Page 1

Rubber PLANT Summit   07th  – 08th  Feb 2012    

Bali Indonesia 


Sri Lanka:   is  an  Island    positioned  in  the  Indian  Ocean,  to  the  southwest  of  the  Bay  of  Bengal, between latitudes 5° and 10°N.   

Climate: The  climate  of  Sri  Lanka  can  be  described  as  tropical  and  warm  with  diverse  weather patterns changing with elevation. 


Total area 

: 65,610 sq.km 

Population 

: 21,513,990 

  Growth Rate 

: 0.9% 

Birth Rate 

: 15.8/1000 

Life Expectancy  : 75.3 


Land Use Detail Map of Sri Lanka 


Rainfall •

Annual 2540 mm to over 5080  mm in South‐West of the  Island. 

Less than 1250 mm in the  North‐West and South‐East of  the Island. 

Rainy Seasons  •

South‐West Monsoon ‐ May to   August 

North‐East Monsoon ‐  November to February   


Sri Lanka is now famous globally for ……. 


Why Rubber is important to all of us ‐   The Industrial Revolution was a period from the 18th to the 19th century. It  began  in  the  United  Kingdom,  then  subsequently  spread  throughout  Western  Europe, North America, Japan, and eventually the world.         

Natural Rubber  found  to  be  the  agricultural  product  that  had  a  vital  role  in  the Industrial Revolution along with Steel & Oil.   

Major changes  in  agriculture,  manufacturing,  mining,  transportation,  and  technology  had  a  profound  effect  on  the  social,  economic  and  cultural  conditions of the times then and  even now. 

Charles Goodyear 


Shift of Rubber Cultivation and Sri Lanka’s Role 


Districts of Rubber Cultivation & Land Distribution 


Growth of Rubber Extent in Sri Lanka 

Source : Rubber Development Department of Sri Lanka 


REVENUE RUBBER EXTENTS AND YIELD PER HECTARE 


Rubber Cost of Production & Net Sale Average in SL Rupee Terms   475.00  425.00  375.00  325.00  275.00 Per Kg  225.00  175.00  125.00  75.00  25.00 COP NSA

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

51.72 52.10

53.06 54.91

55.73 54.77

59.77 68.89

65.98 102.58

72.56 127.04

87.65 141.17

102.30 202.12

120.09 219.50

135.83 348.71

145.90 395.35

170.00 421.40

Source : Rubber Development Department of Sri Lanka & RPC Information  Current exchange  Rate : SL Rupee 114/‐ = 1 USD 


Profit per Hectare in SL Rupees   300,000

250,000

200,000

150,000 SL Rs.   100,000

50,000

(50,000) Profit per Ha

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1,032

(527)

7,197

29,332

44,739

48,147

91,216

97,794

225,283

274,736

281,568

Source : Rubber Development Department of Sri Lanka & RPC Information  Current exchange  Rate : SL Rupee 114/‐ = 1 USD 


Natural Rubber Domestic Consumption Vs Exports Quantities 


Land Constraints for the SL Rubber Industry  Area 

Density

(km2)

(/km2)

Rank by   Population Density 

Country / Region   of special position 

Population

 33 

India 

1,210,193,422

3,287,240

368

 44 

Sri Lanka 

20,238,000

65,610

308

 52 

Vietnam 

85,789,573

331,689

259

 90 

Thailand 

64,232,760

513,115

125

 92 

Indonesia 

237,556,363

1,904,569

121

 116 

Malaysia 

28,306,700

329,847

86

 121 

Cambodia 

14,805,000

181,035

82


How Sri Lanka Achieved High Land Productivity   •Improved Clone selection methods   •New Propagation Nursery Techniques  •Innovative Land and Development Techniques  •Best practice exchange in Planting methods  •Improved Pest & Disease control methods  •Closer attention to Immature upkeep practices  •Scientific Soil conservation and Irrigation method 


High Yielding Clones Recommended for Planting by the Rubber  Research Institute of Sri Lanka    • For the Smallholders : ‐   RRIC 100, 102 and 121   RRISL 203 & 205 up to 10% of the area for holdings of extent more than 5 ha   For Plantation Companies     • Group I:‐ To be planted up to 10% of the total extent   RRIC 100, 102, 121, 130 and PB 217 *, 28/59 *   * Not recommended for areas having more than 3,750 mm of annual rainfall     • Group II :‐ To be planted up to 3% of the total extent   RRIC 117, 131, 133 RRISL 203, 205, 206, 210, 211, 215 and PB 235*, 260*,  PBM 24     •  Group III :‐ Planted up to 2 ha in RRI/Estate collaborative clone trials   RRISL 200,201,204, 208, 217, 218, 219, 221, 222, 225, 226, 227 and RRISL  2000 to 2006 and RRIM 717, GPS 1, PB 255, PR 305, RRII 105     (* Tapped at 67%)  


New Planting methods that are currently under   Experimental stage  The real benefits of   using this “Growing Container”     1. This eliminate root circling in Rubber plant    2. This gives the grower a bigger plant in the nursery    3. This will be more effective in selecting the most vigorous plants    4. This technique will shorten the immature phase    5. This will give the grower 100% success in the field 


The real benefits of using this “Growing Container”           

1. The cost of upkeep in the field during       immaturity is reduced    2. Rubber growing becomes more  profitable,        stimulating growth of the industry    3. Easier to grow Rubber in non‐traditional areas    4. Reduce the immature phase by 1 ‐2 years     


Dr. C. K. Jayasinghe – RRI Sri Lanka 


Dr. C. K. Jayasinghe – RRI Sri Lanka 


Dr. C. K. Jayasinghe – RRI Sri Lanka 


Dr. C. K. Jayasinghe – RRI Sri Lanka 


Dr. C. K. Jayasinghe – RRI Sri Lanka 


1st Year upkeep with RRISL 121 


2nd Year upkeep with RRISL 121 


Field brought into Tapping 


Latex is the Raw Material used in the Process            

Latex is extracted from Heavia brasiliensis by using  specialized methods called tapping.  

         

                

Latex comprises of   

Ash         0.5 – 1 % 

Sugar         1 – 2 % 

Proteins    1.5 – 2 % 

Rubber    30 – 40 % 

Water      55 – 70 % 


Latex is converted to the following Raw Products   in Sri Lanka 

Centrifuge Latex 

Sole Crepe 

R S S  Latex Crepe 

T S R 


Percentages of Production Mix ‐   Sri Lankan Natural Rubber  R S S ‐ 40% 

Centrifuge – 27%  

Latex Crepe – 20%  

T S R – 8% 

Sole Crepe – 3% 


Flow chart of the Crepe Rubber Process  Liquid latex is bulked   in the factory 

Latex stands in settling   tanks to remove Protein 

Smooth milled 

Macerated in rollers 

Laces are temperature   control air dried 

Dried Laces are sorted and  laminated to required  thickness 

Sheets are cut to   size and packed for export 


With Maceration chemical impurities are  removed and washed 


Smooth Milling Section  to facilitate quick drying 


Hot air drying of Milled Laces  


Spreading the dried Laces on tables 


Pre forming Laces to the correct thickness 


Crepe Lace pre‐forming Section 


Lamination of Laces 


Semi Processed Crepe Mats 


Final Inspection 


Laminated Laces – Ready for Sorting 


Packed in Cartons 


Bales of Thick Pale Crepe 


Colour Processed 


ISO Certificate & Sole Crepe Sticks 


CONCLUSION     Sri Lanka’s role in the history of Rubber growing    The incremental growth and current status    Future trends and potential 


Rubber Stakeholders in Sri Lanka  •  The villager & plantation worker  •  The land owner   •  The plantation Manager  •  The local industrialist  •  The foreign industrial consumer  •  The Sri Lankan Government & people 


What does the Rubber Tree mean to   the Sri Lankan Villager?  •  Steady income   •  Fuel wood  •  Timber for construction & furniture  •  Environmental protection  •  Self‐employment & improved quality of life  •  An inheritance of increasing value to their children   


What does the Rubber Tree mean to:  • The Land owner? A reliable long term investment but one that  has a slow return.   • The  plantation  Manager?    A  lifetime  career.  An  opportunity  to  become a professional by work experience.   • The  local  industrialist?  A  source  of  high  quality  raw  material  with relatively low transport cost and the opportunity of just‐in‐ time stock holding.  • The foreign industrial consumer? A consistently reliable quality  product  from  producers  who  can  be  counted  on  to  deliver  on  time and in full. 


What does the Rubber Tree mean to:   The Sri Lankan Government & people?  • An export tax of USD 0.11 cts. per Kg. which realises USD 10.5  Mn. Per year.   • A substantial contribution to foreign exchange earnings.   • Gainful employment of the rural population with minimal  Government investment on infrastructure.  • High value land utilisation.  • Taxable income on rubber based industries. 


In Sri Lanka …………  RUBBER is MONEY! 


Sri Lankan Rubber Cultivation & Manufacturing Techniques  

Rubber PLANT Summit  - 07th – 08th Feb 2012 Bali – Indonesia By Sriyan Eriyagama - Director Lankem Tea & Rubber Plantations - Sri Lanka