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shareholder FA L L 2013

JOHN COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ALUMNI MAGAZINE / SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSIT Y

GLOBAL CITIZENS R A C H A E L PA C E A N D B R E T T B O Y L E , P H . D . A D D R E S S I N G U R G E N T H E A LT H A N D S O C I A L I S S U E S


{from the dean}

THE WORLD IS MUCH SMALLER AND MORE INTERCONNECTED THAN MOST OF US REALIZE. DESPITE OUR UNIQUE B A C K G R O U N D S A N D C U LT U R A L PERSPECTIVES, WE ALL SHARE A SINGLE PLANET WITH FINITE RESOURCES. That realization came to life for me when the John Cook School of Business recently hosted more than 120 leaders from the world’s Jesuit business schools to address the issue of sustainability. Jointly sponsored by the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools and Colleagues in Jesuit Business Education, the World Forum brought together diverse perspectives to develop a collective approach for a global challenge that affects us all. This issue of Shareholder focuses on the business of global citizenship. It features the viewpoints of students, faculty members and business leaders whose cultural experiences have dramatically reshaped their worldview. I think you’ll be inspired by their stories of courage, compassion, sacrifice and entrepreneurship. A church mission trip in high school inspired undergraduate student Rachael Pace to start Water For Panama, a nonprofit charity that brings water – and hope – to the forgotten native villages of Panama. Water also helped motivate Associate Professor of Marketing Brett Boyle, Ph.D., to forego a relaxing spring break for a fiveday volunteer project, drilling a well in an El Salvador village. Management Information Systems/Finance graduate Kevin Crookshank (BSBA ‘08) left a stable position at AT&T to relocate to Armenia as a Peace Corps volunteer, while Economics/Marketing alumnus Marvin Saccucci is currently experiencing his own Peace Corps adventure in Peru.

Feeding the world is always on the mind of Thad Simons, president and CEO of St. Louis-based Novus International, whose mission is to meet the growing global demand for affordable, wholesome food. Finally, Assistant Professor of Marketing, Morris Kalliny, Ph.D., draws on his research of the Middle East region to articulate why he believes globalization is the most effective weapon for impacting other countries. All of these stories illuminate how new perspectives can open our minds to new possibilities. I’m currently experiencing my own new perspective as interim dean of the Cook School for the 2013-14 academic year, following the appointment of Ellen Harshman, Ph.D., J.D., as interim vice president of academic affairs. My new role is a highlight of my 30-year tenure at SLU and one that I am very excited to fulfill. I really look forward to the opportunity to work with our stakeholders in new ways, renew some old friendships and make many new ones along the way. All of us are grateful for your ongoing involvement and support as we continue our mission to equip students to make a positive difference in our interconnected world.

Scott R. Safranski, Ph.D.


{table of contents} SHAREHOLDER

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is published twice yearly for alumni and friends by Saint Louis University’s John Cook School of Business.

EDITOR Camilla Ferrario Hall

CONTRIBUTORS Scott Safranski, Ph.D. Kim Seung, Ph.D. Morris Kalliny, Ph.D. Jeanette Grider Linda Paglusch, SP ‘97 Annelise Piven, BA ‘08 Tyler Sondag, BSBA ‘12 Danielle Stevens, BA ‘07

WRITER Mike Plotnick

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Nicole Cook

PHOTO CREDITS Dale Allen Nate Cowen Brett DeLaria Greg Rannells

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News and Notes

Awards, accomplishments, news and upcoming events at the John Cook School of Business at Saint Louis University.

Cook School hosts leaders from the world’s Jesuit business schools.

Nearly a billion people do not have access to clean, safe drinking water.

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A Global Summit on Sustainability

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PRINTING

The Water Crisis 10

The Printing Source

PLEASE ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO: John Cook School of Business Shareholder Saint Louis University 3674 Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63108 Email: ferrario@slu.edu Past issues of Shareholder can be found at slu.edu/x16732.xml

© 2013 Saint Louis University All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

Taking a Water Break

Marketing Professor Brett Boyle, Ph.D., spends his spring break in El Salvador.

2 Student entrepreneur and Diamond in the Rough member Rachael Pace is CEO of Water for Panama.

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Raising H Ope

Experiencing Panama

Undergraduate business students participate in a 10-day study abroad trip.

Peace Corps volunteers Kevin Crookshank and Marvin Saccucci are transformed by their experiences.

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Cultural Ambassadors

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Feeding the World

Novus CEO Thad Simons is focused on meeting the global demand for food.

Young Alumni Wine Tasting , Cook Networking Happy Hour and Trivia Night.

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Alumni Events

25 Reflection

Perspectives on global citizenship from Assistant Professor of Marketing Morris Kalliny, Ph.D.

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Notes NEWS AND

INTE R NATIO NA L A LUM N I R EC E IV E H O NO RA RY D O CTO RA L D EGR E E S

SA FRA NSK I NA MED INT E RIM DEA N Scott Safranski, Ph.D., has been appointed interim dean of the John Cook School of Business for the 2013-14 academic year, following the appointment of Ellen Harshman, Ph.D., J.D., as interim vice president of academic affairs. A veteran Cook School faculty member for more than 30 years, Safranski has taught courses in management, international business and management information systems. During the past 20 years, he has served in a variety of administrative roles, including associate dean (twice), chair of the management department, interim chair of the decision sciences and information technology department, director of assessment and internal research, director of business school computing and information resources, and director of the Saint Louis University Small Business Institute. Safranski earned his undergraduate and MBA degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and his doctorate from Indiana University. He is a recipient of the Thomas M. Knapp, S.J., Distinguished Faculty Award and the Saint Louis University Graduate Student Association Mentorship Award. His current community and professional activities include service with the Boy Scouts of America and the United Methodist Church, and as a peer-review trainer and member of the appeals board of the Higher Learning Commission.

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C HA N I N VON G KU S OL K I T

M E T E E AUAPIN YAKUL

Chanin Vongkusolkit (MBA ‘77) and Metee Auapinyakul (MBA ‘78) earned the honorary degree of Doctor of Business, Engineering and Technology, honoris causa, at the Saint Louis University Commencement on May 18. During their studies at SLU, both men formulated a shared vision for an energy company that would explore new energy sources while running on traditional ones. That vision became a reality in 1983 with the establishment of the Banpu Public Company Limited, which has become one of the most successful energy companies in Asia. Vongkusolkit serves as chief executive officer, president and director of the company, and Auapinyakul serves as director and executive officer. Beyond his leadership role at Banpu, Vongkusolkit is director of the Erawan Group Public Company Limited and Mitr Phol Sugar Corp., Ltd. In 2006, he received an honorary doctoral degree in economics from Thailand’s Chiang Mai University. Auapinyakul is a board member of the National Accreditation Council for the Ministry of India and has served as an honorary adviser to the Energy Committee of the House of Representatives in Thailand. He also is president of Saint Louis University’s Thailand Alumni Club, one of SLU’s most active international alumni groups. With a commitment to both sustainable energy and education, Auapinyakul focuses on social responsibility and has pioneered alternative energy exploration and “green” power development in Asia. The company provided a $2 million grant to Saint Louis University’s Center for Sustainability and has funded student scholarships, teacher training and infrastructure improvements in areas the company serves.


Events

ANNUAL SE RVICE DAY

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More than 170 students, faculty and staff volunteered in the Service Leadership Program’s eighth annual Service Day on April 5. Participants completed numerous cleaning, painting, landscaping and organization projects for Mathews-Dickey Boys’ & Girls’ Club.

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SUM M E R H IGH SC H O O L ACADE M IE S This summer, the John Cook School of Business hosted three high school summer academies ­— the International Business Summer Academy, Sports Business Summer Academy and Allsup Summer Entrepreneurship Academy. More than 140 high school students from around the country and St. Louis area had the opportunity to meet industry experts, attend field trips, work collaboratively on business projects and present their work to guest judges, while experiencing life on campus.

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1-4: SERVICE DAY VOLUNTEERS GATHER AT SHANAHAN ATRIUM BEFORE THEIR VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING LANDSCAPING AND PAINTING AT MATHEWS-DICKEY BOYS’ & GIRLS’ CLUB. 5: THE BOEING INSTITUTE OF

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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS HOSTS THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS SUMMER ACADEMY. 6: THE CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP WELCOMES MORE THAN 90 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY FOR THE NINTH ANNUAL ALLSUP SUMMER ENTREPRENEURSHIP ACADEMY. 7: IN ITS SECOND YEAR, THE SPORTS BUSINESS SUMMER ACADEMY, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE ST. LOUIS CARDINALS, HOSTS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS INTERESTED

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IN SPORTS BUSINESS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY, PICTURED AT BUSCH STADIUM.

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PRO G RA M U P DAT ES COCABIZ COLLABORATION A new professional development program for one-year MBA students is available through a new collaboration with COCAbiz, a national leader in arts-based education. Following a successful pilot in spring 2013, the program is being offered to students in the fall semester, with potential future expansion opportunities. For more information, visit gradbiz.slu.edu.

SU STAINABILIT Y/M BA DUAL DEGRE E Starting this fall, the John Cook School of Business Graduate Programs and the Center for Sustainability are jointly offering the MBA/M.A. in Sustainability dual degree. The unique program integrates knowledge on sustainable business practices, effective public policy processes and innovative design and engineering approaches. Consistent with the University’s Jesuit mission, candidates will learn applied ethical reasoning skills as the foundation for achieving sustainability. For more information, visit gradbiz.slu.edu.

K AT HY CRA M E R, N EW E XECUTIVE IN RE SIDE NC E Kathy Cramer, Ph.D., has been appointed to the Executive in Residence program at the John Cook School of Business. As the founder and managing partner of the Cramer Institute in St. Louis, Cramer brings more than 25 years of experience in executive training and development to this new position with the Cook School. A SLU alumna and Cook School executive advisory board member, Cramer will assist in the development of a first-of-its-kind executive education program.

2 013 EXC E L L E N C E AWA R DS HO NOR TOP AC H IEV E R S An annual tradition, the Excellence Awards ceremony brings together faculty, staff, alumni and friends of SLU to recognize alumni, faculty and corporate partners for living the mission of service to the community and for their personal and professional achievements. Honorees at the May ceremony were:

DISTINGUISHED CORPORATE PARTNER AWARD: ST. LOUIS BUSINES S JOURNAL

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FR. JOSEPH E . BOLAND OUTSTANDING ALUMNI AWARD: THOMAS HILTON

FR. JOSEPH L . DAVIS ALUMNI MERIT AWARD: ROBERT CIAPCIAK

FR. THOM AS M. KNAPP DISTINGUISHED FACULT Y AWARD: BIDISHA CHAKRABART Y

DISTINGUISHED YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD: JENNIFER EHLEN

JOHN BASLER OUTSTANDING ALUMNI BOARD SERVICE AWARD: BRAD TOMCHEK


ENTREPRENEURIAL HALL OF FA ME INDUCTS FOUR GRADUATES The Center for Entrepreneurship’s Smurfit-Stone Entrepreneurial Alumni Hall of Fame exists to recognize and celebrate SLU graduates who have contributed to our society and economy through entrepreneurial leadership. Four new members were inducted May 14, 2013.

SM ALL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: SCOT T HERNDON HEMDON PRODUCT

LARGE INDEPENDENT ENTREPRENEURSHIP: STEPHEN E. MYERS US C ABLE

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: DAVID HILLIARD W YMAN CENTER

CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP: CRAIG LABARGE LAB ARGE , INC .

In addition, four students distinguished themselves as the next generation of SLU entrepreneurs by winning the center’s Elevator Pitch, Idea to Product, Billiken Angel Network Business Plan and Diamond in the Rough competitions.

COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS FO R UP DAT E S O N EV E N T S TAK I NG P L AC E AT TH E J O H N CO O K S C H OOL OF BU SI N ES S, PL EA S E V I S I T: BUS I N E S S . S LU. E D U/EV E NTS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 5 P.M. - 2 013 ANNUAL I NT ERNAT I ONAL BUSI NE SS AWARDS CEREMONY

The Boeing Institute of International Business will recognize global business leaders David Steward, Chairman and CEO, World Wide Technology, and Marleen Judge, Managing Director, Marsh USA Inc.

TUE S DAY, OCTOBER 8 7: 3 0 A .M. - DEAN’ S BREAKFAST

Featuring Bill Thompson, President, SSM Health Care

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 1 1 : 3 0 A .M. - CE NTE R FOR S U P P LY CHA I N MANAGEME NT ST U D I E S DI ST I NGUISH ED SPE AKER EVENT

James W. O’Neill, President of Global Service and Support, Boeing Defense, Space and Security

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 7: 3 0 A .M. - DEAN’ S BREAKFAST

Featuring General Paul J. Selva, Commander, Air Mobility Command, Scott Air Force Base

2013/14 CALENDAR

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 7: 3 0 A .M . - T H E E ME R S O N I NT ERNAT I O N A L BUS I N E S S CONFER E N CE

Join guests to discuss challenges and opportunities on the global business horizon. Guest speakers include: • Michael King, Senior Vice President at NERA Economic Consulting

WEDNE SDAY, FEBRUARY 26 4 P. M . - A M E R E N S USTA I NABLE BUS I N E S S S P E A K E R

Tony Calandro, Senior Partner, VOX Global

FRIDAY, MARCH 28 12 P. M . - 2 01 4 S E RV I CE DAY P R E S E N T E D BY T H E S E RVICE L E A DE R S H I P P R O G RA M

• Wendy Cutler, Assistant Trade Representative with the U.S. Trade Office • Amy Nice, Executive Director of Immigration Policy for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

THE BUSINE SS OF LIFE: LUNCH SERIE S

• Joe Reagan, President and CEO of the St. Louis Regional Chamber

Presented by Aquinas Institute of Theology and John Cook School of Business

• Richard McClure, President and CEO of Unigroup, Inc.

11 A . M . AT S HE RATO N CLAY TON PL A ZA HOT E L

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5 7: 3 0 A .M . - CE N T E R FO R ENT REPR E N EU R S H I P, I N ST I T U T E FO R P RI VAT E BUS I N E S S S E MI N A R

TUE SDAY, FEBRUARY 11 7: 3 0 A .M . - DE A N ’ S B R E A K FAST

Wes Clayton and Brian Nottingham, ShipWorks founders and co-CEOs

TUE SDAY, NOVEMBER 5 Truth in Advertising: In a ConsumerDriven Society

TUE SDAY, JANUARY 14 The Power of Generosity: Personally and Professionally

TUE SDAY, MARCH 11 Managing Change: The Spirituality of Organizational Restructuring

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{shareholder}

A GLOBAL SUMMIT ON SUSTAINABILITY

THIS SUMMER, THE JOHN COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS H O S T E D D E A N S , F A C U LT Y A N D A D M I N I S T R AT O R S FROM JESUIT INSTITUTIONS A R O U N D T H E W O R L D AT THE WORLD FORUM ON S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y A N D B U S I N E S S P R AC T I C E S .

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ailing from the four corners of the globe, more than 120 leaders from the world’s Jesuit business schools converged in St. Louis in July to share ideas and perspectives about the universal value of sustainability. The John Cook School of Business hosted the three-day World Forum event, which represented the second joint conference of two major advocacy organizations: the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools (IAJBS) and Colleagues in Jesuit Business Education (CJBE). “Both organizations provide opportunities for individuals who lead, manage and teach at Jesuit business schools to get together and share important ideas with other academics and institutions,” said Scott Safranski, Ph.D., interim dean of the John Cook School of Business and program chair of the event. The World Forum attracted a diverse group of participants from the United States,

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Europe, India, Africa, Australia, South Korea, the Philippines, Taiwan, Peru, Argentina, Brazil and Lebanon. The conference theme — “Sustainability and Business Practices: Implications for our Schools” — focused on the unique role and responsibilities of Jesuit academic institutions to be leaders in addressing the global challenges of sustainability.

“ I T ’ S A B O U T TA K I N G ON THE CHALLENGE O F T E AC H I N G F U T U R E BUSINESS LEADERS W H Y S U S TA I N A B L E B U S I N E S S P R AC T I C E S A R E H E A LT H Y A N D NECESSARY FOR THE FUTURE OF THE P L A N E T. ” - MICHAEL GARANZINI, S. J.

The agenda included keynote addresses, breakout sessions, the presentation of 55 different papers and informal discussions. Participants also toured Busch Stadium and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center.

An important aspect of the discussion involved broadening the understanding of sustainability to encompass environmental, social and economic perspectives. “Different cultures in different parts of the world have slightly different — sometimes significantly different — perspectives of what we mean by the term sustainability,” said James Daley, Ph.D., president of IAJBS and retired dean of the Helzberg School of Management at Rockhurst University in Kansas City. “Americans tend to think more of environmental sustainability, while other parts of the world tend to think more about economic sustainability to include economic development. Ultimately it comes down to how we continue to enhance and improve the world so that people today and people in the future will benefit.”

SE E KIN G COM MON GROUN D Bringing together unique ideas and perspectives, the World Forum continued an ongoing dialogue about creating a shared vision for sustainability within Jesuit business schools. “Finding common ground is an extremely important opportunity for us as Jesuit institutions,” said Greg Ulferts, executive director of IAJBS and director of graduate


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business programs at the University of Detroit Mercy. “The exchange is what is so important, learning how to communicate with each other and listening to other perspectives on these issues. That’s where the richness is.” A key element of the discussion involves exchanging new ideas in curriculum development to reflect the recognition that sustainability is an ethical and moral issue. “It’s about taking on the challenge of teaching future business leaders why sustainable business practices are healthy and necessary for the future of the planet,” said Michael Garanzini, S.J. (A&S ’71), president of Loyola University Chicago and secretary for higher education for the Society of Jesus. “We’ve passed the point where the Earth is replenishing itself in sufficient amounts. We’re in a depletion cycle, and we need to find alternatives and new ways of doing business.” Taking a leadership role, Ulferts said, will require rethinking the traditional consumption and production models commonly used and taught at Jesuit universities. “We have a golden opportunity to talk about curriculum redesign that not only deals with economic and social issues, but also environmental issues,” he said. Making a positive difference in the world is consistent with the values of all Jesuit business schools, Daley said. “The phrases vary from school to school, but there’s an expectation that graduates of a Jesuit school will influence the enhancement and improvement of the world around them for the betterment of mankind,” he said. “For a global initiative to have any impact, it has to be applied at the local level, which means becoming more effective in the education and training of student leaders, who will then positively influence their world,” Daley continued.

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1 . M IC H A E L GA RA N ZI N I , S . J. , PR E S I D E N T OF LOYOL A U N I V E R S I T Y CHICAG O, W E LCOM E S L E A D E R S F R OM J E S U I T B U S I N E S S S C HOOL S F R OM A R O UN D T HE WO R LD A S PA RT OF T HE I A J B S A N D C J B E WOR L D FO RUM . 2 . WO R LD FORUM AT TE ND E E S M I N G L E D U R I N G A LU N C H EV E N T AT SA I N T LO U I S U N I VE RSIT Y’S NEW C E N T E R FO R G LOBA L C I T I ZE N S HI P. 3 . WOR L D FO RUM G U E ST S GRE E T O NE A NOT HE R D U R I N G D I N N E R AT B U S C H STA D I UM . 4. T I MOT HY K EAN E , P H .D., D I R ECTO R OF T HE E M E R S ON E T HI C S C E N T E R , G R E E T S WOR LD FORUM AT TE ND E E S D U R I N G T HE C LOS I N G D I N N E R AT B U S C H STA D I UM .

He points to St. Ignatius as a model for inspiring action. “Instead of sitting on a hilltop and praying all day, the Jesuits got out there and acted,” he said. Jesuit universities have the opportunity to leverage a global network that is unrivaled. “In terms of global reach, academics, administrators and students involved, we’ve got a system of schools that is probably as big, or bigger, than any system in the world,” Safranski said. Given the increasing depletion of the Earth’s energy, food and water resources,

Garanzini believes it’s imperative that students are equipped to think about the serious demands placed on them, the world and their communities, and to respond in a coordinated fashion. “It’s awfully selfish to push it off to the next generations,” Garanzini said. “Some of these crises of diminishment and change will happen during the careers of the people we’re teaching today. Educators are supposed to deliver not only wisdom of the past, but also set the path for the future. We have an obligation as Jesuit institutions.” sh

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{shareholder}

THE

WATER CRISIS

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WAT E R I S T H E F O U N DAT I O N O F L I F E , Y E T N E A R LY A B I L L I O N P E O P L E I N T H E D E V E L O P I N G W O R L D D O N ’ T H AV E AC C E S S T O C L E A N , S A F E D R I N K I N G WAT E R . E N T I R E C O M M U N I T I E S A R E R O B B E D O F T H E I R F U T U R E B E C A U S E O F WAT E R - B O R N E I L L N E S S E S A N D T H E T I M E S P E N T F E T C H I N G WAT E R F R O M D I S TA N T S O U R C E S . S L U F A C U LT Y A N D S T U D E N T S A R E D E V O T I N G T H E I R T I M E , TA L E N T A N D R E S O U R C E S T O I M P R O V I N G A C C E S S T O C L E A N WAT E R , W H I L E E D U C AT I N G C O M M U N I T I E S A B O U T T H E I M P O R TA N C E O F H YG I E N E . A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R O F M A R K E T I N G B R E T T B OY L E , P H . D . , D E D I C AT E D H I S S P R I N G B R E A K T O S P E N D F I V E D AY S D R I L L I N G F O R WAT E R I N E L S A LVA D O R . U N D E R G R A D U AT E S T U D E N T R AC H A E L PAC E C O M B I N E D H E R E N T R E P R E N E U R I A L S P I R I T W I T H H E R S E R VA N T H E A R T T O C R E AT E A N O N P R O F I T C H A R I T Y C A L L E D WAT E R F O R PA N A M A . B O T H A R E H E L P I N G T O A D D R E S S O N E O F T H E W O R L D ’ S M O S T U R G E N T H E A LT H A N D SOCIAL ISSUES.

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TA K I N G

A

WATER B R E A K

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A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R O F M A R K E T I N G B R E T T B OY L E , P H . D . , S P E N D S H I S S P R I N G B R E A K D I G G I N G F O R WAT E R I N E L S A LVA D O R .

B

rett Boyle remembers the day he struck water. The breakthrough event happened during his shift operating an enormous hydraulic drill that slowly burrowed a hole deep into the earth of a small village in southwest El Salvador.

Cheers erupted from the crowd of local onlookers as they anticipated imminent access to clean water for their village. It was definitely an untraditional spring break experience for the associate professor of marketing. While many of his colleagues and students were relaxing at a beach or pool, Boyle was spending more than 12 hours a day volunteering for Living Water International, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides clean water access to communities around the world.

BRE AKIN G TH E CYCLE OF P OVERT Y Boyle learned about much more than how to operate a hydraulic drill during those five days in March 2013. He learned that bringing clean water to impoverished villages wasn’t just about health and convenience; it was simple economics. “Living in a village without a close source of clean drinking water means spending hours each day walking to fetch water, which means many children are not in school and adults are not working,” he said. Digging a well costs about $5,000, yet brings new freedom and empowerment to the people it serves. “Breaking the cycle of dependency on far-flung water sources is not only the first step toward a healthy population, but it also breaks the cycle of poverty itself,” Boyle said. “This isn’t some esoteric idea. Water is everywhere underneath our feet, and it’s accessible if people just have the means to acquire it. It’s a solvable problem.”

“I had never worked a piece of machinery heavier than a lawnmower, but the local crew trained me well,” Boyle said. “It was pretty much of a coincidence that I was on the drill when we finally struck water.” The meticulous drilling process required finesse and patience, as the drill frequently became stuck in the ground. While one volunteer operated the drill, others cleared dirt and debris from around the hole, and other team members prepared the hollow pipe that would extend the drill further into the ground.

“ B R E A K I N G T H E C YC L E O F D E P E N D E N CY O N FA RF L U N G WAT E R S O U R C E S I S N O T O N LY T H E F I R S T S T E P T O WA R D A H E A LT H Y P O P U L AT I O N , B U T I T A L S O B R E A K S T H E C YC L E O F P O V E R T Y I T S E L F. ”

Because education plays a major role in Living Water International’s mission, the female volunteers in Boyle’s group taught the local women about the importance of hygiene, using glitter to illustrate how easily germs can be transmitted. “It’s as much about education as it is about providing water to them,” Boyle said. During the trip, he witnessed women washing their dishes and clothes in the same river that contained waste runoff from a hog farm 50 yards away.

“I had never seen poverty like this in person before,” Boyle said. “As - B R E T T B OY L E , P H . D . “Almost exactly 100 feet down, we struck impoverished as they were, their faith water,” Boyle said. “It bubbled at first, put mine to shame. They also had an then there was a gusher effect. It was an extremely strong sense of community. incredible moment.” By all accounts, they were happy people. I took quite a bit away Throughout the experience, Boyle drew inspiration from his crew from that.” leader, Enrique. The experience helped broaden Boyle’s perspective of himself beyond “He was the one trying to get the drill out of the ground for hours on his vocation as a business professor. end, yet he was also the one trying to reassure me,” Boyle said. “He “There’s more to me than just teaching people how to sell more was very patient, which isn’t exactly my strong suit, and he just had sneakers,” he said. “I hope I can provide an example or serve as a role this quiet resolve about all of it.” model to someone who’s trained in business that there’s more to every Because “Brett” is not a common name in El Salvador, Enrique also person than just their specialty. We all have more to offer.” nicknamed Boyle “Brad Pitt” in honor of the American celebrity whose first name most closely sounded like his.

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U N D E R G R A D U AT E S T U D E N T R AC H A E L PAC E I S C E O O F WAT E R F O R PA N A M A , A N O N P R O F I T O R G A N I Z AT I O N T H AT B R I N G S WAT E R T O T H E F O R G O T T E N N AT I V E V I L L A G E S O F PA N A M A .

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t was on a bus trip returning from youth group camp that Rachael Pace decided to start a water charity in Panama. She and some friends had been inspired after a breakfast event that challenged participants to follow their passions and start something significant in their communities. The high schoolers took the assignment seriously, brainstorming ideas that ranged from building clinics and churches to collecting shoes and school supplies. Looming large in Pace’s mind, however, was a recent church mission trip she took to Panama, helping to build and paint houses as well as to teach Bible lessons to kids of the indigenous villages of the Chiriquí Bay area. What struck her most about the trip was how the people she encountered could experience such poverty and joy at the same time. “You can’t really comprehend extreme poverty until you go to a community that literally has nothing,” Pace said. “Yet these were the happiest, most outgoing and

generous people I’ve ever met in my life. That stuck with me in a special place after I left.” As the youth group bus transported Pace back to her comfortable life in the west St. Louis suburb of Ellisville, Mo., the phrase “raising hope” popped into her mind. “Hope is really what water would bring to these communities,” she said. “Water is such a basic need, and once you have it, so many other doors open.” She decided to name the organization Water for Panama, but “raising hope” would be its slogan. The organization’s efforts started small, initially as a marketing campaign for her church to take another mission trip in 2012. Gradually, its fundraising efforts began to get more sophisticated: trivia nights, benefit concerts, silent auctions and boot camps at a local gym. The Water for Panama website, waterforpanama.org, now allows individuals to create and manage their own custom fundraising pages. Recently, the organization achieved its 501(c)(3) tax-exempt public charity status. “That’s a big step for us as an organization,” Pace said. “Donations are now tax deductible for donors, and it opens many doors for new opportunities and partnerships for us.”

SHAPING THE VISION AT SLU Growing up in Ellisville, Pace had initially set her sights on choosing a college farther away from home. But after touring the campus with her mom, she was convinced that Saint Louis University was the ideal campus home for her. “I just fell in love,” she said. “What really sealed the deal was the Micah program. Service is a big part of my life and my faith, so combining both in one learning community and the idea of hanging out with a bunch of people who value the same things was just the perfect fit.” Given her aspirations to build clinics in Panama, she initially chose pre-med as her major. But as she realized she didn’t like the sight of blood and wasn’t keen on enduring years of additional schooling, she began exploring other potential areas of study. She discovered the field of public health after a friend described it as “you in a major.” “I see a need and immediately think of how it can be fixed instead of asking why it is that way,” Pace said. “Public health has definitely harnessed that quality in a very good way.” The John Cook School of Business Center for Entrepreneurship’s Diamond in the Rough program has provided ongoing (continued on page 14)

1. WATER FOR PANAMA’S EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH INCLUDES BUILDING PORTABLE HAND-WASHING STATIONS TO TEACH CHILDREN THE IMPORTANCE OF WASHING THEIR HANDS. 2. PACE WITH PANAMANIAN CHILDREN.

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N URTU R IN G STU DENT ENTR EPR ENEURS The Center for Entrepreneurship’s Diamond in the Rough Program provides training, mentoring and support to students who own and run their own businesses. Open to students from any major or discipline, the program offers networking, fast-track access to angel investors via the Billiken Angel Network, and the opportunity to earn funding through an annual student competition. “A program like Diamond in the Rough highlights a fundamental aspect of entrepreneurship: that anyone can start a business and be successful at it,” said Tyler Sondag, marketing strategist at the Center for Entrepreneurship. “One of our key beliefs is that being

business guidance and support to Pace as she continues to develop Water for Panama. “It’s been really nice to connect with other student entrepreneurs who understand what I’m going through,” she said. “It’s been really helpful just to share my story and know that others have had the same struggles that I have.” Increasingly, others are coming to Pace to ask her for advice and guidance with their own business ventures. “It’s kind of uncomfortable when people tell you they’re inspired by what you did, and you’re not exactly sure what you did,” she said. “I feel like it just kind of came together outside of my power. It’s kind of a miracle that has formed and taken off as it has.”

M A I NTA IN IN G FO C U S As Water for Panama continues to grow and evolve, Pace remains committed to keeping its focus on the native villages the organization was created to serve. “These are people who are often overlooked and not even recognized by the government,” she said. “Many of the general population in Panama aren’t even aware the country has them living there. And these people are in desperate need of so many different things. Since water is so basic, that’s what we focus on.” During her three trips to Panama, Pace has

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an entrepreneur is a versatile thing, and that it means different things to different people. Of course, not everyone takes the same classes or has the same idea-inspiring experience or professor, and we recognize that.” By taking a broad perspective on entrepreneurship, the program strives to nurture all types of student business ventures. “Think about some of the world’s biggest companies, their founders and what they studied in school,” Sondag said. “A very large number of them undoubtedly studied something other than entrepreneurship or business, yet they went on to shape the world as we know it.” The program is designed to take student businesses to the next level. “The more we can make that happen, the better off we all are,” he said.

“IT’S SO DRASTIC W H E N YO U F I N A L LY COMPREHEND THE WEIGHT OF THE NEEDS O F OT H E R P E O P L E A N D H O W YO U H AV E T H E C A PA B I L I T Y T O H E L P THEM.” - R AC H A E L PAC E

visited a few dozen of the several hundred villages. “Unless every village in every community has access to clean, safe, fresh water, then I don’t want to expand to other countries,” she said. “By focusing on one area, you can have so much more of an impact than if you spread yourself too thin. It’s a more personal impact, too, because the people know that we really care about the region.” To build credibility and trust within the villages, Water for Panama has partnered with David’s Well, a ministry that has served the region for many years. “Water means everything to these communities,” Pace said. “It brings a whole new perspective and new outlook for them. They’re not being held back anymore.”

She acknowledges that her age is among her biggest challenges. “It’s difficult being a teenage woman,” she said. “People don’t take you seriously.” But she draws on the same independent spirit that compelled her to teach herself to read and tie her own shoes as a child. She also relies on support from a CFO, board of directors and her parents. Mom is a board member, and dad is a fellow entrepreneur; both provide ongoing guidance. Through the experience of running a global nonprofit organization, Pace has been struck by the extreme contrast between the “American dream” of success and the grim realities faced by the native people of Panama, including high rates of infant mortality and low life expectancy. The observation has transformed her worldview. “It’s so drastic when you finally comprehend the weight of the needs of other people and how you have the capability to help them,” Pace said. “Once you realize you have these talents and gifts and connections, and all this abundance and freedom in this country, you can’t turn it down.” For more information about Water for Panama, visit the organization’s website at waterforpanama.org. sh


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EXPERIENCING PANAMA

A G R O U P O F U N D E R G R A D U AT E B U S I N E S S S T U D E N T S E X P E R I E N C E S PA N A M A N I A N C U LT U R E A S PA R T O F T H E A N N U A L 1 0 - D AY S T U DY A B R O A D P R O G R A M .

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hen Maurice Roper (BSBA ’13) signed up for the 10-day study abroad trip to Panama in January 2013, he figured he’d have a tough time adjusting to the new culture. A finance major, Roper’s only previous voyage outside the United States was to Canada, and his Spanish-speaking skills were limited to “hola,” “gracias” and a few basic phrases. Little did he know that his dancing skills would help bridge the cultural divide. The unexpected opportunity occurred as the students visited the Playa Blanca resort. Roper decided to approach a DJ spinning tunes in the pool area and request “The Wobble,” a song and accompanying dance popular on the SLU campus. When the DJ couldn’t locate the tune, Roper offered to connect his iPhone to the sound system to share the song with the multi-cultural crowd. Before he knew it, he was teaching a group of international tourists how to do the wobble. “We just all started dancing together and having a good time,” he said. “I came back

about an hour later, and the DJ wanted to do it again. It was a lot of fun.” It proved to be an unscheduled cultural exchange during the annual study abroad experience, which combines classroom learning with a series of educational and cultural trips. Recently, the John Cook School of Business broadened its study abroad program by introducing a Global Immersion Experiences course that combines classroom discussion and project-oriented experiences with pre-trip research, in-country experiences and a post-trip report. Panama is among the most popular locales of the 10 study abroad trips offered by the Cook School to countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America. “Each year, the Panama trip is sold out, and we have to turn away students,” said Seung H. Kim, Ph.D., director of the Boeing Institute of International Business and Paul Lorenzini Professor of International Business. “This is a multifaceted program that includes not just an academic learning experience, but also practical field trips and volunteer experiences.”

While in Panama, the students stay at the City of Knowledge, a 300-acre international education campus that overlooks the Panama Canal and formerly housed a U.S. Army base. Since 2004, SLU’s Boeing Institute of International Business has participated in a cultural exchange program among a consortium of universities, business and research organizations.

BRIN GIN G LE ARNI NG TO LIFE For international business major Stephanie Mackenzie (BSBA ’13), the experience helped bring learning to life in a way that transcended traditional classroom learning. “Everything you learn about, you then go out and experience,” she said. “And that just makes it so much more memorable and so much more of an enriching experience than if you were just learning about culture in a classroom.” Although Mackenzie spent her junior year studying at SLU’s Madrid campus and has traveled internationally, she was surprised by Panama’s developed and thriving economy. “We visited the Panama headquarters of HSBC and other companies and found out

1. LOCA L C U IS INE INC LU D E S P LA NTAI N S A N D F I S H. 2 . T HE G R O U P V I S I T S CA S CO V I E J O, I N T HE HISTOR IC D ISTR ICT O F PA NA M A C IT Y.

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they have more jobs than skilled workers to fill them,” she said. The group also learned about the vital role of the Panama Canal in facilitating the international trading activities that drive the country’s economy. A current expansion project will double the capacity of the canal by 2015 to allow more and larger ships to pass through the complex system of locks that connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. “The canal really fuels the whole economy, and that’s something I never really considered,” Mackenzie said. “As globalization increases, that’s the best trading route they have. Expanding it is providing a lot of people with jobs.” The group’s cultural trips included visiting a village inhabited by the Embera tribe of indigenous people, learning about the tribe’s unique culture, language and customs. “We took a canoe down the river, went swimming under a waterfall, then hiked back to the village,” Mackenzie said. “We talked about the clothes they wear and food they eat, met their pet otter, and hiked into the woods to meet a medicine man who uses the surrounding trees to treat different ailments.” For Roper, the experience reinforced the value of living simply. “It’s such a beautiful place, deep inside a forest, where these people live on their own without relying on modern technology and conveniences,” he said. “It reminded me you don’t need a lot of material things to be happy because they seemed like the happiest people.”

UNDE R STA N D I NG THE BUS I N E S S C U LTU R E The group had learned about Latin business culture from Adjunct Instructor Yara DeAndrade, Ph.D., prior to leaving for Panama, but it wasn’t until Mackenzie

“ E V E R Y T H I N G YO U L E A R N A B O U T, YO U THEN GO OUT AND EXPERIENCE. AND T H AT J U S T M A K E S I T S O M U C H M O R E MEMORABLE AND SO MUCH MORE OF AN ENRICHING EXPERIENCE THAN IF YO U W E R E J U S T L E A R N I N G A B O U T C U LT U R E I N A C L A S S R O O M . ” - S T E P H A N I E M AC K E N Z I E

experienced it personally that the cultural differences came to life. She recalls being shocked when a presenter at HSBC casually answered his ringing cell phone and began having a conversation. “I remember thinking that was so rude; I was appalled,” she said. “But I learned that interruptions are normal. They’re not on a linear time schedule like we are. They’re used to juggling lots of things at the same time.“ Roper also was struck by the differing concept of time in Panama. “Everything started a little later, and lasted a little longer than it was scheduled,” he said. “Americans like to be very efficient with our time, but when you visit a restaurant in Panama, they want you to sit back and relax. It’s more of a social experience when you’re around people.” It also was the first trip to Panama for SLU Program Coordinator Danielle Stevens, who accompanied the students on the trip. “I’m a big proponent of study abroad experiences,” she said. “Whenever you can get outside the classroom in experiential learning, it brings so much more to students. You never truly understand a culture until you live in it.” Living in Panama actually helped Mackenzie learn more about herself.

yourself in someone else’s shoes, you can look at something from so many different perspectives. I think traveling gives you these soft skills that you don’t have if you don’t visit different cultures.” In her current job as marketing assistant at Necsel, a supplier of lasers for the projection market, Mackenzie frequently interacts with colleagues and customers from other cultures. The experience also changed Roper’s perspective on doing business in an increasingly global economy. “It opened my mind to being a more wellrounded person in how I view things. We all have to adapt our business practices to meet the needs of people around the world,” said Roper, who works as a consumer compliance examiner at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Kim said the study abroad experiences contribute to understanding global issues so students are more successful in the business world. “You have to understand both business issues and also cultural issues, which can influence everything from what type of clothes you wear to what color gifts you give,” he said. “Ultimately, we want our students to become more competitive and improve their knowledge of doing business abroad.” sh

“I never realized I had such an American viewpoint on things,” she said. “When you see another person’s viewpoint and put

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Cultural AMBASSADORS

A S A P E AC E C O R P S VO LU N T E E R I N A R M E N I A , KEVIN CROOKSHANK IMMERSES HIMSELF IN A NEW C U LT U R E , M E E T S H I S F U T U R E W I F E A N D I S T R A N S F O R M E D BY THE EXPERIENCE .

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n April 20, 2010, the day before his 24th birthday, Kevin Crookshank (BSBA ‘08) received a blue packet in the mail that would determine his destiny for the next two years — and beyond. He tore open the envelope to discover that he would be shipping off to the Eastern European republic of Armenia as a Peace Corps volunteer. The moment was the culmination of a lengthy application process that involved months of uncertainty. “It felt like the NBA draft or something,” he said. “You’re getting adopted by some country. After a year of waiting, it was pretty exciting.” With less than a month to prepare for his new life, he had to resign from his job at AT&T, empty the contents of his apartment and place them in storage, buy supplies for his trip and say goodbye to family and friends.

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“It was one of the craziest months of my life, to be honest with you,” he said. “There’s not a lot you can do until you know where you’re heading.” Turns out he was heading to a country he knew only as the homeland of the rock band System of a Down as well as the site of tragic genocide during World War I. Thankfully, the Peace Corps armed him with materials about Armenian history, language and culture before he set off on the more than 6,000-mile journey to the former Soviet republic. His first stop was Washington, D.C., where he met fellow Peace Corps volunteers and underwent a day of training. Then, the group flew to Vienna, Austria, taking advantage of a 12-hour layover to explore the scenic city. Early the next morning, reality set in as they arrived at their new home in Armenia.


“ I F E E L L I K E W H AT W E D O H E R E H A S A H U G E I M PA C T O N T H E R E S T O F T H E W O R L D . I U N D E R S TA N D H O W P E O P L E S E E U S A N D H O W I M P O R TA N T W E A R E O N T H E G L O B A L S C A L E . A N D T H AT ’ S F L AT T E R I N G , T H AT ’ S S C A R Y, T H AT ’ S I N C R E D I B L E . ” - KEVIN CROOKSHANK

“We were exhausted, sleep-deprived, hot, sweaty and uncomfortable,” Crookshank said. “The old Soviet-style airport looked like something from Star Trek, and we were surrounded by people speaking a strange language, driving odd cars and listening to weird music. It was another world.”

“It was an end-of-the-road kind of town, in an impoverished area, with 60 to 70 percent unemployment,” he said.

As a charter bus transported Crookshank through the city, he remembers feeling shock as he looked out the windows and realized this would be his home for more than two years.

He served as a community and business development volunteer, working with non-governmental organizations to improve their operations. His activities included helping the YMCA develop a strategic plan and create a brochure, newsletter, YouTube channel and Facebook page so the organization could improve its communications with partners and donors from abroad.

“When you’ve been living in America all your life, there’s no frame of reference of what Armenia looks like,” he said. “I remember a guy next to me on the bus looked over and said, ‘Well, this just got real, didn’t it?’ It was such a rip-the-Band-Aid-off kind of feeling.”

Other community involvement activities included serving on an HIV/AIDS committee, assisting with poetry competitions and participating in a border-to-border program of volunteers who walk the countryside to teach health lessons and promote healthy lifestyles.

The food, lack of sleep and stress caught up to him the second week, and he got extremely ill. Battling intense stomach cramps and diarrhea, he was forced to endure lengthy language classes in a hot school with uncomfortable chairs.

At the beginning of his experience, language was the biggest barrier.

“I was trying to learn a strange language with new letters, I hadn’t eaten anything and my stomach was going crazy. That’s when I thought ‘what the heck am I doing?’ “The Peace Corps always says it’s an emotional roller coaster, and it’s very true,” he said. “There’s extreme highs and extreme lows, where you’re lonely, very homesick, feel out of place and don’t feel like you belong. You question the decision you made to leave home.”

“One day you’re in corporate America managing a $1 billion portfolio, and the next day, you can’t even talk to people,” he said. “That’s incredibly frustrating.” Once his language skills improved, the culture became his primary challenge. “Trying to see issues from their perspective — why they don’t want to do something or why they don’t know how to do something — was a huge challenge,” he said.

A M E RICAN A M BAS SADOR

But those feelings and doubts are balanced by another Peace Corps cliché: that its volunteers gain so much more from the people they serve than vice versa.

Beyond offering trained volunteers to countries in need, the Peace Corps also exists to promote cultural exchange between America and its host country nationals.

S ERV IN G T H E PEO PLE

About two-thirds of Crookshank’s work involved cultural exchange, ranging from interacting with a classroom of junior high kids in St. Louis to teach them about Armenia to preparing American food and explaining American culture to the Armenians.

Crookshank spent the first two months of his Armenian life in Solak, a small scenic village in the center of the country, before receiving his permanent assignment in Vardenis, located near the eastern border.

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1. C ROOKSHANK ACCOM PA NIE S S EV E RA L CO L L E AG U E S TO A POE T RY COM PE T I T I ON . 2 . COWORK ERS FR OM TH E YMCA IN VA R D E N I S S U R R O U N D C R O OKS HA N K .

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“You’re an ambassador in many ways,” he said. “You may be the only American someone has ever met or ever will meet. What you do and what you say has a big impact on how they see our country.” As he interacted with the locals, he developed a great affinity for the country he previously knew little about. “You have this incredibly intimate experience with the country, the people and the culture, and I just think that’s incredibly valuable and can really shape your whole worldview for the rest of your life,” he said. “I know that no one can take that away from me. That’s a beautiful thing that comes out of the Peace Corps.” As an unexpected bonus, he met Agnieszka (“Aga”) Oleksiak, a European Voluntary Service (EVS) volunteer from Poland who would become his fiancée. “She just happened to be sent to the same small NGO in my tiny town,” he said. “The stars aligned for us. It was good fortune and serendipity and a lot of things all at once.”

R ET U R N I N G H OME A few things stood out to Crookshank when his parents picked him up from the airport in Chicago after his Peace Corps service ended in August 2012. “High-quality roads, massive cars, big lanes and not having to swerve around cows,” he said. “Also going to the grocery store and seeing 80 kinds of cereal to choose from.”

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Returning to America also meant facing the reality of finding another job. After six months of unemployment and applying for more than 200 jobs, he secured a position as an analyst at State Farm Insurance in Bloomington, Ill. He also started another lengthy application process: this time for a fiancée visa. He and Aga were married on Aug. 31. Although Crookshank has readjusted to life as a private citizen, he misses his Peace Corps experience. “I still miss Armenia everyday,” he said. “I’m very nostalgic about that magical time of my life. Learning new things constantly, the food, the nature, the Armenian people, the language, the amazing volunteers you’re serving with. I miss the uniqueness of that time in my life.” He says the experience definitely broadened his perspective of the world. “I do feel like a citizen of the world now,” he said. “I feel like what we do here has a huge impact on the rest of the world. I understand how people see us and how important we are on the global scale. And that’s flattering, that’s scary, that’s incredible.” Read more about Crookshank’s Peace Corps experience and current life on his blog at icenugget.wordpress.com.


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1. SACCUCCI’S FIELD-BASED TRAINING INCLUDES TRAVELING TO CAJAMARCA, PERU, TO PRESENT A BUSINESS SIMULATION TO STUDENTS FROM THE LOCAL COLLEGE. 2. SACCUCCI IN PERU.

R E C E N T G R A D U AT E M A R V I N S AC C U C C I ( B S B A ’ 1 3 ) F U L F I L L S H I S P E AC E C O R P S D R E A M .

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ver since he was in high school, Marvin Saccucci has wanted to volunteer for the Peace Corps. His interest only intensified as he attended two different Jesuit universities and solidified his career aspirations of working in community economic development. Last summer, Saccucci got a taste of what a Peace Corps experience might involve when he volunteered for the Pisco Sin Fronteras program in Peru, helping to build modular houses and teaching children to read in a community devastated by a recent earthquake. “It was a great experience; I loved every minute of it,” Saccucci said. “I also realized I really enjoy working with people from around the world.” When he returned home, he focused his attention on pursuing a Peace Corps opportunity. Although he was open to serving anywhere in the world, his assignment ended up taking him back to Peru. Saccucci arrived at the humble village of Chacrasana in June to complete several weeks of training before learning where his permanent post would be. “I was really impressed with the work ethic of the people

there,” he said. “Most of them wake up at 5:30 a.m. to commute two hours to work.” Cars were a luxury, and most people traveled the brown, dusty terrain in jam-packed small buses known as combis. The traditional, family-oriented culture dictated that most men work in construction or agriculture and most women stay home, taking pride in cooking and cleaning for their families and guests. “In our American culture, we learn to be independent from a young age, but that means we can miss out on family traditions,” he said. In late August, Saccucci transferred to his permanent site in Otuzco, a small town in the Andes Mountains where the main mode of transportation is the donkey. Known as the capital of faith, Otuzco attracts thousands of people each December for a religious pilgrimage that is one of the most important holidays in South America. Saccucci’s work will revolve around youth entrepreneurship, money management and small business development. To follow Saccucci’s Peace Corps experience, visit marvingoestoperu.blogspot.com. sh

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{shareholder} S T. LO U I S - B A S E D N OV U S I N T E R N AT I O N A L — L E D BY PRESIDENT AND CEO THAD SIMONS — IS FOCUSED ON MEETING T H E G LO B A L D E M A N D F O R A F F O R DA B L E , W H O L E S O M E F O O D.

FEEDING E THE WORLD

very morning, Thad Simons wakes up with the thought of having 9 billion mouths to feed.

That’s the number of individuals who are expected to inhabit planet Earth by 2050. As president and CEO of Novus International, Simons leads a business whose vision is to help feed the world affordable, wholesome food so people can achieve a higher quality of life. Talk about a worthy calling. “We know now that the world will have to produce as much food in the next 40 years as has been produced in all of human history,” said Simons, who is a supporter of SLU’s Executive Master of International Business program. “That increased demand will require doubling or tripling the amount of food production with the same resources.” Demand is growing as the global population continues to increase and as living standards improve. “As people around the world move into the middle class, they become more concerned with their own nutritional needs and are interested in bringing more protein into their diets,” Simons said. “It’s especially important for children to have adequate protein in their diets.” The global food supply is also undergoing increased scrutiny as concerns over food

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safety, security and sustainability come to the forefront. “People care about food,” Simons said. “They care about where it comes from. They care about how the animals are treated. They care about the impact we’re having on the environment. In the end, it comes down to how we produce food to meet the global demand in a sustainable way.”

G ROWIN G A GLOBA L LEA DER Formed in 1991 when Monsanto sold its Feed Ingredients division to two Japanese companies, Novus creates animal nutrition solutions products for livestock, poultry and aquaculture.

He actively promotes sustainable agriculture practices, including increased animal-based food supply, improved environmental preservation, use of local by-products, food safety, renewable fuel sources, animal welfare standards and fresh water conservation. “One of the best ways of raising living standards for people is teaching them how to grow chickens,” he said. “Starting a small poultry operation is a very quick way to bring a revenue source into a family.” Novus recently worked with one of its customers in Brazil to start a small poultry farm, working with a local university to source local raw materials, including a cactus plant that could feed the chickens cost-effectively.

ALL BUSIN E S S IS G LO BA L

The company’s core products incorporate micro ingredients — minerals, amino acids, probiotics and other essential nutrients — that add nutritional value to animal feed to compensate for deficiencies in an animal’s diet. Serving customers in nearly 100 countries around the world, Novus sells it products to integrated food producers such as Tyson Foods as well as commercial feed producers such as Cargill. Simons, an attorney, accepted an offer to join the fledgling company in 1991 as general counsel. He and his family had recently relocated to St. Louis from Belgium so he could complete a three-year assignment at Monsanto. “It was a great opportunity to be part of the grassroots of a company that was already operating globally,” he said. “It was very challenging, but a lot of fun.”

Although its headquarters, offices and research facilities are located on a single campus in St. Charles, Mo., Novus is the epitome of a global operation.

“ W E K N O W N O W T H AT THE WORLD WILL H AV E T O P R O D U C E A S MUCH FOOD IN THE NEXT 40 YEARS AS HAS BEEN PRODUCED IN ALL OF HUMAN H I S T O R Y. ” - THAD SIMONS

It didn’t take long for Simons’ leadership skills to be tapped for other areas of the business, including human resources and business development. Since assuming the reins as president of Novus in 2001, he has led an expansion of the company’s worldwide presence through the development of new products that help farmers to produce meat and milk with fewer resources, less waste and less cost. “We help farmers to more efficiently grow the animal protein that consumers want, and we do this on a global basis in all different climates and economic conditions,” Simons said.

“We have about 20 different nationalities working in St. Louis and people located in more than 50 countries around the world,” Simons said. “I don’t know that there’s any way you can consider doing business today without taking into consideration what’s happening in other parts of the world and how the supply chains are changing.” Simons regularly sponsors Novus employees to complete SLU’s Executive Master of International Business program and has served as a guest lecturer, board member and mentor to the program.

“Saint Louis University’s international business program is one of the great ways in which we can make sure that our talent is developed to have access to the best opportunities,” he said. “Dr. Kim is a great ambassador of St. Louis, and he’s showcased the region as a great location for investment and trade to so many speakers and delegations.” In recognition of excellence in global business practices, Simons earned the International Visionary Award from SLU’s Boeing Institute of International Business in 2007. He serves as president of the board of directors of the International Food and Agribusiness Management Association. sh

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Events ALUMNI

COOK N E T WORKIN G H AP PY H O U R Meet fellow Cook School alumni at the November Networking Happy Hour, sponsored by the Alumni Board. To register, please visit alumni.slu.edu/cooknetworkingseries.

YO U N G A LUM NI WINE TA STING T HUR S DAY, O CTOB ER 17

TRIVIA N IGH T

6: 3 0 P.M .

Join fellow Cook School alumni for the annual Trivia Night, hosted by the John Cook School of Business Alumni Board.

SA MU E L CU P P LES HO U SE

JANUARY 2 01 4*

COST: $2 5

DOORS OPE N AT 6 P. M .

I NC LU D E S T H E WINE TA STING, A P P E T I Z E R S A ND A $ 5 GIF T TO TH E EM ER GE N CY SC HOLA R S HIP F U ND.

TRIVIA STARTS AT 6 :3 0 P. M.

Join young alumni from SLU and other Jesuit universities for the Young Alumni Wine Tasting. Enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres at Samuel Cupples House on SLU’s campus while seeing old friends and networking with new connections. To register, please visit alumni.slu.edu/winetasting13.

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COST: $25 0 (REGULAR TAB L E); $400 (PRE M IUM TABLE ) A percentage of the proceeds support the John Cook School of Business Alumni Scholarship Fund. To learn more and register, please visit alumni.slu.edu/trivia14. * Specific date to be determined.


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THE BUSINESS OF GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP KALLINY IN TAHRIR SQUARE, EGYPT

M

y students often ask me why we care so much about what happens in other countries. This question has become so common, yet the answer to it has become increasingly more complicated. The complexity stems from the fact that the world’s countries are now connected economically, politically, socially, culturally, technologically and environmentally. Therefore, the answer to the question often depends on which of these is at play and concerns us the most. The world has become small, really small. But what implications does this have for business activities and global citizenship? While the answer to this question can be lengthy, an important aspect is global awareness. Countries and nations are now more connected and interdependent than ever before, where each of us is aware of the wider world and has a clear sense of our own role as a world citizen. This interdependence brings a new reality where our destiny is not only determined by what we do as a nation within our own borders, but also by what other nations do within their borders as well. Take, for example, the Middle East, a region where the United States maintains active involvement for all kinds of political, economic, social and cultural reasons. We have strong economic interests in the region that corporate America expects our government to protect, such as energy resources. According to The U.S. Energy Information Administration, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Libya and Qatar (All Arab Middle Eastern countries) account for a very large portion of proven oil reserves coveted by the world market. In addition, Qatar is reported to have the largest supply of natural gas in the world. Because business activities are not confined to national borders, there are certain resources that are crucial to this increasing world economy, and energy is among them. Second, we have a multifaceted political interest in the region. For example, in order for the supply of energy resources to stay stable, the region must also be stable. This simply means that the world cannot afford to see the outbreak of wars in the region where the supply of oil and natural gas is interrupted on a large scale. The world economy is based on energy, and it is difficult for it to function

By Morris Kalliny, Ph.D.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MARKETING

without it. In addition, we are actively involved in the ongoing ArabIsrael conflict, so our political involvement in the region is not likely to end anytime soon. Third, there are social and cultural reasons why we are involved in the Middle East. In 2001, President Bush declared war on terrorism. While this declaration resulted in two actual wars — Afghanistan and Iraq — I believe we also entered (intentionally or unintentionally) a social and a cultural war. Many countries within the Arab region believe that a change in their social and cultural values may actually be in our best interest as they become more similar to us and less likely to kill us for these differences. My research and visits to various countries in the Middle East confirm my deeply rooted belief that the most effective weapon today in impacting other countries is globalization armed with international business activities. I strongly believe that we can bring more long-term change to those countries using products than any other weapons available. Probably the clearest evidence for this is the “Arab Spring,” a group of several Middle East countries that joined together in 2011 to demand that dictatorships in the region be replaced by democratic regimes. While several factors have contributed to this development, I believe the most effective players were in the form of new products initiated by business activities, such as media technology (satellite networks, Internet, cell phones, etc.) that have allowed people in the Middle East to see how the West lives and how it does things. These advancements also gave them the means to communicate with one another, rally, and organize via social media and satellite networks that have supported many of the popular uprisings. Therefore, these global products have influenced and enabled these people to do what was recently unthinkable. I believe as citizens of a country that has the means and the power to influence others, we have an obligation to be aware of what is outside our borders. This awareness will allow us to identify the right tools and use them to help others and make this world a better place for all of us. sh

FALL 2013 | 25


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Shareholder Alumni Magazine Fall 2013: Global Citizens  

This Fall 2013 issue of Shareholder focuses on the business of global citizenship. It features the viewpoints of students, faculty members a...

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