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A century of saving lives Surf Life Saving New Zealand recently celebrated 100 years of lifeguard service here in New Zealand. During this time we have saved more than 50,000 lives on New Zealand beaches. The first Surf Life Saving club was established at Brighton Beach in 1910. From these small beginnings we have grown to 73 individual clubs across our nation.

to cater to the demand of our growing population; with over 3.1 million people now visiting the beach each summer. We were the first country in the world to create, develop and adopt the Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) which is now used in over 60% of our rescues. We now have 190 IRBs in operation across 83 locations New Zealand wide. IRBs are now utilised by lifeguarding services the world over. We are continually striving to meet the growing needs of our communities by constantly evolving to provide a world class service on our beaches.

Over the past ten years we have increased our beach patrol hours by 30% and trained 25% more lifeguards. Our membership base has increased by 45%

Surf Life Saving

Calendar 2011

IN THE LAST YEAR...

1041

This issue > Off duty lifeguard has perfect timing, p1 > From Nippers to Olympians, p2

HEADLINE STATS

229 searches 1489 first aid treatments 83,302 safety interventions 3.1 million visitors to our beaches 190 IRBs in operation 73 clubs Over 80 patrol locations

Photographer unknown. Lytterton Times Collection, Canterbury Museum. Ref 1979.91.26.

Issue 01 Winter 2012

PEOPLE RESCUED

204,090 patrol hours

New Brighton Surf Life Saving Club, circa 1911.

between the flags

Over 16,000 members

> “Amazing lifeguards” give second chance to Jim, p3 > Educating kiwi kids on the water, p3

Perfect timing avoids tragedy After a busy day on patrol at Kaka Point, Senior Lifeguard Allistair Carey had packed up for the day and was heading to the fish and chip shop for a classic kiwi dinner. Whilst waiting in line, Allistair was approached by a member of the public about a boat in distress. Four children in a small inflatable boat, was 600 metres offshore and thanks to the strong westerly winds was drifting further out to sea. It was clear to Allistair that the children were in serious trouble and that he would have to act quickly to ensure their safety.

lifejackets and had only two small plastic paddles on board. Battling the strong head winds, Allistair got the four distraught children back to shore where Dad was waiting. Allistair explained to the children the dangers of the sea, basic water safety skills, and that they should always use common sense when in the sea. The children and their Dad were extremely grateful to Allistair, and acknowledged how lucky they were that he was close by at the time. But it was more than just luck at play on the day. Allistair’s skill as an experienced surf lifeguard avoided a tragedy. He certainly earned his fish and chips that day.

As bystanders looked on from the beachfront Allistair quickly ran back to the club and began preparing the Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) for a solo rescue attempt. Fortunately though, a bystander offered to help and realising there were no other lifeguards around Allistair briefed him on how to stay safe in the IRB and they made their way out into the surf. With the winds increasing the four children were getting swept further out to sea and began to panic. When Allistair reached the boat they pulled the four children out and straight into the safety of the IRB. The children, aged between 10 and 12, were not wearing

Kaka Point beach, the site of the dramatic rescue.

www.100yearsofsurflifesaving.org.nz

urflifesaving.org.nz

Your support keeps us on patrol

Over 100 years of Surf Life Saving, over 50,000 lives saved

If you would like to donate, you can:

As a Charity we are proud of the of the lives we have saved and the protection we provide on New Zealand’s beaches

• Call 0508 543 372 to make a credit card donation, or

In the past year;

• Visit www.surflifesaving.org.nz and click on donate now Contact us on 0508 543 372 or at supportus@surflifesaving.org.nz to advise us of a change of address, update your mailing preferences, or find out about other ways to support us.

16,000 volunteers utilise their skills and equipment in an effort to prevent drowning and injury on New Zealand’s beaches

1,500 lifeguards provided emergency care to those in need

204,000 hours spent patrolling New Zealand’s beaches to keep our friends and family safe

83,000 life threatening incidents prevented through lifeguard intervention

To make a donation and show your support please visit www.surflifesaving.org.nz or call us on (0508) 543 372. Proudly supported by


3

2

From Nippers to Olympians

“Amazing lifeguards” give second chance to Jim

The Olympics are fast approaching and we at Surf Life Saving are proud to have some of our own competing in the 2012 London Olympic Games.

He had no visible signs of life, no pulse, and he was not breathing - yet Jim Te Whata got a second chance at life thanks to three lifeguards from Kariaotahi. Taylor Abernathey-Newman, Phil Jenkins and Fiona Whyte were instructing a Beach Education class at Kariaotahi Beach when their attention was drawn to a boat that had flipped and thrown three people overboard. The boat had been capsized whilst trying to make its way through the surf, 600 metres north of the club house.

Surf Life Saving athletes will be making a splash in the pool with Lyall Bay’s Tash Hind, New Plymouth Old Boys’ Dylan Dunlop-Barrett, St Clair’s Andy McMillan, and Titahi Bay’s Steven Kent all making it on to the swim squad. For Steven Kent competing at the Olympics will be a particularly special event given his family’s history with the Games; “it’s a real honour for me personally to be competing at an Olympic event as my whole family has been heavily involved in the Olympics. Before my father Paul passed away he worked for the New Zealand Olympic Committee and my mum still works there. My older brother Dean has also competed in three Olympic events; the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Olympics where my two other brothers Andy, David and I watched and cheered as ambitious young’ins from pool side”. Canoeing and Kayaking sees five surf lifesaving athletes hit the water. Red Beach’s Erin Taylor and Mount Maunganui’s Lisa Carrington will be representing New Zealand at the Games; competing together in the K2 500m event, and Lisa competing individually in the K1 200m event. Piha’s Steven Ferguson and Waikanae’s Darryl Fitzgerald will also be competing together in the K2 1000m. Mount Maunganui’s Luuka Jones will be competing in the K1M. Surf Life Saving New Zealand high performance team member and Orewa

Taylor and Phil immediately dispatched the Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) to assist the people to shore. Upon reaching the boat and spotting two lifejackets floating in the surf they feared the worst. Taylor dived from the IRB to check underneath the boat whilst Phil headed towards shore looking for survivors. Arriving at the beach Phil rushed to the three men who had made it to shore, one of which was in a serious condition. He had no visible signs of life, no pulse, and was not breathing. This man was Jim Te Whata. The lifeguards immediately began CPR and oxygen therapy in an effort to revive Jim. Lisa Carrington and Erin Taylor. Photo taken on the shore of Lake Pupuke, Takapuna, after a training run. Photographer: Ross Malyon.

lifeguard Teneale Hatton will be competing in the slalom K1 500m. Both Erin and Lisa began their sporting journeys as Nippers at their local surf lifesaving clubs. Erin began at the age of 13 at Red Beach SLSC and Lisa at the age of nine at Whakatane SLSC where Lisa still competes in Surf Life Saving events (when she gets a chance). Erin and Lisa are now training over 25 hours a week, living life as full-time athletes - and surf lifesaving is what started it for them. “Surf lifesaving got me into kayaking so it was a very influential stepping stone towards the Olympics,” explains Erin. She says that it is the people you meet and the skills you learn that make surf lifesaving

invaluable to a child. “It’s a great sport because you get to train and compete in a safe environment and make great friends along the way.” Lisa feels very strongly about the relationships she has established through her journey as a surf lifesaver; “Surf Life Saving has always been a big part of my life, with it being one of my main sports until I was 18.” Lisa explains her transition into kayaking as “easy” as she used to compete in surf ski events which is very similar; “if it was not for the Nipper programme and the great encouragement I have had throughout my life from Surf Life Saving, I really do believe I would not be in the position I am in today.”

After performing CPR for an extended period of time Taylor and Phil were successful in getting Jim to breathe on his own, albeit weakly. The lifeguards put him into the recovery position and continued to administer oxygen. Jim slowly began to regain consciousness and started to struggle, trying to rip the oxygen mask off his face. Once stabilised, Jim was taken to Middlemore Hospital to recover. After four days in Middlemore Hospital Jim made a full recovery and is extremely thankful that Taylor, Phil, and Fiona were there to

Jim Te Whata

Surf lifeguards Fiona Whyte and Taylor Abernethy-Newman with Jim Te Whata.

Educating kiwi kids on the water Each year thousands of New Zealanders flock to our beaches chilly bin in tow - to enjoy the sun, sand and surf. With 95% of our population living within 40km of the New Zealand coastline it is our responsibility to help keep you safe while enjoying the beach. As well as saving lives on the beach, Surf Life Saving educates young Kiwis on how they can be surf smart whilst enjoying some of the world’s most beautiful coastline. Lauren Gibbs, Surf Life Saving Community Education Instructor, has been through the Surf Education herself as a child:

Olympics: surf lifeguards in action CANOE/KAYAK Erin and Lisa: K2 500m – Tuesday 7 August – Heats and Semi-Finals. Finals Saturday 11 August Lisa: K1 200m – Friday August 10 – Heats and Semi-Finals. Finals Thursday 9 August

“Growing up in New Zealand I know first-hand how important it is to not only be water safe, but water confident, I believe they go hand in hand” says Lauren.

Steven and Darryl: K2 1000m – Monday 30 July – Heats. Semi-Finals Thursday 2 August Luuka: K1M – Sunday 29 July – Heats. Semi-Finals Wednesday 1 August Teneale: K1 500m - Monday 30 July – Heats. Semi-Finals Thursday 2 August

SWIMMING Dylan, Steve and Andy: 4x200m Freestyle Relay – Tuesday 31 July – Heats and Semi-Finals

The lifeguards involved in the rescue were ecstatic when informed of Jim’s recovery. Taylor notes that not every rescue has a happy ending, but when it does he feels proud to call himself a lifeguard; “just knowing that if we had not been at the club that day Jim, and possibly his friends too, would have drowned”. Taylor says that the memory of this particular rescue is what drives him to continue volunteering his time as a lifeguard; “I now know the importance of my role and the essential service Surf Life Saving provides. Without this organisation, and without lifeguards on the beach, people such as Jim would not be alive today”.

“I was so lucky to have been rescued by those amazing lifeguards. I really do owe my life to them and I feel grateful every day that I’m still alive.”

Bring it home kiwis!

Tash: 4x200m Freestyle Relay – Wednesday 1 August – Heats and Finals

make a lifesaving difference; “I was so lucky to have been rescued by those amazing lifeguards. I really do owe my life to them and I feel grateful every day that I’m still alive.”

Children enjoying the surf under careful watch of a surf lifeguard.

Lauren believes that the community education programs we offer are invaluable to all kiwi kids. She has been involved with all three youth education programmes that are currently offered by Surf Life Saving;

Beach Education, Surf to School, and City Nippers. “As an instructor I have encountered children who have never set foot on a beach, but within the space of a few hours, they have developed a new found enjoyment whilst learning such important lifesaving lessons, such as always having an adult within arm’s reach and knowing your limits.” Lifeguard and Surf Life Saving New Zealand Lifesaving Services and Education Manager Andy Kent, who has been involved with Surf Life Saving for over 22 years, agrees with Lauren about the importance of confidence and safety; “I find that by helping children become aware of hidden dangers and how to spot them, they can be more confident while in the water.” Surf Life Saving educates over 40,000 children each year on how to be surf safe on New Zealand’s beaches. As a nation surrounded by water we must all do our part to ensure it remains New Zealand’s favourite playground.


3

2

From Nippers to Olympians

“Amazing lifeguards” give second chance to Jim

The Olympics are fast approaching and we at Surf Life Saving are proud to have some of our own competing in the 2012 London Olympic Games.

He had no visible signs of life, no pulse, and he was not breathing - yet Jim Te Whata got a second chance at life thanks to three lifeguards from Kariaotahi. Taylor Abernathey-Newman, Phil Jenkins and Fiona Whyte were instructing a Beach Education class at Kariaotahi Beach when their attention was drawn to a boat that had flipped and thrown three people overboard. The boat had been capsized whilst trying to make its way through the surf, 600 metres north of the club house.

Surf Life Saving athletes will be making a splash in the pool with Lyall Bay’s Tash Hind, New Plymouth Old Boys’ Dylan Dunlop-Barrett, St Clair’s Andy McMillan, and Titahi Bay’s Steven Kent all making it on to the swim squad. For Steven Kent competing at the Olympics will be a particularly special event given his family’s history with the Games; “it’s a real honour for me personally to be competing at an Olympic event as my whole family has been heavily involved in the Olympics. Before my father Paul passed away he worked for the New Zealand Olympic Committee and my mum still works there. My older brother Dean has also competed in three Olympic events; the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Olympics where my two other brothers Andy, David and I watched and cheered as ambitious young’ins from pool side”. Canoeing and Kayaking sees five surf lifesaving athletes hit the water. Red Beach’s Erin Taylor and Mount Maunganui’s Lisa Carrington will be representing New Zealand at the Games; competing together in the K2 500m event, and Lisa competing individually in the K1 200m event. Piha’s Steven Ferguson and Waikanae’s Darryl Fitzgerald will also be competing together in the K2 1000m. Mount Maunganui’s Luuka Jones will be competing in the K1M. Surf Life Saving New Zealand high performance team member and Orewa

Taylor and Phil immediately dispatched the Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) to assist the people to shore. Upon reaching the boat and spotting two lifejackets floating in the surf they feared the worst. Taylor dived from the IRB to check underneath the boat whilst Phil headed towards shore looking for survivors. Arriving at the beach Phil rushed to the three men who had made it to shore, one of which was in a serious condition. He had no visible signs of life, no pulse, and was not breathing. This man was Jim Te Whata. The lifeguards immediately began CPR and oxygen therapy in an effort to revive Jim. Lisa Carrington and Erin Taylor. Photo taken on the shore of Lake Pupuke, Takapuna, after a training run. Photographer: Ross Malyon.

lifeguard Teneale Hatton will be competing in the slalom K1 500m. Both Erin and Lisa began their sporting journeys as Nippers at their local surf lifesaving clubs. Erin began at the age of 13 at Red Beach SLSC and Lisa at the age of nine at Whakatane SLSC where Lisa still competes in Surf Life Saving events (when she gets a chance). Erin and Lisa are now training over 25 hours a week, living life as full-time athletes - and surf lifesaving is what started it for them. “Surf lifesaving got me into kayaking so it was a very influential stepping stone towards the Olympics,” explains Erin. She says that it is the people you meet and the skills you learn that make surf lifesaving

invaluable to a child. “It’s a great sport because you get to train and compete in a safe environment and make great friends along the way.” Lisa feels very strongly about the relationships she has established through her journey as a surf lifesaver; “Surf Life Saving has always been a big part of my life, with it being one of my main sports until I was 18.” Lisa explains her transition into kayaking as “easy” as she used to compete in surf ski events which is very similar; “if it was not for the Nipper programme and the great encouragement I have had throughout my life from Surf Life Saving, I really do believe I would not be in the position I am in today.”

After performing CPR for an extended period of time Taylor and Phil were successful in getting Jim to breathe on his own, albeit weakly. The lifeguards put him into the recovery position and continued to administer oxygen. Jim slowly began to regain consciousness and started to struggle, trying to rip the oxygen mask off his face. Once stabilised, Jim was taken to Middlemore Hospital to recover. After four days in Middlemore Hospital Jim made a full recovery and is extremely thankful that Taylor, Phil, and Fiona were there to

Jim Te Whata

Surf lifeguards Fiona Whyte and Taylor Abernethy-Newman with Jim Te Whata.

Educating kiwi kids on the water Each year thousands of New Zealanders flock to our beaches chilly bin in tow - to enjoy the sun, sand and surf. With 95% of our population living within 40km of the New Zealand coastline it is our responsibility to help keep you safe while enjoying the beach. As well as saving lives on the beach, Surf Life Saving educates young Kiwis on how they can be surf smart whilst enjoying some of the world’s most beautiful coastline. Lauren Gibbs, Surf Life Saving Community Education Instructor, has been through the Surf Education herself as a child:

Olympics: surf lifeguards in action CANOE/KAYAK Erin and Lisa: K2 500m – Tuesday 7 August – Heats and Semi-Finals. Finals Saturday 11 August Lisa: K1 200m – Friday August 10 – Heats and Semi-Finals. Finals Thursday 9 August

“Growing up in New Zealand I know first-hand how important it is to not only be water safe, but water confident, I believe they go hand in hand” says Lauren.

Steven and Darryl: K2 1000m – Monday 30 July – Heats. Semi-Finals Thursday 2 August Luuka: K1M – Sunday 29 July – Heats. Semi-Finals Wednesday 1 August Teneale: K1 500m - Monday 30 July – Heats. Semi-Finals Thursday 2 August

SWIMMING Dylan, Steve and Andy: 4x200m Freestyle Relay – Tuesday 31 July – Heats and Semi-Finals

The lifeguards involved in the rescue were ecstatic when informed of Jim’s recovery. Taylor notes that not every rescue has a happy ending, but when it does he feels proud to call himself a lifeguard; “just knowing that if we had not been at the club that day Jim, and possibly his friends too, would have drowned”. Taylor says that the memory of this particular rescue is what drives him to continue volunteering his time as a lifeguard; “I now know the importance of my role and the essential service Surf Life Saving provides. Without this organisation, and without lifeguards on the beach, people such as Jim would not be alive today”.

“I was so lucky to have been rescued by those amazing lifeguards. I really do owe my life to them and I feel grateful every day that I’m still alive.”

Bring it home kiwis!

Tash: 4x200m Freestyle Relay – Wednesday 1 August – Heats and Finals

make a lifesaving difference; “I was so lucky to have been rescued by those amazing lifeguards. I really do owe my life to them and I feel grateful every day that I’m still alive.”

Children enjoying the surf under careful watch of a surf lifeguard.

Lauren believes that the community education programs we offer are invaluable to all kiwi kids. She has been involved with all three youth education programmes that are currently offered by Surf Life Saving;

Beach Education, Surf to School, and City Nippers. “As an instructor I have encountered children who have never set foot on a beach, but within the space of a few hours, they have developed a new found enjoyment whilst learning such important lifesaving lessons, such as always having an adult within arm’s reach and knowing your limits.” Lifeguard and Surf Life Saving New Zealand Lifesaving Services and Education Manager Andy Kent, who has been involved with Surf Life Saving for over 22 years, agrees with Lauren about the importance of confidence and safety; “I find that by helping children become aware of hidden dangers and how to spot them, they can be more confident while in the water.” Surf Life Saving educates over 40,000 children each year on how to be surf safe on New Zealand’s beaches. As a nation surrounded by water we must all do our part to ensure it remains New Zealand’s favourite playground.


4

A century of saving lives Surf Life Saving New Zealand recently celebrated 100 years of lifeguard service here in New Zealand. During this time we have saved more than 50,000 lives on New Zealand beaches. The first Surf Life Saving club was established at Brighton Beach in 1910. From these small beginnings we have grown to 73 individual clubs across our nation.

to cater to the demand of our growing population; with over 3.1 million people now visiting the beach each summer. We were the first country in the world to create, develop and adopt the Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) which is now used in over 60% of our rescues. We now have 190 IRBs in operation across 83 locations New Zealand wide. IRBs are now utilised by lifeguarding services the world over. We are continually striving to meet the growing needs of our communities by constantly evolving to provide a world class service on our beaches.

Over the past ten years we have increased our beach patrol hours by 30% and trained 25% more lifeguards. Our membership base has increased by 45%

Surf Life Saving

Calendar 2011

IN THE LAST YEAR...

1041

This issue > Off duty lifeguard has perfect timing, p1 > From Nippers to Olympians, p2

HEADLINE STATS

229 searches 1489 first aid treatments 83,302 safety interventions 3.1 million visitors to our beaches 190 IRBs in operation 73 clubs Over 80 patrol locations

Photographer unknown. Lytterton Times Collection, Canterbury Museum. Ref 1979.91.26.

Issue 01 Winter 2012

PEOPLE RESCUED

204,090 patrol hours

New Brighton Surf Life Saving Club, circa 1911.

between the flags

Over 16,000 members

> “Amazing lifeguards” give second chance to Jim, p3 > Educating kiwi kids on the water, p3

Perfect timing avoids tragedy After a busy day on patrol at Kaka Point, Senior Lifeguard Allistair Carey had packed up for the day and was heading to the fish and chip shop for a classic kiwi dinner. Whilst waiting in line, Allistair was approached by a member of the public about a boat in distress. Four children in a small inflatable boat, was 600 metres offshore and thanks to the strong westerly winds was drifting further out to sea. It was clear to Allistair that the children were in serious trouble and that he would have to act quickly to ensure their safety.

lifejackets and had only two small plastic paddles on board. Battling the strong head winds, Allistair got the four distraught children back to shore where Dad was waiting. Allistair explained to the children the dangers of the sea, basic water safety skills, and that they should always use common sense when in the sea. The children and their Dad were extremely grateful to Allistair, and acknowledged how lucky they were that he was close by at the time. But it was more than just luck at play on the day. Allistair’s skill as an experienced surf lifeguard avoided a tragedy. He certainly earned his fish and chips that day.

As bystanders looked on from the beachfront Allistair quickly ran back to the club and began preparing the Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) for a solo rescue attempt. Fortunately though, a bystander offered to help and realising there were no other lifeguards around Allistair briefed him on how to stay safe in the IRB and they made their way out into the surf. With the winds increasing the four children were getting swept further out to sea and began to panic. When Allistair reached the boat they pulled the four children out and straight into the safety of the IRB. The children, aged between 10 and 12, were not wearing

Kaka Point beach, the site of the dramatic rescue.

www.100yearsofsurflifesaving.org.nz

urflifesaving.org.nz

Your support keeps us on patrol

Over 100 years of Surf Life Saving, over 50,000 lives saved

If you would like to donate, you can:

As a Charity we are proud of the of the lives we have saved and the protection we provide on New Zealand’s beaches

• Call 0508 543 372 to make a credit card donation, or

In the past year;

• Visit www.surflifesaving.org.nz and click on donate now Contact us on 0508 543 372 or at supportus@surflifesaving.org.nz to advise us of a change of address, update your mailing preferences, or find out about other ways to support us.

16,000 volunteers utilise their skills and equipment in an effort to prevent drowning and injury on New Zealand’s beaches

1,500 lifeguards provided emergency care to those in need

204,000 hours spent patrolling New Zealand’s beaches to keep our friends and family safe

83,000 life threatening incidents prevented through lifeguard intervention

To make a donation and show your support please visit www.surflifesaving.org.nz or call us on (0508) 543 372. Proudly supported by

Between the Flags  

Surf Life Saving New Zealand supporter newsletter Issue #1 Winter 2012

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