany and Italy. His numerous articles and books were published both in Europe and the United States. Much of his scholarship concentrated on international trade and economic relations. Rohlik has also written multiple op-ed pieces on such topics as diplomatic endeavors in the Balkans, U.S. policy toward China and capitalism in Russia. Apart from international law, Rohlik has considerable experience in teaching conflict of laws, commercial law and arbitration. He was an active arbitrator since the early 1970s and is a member of the prestigious National Academy of Arbitrators, which has fewer than 600 members in the U.S. He served as a member of the School’s Wefel Center for Employment Law and the Center for International and Comparative Law. While a visitor at the University of Georgia, he was instrumental in bringing John Murray to the law school as dean. Additionally, Rohlik served as a member of the dean search committee which selected Dean Hasl and co-chair of the dean search committee which selected Dean Attanasio. For many years he was a member and also chair of the appointments committee of the law school, its representative to the University committee on rank and tenure, and, for eight years until 2010, chair of that committee. He remains an active arbitrator and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future in his retirement.

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Here’s what Twitter’s been saying about SLU LAW: @mikemorton89 Excited to speak to students from @ASUJonesboro this morning about @SLULAW, the @SLULAWAdmits process, and the pros of coming to #SLULAW @downtownstlouis View from the 12th floor rooftop deck at new @slulaw building in DT. Can’t wait to welcome you to the neighborhood pic.twitter.com/8gk1DcY V3x @ThompsonCoburn We can see the Socratic method already! RT @slulaw: Framing for classroom seating has been installed. #NewSLULAW http://instagram.com/p/XvNGaPjQNu/ @ArchGrants Did you know that @SLU_Official’s health law program has been #1 in the nation for TEN yrs? http://www. bizjournals.com/stlouis/blog/2013/03/ slu-health-law-program-rankednations.html … @TheSTLScoop SLU health law program ranked nation’s best http://dlvr.it/34MWym @stlbizesherberg SLU finally gets it right! SLU names Mike Wolff dean of law school http://www. bizjournals.com/stlouis/blog/2013/03/ slu - names- mike -wolf f- dean - of- lawschool.html?ana=twt … via @stlouisbiz #goodguy #smartguy #rightguy @TheNineNetwork In case you missed it @SLULAW Prof. John Ammann was on #StayTunedSTL last Thur discussing immigration reform: http://ow.ly/hxMii @yourstruly_ KEV Y No school for us today! On our way to SLU law school for Law Day!! Can’t you tell we’re STOKED lol! Get in on the conversation and follow SLU LAW on Twitter and Instagram for photo tours of the new building, live tweeting of events and more! @SLULAW

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DEAN MICHAEL WOLFF:

TAKING SLU LAW TO NEW HEIGHTS

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he Honorable Michael A. Wolff was announced as the new dean of Saint Louis University School of Law in March 2013. Wolff, who rejoined the SLU LAW faculty in 2011 after 13 years on the Missouri Supreme Court, brings an established record of leadership. He is committed to educating future lawyers and dedicated to the School’s mission of justice. For 23 years prior to his appointment to the Court, he worked as an assistant, associate and full professor at SLU teaching civil procedure, state constitutional law and trial advocacy, among many other courses. Most recently, he served as chair of the Building Committee and co-chair of the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Law. SLB: The last few years have seen a lot of turnover in the Dean’s Office. What will you do to reestablish stability in the law school administration, and what challenges and opportunities come with this? MW: The important thing here is perspective.

All institutions have their rough patches. That’s behind us now. Most importantly, we’re focused on identifying the best ways to prepare our students to become outstanding lawyers. SLU LAW’s future is extremely promising and exciting, despite this being a very challenging time for legal education nationwide. As everyone knows, law students face daunting costs and a tight job market. Yet there are growing numbers of people in our country who have limited or no access to legal services. This presents a major challenge to everyone concerned not only with the legal profession, but with the well-being of the nation as a whole. SLB: How will SLU LAW address these challenges? MW: Fortunately, SLU LAW’s task is much

more manageable than those faced by so many other law schools. This is because our business plan was never based on promising people that they could go to Wall Street or Silicon Valley and make gobs of money. Those other schools have been left wondering about their next course of action. In contrast,

SLU LAW’s curriculum has long emphasized the importance of our students becoming part of the profession before graduation. Our students get experiences during their law school years that others receive only after being hired. It’s a big advantage for our graduates. SLB: Alumni support took a hit in the last year with the controversies at both the School of Law and University. What are you going to do to further engage and win back the support of alumni? MW: I’ve already received a large number

of very positive responses. Our alumni are fundamentally engaged, and that’s because they care about SLU LAW, and because they understand and believe in our mission. A big part of my job is to demonstrate that we are on the right course, that we will adhere to the right values, and that we’ll continue to build on our school’s many strengths. A SLU LAW degree is worth a lot. And it will be even more valuable in the years to come – that’s the goal. We will be a smaller law school going forward. But we will become an even more effective one. This is because we will be aiming to prepare our graduates even better than before for a demanding legal marketplace that needs outstanding lawyers. SLB: How do you see Saint Louis University’s Catholic, Jesuit mission reflected in SLU LAW?

MW: Take, for example, the outstanding work being done at our Legal Clinics. Our faculty, cooperating lawyers and the students in these programs are fulfilling a social justice mission – part of what it means to be a Jesuit institution – by emphasizing the importance of service to others. They provide a variety of legal services to those who cannot afford a lawyer, and at the same time our students are receiving excellent real-world practice opportunities. Once we are downtown, our Legal Clinics will have even higher visibility and an even greater impact. We are also planning a “Partnership for Justice” program – an advisory board of cooperating lawyers and leaders in the profession who will work to further enhance the Legal Clinics’ programs. So expect our work and service in this area to be more visible and more effective once we are established downtown. SLB: How do you plan on integrating SLU LAW into the larger St. Louis legal community? MW: The move into the heart of the legal community in downtown St. Louis will allow us to further integrate our curriculum with practical and experiential opportunities offered by our friends in the practicing bar. We already have 75 adjunct professors who teach with us on a regular basis. I would like to expand that so the substantive, intellectually

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challenging courses we offer can be coupled with practical skills problems – where practitioners come in with real life situations that will reinforce the coursework. And at the same time, we can expose our students to outstanding members of the profession, especially our alumni, who are extremely professional and sharp, and who have been outstanding in making our students feel part of the profession. I think we’ll be able to do that really well downtown. SLB: Legal education is changing. How can SLU LAW be at the forefront of that restructuring? MW: One of our challenges is how much it

costs to become a lawyer. We’re going to look at that very seriously in our strategic planning process. We will search for ways to make a SLU LAW degree more affordable, more effective, even more practice-ready and more valuable – all while seeking out new ways to encourage public-spirited graduates to take lower-paying jobs in public service. SLB: Do we need to reevaluate how we teach law students?

There has been some movement nationally suggesting that a student’s time in law school should be shorter. That addresses the cost of tuition issue. At the same time, there’s a conflicting demand that law schools be more comprehensive and teach more, not less. Obviously, we can’t do everything and satisfy everyone. Finding the right formula, however, is a key emphasis for us. It’s an important, ongoing process that SLU LAW has already been pursuing with good success for years, and our graduates will continue to benefit from our efforts. Part of our continuing

MW:

10

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

challenge is to further this success by keeping a strong focus on all the things that make for an effective lawyer in today’s world. SLB: What makes an effective lawyer? MW: We have to focus on several broad areas

of competence [see sidebar, page 11]. Part of my challenge as dean is to have these core competencies analyzed, taught and instilled in an organized way at SLU LAW, so that our prospective graduates can map their progress. It’s not just the intellectual ability to analyze and write and persuade. It’s an entire suite of skills, perspectives and habits of mind, all of which can be learned, such as how to best organize one’s work, how to run a business and be entrepreneurial and how to collaborate. When I was in law school, the law was billed as primarily an adversarial system – everybody was competing. But if you look at the way law is practiced today, it’s oftentimes very collaborative. Our education must reflect that reality. SLB: How do you make this kind of education a reality? MW: Well, first of all, you’ve got to continually “ground test” it with lawyers working in the changing legal marketplace. So whenever I meet with our alumni I try to find time to say: “Here’s my list of what I think makes a good lawyer. But what are you looking for when you hire? What do you expect us to produce for you in these students we’re bringing into the profession?” I’m open to adding to, and changing, my list – and then looking at what might need to be changed in SLU LAW’s offerings. That’s the point of the conversation. So, for example, when people stress leadership or working well with

others: I want to make sure that our students can develop those traits here, not just in their classwork but also by working on journals or SBA or other student organizations. We want to identify and nurture leaders as part of our co-curricular programs as well. SLB: Your background as a judge is somewhat unusual among law deans. How will that background help you in your new position? MW: Having been a judge brings different

perspectives on the law, and that’s been very valuable to me as an educator. First of all, from the bench, one sees how the law is actually being practiced in many areas. That’s a very practical part of the experience. But it goes far beyond that, since working for the Court often provided dramatic illustrations of the vital importance of law in our society. That entire experience informs my work as a teacher, and I hope it will help direct my work as dean. Being on the Missouri Supreme Court was also a bit like being on a faculty, because you spend a lot of time puzzling out and discussing law, and working to persuade others about what the law is and should be. And on a court of seven judges, unless you have three other judges agree with you, you can’t do much. It’s vitally important to listen to, and work with, one’s peers. And finally, the Supreme Court work was very satisfying and interesting public service, which is something we emphasize here at SLU. SLB: Earlier, you referred to how different a legal education was when you were in law school. What else has changed? How will SLU LAW address those changes?


FACULTY PRO FILE

MW: When I was in law school, nobody really thought systematically about how to run a business, how to be entrepreneurial, how to get business. A lot of our alumni have gone on to running successful law firms. Others are running business enterprises. So for that reason I’ve talked to the School of Business about teaching those skills and getting some more entrepreneurial content into our curriculum. There will be some students who, of course, will have little interest in learning more about business. And that’s fine. Perhaps instead they’ll want to study public interest law. If so, we also have a lot to offer them. Or maybe they’re interested in running for public office, or in becoming policy experts or in running a nonprofit organization. We are a great place for learning that as well, as seen in our alumni who are leading legislators and public officials. The key point is this: we need to provide for our students a wide array of approaches and methods, so that when challenges and opportunities arise for our graduates – like running a law firm, or a non-law business or running for office – they’ll be ready to take it on with confidence, professionalism and success. SLB: How do SLU LAW’s Centers of Excellence fit into the picture? Will they change or be expanded? MW: These are four outstanding programs – the Center for Health Law

Studies, the Wefel Center for Employment Law, the Center for International and Comparative Law and the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Law. All four allow our students to add a specialized area of focus to their legal education. Our health law program has been ranked number one in the nation for ten years running and is a great example of what I’m talking about. That program directly connects and integrates our students and faculty – in a variety of ways – with leading health lawyers around the nation. For example, our health law externships in Washington, D.C., are a model for both reinforcing and expanding the substantive classroom learning and for practical engagement with the profession. That’s a model I want to expand in our other curricular offerings as well. SLB: What accomplishments in your career are you most proud of? MW: First and foremost: teaching. Being in front of a class and being a part of such a highly talented faculty enables me to pay it forward to get the next generation engaged and make society better. I’m also proud of my service on the Missouri Supreme Court, particularly since I played a role in getting lawyers, judges and the public more fully involved in protecting the judicial system’s independence and in improving the criminal justice system. In my current role as dean, I hope to help set our students on the path toward finding similar satisfaction in their work. That’s really my current job: preparing the next generation. It’s a great privilege and duty that all the members of our faculty take seriously. SLB: What do you find most exciting about the future of SLU LAW? MW: Being downtown will be great. It means an even greater engagement

with the profession. It means SLU LAW will become a genuine part of the legal work being done downtown. It will make us an even better and more engaged place to study law. It’s an extraordinary opportunity and challenge, and as you can see, I’m pretty excited about it.

8

CORE COMPETENCIES

OF WHAT MAKES AN

EFFECTIVE

LAWYER

While Wolff was on the bench of the Missouri Supreme Court, he consistently thought about what kinds of people are in the legal system. In meeting with hundreds of lawyers in the state, he was always curious, “Why is this person a good lawyer? What does she have that other lawyers don’t?” While borrowing from some literature from the University of California, Wolff developed these core competencies and attributes of what makes for a good lawyer. 1. Intellectual Qualities // Analysis and reasoning // Creativity – innovation // Problem solving // Practical judgment 2. Researching Law and Getting the Facts // Researching the law // Fact finding: questioning and interviewing 3. Communicating // Influencing and advocating – writing, speaking, listening 4. Conflict Resolution // Negotiation // Empathy: Being able to see the world through the eyes of others 5. Planning and organizing // Strategic planning // Managing one’s own work // Managing others, including collaborating with colleagues 6. Entrepreneurship // Ability to network and develop business // Providing clients with advice and counsel and building relationships 7. Working with others Developing professional relationships // // Mentoring and being mentored // Becoming a leader 8. Character // Integrity – honesty // Diligence, persistence // Passion, engagement // Stress management // Community involvement and service // Self-development

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

11


Memories of

Morrissey

A BRIEF HISTORY O F THE SCHOOL OF

LAW

MARY M c H U G H A N D LAUREN BRU C KE R BY

12

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


COVER STO RY

I f the walls coul d s p eak, oh the stories they woul d tell . From its humble beginnings with 18 students right after the Civil War, Saint Louis University School of Law has experienced an exponential growth in its student population over its 170 year history, an everconstant struggle for space and the evolution of legal education, all of which have helped shape the attitudes of the law school community and the school’s survival itself. Outside its walls, the world experienced and reacted to the complexities of two world wars, the women’s movement, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, the social justice movement and changing political environments. The school itself has undergone four location moves and numerous alterations and expansions. Inside the library, for example, the walls have nearly burst at the seams as dedicated staff members tried to, along with the work of creative architects, contain and display a collection that has grown to include more than 664,000 titles. The memories of the people who have come and gone through the years have helped keep the School of Law stories alive and build a rich history for the school both on the SLU campus and beyond. As the law school prepares to make the historical move beyond the halls of Morrissey, those who have built the school into the institution it is today give us a look back into the past.

W

hile no formal history of the school exists on paper in any one location, the story can be told through a hodgepodge string of historical notes appearing on plaques hanging throughout the school. But the essence of the place, its cultural history, the flavor of its hopes, dreams and aspirations lies in the memories of the staff, faculty, students and alumni. It is through them that the past comes to life and brings forth a rich and colorful narration that spans a century, reflects the wonderful characters who have graced the hallways and left their mark in one fashion or

another, and certainly cements SLU LAW’s position as a school that puts service to others above all. The memories have been passed down through generations in the ancient way of storytelling — word of mouth. With laughter and humility, the stories are retold with a spirit of reverence in memory of those about whom the subjects are speaking. The stories fill the space, continue to create tradition and lore, and make the school come to life. For without the stories to fill it, a building is just space bordered by its walls.

Eileen Searls sits behind her desk on the second floor of the Omer Poos Library recounting her 48 years as the SLU LAW librarian. The wealth of memories inside her mind are far greater than that which appears in the hundreds of law volumes and journals that line the floor-to-ceiling shelves. Historical photos hang on the walls in a haphazard way, as if to prove her mind showcases a greater pictorial overview of the school’s history. Her desk is piled chin high with research and historical notes. At 88, she is a vibrant, walking library. Favorite teachers of hers? She rattles off the names of some of the school’s more illustrious professors, staff and deans, including Alvin Evans, Vince Immel, Dick Childress, Joe Simeone, Sandy Sarasohn and Mike Wolff. Outside her office in the nearby hallway are boxes lining the walls, filled with volumes and supplies. Engineers walk around with tools, measuring wall space. Another move. With more than a half million volumes now fighting for space in the Omer Poos Library, and a rabbit hole-esque pathway of corridors, classes and courtrooms leading into the labyrinth of Morrissey Hall, students and faculty are preparing for one of the biggest moves in the school’s history. Rather than just eeking out more space in some unused corridor, the law school will be moving its operation to a 12-story building at 100 N. Tucker Blvd. in downtown St. Louis, just steps away from the Civil Courts building and within walking distance of the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse, providing students with daily exposure to the innerworkings of a life in the legal profession. The move is unprecedented in the history of SLU LAW. When completed in August 2013, the SLU LAW Legal Clinics, the classrooms and the library will, for the first time since the early 20th century, be under one roof. The vertical layout of the building will be something new to the students and professors who have traversed the old locations in a horizontal pattern without having to walk up more than a couple flights of stairs to reach any one particular place. The move will be a culmination of years of searching for space and struggling for a permanent residence, which started with the first law school class. The year was 1843, and there were just over 16,000 people who called St. Louis home. The two-story brick building on the north side of Washington VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

13


SAINT LO U I S U NIV E RSIT Y

S C H O O L O F LAW

COVER STORY

Timeline

to accommodate the five pioneering women who entered the program that first year, graduating in 1911.

1800

1818

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY FOUNDED

1825 1843

Saint Louis University LAW SCHOOL opens, as part of SLU’s downtown campus at Effingham & Lyell; first law school west of the Mississippi River

1850

1847

Law school closes as a result of Dean Buckner’s death

DOWNTOWN

1875

Institute of Law moves to 3642 Lindell BLVD.

1916

Most notable, however, was the second floor “lady students’ assembly room”

1900

MIDTOWN 1908

Saint Louis University INSTITUTE OF LAW IS ESTABLISHED, AT 2740 LOCUST ST.

1912

NIGHT SCHOOL EXPANDED FROM THREE TO FOUR YEARS OF STUDY 14

The Honorable Richard Buckner, a Virginia native, was the school’s founder and only faculty member. A few of his early graduates went on to become quite famous. J. Richard Barret – nicknamed “Missouri Dick” – became a two-time U.S. congressman, Lucien Carr went on to become a famous anthropologist at Harvard University and William Tell Coleman helped tame the West by establishing order on the San Francisco waterfront. However, after Buckner’s untimely death in 1847, there was a 60-year gap before the university found the energy, interest and resources to establish the law school again. In 1888 the university moved to the Grand and Lindell area, and Rev. James Conway was commissioned to resurrect the law school. In 1908, the Institute of Law opened in a threestory mansion located in the same n e i g h b o rhood where T.S. Elliott once lived, on the southeast corner of Leffingwell and Locust. The building housed administrative offices, a general assembly hall, a courtroom and a law library containing 3,000 volumes.

1888

SLU MOVES CAMPUS TO GRAND AND LINDELL

1910

Avenue between 9th and 10th streets measured 34 by 80 feet and had the honor of being the first law school west of the Mississippi. Classes began on the first Monday of November and ended the following March. In addition to classes, a weekly moot court session was held for the students to discuss the issues of the time.

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

14

SA I NT LO U I S B R I EF

The law school was ahead of the rest of the University in this respect because it would be another 12 years before a women would receive a graduate degree in another area of study at SLU, and nearly half a century before women would be admitted to the undergraduate programs (a common practice for both private and public institutions at the time). The law students attended classes six days a week, excluding Sundays and holidays. The night school met for two hours, four nights a week. Tuition was steep – $100; and, with book fees ranging anywhere from $25 to $50, most students had to work part time jobs just to try and make ends meet. The student population nearly doubled in those three years from 94 to 185. Once again, things were bursting at the seams. The Institute of Law found a new home at 3642 Lindell Blvd. The address would be home to the School of Law, as it became known in 1924, for the next 70 years. In the early ‘20s the library was staffed and run by the law school students. Rooms across the top of the building – four of them and a bathroom – served as home to the staff. Law student Omer Poos, a coal miner’s son and future Federal District Judge for Southern Illinois, was one of the live-in librarians. He and his fellow colleagues ate their meals with the Jesuits in the dining hall behind DuBourg Hall. Little did Poos know that nearly a half century later, the new SLU LAW library would bear his name. With war raging over seas, the law school closed down from 1943-1946. The few students who were left during these years were sent to Washington University’s School of Law for class and both schools now claim these students as alumni.


COVER STORY 1920

As the veterans began returning home, the local demand for legal education grew. SLU LAW’s first post-war program began in 1946 with 23 students, all but two of whom were veterans. By the next year, enrollment reached 202, and the following year, 348. Two of the more illustrious professors to grace the hallways at SLU LAW arrived with this new chapter: Joseph Simeone and Richard “Dick” Childress. Each had a distinctive style of teaching that made students either cringe or laugh depending upon how much preparation they did for class. Simeone recalls when he joined in 1947, there were just 11 faculty members with little to no law school teaching experience, who were young and full of character and personality. “When I was hired I was thankful to have a job making $300 a month, twice as much as I was making at the law firm [where he was working],” he said. “As a young teacher I was quite diffident and told to be more confident. One day I went to Dean Evans and sought his advice on how to teach law. He looked me squarely in the eye and told me, ‘Son, all I know to tell you is teach like hell!’” Simeone is currently professor emeritus at the School of Law; Childress, who became dean in 1969, passed away unexpectedly in 1974. In 1958, the legendary Vincent Immel joined the faculty and, aside for a stint as dean from 1962 to 1969, taught contracts and remedies into the 21st Century. In the late 1960s, enrollment began to swell because of a combination of factors: the baby boom, the civil rights movement, veterans returning from Vietnam and the women’s rights movement, all of which reached law schools at approximately the same time. Professor Peter Salsich (’65), who joined the faculty in 1969, recalls the obvious need for new space. “From 1969-71 we went from an entry class of 70 students to one of 220,” he said. “Of course that time period marked the beginning of major changes in law schools across the country. We went from a collection of people like me – white, male, suburbanites – to a

pretty diverse group. And it was the student population that changed first.”

1924

THE SCHOOL’S NAME CHANGES TO SCHOOL OF LAW

Salsich said law schools were beginning to reflect societal changes. If the ‘60s set the stage for sweeping social change, the ‘70s ushered in the need for even more space to accommodate increased enrollment that resulted from these movements.

1928

NIGHT SCHOOL CLOSES

1930

“We went from virtually an all-male school to one that was about half female,” he said. “You have to remember, the ‘60s were full of turmoil. We had the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, the women’s liberation movement. These all converged at the same time, and our student population reflected these changes.”

MIDTOWN

Salsich recalls the fall of 1971 as his favorite first-year class ever. He was assistant dean and chair of the admissions committee at the time, and it was his job to greet the students the first day of class.

1943

SCHOOL CLOSES DUE TO WORLD WAR II (AUG. 20)

1946

SCHOOL REOPENS (JAN. 7); EVENING PROGRAM ESTABLISHED

“I’ll never forget the first four people who walked in that day,” he said. The first one to greet Salsich was a woman walking with two small children. One child was walking alongside of her, holding her hand. “The other child was in a papoose on her back,” Salsich said. “That woman (Doreen Dodson) later became president of the Missouri Bar.

1950

1954

ORDER OF WOOLSACK ESTABLISHED (TOP 10% OF SENIOR CLASS)

“The second student that day was another woman who had just gotten off a motorcycle and she walked in wearing Levi’s carrying her helmet under her arm. The third one was a guy just back from Vietnam, shirt open to his navel with gold chains. And the fourth one was a guy from Boston, tall with a three-piece dark suit who looked a little Ted Kennedy-like. And I thought to myself, this is going to be an interesting year because the incoming students were so diverse. And all of these changes seem to have happened almost overnight.”

1960 1964

FIRST LAW SCHOOL IN MISSOURI TO OFFER THE JURIS DOCTOR DEGREE TO GRADUATES (JOINING A NATIONWIDE EFFORT TO ELIMINATE THE OLD LL.B.)

1966

Undergraduate degree becomes admission requirement; First Barrister’s Ball held, to raise money for scholarship fund

By that time the school administrators knew they had to do something, Salsich said. The first step was to find additional classroom space on and off campus. Salsich VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

1940

1967

15

JUVENILE LAW CLINIC FORMED WITH THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SERVICE

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

15


1969

COVER

1971

remembers teaching classes in the Coronado Ballroom across the street, in the School of Business (Davis-Shaughnessy Hall) and in the underground classrooms behind Busch Student Center.

LEGAL CLINICS FORMED

1970

FIRST JOINT-DEGREE PROGRAM OFFERED

1973

OMER POOS LAW LIBRARY DEDICATED; BLSA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED

1974

FIRST HOODING CEREMONY

1975

PLACEMENT OFFICE (NOW OFFICE OF CAREER SERVICES) ESTABLISHED TO AID IN JOB SEARCH

1980 1980

MORRISSEY HALL DEDICATED

1982

CENTER FOR HEALTH LAW STUDIES OPENS

1986

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW OPENS

1987

CENTER FOR EMPLOYMENT LAW OPENS

1990

MIDTOWN

1994

HEALTH LAW CERTIFICATE AND HEALTH LAW LL.M. PROGRAMS BEGIN

1996

SLU PUBLISHES JOURNAL OF HEALTH AND HOSPITAL LAW, LATER RENAMED JOURNAL OF HEALTH LAW

1998

VINCENT C. IMMEL ATRIUM ADDED TO THE SCHOOL OF LAW; QUEEN’S DAUGHTERS HALL RENOVATED AND DEDICATED

2000

2000 16

1843 SCHOLARS PROGRAM AWARDS FIRST FULL TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS TO 10 INCOMING STUDENTS; FIRST ISSUE OF SAINT LOUIS BRIEF

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

STORY

At the same time, steps were taken to begin construction of a long-planned new law school building. Salsich recalls a meeting he attended in Dean Childress’ office with Gyo Obata, a principal of a well-known architecture firm. Childress opened the meeting by stating that the University had raised $750,000 toward a new building. He acknowledged that was not enough to build the entire law school, and asked Obata what he could get for that amount. Obata pulled from his pocket a color Polaroid snapshot of a new elementary school building he had designed for a school in Denver. It looked like a yellow brick box. Childress said, “Do it. We’ll build the library, and add the classes later.” In October 1973, the Omer Poos Law Library was officially dedicated at the southwest corner of Spring and Lindell. The design allowed for a new law school building to be added on in the future. The new building provided 32,000 square feet of library space, new faculty offices and administrative offices for the law library. And best of all – air conditioning. While shelving the books in the new space, Searls was also dealing with the advent of technology. SLU was one of the first 10 law schools in the country to subscribe to the LexisNexis online legal search system. “There was no internet at that point,” she said. “The Missouri Statutes, and all Missouri cases back to the turn of the century, the U.S. Supreme Court cases and a few federal cases were all available on this system.” By 1980 Morrissey Hall was completed. The threestory structure adjoined the Omer Poos library on the west. In addition to classrooms, administrative and faculty offices, a large

16

SA I NT LO U I S B R I EF

courtroom, judge’s chamber and jury room, Morrissey Hall offered space for another 150,000 volumes in the law library. Over the next 20 years additional alterations and expansions were made to the law school’s buildings: the Vincent C. Immel Atrium, named after the renowned dean and professor; new classrooms where Myron’s Tire shop used to be; and, finally, the expansion and restoration of Queen’s Daughters Hall which included a connection to Morrissey Hall from the mansion. This provided a new home for the Office of Admissions and offices for the law school journals and clinic.

As the School of Law entered the new millennium and its unknowns, it entered familiar territory of needed expansion and not enough space to put everyone. The Legal Clinics, Catholic Legal Assistance Ministry (CLAM) and Catholic Immigration Law Project moved across Lindell Blvd. to the former School of Public Health (which had been vacant) at 321 N. Spring Street. After they vacated the third floor of Queen’s Daughters, the Office of Development and Alumni Relations and the Office of Publications (now Communications) moved up one floor. The Office of Career Services settled into its new home in the former Student Bar Association offices in mid-July 2002, which left the second floor of Queen’s Daughters open for the dean’s office and staff. The former dean’s office (Morrissey Hall Room 101) became the nerve center for the Office of Student Services, housing the new associate dean of students, academic support, the registrar and other support services. This area finally became functional for students as they could access all these important services available to them, as well as Career Services, on the first floor of Morrissey. “Each dean had a different way of approaching the space problem and creating new space,” Salsich said. “For those last


COVER STORY 2001

70 years before moving to Morrissey Hall, there was never enough money to a do a fullfledged law building. A lot of our additions addressed a particular space problem we were dealing with at a particular time. What resulted through the years is a building that goes off in a lot of different directions.” It was under Dean Jeff Lewis’ term (19992011) that the Legal Clinics were moved to 321 N. Spring Street. When Lewis arrived at SLU, there were 750 students and about 35 faculty. Two clinicians were running the Clinics. By the end of his term 11 years later, the size of the faculty had doubled and the student body had increased by 30 percent. There were seven clinicians heading up the Legal Clinics. “The law school has had this long tradition of caring and being service-minded. And that, in fact, was one of my concerns each time we talked about expanding things here,” Lewis said. “One of my principle worries was that we might lose the spirit of this place. That’s often a side effect of expansion when you start bringing in so many new people and adding programs. But as we continued to expand, the staff and I were very conscious of what we had. We continually talked about it, and we managed to keep the spirit of this place intact through all the changes.” Once again, Saint Louis University is redefining what it means to educate lawyers. Continuing and expanding on that sense of community will be at the center of the new state of the art facility downtown. The building was donated to the University and offered to the law school for renovation in late 2011.

One of the most exciting parts of the move for Dean Michael Wolff is the physical aspect of the law school community finally being together under one, easily navigable roof. The vertical layout of the building, along with the multitude of open area seating, will encourage collaboration among students, faculty and staff. That, in turn, will help encourage the sense of community and care that uniquely identifies the SLU LAW experience. Additionally, though just over two miles from the main University campus, this new location puts the school right in the heart of the legal community, giving students unparalleled access to a variety of learning opportunities with the practicing bar. The architects and contractors, with a great deal of involvement from the law school community, are transforming a former office building into an attractive, multipurpose facility that will enhance the school’s educational program and create a profound change in its ability to teach, learn and become fully integrated with the legal community. From the lobby entryway to the newly created 12th floor, complete with a rooftop pavilion and courtyard, the building will be contemporary, spacious and suitable for a multitude of learning and networking opportunities. The interior spaces will be adaptable to small group study and meeting sessions, diverse classroom arrangements, large events and professional skills competitions. “As we move downtown there is no question that part of what we become in terms of professionalism and public service will be driven by the fact that we will be within blocks of many of our alumni and practicing attorneys,” said Wolff. “It will help us create and define what we want to do with our programs and our curriculum, and truly transform the way we educate future lawyers.”

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

17

FIRST SUMMER ABROAD PROGRAM OFFERED (MADRID); FIRST “SMALL SECTION” PROGRAM (FIRST-YEAR CLASSES UNDER 35 STUDENTS)

2002

severAL LOCATION CHANGES HAPPEN WITHIN THE COMMUNITY, MOST NOTABLY MOVING THE LEGAL CLINICS TO SPRING STREET

MIDTOWN

2006

EXAM4 ELECTRONIC EXAMS FIRST IMPLEMENTED

2007

FIRST ISSUE OF SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF HEALTH LAW & POLICY PUBLISHED

2008

EMAIL SERVICES MIGRATED TO GOOGLE APPS

2009

SERVICE DAY BECOMES A COMPONENT OF FIRST-YEARS’ ORIENTATION WEEK

2010

LEGAL CLINICS EXPANSION

2010

2011

CENTER FOR THE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF LAW OPENS; HEALTH LAW SEMESTER IN WASHINGTON, D.C., PROGRAM BEGINS

2012

ANNOUNCED DONATION OF SCOTT HALL AND SLU LAW’S MOVE TO DOWNTOWN; RENOVATION BEGINS IN OCTOBER

2013

CONSTRUCTION CONTINUES, THE MOVE WILL BE COMPLETE IN TIME FOR THE FALL SEMESTER

DOWNTOWN

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

17


COVER STO RY

Memories of

Morrissey

REFLECTION ON THE SCHOOL OF LAW A

When I think of Morrissey Hall, two things immediately come to mind that ref lect the character of Saint Louis University and its alumni. Each one has a personal aspect to it. The first thing is the Omer Poos Law Library. Judge Poos lived in the small Illinois town where I grew up, and I saw him each Sunday at 10 a.m. Mass. Of course, in a small town everybody knows everybody, and his wife was my high school English teacher. Judge Poos was originally from an even smaller town, a mining town where his father was a coal miner in the days when coal miners were the poorest of the poor. But Judge Poos was a determined student and made his way to SLU, where he graduated with a law degree. He was forever grateful to the University for providing him with the opportunity for an education, because he worked his way through school by working in the library and a cafeteria. The school even gave him a place to live up on the top f loor of the law school building. He was so grateful that he did whatever he could do to support the law school, and that included making sure that it had the funds to build the new law library building. The second thing is that my late father-in-law Richard Dodge was the co-chair, along with his friend and fellow Class of 1951 graduate John Shepherd, of the fundraising campaign to build Morrissey Hall. Like Judge Poos, Dick Dodge was grateful to SLU for the opportunity it gave him, and he was forever loyal to the University. Throughout his life, he was an active and enthusiastic fundraiser for the School of Law. These are two examples of how Saint Louis University School of Law has provided opportunities for students to become not only law yers but also productive citizens, and how those students have returned the favors with their loyalties and life-long efforts to support the school in many different ways.

Bill O’Neill (’99) Partner, Senniger Powers SLU LAW Adjunct Assistant Professor

18

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


COVER STO RY

Farewell to Morrissey Hall

FA R E W E LL CE RE MO NY

M AY 1 6, 20 1 3

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

19


ALUMNI PROFILE

RUDY HASL (‘67) BY MA RY m cH UGH

R

udy Hasl (‘67) humbly reacts to comments regarding his distinction of being the longest serving law school dean in the nation. When reflecting on the past 32 years, where he worked as dean of Saint Louis University School of Law (197991), St. John’s University School of Law (1991-1998), Seattle University School of Law (2000-2005) and most recently, Thomas Jefferson School of Law (2005-2013), Hasl

20

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

talks less about his own accomplishments and accolades and, instead, focuses more on the importance of integrating social justice, community service and global awareness into the legal education process. Formation, he calls it. This interest in the formation of the whole student was something that first struck him as a student at SLU LAW in the mid-60s.

“I was really impressed by the people who were willing to engage with me individually and seemed to be genuinely interested in my development,” Hasl recalls. “And then, in 1971, when I returned to SLU as a torts professor, I found that same spirit was still there. SLU is an institution where we really tried to embody the Jesuit tradition in each student, focusing on the total development, rather than teaching them just law.”


ALUMNI PRO FILE

It is a philosophy that he has carried with him throughout his career. Through the decades, he has built a successful track record in fundraising, capital improvement planning and oversight, and institutional reputation building. While at Thomas Jefferson School of Law (TJSL), Hasl continued to add academic programs that promoted a wellrounded student, including international business and comparative law summer study abroad programs in Hangzhou, China and Nice, France, and a Small Business Law Center to serve small business entrepreneurs, arts and art organizations; and just recently, the launch of a new solo practice skills track. He also created an incubator program for TJSL alumni to help jump start their own solo practices while at the same time providing better access to justice for underserved communities. He will retire from Thomas Jefferson at the end of the 2012-2013 school year. He has held numerous leadership positions within the American Bar Association (ABA), the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) and the Law School Admissions Council. He has served as chair of the ABA Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar and its Accreditation and Standards Review Committees, as well as the AALS Committee on the Recruitment and Retention of Minority Faculty and Students. His most recent achievement, however, was serving as the guiding force behind the design and construction of TJSL’s state-ofthe-art eight story, 300,000-square-foot law school building, located in the East Village in San Diego’s downtown area. The building was completed in 2011. “It’s extraordinary,” Hasl said during a phone interview from his new office. “Our bringing in about 1,200 students and staff each day to the downtown area has really helped revitalize this East Village area. In the past year we have forged relationships with various businesses which provide opportunities for both the businesses and our students.” Citing SLU LAW’s upcoming move to the newly renovated 12-story building in downtown St. Louis, Hasl references the dramatic opportunities that await the students and staff. “Given the proximity to the courts and the government offices there really is a chance to build some internship

and networking opportunities with law firms, the courts and political offices, things that will be easier to do than from the current Lindell location,” Hasl said. “I also think the concentration of all the activities in one building allows for more inward focus in the building community.” The new law school building will be just steps away from the Civil Courts building and within walking distance of the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse, City Hall and numerous law firms.

them, but it was very much on a cash basis. We never had to borrow for any of these projects, and I think these experiences helped me later on when I oversaw similar projects at the other schools. Each one added to my knowledge and experience.” Hasl has witnessed profound changes within the legal education field and predicts many more.

“The integration of artwork with historical artifacts, installation of technological advances, the transformation of moving from a horizontal layout to a vertical one, and the creation of space that supports the kind of academic culture SLU is trying to create, is something that faculty and students should be excited about,” Hasl said. “The entertainment space on the top floor will really prove to be a valuable space for increasing the connection between the law school and the St. Louis business and legal community.” Again, formation. Hasl said after the school makes the move, he envisions SLU professors will continue to build the connections that support the students in their total set of needs, including housing and transportation to and from the main campus. Hasl reminisced of his SLU LAW school days when he toiled under the tutelage of law librarian Eileen Searls, back when the library was located at 3642 Lindell. Upon his return in 1971 as a professor, Hasl worked alongside many of the school’s renowned teachers including Vince Immel, Dick Childress and Joe Simeone, among others. “It was a very active time,” Hasl said. “We had the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement and a changing political environment. I myself was a veteran, having served in the JAG Corp in Vietnam, and the student population was changing. It was an exciting time to be at a law school.” During his tenure at SLU LAW Hasl witnessed the construction and dedication of the Omer Poos Law Library, Morrissey Hall and the connecting building to Queen’s Daughters Hall.

“Today’s law student has to focus more on the development of professional skills and values in order to allow for a quicker transition to a legal practice than was true in the earlier days. The use of clinical programs in which students are actually involved in producing services to clients has been incredible. Technology has introduced a whole other range of skills that students must adapt to now.” Hasl cites the two recording studios installed in his new building in San Diego. He mentions each classroom is set up for broadcasting purposes. A cloud networking system allows all students and faculty the ability to use one server. “The legal world continues to change and schools must continue to adapt to these changes,” Hasl said. As for his retirement, Hasl said he’ll dwell on that a bit more after he completes a summer program he is teaching in China through June, once again proving that his dedication to his students and the legal field reflects the Jesuit tradition.

“These buildings were all constructed incrementally. We were able to find the funding, develop the plans and implement VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

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FAC ULTY

SCHOLARSHIP

FAC ULTY

SCHOLARSHIP SLU LAW faculty’s national and international reputation of excellence continues to develop through their immense production of legal scholarship. Below is a collection of our faculty’s scholarly successes from the 2012-2013 academic year. *Scholarship citations are listed in accordance with Bluebook citation guidelines.

M atthew B odie ,

Professor

The Bizarre Law & Economics of Business Roundtable v. SEC , (with Grant M. Hayden), 38 J. C o r p. L. 101 (2012).

M iriam C herry,

Professor

Chapter 7: Employee Privacy and Autonomy, §§ 7.01-7.07, in R e statem ent (Th i r d) o f E m ploy m ent L aw , Tentative Draft No. 5, March 30, 2012. Approved by ALI Membership, 2012.

Chevron, Greenwashing, and the Myth of “Green Oil Companies,” 3 Wa sh . & L ee J. E n ergy, C li mate C han g e , & E nvi ro n m ent 133 (2012) (with Judd Sneirson) (article).

Employees and the Boundaries of the Corporation, in R e se arch H an d boo k o n th e E co n o m ic s o f C o r p o r ate L aw , (Claire Hill & Brett McDonnell eds., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012).

The Gamification of Work, 40 H o fstr a L. R e v. 841 (2012) (essay).

Open Source and the Reinvention of Legal Education, in Th e D ig ital Path of th e L aw : Th e F utu r e of th e L aw S chool C ou rse B ook (Edward L. Rubin ed., Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012).

The Law Review Games, 117 P en n St. L. R e v. P en n Stati m 1 (2012) (with Paul Secunda).

J oseph C uster , Director , O mer P oos Law Library; Assistant P rofessor

Labor Speech, Corporate Speech, and Political Speech: A Response to Professor Sachs, 112 C o lu m . L. R e v. S i d ebar 206 (2012), http://www.columbialawreview.org/wpcontent/uploads/2012/10/206 _ Bodie.pdf.

Ideological Voting Applied to the School Desegregation Cases in the Federal Courts of Appeals from the 1960’s and 70’s, 16 S ch o l ar _ _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013).

The Post-Revolutionary Period in Corporate Law: Returning to the Theory of the Firm, 35 S e at tle U. L. R e v.1033 (2012) (Berle III Symposium).

I saak D ore ,

Lynn B ranham ,

Visiting P rofessor

CASES AND MATERIALS ON THE LAW AND POLICY OF SENTENCING AND CORRECTIONS (9th ed.) (2012) THE LAW AND POLICY OF SENTENCING AND CORRECTIONS IN A NUTSHELL (9th ed.) (2013) Plowing in Hope: A Three-Part Framework for Incorporating Restorative Justice Into Sentencing and Correctional Systems, 38 WILLIAM MITCHELL L. REV. 1261 (2012) Introduction and Overview: Symposium on the Aftermath of Padilla v. Kentucky: A New Era for Plea Bargaining and Sentencing?, 31 ST. LOUIS U. PUB. L. REV. 3 (2012)

22

Follow the Leader: The Advisability and Propriety of Considering Cost and Recidivism Data at Sentencing, 24 FEDERAL SENTENCING REPORTER169 (Feb. 2012)

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

P rofessor

Deconstructing and Reconstructing Hobbes, 72 L o u isiana L. R e v. 815 (2012) Access to Justice : An Overview of the Doctrine of Justiciability under the Constitution of the United States, CRJFC , Université de Franche-Comté, Dalloz. (2012).

M onica E ppinger , Assistant Professor

Military Tribunals: A Critical Assessment, 56 St. L o u is U. L. J. (2012). Reality Check: Detention in the War on Terror, 62 C ath . U. L. R e v. (2013). Sages, Savages, and Other Speech Act Communities: Culture in Comparative Law, 57 St. L o u is U. L. J. (2013).


FAC U LT Y

C had F landers ,

SCHOLARSHIP

Blood Institute Working Group’s Report on Optimizing the IRB Process, 87 ACAD. M ed . 1710 (2012).

Assistant Professor

Election Law Behind a Veil of Ignorance, 64 F l a . L. R e v. 1369 (2012).

J oel K . G oldstein ,

Cost and Sentencing: Some Pragmatic and Institutional Doubts, 24 F ed . S ent. R.

U n d erstan di n g C o n stitutio nal L aw (4th ed.) (with John Attanasio) (LexisNexis, 2012)

164 (2012). The Mind as a Whole, 7 A dam S m ith R e v. (2012). In Defense of Punishment Theory, and Contra Stephen, 10 O h io St. J. C r i m . L. 243 (2012). Election Law: Too Big to Fail? 56 St. L o u is L. J. 775 (2012) (invited symposium). Cost as a Sentencing Factor: Missouri’s Experiment, 77 M o . L. R e v. 391 (2012). The Mutability of Public Reason, 25 R atio J u r is 180 (2012). Hume’s Death and Smith’s Philosophy in N e w E s says A dam S m ith ’s M o r al P h i loso ph y (2012).

in

“People Just Don’t Do That!” Curb Your Enthusiasm and the Virtue of Civility (with David Svolba) in C u r b Yo u r E nth usia s m an d P h i loso ph y (Mark Ralkowski, ed. 2012). Death Takes a Road Trip in C h u ck K loster man an d P h i loso ph y (Seth Vannatta, ed. 2012). Review of Michael Zimmerman, Punishment. 122 E th ic s 641 (2012).

The

Immorality

of

Review of Douglas Laycock, 2 Religious Liberty: Free Exercise, J. C h u rch & State 281 (2012). The White Primaries and Bush v. Gore in O xfo r d E n c yclo pedia o f A m eric an P o litic al , P o lic y, an d L egal H isto ry (2012).

B radley F ogel ,

Professor

When Babies Retire: Using Trusts as Beneficiaries of IRAs, P ro bate & P ro pert y, March/April 2013 at 10.

R oger G oldman ,

Callis Family

P rofessor of Law

A Model Decertification Law, 32 St. L o u is U. P u b . L. R e v. 147 (2012) (invited symposium). Introduction, 32 St. L o u is U. P u b . L. R e v. 3 (2012) (invited symposium).

J esse G oldner ,

John D. Valentine

P rofessor of L aw

Foreword: Drugs and Money, 6 J O f H e alth L. & P o l’c y 1 (2012). _ _ _ , Carl Coleman, et al., Th e E th ic s A n d R eg u l atio n o f R e se arch with H u man S u b j ec ts (2005) (135 page Supplement, covering 2004-2012, published in September, 2012). _ _ _ , Alice Mascette, et al., Are Central Institutional Review Boards the Solution? The National Heart, Lung and

Vincent C. I mmel P rofessor of L aw

Reshaping the Model: Clinton, Gore and the New Vice Presidency in Rosanna Perotti ed. Th e C li nto n P r e si d en c y an d th e C o n stitutio nal System (Texas A & M University Press, 2012). “ Vice President, U.S . O xfo r d C o m pan io n to A m er ic an P o litic s , (David Coates,ed.) (Oxford University Press, 2012) 2012 Supplement to C o n stitutio nal L aw (5th ed.) (with Norman Redlich & John Attanasio) (LexisNexis, 2008) 2012 Supplement to UNDERSTANDING CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (4th ed.) (with John Attanasio) (LexisNexis, 2012). Constitutional Change, Originalism and the Vice Presidency, 15 U. Pa . J. C o n st. L aw _ _ (forthcoming 2013)

T homas G reaney,

Co-Director, Center for H ealth Law Studies ; Chester A. Myers Professor of L aw

2012 Health Reform Supplement to F u r row , G r e an e y, J o h n so n , J ost & S chwar z H e alth L aw C a s eboo k (2012) For Profit versus Nonprofit: Does Corporate Form Matter? (with Timothy P Glynn) in I s a F o r -P ro fit Stru c tu r e a V iab le A lter native fo r C ath o lic H e alth C ar e M i n istry ? (Kathleen Boozang ed.) (2012) Controlling Medicare Costs: Moving Beyond Inept Administered Pricing and Ersatz Competition, 6 St. L o u is U. J. H e alth L. & P o lic y (forthcoming 2013).

J ustin H ansford, Assistant Professor

Contestable Terrain at the Borders: ‘By the time I get to Arizona,’ 48 C al . W e ster n L. R e v. 345 (2012). Cause Judging, _ _ G eo . J. L egal E th ic s (forthcoming 2013).

Sandra Johnson , Professor E merita

Discrimination in the Religious Workplace, 42 H a sti n gs C enter R ep o rt 10 (2012). 2012 Health Reform Supplement to Furrow, Greaney, Johnson, Jost & Schwartz, H e alth L aw : C a s e s , M ater ial s an d P ro b lem s (West 2012) Seventh Edition of Furrow, Greaney, Johnson, Jost & Schwartz, H e alth L aw : C a s e s , M ater ial s an d P ro b lem s (West 2013, forthcoming in June) (Along with Teachers’ Manual and Abridged Edition) Looking Back and Looking Forward: Celebrating Anniversaries by Anticipating the Implementation of the Affordable Care Act, _ _ _ St. L o u is U. J. H e alth L. & P o l’ y _ _

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

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FAC ULTY

SCHOLARSHIP

(2013, forthcoming in May) (introduction to Symposium issue) “Legal Regulation of Health Care Professionals” E n c yclo pedia O f B io e th ic s (4th ed., 2013, forthcoming)

in

W illiam J ohnson , Co- Director, C enter for International and Comparative L aw; Associate Professor The Hierarchy That Wasn’t There: Elevating ‘Usage’ to its Rightful Position For Contracts Governed by the CISG, 32 N o rthwe ster n J. I nt ’ l L. & B us . 263 (2012) Analysis of Incoterms as Usage Under Article 9 of the CISG, 35 U. Pa . J. I nt ’ l L. (forthcoming 2013)

Samuel J ordan,

Associate Professor

Reverse Abstention, (forthcoming 2013)

B osto n

U.

L.

R e v.

State Power to Define Jurisdiction, G eo rg ia L. R e v. (with Christopher Bader) (forthcoming 2013)

J effrey L ewis ,

D ean E meritus ;

Professor

A Set of Problems to Teach Permissible Remedial Combinations, St. L o u is U. L. J. (forthcoming 2013) (essay)

Yvette J oy L iebesman , Assistant Professor

The Mark of a Resold Good, 20 G eo . M a so n L. R e v. 157 (2012) (with Benjamin Wilson).

Professor E meritus

_ _ _ , et al., M is so u r i E vi d entiary F o u n datio n s (3d ed. Juris Publishing Co. 2012)

H enry Ordower ,

Professor

Schedularity in U.S . Income Taxation and its Effect on Tax Distribution, 108 N o rthwe ster n U. L. R e v. (forthcoming 2013) (invited symposium). Utopian Visions toward a Grand Unified Global Income Tax, 14 F l a . Ta x R e v. (forthcoming 2013) Corporate Taxation (U.S. Report), European Association of Tax Law Professors in Corporate Taxation (Amsterdam: International Bureau of Fiscal Documentation, forthcoming 2013) (invited) Tax neutrality between CIT and non-CIT subjects: how to improve our systems? 2013 EATLP Congress (Lisbon) Thematic Report (Amsterdam, forthcoming 2013)

Karen Petroski ,

Assistant Professor

Iqbal and Interpretation, 39 F l a . St. U. L. R e v. 417 (2012). Does It Matter What We Say About Legal Interpretation?, 43 M c G eorge L. R ev. 359 (2012). Statutory Genres: Substance, Procedure, Jurisdiction, 44 L oy. U. L. R e v. 189 (2012). Interpretation and Accessibility, _ _ _ St. L o u is U n iversit y L aw J o u r nal _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013).

J effrey A . R edding ,

M arcia M cCormick ,

Assistant Professor

Associate Professor

Decoupling Employment, 16 L e wis & C l ar k L. R e v. 499 (2012). Workplace Reform in a Jobless Recovery, 81 UMKC L. R e v. 347 (2012) (essay). Disparate Impact and Equal Protection after Ricci v. DeStefano, 27 W is . J. L aw , G en d er & S oc ’ y 100 (2012). Gender, Family, and Work, 30 H o fstr a L ab . & E m p. L. J. _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013) (invited symposium). From Podcasts to Treasure Hunts – Using Technology to Promote Student Engagement, 58 St. L o u is U n iv. L. J. _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013) (invited symposium).

Carol A . N eedham,

J ohn O ’ B rien ,

Professor

Advance Consent to Aggregate Settlements: Reflections on Attorneys’ Fiduciary Obligations and Professional Responsibility Duties, 44 L oy. U. C h i . L. R e v. 511 (2012).

What American Legal Theory Might Learn from Islamic Law: Some Lessons from ‘Shari‘a Court ’ Practice in India, 83 U. C o lo . L. R e v. 1027-63 (2012) (invited submission) Secularism, The Rule of Law, and ‘Shari‘a Courts’: An Ethnographic Examination of a Constitutional Controversy, 57 St. L o u is U. L. J. 339-76 (2013) (invited submission) From ‘She-Males’ to ‘Unix’: Transgender Rights and the Productive Paradoxes of Pakistani Policing, in A nth ro p o logy o f C r i m i nal C a s e s i n S o uth A sia (Daniela Berti & Devika Bordia eds., 2012) (forthcoming) (Chapter in edited volume)

P eter W. Salsich Jr . ,

McDonnell Professor of Justice in A merican Society

Homeownership: Dream or Disaster, 21 J o u r nal o f A ffo r dab le H o usi n g an d C o m m u n it y D e velo pm ent L aw 17 (2012) Choice Neighborhoods Initiative: Model Cities by Another Name, or Truly Transformative? 26 P ro bate & P ro pert y 34 (2012)

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FAC U LT Y

SCHOLARSHIP

Does America Need Public Housing? 19 G eo . M a so n L. R e v. 689 (2012) (invited symposium)

A nn S carlett,

Professor

Incorporating Litigation Perspectives to Enhance the Business Associations Course, 8 J o u r nal o f B usi n e s s & Tech n o logy L aw (published by University of Maryland) _ _ (2012) Shareholder Derivative Litigation’s Historical and Normative Foundations, 61 B u ffalo L aw R e vi e w (forthcoming, August 2013).

Aaron Taylor ,

Assistant P rofessor

Undo Undue Hardship: An Objective Approach to Discharging Federal Student Loans in Bankruptcy, 38 N otr e D am e J o u r nal o f L eg is l atio n 185 (2012) Reimagining Merit as Achievement, 44 N e w M e xico L aw R e vi e w _ _ (forthcoming 2013) Making State Merit Scholarship Programs More Efficient and Less Vulnerable, 24 U n iversit y o f F lo r i da J o u r nal o f L aw an d P u b lic P o lic y _ _ (forthcoming 2013)

Steve Thaman , Co- Director for the Center of I nternational and Comparative L aw; Professor “Vereinigte Staaten von (United States Country in J u r isdi k tio n s ko n fli k te g r enzü b ersch r eiten d er

 Sidney Watson ,

Professor

Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act: Civil Rights, Health Reform, Race and Equity, 55 H owar d L. R e v. 855 (2012) The Current and Future Role and Impact of Medicaid in Rural America, Rural Policy Research Institute, Rural Health Panel, 2012 (coauthored with Keith J. Mueller, Andrew F. Coburn, Jennifer P. Lundblad, A . Clinton MacKinney and Timothy McBride) Embracing Justice Roberts’ New Medicaid, _ _ _ S ai nt L o u is J. H e alth P o l’ y an d L aw _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013)

A lan W einberger ,

Amerika” Report)

Professor

The Art of Breaking the Deal: The Case of the Penthouse Casino, 82 M is sis si ppi L. J. 651 (2013).

b ei

o rgan isi erter

K r i m i nalität (Arndt Sinn ed.).(Conflicts of Jurisdictions with Cross-Border Criminality) Universitätsverlag Osnabrück (2012), pp. 475-498 (in German). (book chapter) The Penal Order: Prosecutorial Sentencing As a Model for Criminal Justice Reform?, in Th e P ros ecuto r i n Tr an s natio nal P erspec tive 156-175 (Erik Luna & Marianne Wade eds 2012). Oxford University Press, at 156-175 (book chapter). Criminal Courts and Procedure, in COMPARATIVE LAW AND SOCIETY (David S. Clark ed. 2012). Edward Elgar, pp. 235-253 (book chapter).

Constance Z. Wagner, Associate Professor

D ouglas W illiams ,

Professor

A Harder “Hard Case,” 57 St. L. U. L. J. _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013) Toward Regional Environmental Governance, _ _ A k ro n L. R e v. _ _ _ (forthcoming 2013)

M olly Walker W ilson ,

CoDirector of the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Law; Associate Professor

Financing Elections and “Appearance of Corruption”: Attitudes and Behavior 63 C ath . U. L. R e v. _ _ _ (forthcoming).

Constance Z. Wagner, Looking at Regional Trade Agreements through the Lens of Gender, 31 St. L o u is U. P u b . L. R e v. 497 (2012).

The Expansion of Criminal Registries and the Illusion of Control 73 L a . L. R e v. 509 (2013).

Year in Review: Corporate Social Responsibility, 47 I nt ’ l L aw _ _ _ (2013) (contributor).

The Supreme Court, Self-Persuasion, and Ideological Drift 83 M is s . L. J. _ _ _ (forthcoming).

A nders Walker,

Associate D ean for Research and Faculty Development; Associate Professor

“A Horrible Fascination”: Segregation, Obscenity, and the Cultural Contingency of Rights, 89 Wa s h . U. L. R e v. 1017 (2012). Strange Traffic: The Puzzling Persistence of the Mann Act, 46 C o n n . L. R e v. (forthcoming 2013).

M ichael A . Wolff, Dean and P rofessor

Is There Life After Conception? State Courts, State Law, and the Mandate of Arbitration, 56 St. L o u is U. L aw J. 1269 (Summer 2012) Missouri Provides Costs of Sentences and Recidivism Data: What Does Cost Have to Do With Justice? 24 F ed er al S enten ci n g R ep o rter 161 (Feb. 2012)

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

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DEVELOPMENT A ND ALUMNI RELATIONS

Dear Friends, It is an honor to have joined Saint Louis University School of Law in April 2013. Originally from Duncan, Okla., I received my J.D. from the University of Oklahoma College of Law, where I also worked as the Director of Development & Alumni Affairs. In my short time at SLU LAW, I have already been privileged to meet numerous alumni, particularly at the Clayton and downtown alumni lunches (see page 27 for photos), and I look forward to meeting many more of you in the months to come. Legal education is changing, and, as an attorney myself, I know firsthand the importance of staying ahead of these changes. Our alumni play a crucial role in ensuring our students are prepared for the professional market they’ll enter. As we move downtown, I anticipate many new opportunities for you to get involved and interact with our students and faculty to keep SLU LAW at the forefront of educating future lawyers. We invite you to visit our website (law.slu.edu) for the latest pictures as the contractors put the finishing touches on our multipurpose, state-of-the-art facility. With flexible classrooms and spaces for everything from quiet individual study to collaborative work, and

improved technology for teaching and scholarship, our students will reap the rewards of new amenities and design that can better assist them in their study of law. If you are interested in learning about the different naming opportunities available for these spaces or other ways to support SLU LAW and our new home, please let me know. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you ever have any questions, comments or concerns. The tradition of SLU LAW is rich, and the future is bright. We thank you for your continued support and look forward to working together for continued success as we enter a new chapter in the history of the School of Law. Most Sincerely,

Sheridan K. Haynes Director of Development & Alumni Relations T: 314-977-3303 E: hayness@slu.edu

Please consider a gift to the Law Center Building Fund. There are numerous opportunities to recognize family and friends through giving to SLU LAW. For more information, please contact Alumni & Development. Again, thank you for your continued support of SLU LAW.

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DEVELOPMENT A N D ALUMNI RELATIONS

2013

ALUMNI LUNCHES

CLAYTON

DOWNTOWN

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Cafe Napoli

CaRMINE’S STEAK HOUSE VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

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FACULTY PROFILE

ANTONIA MICELI

DIRE C TO R O F B AR E X AM PR EPAR ATION

F

or many law school graduates, just as soon as the feelings of elation and accomplishment over completing the J.D. program arrive, they quickly evaporate into feelings of dread and anxiety with the thought of the weeks and months they must now devote to cramming for the state bar exam. But those emotions aren’t limited to recent graduates. They resurface for those once again attempting to pass the exam, or licensed attorneys seeking admission to another state’s bar. But no matter the scenario, Instructor Antonia Miceli and SLU LAW’s Office of Bar Examination Preparation has a plan to help. It’s Miceli who serves as cheerleader, guidance counselor and bar expert to those stressed students and angst-ridden associates in her role as director of bar examination preparation. Born and raised in Stockton, Calif., working her way through her family’s pizza business, Miceli set out for the East Coast, where she received her undergraduate degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University, before returning west to attend Pacific McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento. After sitting for the California bar exam the summer after law school, she then moved to St. Louis to be with her soonto-be husband, Alex, who was completing his Ph.D. at Washington University (the two met at Johns Hopkins), where she sat for both the Missouri and Illinois bar exams before obtaining reciprocity with the District of Columbia bar. Miceli has experienced many sides of the law, clerking for both the Hon. Rodney W. Sippel and the Hon. G. Fleissig of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri and working in the business litigation practice group at Thompson Coburn. During her time at the federal court and in practice she got an early glimpse at the distinctive character of SLU LAW students when they would serve as interns and summer associates. “I was always impressed by the quality of their written work and their genuine interest in the assignments they were given,” she said.

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SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


FACULTY PRO FILE

Miceli joined SLU LAW in August 2011 as the school’s first permanent, full-time bar prep director. Whether a 1L looking to save some money on their bar exam application by completing the Missouri or Illinois Law Student Registration, or a 2L starting to think about taking the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, or a 3L beginning to plan for taking the bar exam, or an alum who is preparing for their first, second or fifth bar exam, Miceli is on hand to help guide her students through the process and support them in developing the necessary skills to succeed. In the following interview, she gives insight into what many consider the scariest part of law school. SLB: How does bar prep differ from when a new graduate takes it for the first time versus an established lawyer sitting for a new state exam? AM: The two greatest differences are proximity to the substantive law and amount of time available to study for the bar exam. Recent graduates are much closer to their law school classes, many of which covered topics tested on the bar exam. The further away an alumnus is from law school, the more challenging it often is to return to those core subject areas and re-learn the law. In practice, our alumni are often using state or local law, whereas the Uniform Bar Exam tests on majority rules and “general” law – not Missouri-specific law.

Additionally, recent graduates often have the luxury of being able to dedicate themselves to bar examination preparation on a full-time basis, whereas an established lawyer often has to balance his or her career with his or her bar examination preparation. On average, it takes 500 hours of preparation to successfully pass the bar exam. If you are trying to fit those 500 hours in around your work schedule, it becomes much more challenging to effectively prepare for the bar exam. Planning is key in that situation, so I assist working alumni in developing specific study schedules that will help them attain that goal. SLB: How can Bar Prep be of service to alumni? AM: Whether alumni are sitting for their

first bar exam, re-taking a bar exam or seeking to be admitted to an additional jurisdiction, I am here to help them identify, assess and rebuild the necessary skills to pass the bar exam. I also provide alumni with bar exam application assistance, such as determining the requirements for admission

to a particular jurisdiction and applying for Character & Fitness determinations, as well as reciprocity application assistance, whether they are transferring their Multistate Bar Exam score to a new jurisdiction or applying for reciprocity based upon years of practice. SLB: What is the most effective way to study for the bar? AM: The one common element is that memorization is not enough. Effective bar exam preparation requires taking in the substantive law from the lecture, memorizing it and then practicing how to apply it on multiple choice and essay questions. One portion of many state bar exams, the performance test, doesn’t even test the substantive law that alumni spend months learning and memorizing. Instead, it tests the bar taker’s ability to work through a closed-universe set of law and facts and create a piece of legal work product in a set amount of time. This part of the exam is a great way to build up a cushion of points to help with a lower score on an essay or on the multiple choice section, but the only way for alumni to improve their score on the performance test is to practice writing them under timed conditions, and then reviewing sample answers to learn how to improve their organization and content on the next one. SLB: What is the most important thing for bar takers to remember? AM: While they have all the tools they need

to pass the bar exam – the evidence is there in their law school diploma – they still need to put in the requisite time and effort to learn the specific law that will be tested on the bar exam and practice the skills to communicate that law appropriately to the graders. The great thing about the bar exam is that it is a test of finite possibilities. The bar examiners are not there to trick you – they are there to make sure you have the fundamental knowledge they deem necessary to succeed as a licensed attorney. Use that to your advantage! SLB: What is your favorite part of your job? AM: SLU LAW admits and graduates an

incredible group of individuals each year, and I have the honor of working with them on their last hurdle to becoming licensed attorneys. My favorite days of the year are the day after each bar exam and the day that bar exam results are announced because I get emails, phone calls and visits from alumni who have worked with me through their bar exam preparation process and are now able to celebrate their well-deserved success.

Knowledge is Power SLU LAW Bar Prep Workshops

The combined results of bar prep programming have been very encouraging: for the July 2012 Missouri Bar Exam, both the SLU LAW overall and first time Missouri pass rates surpassed the Missouri state overall and first time pass rates. Moreover, the SLU LAW overall Missouri pass rate for July 2012 (91.89%) marked a significant increase over the July 2011 administration (85.96%), as did the July 2012 SLU LAW first time Missouri takers pass rate (2012 – 93.60%; 2011 – 87.65%). Most recently, 100 percent of February 2013 Illinois and Missouri bar takers who participated in Bar Prep passed their exam. While the exam itself might take just two days, bar preparation is a 24/7, 365 day operation for Miceli, who offers a series of information sessions and skills workshops throughout the year for students and alumni. If you are looking for application assistance and individual bar exam counseling or are interested in attending one the workshops, contact her at barprep@slu.edu. For more information on SLU LAW ’s Bar Prep programming, visit slu.edu/x47471.xml and click on Bar Exam Preparation or check out the SLULawBarPrep Facebook page.

100% PERCENTAGE OF FEBRUARY 2013 ILLINOIS AND MISSOURI BAR TAKERS WHO PARTICIPATED IN BAR PREP AND PASSED THEIR EXAM

91.89% the SLU LAW overall Missouri Bar pass rate for July 2012

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STUDENT S POT LIGHT

Student Service Spotlight: Law Students for Veterans Advocacy By Diane Todd

STUDENT SERVICE SPOTLIGHT:

LAW STUDENTS FOR VETERANS ADVOCACY

The Law Students for Veterans Advocacy (LSVA) of Saint Louis University School of Law, previously the Veteran Student Association, was established in 2012 and had its first elections at the beginning of the fall semester of 2012. The name of the organization was changed to better reflect the mission of the organization and make it clear that it is not an organization for veteran students; rather, it is an organization designed to assist veterans, students and non-students alike.

BY D I A N E TO DD

The LSVA has two primary goals: support veteran law students and their families and support the veteran community in St. Louis. Veteran students and their families can face challenges that other students do not. There are SLU LAW students who have been deployed and had to delay the continuation of their studies for one or more years. There are students slated for potential deployment who may not be(LSVA) able to finish givensemesters school year. are students whose he Law Students for Veterans Advocacy In thea two sinceThere the inception of the spouses and families of areSaint deployed or moved to a different duty station while the student continues their education Louis University School of Law, LSVA, the organization has grown in membership here. The LSVA intends to previously support the of students who are their military those who students the families Veteran Student Association, waswithout and participated in spouse myriad and activities, both are in and whose military family members are away from home.

T

established in 2012 and had its first elections at the

out of school. Our softball team was sponsored by

The communitybeginning outreachofportion our mission is focused onofassisting homeless veterans and assisting veterans, the fallof semester of 2012. The name Thurman Grill and Provisions near Tower Grove Park homeless or otherwise, to obtain the disability benefits for medical disabilities that they so the organization was changed to better where we played, Budweiser supported richly deserve. Veterans can be eligible to receive monthly benefit payments from the federal reflect the mission of the organization and our Party Bus event to introduce the government for injuries and disabilities acquired during, or aggravated by, military service. It make it clear that it is not an organization organization and its goals to the SLU is not necessary to be an attorney in order to assist a veteran in the disability benefit application for veteran students; rather, it is an LAW student body while letting off a process, but accreditation is required. The LSVA has a goal of training students to become organization designed to assist veterans, little steam, our yellow ribbonand event effective, accredited representatives to veterans applying forand disability benefits expects students and non-students alike. for the Veterans Day resulted in the training to serve them well in their careers, whether they choose to become more military than 150 people wearing yellow ribbons disability benefit attorneys or choose to represent these much underserved veterans in their The LSVA has two primary goals: support to commemorate veterans throughout pro bono work.

veteran law students and their families and

the law school. Additionally, members In the two semesters the inception LSVA , the organization has grown to a supportsince the veteran communityofinthe St. Louis. participatedboth in the DownOur membership of [X] and participated in myriad activities, in last andtwo outStand of school. Veteran students and their families can events for homeless veterans, specifically softball team was sponsored by Thurman Grill and Provisions near Tower Grove Park where we face challenges that other students do not. working with attorneys to its assist played, Budweiser supported our Party Bus event to introduce thelicensed organization and goals to There are SLU LAW students who have been deployed the SLU LAW student body while letting off a little steam, and ourveterans yellow with ribbon event for the Veterans Day raised legal concerns. LSVA was also proud to more had tostaff delay and the continuation of their studies for one than $100 fromand faculty, students, resulting in more than have 150 people wearing yellow ribbons commemorate Bob Crecelius, the coordinator fortothe Veterans or more years. areAdditionally, students slated for potential veterans throughout the law There school. members participated the last Down events for homeless Affairs in division fortwo theStand St. Louis City Department deployment who may be able to finish a given schoolveterans with legal concerns. LSVA was also proud to have veterans, specifically working withnot licensed attorneys to assist of Human Services, present at a member meeting. There are students whose spousesAffairs and families are for the St. Louis City Department of Human Services, Bob Crecelius, year. the coordinator for the Veterans division He spoke about the plight of homeless veterans present at a member meeting. about plight of homeless veterans in St. Louis, the deficiencies of the deployed or movedHe to spoke a different dutythe station while the in St. Louis, the deficiencies of the criminal justice criminal justicestudent systemcontinues for St. Louis homeless veterans, and offered suggestions for activities in which the participation their education here. The LSVA works system forthe St.Public Louis homeless veterans, and offered of SLU LAW students could be beneficial. Most recently, LSVA paired with Interest Law Group for the Gold and to support the families of students who are without suggestions for activities in which the participation White Ball, a law school event at which more $300 was raised for St. Patrick ’s Center, an organization that of supports their military spouse and those whothan are students whose SLU LAW students could be beneficial. Most recently, homeless veterans. military family members are away from home.

LSVA paired with the Public Interest Law Group for

LSVA officers are so proud of what has been achieved in its first year and are excited for the organization’s future. Gold and White Ball, which raised money for The community portion of our mission is the We intend to continue the pathoutreach on which we have begun, working toward veteran disability benefit representative St. Patrick’s Center, an organization that supports focused on assisting homelessveterans veterans in and accreditation and assistance to homeless theassisting St. Louis area. The organization could benefit greatly from homeless veterans. licensed attorney mentorship from local attorneys with experience serving disabled veterans and intends to do more veterans, homeless or otherwise, to obtain the disability outreach to local attorneys in the comingthat year. The LSVAdeserve. has lofty goals for a student organization, but feel wellbenefits for medical disabilities they so richly LSVA officers are so proud of what has been achieved prepared to meet those can goals. Veterans be eligible to receive monthly benefit

in its first year and are excited for the organization’s

the federal 3L Diane Todd payments is Masterfrom Sergeant (E-7)government Air Force for andinjuries Activeand Duty Utah Air National Guard with 11 ½ years of service. She future. We intend to continue the path on which we intends to return to LSVAacquired as a mentor. disabilities during, or aggravated by, military service. It is not necessary to be an attorney in order to assist a veteran in the disability benefit application process, but accreditation is required. The LSVA has a goal of training students to become effective, accredited representatives to veterans applying for disability benefits and expects the training to serve them well in their careers, whether they choose to become military disability benefit attorneys or choose to represent these much underserved veterans in their pro bono work.

have begun, working toward veteran disability benefit representative accreditation and assistance to homeless veterans in the St. Louis area. The organization could benefit greatly from licensed attorney mentorship from local attorneys with experience serving disabled veterans and intends to do more outreach to local attorneys in the coming year. The LSVA has lofty goals for a student organization, but feel well-prepared to meet those goals.

3L Diane Todd is Master Sergeant (E-7) Air Force and Active Duty Utah Air National Guard with 11 ½ years of service. She intends to return to LSVA as a mentor. 30

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF 30 SAINT LOUIS BRIEF


ALUMNI PRO FILE

WILLIAM E. BROWN (‘98) BY MA RY M c H UGH

M

ilitary combat helmet, Kevlar body armor, a weapon and a Black Hawk helicopter are probably the last things you associate with an attorney heading to court. But for Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) William Brown (’98), a U.S. Army JAG Corps attorney, it’s nothing out of the ordinary. In fact, he recalls during his last tour of duty in Iraq, a courtroom scene in which the judge, jury members and attorneys were not only armed but forced to postpone their trial for a few moments until the bombing which was occurring outside the courthouse subsided.

Brown never quite envisioned such a scenario when he came across a brochure at SLU LAW that featured a student dressed in army fatigues entering a law school building. The idea of a career in the military had always been a possibility for Brown, whose father and two uncles served in Vietnam. He also was a ROTC stand-out at Cleveland Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps High School in south St. Louis from where he earned a college football scholarship to Vanderbilt University. The possibility became a reality when Brown entered the JAG Corps as a Direct Commissioned Officer after graduating from SLU LAW and passing the Missouri Bar. During his initial training, Brown faced rigorous courses in leadership, military law and operational tactics designed to challenge new Army legal officers. After completing his training, Brown was stationed at Fort Sill in Lawton, Okla., where he served as a family and consumer lawyer providing counsel to military families on issues ranging from custody agreements to contract disputes with landlords. From there he was assigned to a prosecuting attorney position and litigated criminal court martial cases. Today, he works as the Branch Chief, International and Operational Law, in the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate for III Corps at Ft. Hood, Texas. Whether it is an international operation (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan or foreign humanitarian relief mission), a routine training exercise or a

domestic homeland security and homeland defense mission (e.g., wildfires, hurricane relief or border security), Brown’s legal team provides Ft. Hood commanders legal advice, coordination support and planning guidance in order to lawfully conduct such missions. Brown will soon depart for a oneyear tour of duty in Afghanistan where he will serve as both the Deputy Staff Judge Advocate for the U.S. III Corps and as a legal advisor for NATO International Security Assistance Force Afghanistan Headquarters. While there, he will advise a three-star commander who has operational command of all U.S. and NATO military forces currently serving in the country – 100,000 combined troops. Brown will work on establishing security according to the Rule of Law in transferring power to the Afghan leaders. “The legal advice we give to our commanders has national and international implications,” Brown said. “So I think one of the biggest challenges for military lawyers is to keep pace with emerging issues in order to provide commanders the best legal advice for conducting contingency operations and homeland security missions.” While deployed in Afghanistan, Brown and other military lawyers will train local police, judges and Afghan military lawyers. They will also accompany the International Committee of the Red Cross on inspection visits of detention facilities in order to help facilitate changes that will make these institutions worthy of the trust and confidence of the Afghanistan people. “Our mission is just one critical part of rebuilding the civil capacity of Afghanistan,” Brown said. “But it may be the keystone to developing a functioning, stable

and democratic country. The future of Afghanistan will be determined by the people of Afghanistan, but I believe lawyers from the U.S. military are making a significant contribution to helping them meet the challenges of progress.” Brown credits his certification in Labor and Employment Law from SLU LAW with helping him get accepted into the JAG Corps program. For three years, he even taught labor law at the JAG Corps’ Legal Center and School in Charlottesville, Va. “The Department of Defense has just as many civilian employees as it does active duty military service members,” Brown said. “The labor attorneys advise the commanders on collective bargaining agreements for civilians, and other employment and labor law issues.” To this day as Brown reflects on the fortunate turns in life, the old SLU LAW brochure depicting an Army soldier attending law school still comes to mind. “The minute I saw it I knew I wanted to be a military attorney, and once I was fortunate enough to be selected, I knew I would perform to the best of my abilities at each and every assignment.” His toughest assignment may be ahead, but Brown knows he has the support of his immediate family (his wife, Dr. Marilyn Brown, and children William, Alexander and Ashley), the soldiers he serves alongside and his country. Though he is unable to specify logistics of his upcoming tour, Brown is excited for whatever lies ahead. “I couldn’t think of anything more honorable to do,” he said. “I get to wear the uniform and represent the country while serving with men and women who defend freedom and protect the security of our nation. And all for the best law firm in the country.” VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

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SCHOOL OF LAW

HOODING MAY 16, 2013

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NOTES

C L ASS 1951 Hon. Joseph Nacy attained 45 years of federal service, more than 42 of which have been as an administrative law judge at two major federal regulatory agencies. He is presently the senior ALJ at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

1960 Mary Dahm, of the St. Louis County Law Library, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Public Service Practitioner Award.

1964 Charles Todt joined the law firm Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard as Counsel.

1969 Charles Steib, a principal with the law firm Chas. H. Steib, P.C ., was elected to The Gateway Fire Historical Society board of directors. James Virtel , of the law firm Armstrong Teasdale LLP, was named as a 2013 Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers in the area of energy law.

1973 Kevin O’Malley, an officer at the law firm Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale PC , received the Award of Honor from the Lawyers Association

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NOTES

of St. Louis. He was honored for his 10 years of service as a federal prosecutor for the U.S. Department of Justice prosecuting organized crime and white collar crime; his record of defending physicians and hospitals in medical malpractice lawsuits; and his role as senior author for the nine-volume “Federal Jury Practice and Instructions” treatise that is used in federal trials in the U.S. The association gives the award annually to an outstanding trial attorney whose service to the profession and community merits recognition.

Missouri Lawyers Awards. Along with the rest of the defense team, he was recognized for receiving a summary judgment and prior dismissal on claims worth $28 million.

1974

1975

G. Tracy Mehan, a principal with The Cadmus Group, Inc., was retained to coordinate the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities Endowment ’s source water protection efforts. He will focus on working with the water utility industry and individual utilities to help advance watershed protection in a systemic, transformative and sustainable way. Francis X. O’Connor, a sole practitioner in Great Bend, Pa., became president-elect of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. He will become president of the 28,000-member statewide lawyers association in 2014. Daniel G. Tobben, of Danna McKitrick, P.C ., was honored with an award as “Missouri Attorneys Securing the Largest Defense Verdicts in 2012” at the 2013

Hon. Richard Tognarelli was appointed vice-chair of the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism. He has served as a member of the Commission on Professionalism since its creation and also serves as a member of the Illinois Supreme Court Planning and Oversight Committee for the Judicial Performance Evaluation Program.

Bob Stewart was admitted as a shareholder in the national labor/ employment/employee benefits firm Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart ’s St. Louis office.

1978 Daniel P. Finney Jr. was selected for service in the American Society of Legal Advocates. The former city prosecutor has been in private practice for the past 30 years.

1979 Raymond Fournie , of the law firm Armstrong Teasdale LLP, was named a 2013 Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers in the area of mass tort litigation/class actionsdefendants.


1980 Stan Schroeder was admitted as shareholder in the national labor/ employment/employee benefits firm Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart ’s St. Louis office.

1981 Timothy Tryniecki, of the law firm Armstrong Teasdale LLP, was named a 2013 Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers in the area of land use and zoning law.

1982 Eugene Schmittgens was elected as a member by the St. Louis law firm Evans & Dixon. He focuses his practice on environmental law.

1983 Francis X. Buckley Jr., partner at Thompson Coburn, was elected to the board of directors of the American College of Bankruptcy at its annual meeting. He will serve a three-year term on the board, which consists of 15 association members who are among the world’s leading bankruptcy judges, academicians and practitioners. A member of Thompson Coburn’s financial restructuring group, Buckley Jr. is the managing partner of the firm’s Chicago office. He is a member of the Missouri and Illinois bar and maintains offices in both Chicago and St. Louis.

1984 Michael Gibbons, a partner at Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP ’s St. Louis office in the law firm’s government solutions practice group, was named the 2012 Citizen of the Year by the Kirkwood-Des Peres Area Chamber of Commerce. Lawrence Smith, a partner at the St. Louis law firm Brinker & Doyen,

LLC , was named a 2013 Winningest Defense Attorneys award winner by Missouri Lawyers Media.

personnel-related matters as well as collective bargaining and grievance proceedings.

Hon. Angela Quigless, of the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Public Official Award. She was also awarded the SLU LAW Black Law Students’ Associations Theodore McMillin Award.

K athryn Klein was promoted to partner at Riezman Berger, PC .

1985 Hon. Andrew Gleeson, an associate judge of the 20th Judicial Circuit of Ill., was elected the resident circuit judge of St. Clair County, Ill. He presently serves in the major civil jury assignment. In addition, his duties include major civil bench trials, asbestos litigation and class action litigation. Doug Ommen joined the Jefferson City, Mo., law firm Schreimann, Rackers, Franka & Blunt. He is making the transition to private practice after a very distinguished career in public service, including appointments as director of insurance, consumer chief counsel for the attorney general, commissioner of securities and administrative hearing commissioner.

1986 Donna M. Goelz is a shareholder with the law firm Howard and Howard Attorneys PLLC’s Peoria, Ill., office. She concentrates her practice in corporate, regulatory and compliance matters for financial institutions.

1987 K atherine Butler, of the law firm Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Business Practitioner Award. Robert Golterman was appointed as a member of the management committee of the law firm Lewis Rice Fingersh. He practices in several areas including labor and employment law, construction law, commercial litigation, ERISA litigation and municipal law. Golterman counsels employers and management in

K athleen Whitby, an of counsel attorney with the St. Louis law firm Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP, was named a 2013 Top Rated Lawyer in Environmental Law by LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell and American Lawyer Media. She concentrates her practice in environmental law, real estate, dispute resolution and complex litigation.

1988 Gregory Herkert joined the law firm Evans & Dixon. He practices in the area of creditor’s rights and remedies, bankruptcy, real estate and general business litigation. Vanessa Keith, an officer in Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale PC’s litigation and labor and employment practice groups, was named to the 9th edition of Who’s Who In Black St. Louis and is featured in its “Phenomenal Women of St. Louis” section. The honor recognizes African-Americans locally and nationally for their achievements, sacrifices and triumphs. Michael Skinner is an adjunct professor in Saint Louis University’s PreLaw Department, teaching trial advocacy, appellate advocacy and coaching the mock trial team.

1989 Michael Buenger graduated in December 2012 with distinction from the LL.M. program of the University of Kent, Brussells School of International Studies. He graduated with the highest average in the program and received the university’s Macgregor Award of Excellence. Buenger, who served as Missouri’s state court administrator until 2007, spent two years in Kosovo with the rule of law project

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of the National Center for State Courts. He is senior counsel with the National Center. A portion of his LL.M. dissertation, “The EU’s ETS and Aviation: Why ‘Local Rules’ Still Matter in a Global World and May Even More in the Future” was published in the University of Denver Journal of International Law and Policy. Caroline (Broun) Buenger, is a Department of State Foreign Service officer. She attended several meetings with then-Secretary of State Hilary Clinton when Clinton was in Brussells for the EU-U.S. Energy Council meeting Dec. 5, 2012. Buenger will be assigned to the American Embassy in Baghdad starting in June. James Green is a partner at the Champaign, Ill., law firm Thomas, Mamer & Haughey, LLP. He is also a member of the Illinois Supreme Court Rules Committee.

1990 Karie Casey was elected as a member by the St. Louis law firm Evans & Dixon. She focuses her practice on workers’ compensation law. Jennifer Joyce , St. Louis City circuit attorney, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Public Official Award. K aren McCarthy, of The Bar Plan, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Enterprise Award.

1991 Steve Clark was recognized as a Super Lawyer for the fifth time and the fourth consecutive year. He is recognized in the field of complex business litigation. Ellen Dunne was promoted to partner by the law firm Blitz, Bardgett & Deutsch, LC .

1992 James Cantalin joined the St. Louis law firm Brown & Crouppen as a trial attorney. He

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is a past president of the Lawyers Association of St. Louis. James Hopkins joined the St. Louis law firm Brown & Crouppen. E . Kelly Keady formed the publishing company Forty Press as an alternative to traditional publishing modes and is legal counsel and chief marketing officer. He is author of the critically acclaimed Peter Farrell series as well as the short story “Slater Maxwell” in “Once Upon A Crime’s Writes of Spring” anthology. His second novel, “The Fall Of St. Sebastian,” was recently published. Bill Lawson was admitted as a shareholder in the national labor/ employment/employee benefits firm Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart ’s St. Louis office.

1993 Timothy Gearin, of the law firm Armstrong Teasdale LLP, was named a 2013 Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers in the area of medical malpractice lawdefendants.

1994 Tracy Litzinger, of the law firm Howard & Howard’s Peoria, Ill., office, was named a 2013 Illinois Super Lawyer and a 2013 Illinois Rising Star in the field of employment litigation defense. J. Christopher Wehrle was hired as of counsel in security litigation and FINRA arbitration practice in the law firm Foley & Mansfield, PLLP ’s St. Louis office.

1995 Brian Behrens was named managing partner at Carmody MacDonald, providing corporate counseling for large and small

established companies as well as emerging companies. He concentrates his practice in the areas of corporate and business law, mergers and acquisitions, growth and venture companies and corporate finance. Julia Gomric was elected by the Illionis 20th Judicial Circuit Court judges to fill an associate judgeship position in St. Clair County, Ill. She was previously an associate in the Belleville, Ill., law firm of O’Gara & Gomric, PC . Thomas W. Jerry, of the law firm Spencer Fane Britt & Browne, was named to the 2013 edition of Best Lawyers for his work in the area of real estate law.

1996 K atherine Smith joined the law firm Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard, PC after five years at her own law firm in Alton, Ill.

1997 Catherine Merritt Dickenson joined Bryan Cave’s product liability client service group in its St. Louis office as counsel in the general business litigation practice group. Her practice focuses on complex product liability and commercial litigation matters.

1998 William Bolster was appointed as a member of Lewis Rice Fingersh’s management committee. He represents a broad range of private and publicly traded companies including health care industry manufacturers, private equity funds, insurance brokerage firms and real estate development firms. Bolster is also a member of the firm’s recruiting committee. Joan A . Coulter, attorney at law, changed the name of her law firm to The Coulter Law Firm, with the additon of Con Curran Coulter II (’12).

1999 Adam Hirtz joined The Lowenbaum Partnership. He is a business and


CLASS

employment litigator for clients in state and federal courts throughout the country.

at the law firm Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, PC , was accepted into the 20132014 Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) Fellows Program.

2000 Kristine Bridges, of the law firm Thompson Coburn, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Litigation Practitioner Award. Joseph Demko joined the law firm SmithAmundsen as a partner in its St. Louis office. He counsels business owners and investors in all phases of a business’ life-cycle including choice of entity, formation, owner and employee agreements, business succession, and dissolution. Tanja Engelhardt was appointed to attorney team leader for St. Louis City Circuit Attorney’s Office’s family violence, sex crimes and child abuse units. Matthew Fields joined the St. Louis law firm of Danna McKitrick, PC as a principal. He focuses his practice on toxic tort litigation, defending claims of harm to health or damage to property allegedly caused by product exposure, particularly asbestos.

2002 Meg Fowler was elected as a partner with the law firm HeplerBroom LLC in its St. Louis office. She focuses her practice in civil defense and litigation, including product liability, professional malpractice, intentional torts, general personal injury and insurance coverage issues. R. John Klevorn III joined the law firm Lewis Rice & Fingersh as a member, focusing his practice on business law and taxation. Patrick Mickey joined the St. Louis law firm Brown & Crouppen.

Marcus Helt, a partner in the law firm Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP ’s Dallas office, was selected as a 2013 Texas Rising Star.

Kevin Myers was elected as a principal by the law firm Danna McKitrick, PC . Myers advises and represents clients in matters involving insurance coverage and disputes over policy analysis.

Kristen (Fjeldstad) Johns was named assistant general counsel by Emdeon.

2003

Zachary Pancoast was selected as a Rising Star for 2013 by Illinois Super Lawyers in the personal injury plaintiff: medical malpractice practice area.

2001 Joseph Blanner joined the law firm McCarthy, Leonard & Kaemmerer, LC . Zofia Garlicka was promoted to principal at Carmody MacDonald. Christopher Pickett, an officer

David Berwin was elected as a member by the St. Louis law firm Evans & Dixon. He practices civil litigation focusing on business claims including the areas of insurance defense, product liability, premises liability, toxic torts and general liability. Stephen D’Aunoy was promoted to partner by the law firm Thompson Coburn, LLP. Derek Falb, vice president for finance and treasurer of the CIC Group, was named to the St. Louis Business Journal’s 2013 Class of 40 Under 40.

NOTES

Carrie Keller is a partner in the St. Louis law firm Herzog Crebs, LLP. She represents a variety of business and individual clients on matters including business planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, contract negotiations, general corporate counsel advice, business succession planning, estate planning, and probate and trust administration. Tracy Beckham Phipps is a partner in the St. Louis law firm Herzog Crebs, LLP. Her practice is based in civil defense and complex litigation with a concentration in toxic tort litigation. Jacqueline Redmond is a partner in the St. Louis law firm Herzog Crebs, LLP. She focuses her practice on business litigation matters, including toxic torts and product liability. Anna Selby is a partner at Armstrong Teasdale LLP. She is a member of the firm’s litigation practice group, advising and defending health care providers in high profile matters involving complex medical malpractice allegations and multimillion dollar claims. Carla Storm was promoted to partner in the law firm Foley & Mansfield’s St. Louis office. Benjamin F. Westhoff joined Sedey Harper as a shareholder, concentrating his practice on representing plaintiffs in personal injury and employment litigation in Missouri and southern Illinois.

2004 Kelly Dineen, assistant dean for academic affairs at Saint Louis University School of Law, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Legal Scholar Award. Seth Frederiksen was elected a partner by the law firm Bryan Cave LLP. He is a member of the firm’s transactions, technology, entrepreneurial and commercial practice and the firm’s corporate

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finance client service groups. Frederiksen was also named a member of the board of directors of Habitat for Humanity St. Louis. Patrick Foppe was promoted to partner at Lashly & Baer, PC . Nancy Hawes joined the law firm Armstrong Teasdale as a partner. She is a member of the corporate services practice group, focusing on real estate, finance, nonprofit and taxexempt organizations and public finance law. Brian Nolan was promoted to principal by the law firm Carmody MacDonald. Daniel Schoenekase was promoted to partner by the law firm Greensfelder Hemker & Gale, PC .

2005 Adam Birenbaum, CEO of Buckingham Asset Management and BAM Advisor Services, was named the most influential person in the registered investment advisor industry for 2013 by RIA Biz, a trade publication for the advisor business. James Heffner was elected as a principal at the law firm Danna McKitrick, PC. He concentrates his practice in banking and finance, corporate and real estate law. In addition to his law practice, Heffner co-chairs the firm’s marketing committee and mentors younger attorneys in the firm. Brian K aveney, partner at the law firm Armstrong Teadale LLP, was named to the St. Louis Business Journal’s 2013 Class of 40 Under 40. Ryan Kerner is general counsel for Freedom Title in St. Louis. Ryan McAlvey was named assistant athletics director for compliance and student services at the University of Portland.

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Sara Melly is a partner at Armstrong Teasdale LLP. She is a litigator in the firm’s financial services group, concentrating her practice on representing clients in matters involving debtor and creditor rights, lender liability, financial distress, restructuring and reorganization. Julia Pucci started the twoattorney family law firm of Pucci/ Pirtle, LLC which has offices in St. Charles, Ill., and Elgin, Ill. Mark Ryerson is a shareholder at Howard & Howard Attorneys, PLLC in the law firm’s Chicago office. He focuses his practice on business and corporate law with an emphasis on private equity and mergers and acquisitions. Alyson Slaughter, president of the Illinois Association of Blind Students, was appointed by Gov. Pat Quinn to the state’s Blind Services Planning Council. Mark Sowers was named a member by the law firm Lewis, Rice & Fingersh, LC . Jason Steinmeyer was promoted to director of the white collar crime and fraud unit in the St. Louis City Circuit Attorney’s Office. Stephen Wohlford joined with three other attorneys to form the law firm SWMK Law, LLC , with offices in downtown St. Louis and Edwardsville, Ill. The firm, formed in August 2012, focuses on asbestos, personal injury, pharmaceutical, commercial and general civil litigation and estate planning, business and real estate law.

2006 Timothy McFarlin was recognized as a Super Lawyers Rising Star in the field of complex business litigation for the second consecutive year. Scott Mueller was elected

director of Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith. He was also recognized for his work in the largest defense verdict category of Missouri Lawyers Media 2013 Awards and received an AV rating from Martindale-Hubbell. Kelly Murrie was named a partner by the St. Louis law firm Dowd Bennett LLP. Erin Phillips was named a partner in the law firm Unsell, Schattnik & Phillips in Wood River, Ill. Lisa Reynolds was promoted to partner at Boggs, Avellino, Lach & Boggs.

2007 Erin Burlison-Huss was named an associate circuit judge in St. Charles County, Mo., by Gov. Jay Nixon. David Frenzia was hired as an associate by Armstrong Teasdale in its litigation practice group. He focuses on issues pertaining to organizing campaigns, union avoidance, collective bargaining, grievance investigations, unfair labor practices, discrimination and other employment-related issues. Courtney Jackson was hired as an associate at Armstrong Teasdale. She is a member of the intellectual property practice group, providing counsel regarding trademark and brand management, strategy and operational issues. Kilby Cantwell Macfadden was presented the Distinguished Service Award from the Hon. Charles P. Burns, circuit judge for Cook County, Ill., for her dedication and commitment to Cook County’s Rehabilitative Alternative Probation (R. A .P.) Program. Cristina Spicer, an attorney with Monsanto Co., was one of three attorneys elected to lead the 2013


CLASS

board of the Young Friends of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri. Edward Vishnevetsky, an associate in the the law firm Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr, PC’s Dallas office, was named one of Texas Lawyers’ top 25 “Legal Leaders on the Rise” in Texas under 40.

2008 Raven Akram, of the law firm Sandberg, Phoenix & von Gontard, was a recipient of the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Media Women’s Justice Rising Star Award. Rebecca Frigy, an associate at the St. Louis law firm Polsinelli Shughart, was honored by the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery at their annual gala as a Young Professional’s Hero for her generosity and commitment to the children of the Crisis Nursery. Megan Meadows joined Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP as an associate in the firm’s labor and employment and litigation groups. Amy White was hired by the law firm Jackson Lewis LLP as an associate in its Creve Coeur, Mo., office, focusing her practice on employment litigation.

2009 Emily Bardon joined the law firm Lewis Rice & Fingersh as an associate, practicing business law and immigration. K ara D. Helmuth, of Danna McKitrick, P.C., was honored with an award as “Missouri Attorneys Securing the Largest Defense Verdicts in 2012” at the 2013 Missouri Lawyers Awards. Along with the rest of the defense team, she was

recognized for receiving a summary judgment and prior dismissal on claims worth $28 million. Audra Zobrist joined the law firm HeplerBroom LLC in its Edwardsville, Ill., office as an associate. She focuses her practice on the defense of asbestos toxic torts involving products and premises liabilities.

2010 Salim Awad, attorney and co-owner of the firm McQueen Awad, LLC, was named to the St. Louis Business Journal’s 2013 Class of 40 Under 40. Sheena Hamilton, an attorney in Armstrong Teasdale’s employment and labor practice group, was appointed vice chair of the Missouri Bar Labor & Employment Law Committee.  Patrick Hinrichs was hired by Danna McKitrick, PC in its litigation practice group. Constantino Ochoa , of the law firm Bryan Cave LLP, was named to the St. Louis Business Journal’s 2013 Class of 40 Under 40. Benjamin Wilson, along with Saint Louis University School of Law professor Yvette Liebesman, won

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NOTES

the top award from the International Trademark Association, the Ladas Memorial Award, for the article, “The Mark of a Resold Good”, 20 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 157 (2012).

2011 Cassie Barr was hired by the St. Louis law firm Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale PC . She has experience in accounting, including international tax and counsels clients on a wide range of corporate and general business matters. Matthew Bigham was hired by Freeark, Harvey & Mendillo, PC an associate. Andrew Eastman was hired by the St. Louis law firm Brinker & Doyen LLP as an associate, focusing his practice on civil litigation, insurance defense, medical malpractice defense and personal injury defense.  K atherine Jacobi joined HeplerBroom LLC in the St. Louis office as an associate attorney. Richard Walker is an associate attorney at the law firm Ward & Eccher, specializing in DWI and criminal defense. He lives in Lake Saint Louis, Mo.

2012 Alexander Chosid joined the St. Louis law firm Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard as an associate, focusing his practice on family law. C. Curran Coulter II joined The Coulter Law Firm, LLC as an associate. He will supplement the firm’s existing

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Go to law.slu.edu/alumni and click on “UPDATE MY INFORMATION.” You can also email your class notes to BRIEF@LAW.SLU.EDU. Submitted photos will be included as space allows.

VO LU M E 1 4 I SS U E 2

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C L ASS

NOTES

family law practice with his focus on bankruptcy and estate planning. Eileen Costellow was hired as an associate by the family law firm of McCurley Orsinger McCurley Nelson & Downing, LLP in their Dallas office. She previously served as a legal intern to the Hon. E. Richard Webber of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. K atie Dageforde was hired as an assistant general counsel by the Tennessee Medical Association in Nashville, Tenn. Margaret Devereux Gentzen joined the St. Louis law firm Fox Galvin as an associate. Before joining Fox Galvin, she clerked at a St. Louis firm and completed a judicial externship for the U.S. District Court

IN

for the Eastern District of Missouri.

practice group.

Susan Jostes was hired by the St. Louis County Prosecutor’s Office.

Juliane M. Rodriguez was hired by St. Louis-based law firm The Onder Law Firm for its personal injury and products litigation department.

Mark Keaney was hired as an associate by Bryan Cave in its commercial litigation client service group. K atherine O’Dell joined the Springfield, Mo., law firm of Baird, Lightner, Millsap & Harpool as an associate, focusing her practice on business litigation, civil rights, immigration and employment law.

Kristen Deets Strieker was hired as an associate by the Stange Law Firm in its Edwardsville, Ill., office, focusing her practice on family law matters.

MEMORIAM MR. RALPH MARKUS, 1950

MR. WILLIAM MAIER, 1963

MAJ. GEN. FRANK SIMOKAITIS, 1950

MR. HENRY GERHARDT, 1971

MR. MILTON MEYER, 1950

MR. LESLIE DAVIS, 1973

JUDGE IRVIN EMERSON, 1951

MR. DENNIS RATHMANN, 1973

MR. RICHARD DEMPSEY, 1951

MR. CARY HAMMOND, 1975

MR. ROBERT LEU, 1954

MR. BRIAN RANSOM, 1976

MR. RAYMOND GERRITZEN, 1954

MRS. MARY BALESTRI SCHROEDER, 1980

MR. WILLIAM ENGLAND, 1955

MR. CHRISTOPHER KELLEHER, 1980

MR. DONALD TEDESCO, 1955

REV. ROBERT PIERCE, 1989

MR. ROBERT GASSETT, 1955

MRS. HELEN HENRY LARSEN, 1991

MR. THOMAS BOBAK, 1958

MR. SCOT ALLEN, 1994

MR. HERMAN ODLE, 1958

MR. R. DERYL EDWARDS, 1997

MR. JOHN NIEMANN, 1959

MS. RONDA WILLIAMS, 2002

MR. WILLIAM HOEMAN, 1960

MS. MELISSA DORSEY, 2007

MR. ROBERT HOEMEKE, 1961

40

 Emery Reusch was hired by Danna McKitrick, PC in its litigation

Tyler Short was hired as an associate by the St. Louis law firm Bryan Cave. Her will join the transactions, corporate finance, technology and entrepreneurial and commercial client service groups.

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


K C A B G N I V I G N O FOCUS The Office of Development and Alumni Relations is highlighting students who benefit from donor contributions. Contributions to the law school directly support law school students and their education.

LOREN MENEFEE ('15)

RISING SECOND YEAR STUDENT, HEALTH LAW EMPHASIS, SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT

Your charitable gifts to SLU LAW allow me to pursue my passion for health law at the nation's premier program. I have more choices for health law classes than any other law school and the opportunity to learn from and work with professors who are leaders in the field.”

Student Scholarships Scholarships are a life-changing gift for a student. Many students would not be afforded the opportunity to attend law school if they did not receive financial aid. Scholarships enhance the SLU LAW experience by allowing us to bring in the best and brightest classes. Additionally, scholarships for second- and third-year students provide an opportunity to reward exceptional achievement beyond students’ first year of law school.

Faculty and Student Development Faculty and students are at the core of legal education. Fostering their professional development through creative initiatives such as lecture series, moot court competitions and other hands-on experiences strengthens the legal education offered at SLU LAW.

Loyal to Law Annual Fund The Loyal to Law Annual Fund sustains the future of SLU LAW. It is an unrestricted fund that allows the dean to cover needed resources that inspire students to excel. Examples include the Student Bar Association mentor program, renewing and acquiring needed resources for the law library and enhancing student activities.

Downtown Law School Building The new law school building is a legal education Mecca. Its highprofile location at the center of the legal community and adjacency to the business and financial community provides endless opportunities for current and future students. In addition, there are many ways for alumni and friends to be a part of this milestone in SLU LAW history by commemorating memories and professional achievements.

For information about giving to the School of Law, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations: SHERIDAN HAYNES 314-977-3303 hayness@slu.edu LIZ STOOKEY 314-977-3978 ebolen1@slu.edu School of Law Development Office as of Aug. 1 100 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 314-977-3300 law.slu.edu/alumni/giftform


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C ALENDA R O F

EVENTS

JULY

30 & 31

Lunch for Missouri Bar Exam Takers, Jefferson City, Mo.

AUGUST

8

19 22

Alumni Open House at 100 N. Tucker Blvd. (5-7:30 p.m.) Classes Begin Recent Alumni Event at Busch Stadium

FA L L 201 3

SEPTEMBER

5 13 13 & 14

20 27 & 28

Kansas City Alumni Reception SLU LAW Trivia Night Class of 1988's 25th Reunion

OCTOBER

4

25 & 26

Mastering the Art of Mediation Advocacy Program CLE SLU LAW Reunion Weekend

NOVEMBER Alumni Lunch as part of the Missouri Bar Midyear Meeting, Columbia, Mo. Alumni Open House at 100 N. Tucker Blvd. (Fri. 4-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.)

1

Childress Lecture


Saint Louis Brief v14i2 Alumni Magazine