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OAKLAND High School An International Baccalaureate World School

2010-2011 Curriculum OHS Mission Statement:

Guide

The mission of Oakland High School is to provide appropriate academic opportunities for all students in a nurturing and safe learning environment using diverse, challenging, relevant programs and assessments that lead to the graduation of responsible and productive citizens of the world.

2 2 2 5 Pa t r i ot D r i ve , M u r f re e s b o ro , T N 37130 • Phone: (615) 90 4-3780 • www.ohs.rcs.k12.tn.us •

Fax: (615) 90 4-3781


This program of studies is current as of February 1, 2011. State and local changes may occur after publication.

OHS Administrative Team: Principal Bill Spurlock- spurlockb@rcs.k12.tn.us Assistant Principals Kim Edwards, 12th grade- edwardski@rcschools.net • Sam Guydon, 10th grade- guydons@rcschools.net Rick Collins, 11th grade- collinsr@rcschools.net • Tim Roediger, 9th grade- roedigert@rcschools.net


Curriculum Guide Overview With a deep commitment to our Mission and Beliefs, we take pride in offering the following course choices to our students. The Curriculum Guide is intended to help each student and his/her parent/guardian prepare a four-year educational plan. Requirements for each pathway are shown on the following pages. Elective focus areas are listed with their pathway course descriptions on pages 6-13. It is important to plan wisely. The choices you make during registration will determine your classes next year. Each course request you make is a factor when school officials set budgets for educational needs. Schedule changes will be made based on graduation requirements or on post-secondary school admission requirements. These changes must be made within three days of the beginning of each semester. **Four-year plans will be reviewed each year at registration time with a counselor and in the fall through credit-checks with each assigned counselor. A change in focus is not recommended after the fall of the junior year.

Homebound services Homebound services are provided to students who are unable to attend school due to an accident or illness. The homebound teacher provides consultation between the regularly scheduled teachers and the student at home until the student returns to school. This service requires a physician’s referral and school board approval.

Types of Diplomas •

The Regular High School Diploma will be awarded to students who earn the required 23 credits in the required pathway focus. • The Honors Diploma is offered to students that score at or above all of the subject area benchmarks on the ACT or equivalant score on the SAT. • The Distinction Diploma is awarded to students attaining a 3.0 GPA and completing at least one of the following: • earn a nationally recognized industry certification. • participate in one of the state’s All State musical organizations. • participate in at least one of the Governor’s Schools. • be selected as a National Merit Finalist of Semi-Finalist. • attain a score of 31 or higher composite score on the ACT. • attain a score of 3 or higher on at at least two advanced placement exams. • successfully complete the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. • earn 12 or more semester hours of transcripted post-secondary credit. • The OHS IB Diploma criteria consists of six subject groups which students study: Language A1, Second language, Individuals & Societies, Experimental Sciences, Mathematics, Art/Music. Students complete a variety of assessments (oral and written) including three to five hour exams in six content areas and are awarded score points. Students receiving a minimum of 24 points are awarded the diploma. Included in the remaining requirements are completion of the Theory of Knowledge course, completion of the 4000-word extended essay, and completion of 150 CAS hours. *In addition to these requirements, the student must take all state mandated exit exams.

International Baccalureate Classes Through comprehensive and balanced curricula coupled with challenging assessments, the International Baccalaureate Organization aims to assist schools in their endeavors to develop the individual talents of young people and teach them to relate to the world outside.

Beyond intellectual rigor (international spelling) and high academic standards, strong emphasis is placed on the ideals of international understanding and responsible citizenship, to the end that IB students may become critical and compassionate thinkers, long-life learners, and informed participants in local and world affairs. Prospective students should be self-motivated, organized, involved in school and community activities, have good attendance, and possess time management skills. Additional information about the IB program is found on page 28 of this Guide. Please contact Todd Williamson, IB coordinator, at 615-904-3780 or at williamsont@rcschools.net for more information.

AP Classes The Advanced Placement Program is an academic program of collegelevel courses and examinations for secondary school students. The AP program gives students the opportunity to pursue college-level studies while still in high school and possibly to receive college credit. A typical AP course is a special learning experience that takes a full academic year. The curriculum of an AP course is challenging and requires more effort and homework on the part of the student than a regular or honors high school course. It gives greater opportunity for individual progress and accomplishment and goes into greater depth with the academic material of each individual course. Perhaps the real educational value of this program is that students develop critical thinking skills, fluid-writing abilities, problem-solving skills, and expertise in absorbing masses of material. AP students learn to deal with strenuous, traditional academic settings. These skills are transferable to all subject areas. We encourage all AP students to test at the end of the courses; however, if the student chooses not to test, the courses will reflect as an Advanced Honors Course Credit.

Dual Enrollment Dual enrollment is the enrollment of a high school student in one or more specified college courses for which the student will be awarded both high school and college credit. To be eligible for Motlow dual enrollment courses, the student must: 1. Have an ACT/PLAN composite score of 19 or higher with a sub score of 19 in English and/or math if enrolling in English or math courses. 3. Complete a Permission/Certificate Form which must be signed by both parents/guardian and the high school official. 4. Submit official high school transcripts to the Office of Admissions and Records. 5. Complete an admission application and pay the required fees.

Graduation Requirements (Freshmen in 2009) English - 4 credits English I 1 credit English II 1 credit English III 1 credit English IV 1 credit Mathematics - 4 credits

(students MUST take a math each year)

Algebra I Geometry Algebra II

1 credit 1 credit 1 credit

Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide




Upper Level Math Lifetime Wellness - 1.5 credit Wellness Physical Education Fine Arts - 1 credit

1 credit

Grade & Percentage Range:

1 credit .5 credit

Elective Focus - 3 credits

Science - 3 credits Biology I Chemistry or Physics Another Lab Science Social Studies - 3 credits Geo., World, Ancient, Modern or Euro. U.S. History Economics Government Personal Finance - .5 credit

Tennessee Uniform Grading System

1 credit 1 credit 1 credit

1 credit 1 credit .5 credit

.5 credit

A

100-93

B

92-85

C

8 4-75

D

74-70

F

69-0

*Weighting for Honors Courses & National Industry Certification: Includes the addition of 3 percentage points to the grades used to calculate the semester average. **Weighting for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate: Includes the addition of 5 percentage points to the grades used to calculate the semester average.

2010 Rutherford County Freshman Placement

Mat h

B ot h A l ge b r a I St a n d a rd and Double Dose Classes

A l ge b r a I St a n d a rd

Algebr a I Honor s

Foreign Language - 2 credits

Mat h Explore

14 & below

15-18

19-25

(MUST be the same language)

Mat h TC AP (7t h gr ade ‘08)

50 percentile & below

51-81 percentile

82-100 percentile

*TC AP Scale Score (7t h gr ade ‘08)

546 & below 547-579

580 & above

English

E n gl i s h I St a n d a rd

E n gl i s h I Honors

English I Advanced

English Explore

14 & below

15-19

20-25

Reading Explore

15 & below

16-19

20 & above

English TC AP (7t h gr ade ‘08)

50 percentile & below

51-81 percentile

82-100 percentile

*TC AP Scale Score (7t h gr ade ‘08)

536 & below 537-563

23 Total Credits Required for Graduation

Students must complete a Pathway Focus of three units in a state approved CTE Program of Study, science and math, humanities, fine arts, JROTC, or AP/lB. The Physical Education Requirement may be met by substituting an equivalent time of physical activity in other areas including, but not limited to, marching band, JROTC, cheerleading, interscholastic athletics, and school sponsored intramural athletics. The Fine Art and Foreign Language Requirements may be waived for students who are sure they are not attending a University and be replaced with courses designed to enhance and expand the pathway focus.

Course Substitutions: • • • •

JROTC (2 years) for Wellness JROTC (3 years) for Government and Personal Finance American Business Legal Systems (ABLS) for Government Business Economics, Consumer Economics, Marketing and Management I, or Virtual Enterprise for Economics

Freshmen entering Rutherford County Schools for the class of 20102011 and subsequent classes shall be required to earn at least 23 credits for graduation. IEP teams for special education students may reduce the system’s graduation requirement for SPED students to the 22 credits identified by the state. Valedictorians and salutatorians shall meet the following criteria: 1. The valedictorian/salutatorian shall have taken a mini- mum of twelve (12) honors or above honors courses, and 2. The valedictorian/salutatorian shall be determined on a 4.0 Quality Point average, and 3. The valedictorian/salutatorian shall also have attained the state “Distinction Diploma” criteria. In the event a school does not have a student achieving the distinc tion criteria, selection shall revert to requirements I and 2.



Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

56 4 & above

* The scale score equivalents are only applicable to the 7th grade TCAP tests from 2008.

Counseling Center: Fax: (615) 904-6713, Counseling Secretary: Laura Davis 904-3780*23911 The Oakland High School Counseling Department offers many services to the students and faculty. The counselors offer guidance to students individually and in groups regarding personal, social, educational, and career needs. They work with school staff to provide school-wide counseling and guidance programs. The Counseling Center houses informational materials such as career opportunities, job trends, colleges, state technical schools, scholarships, financial aid, tests, and other publications. A computer is also available for student use in the College and Career Room. Oakland High School counselors are dedicated to meeting the needs of all students, faculty, parents, and administrators. We encourage parents to contact the appropriate counselor for any school-related reason. Counselors are key players during this critical time of planning course work for the upcoming school year.


Guidance Counselors Missy Blissard- blissardm@rcschools.net Mary Richardson- richardsonma@rcschools.net Milton Moore- mooremi@rcschools.net Diana Brown- brownd@rcschools.net Teri Pigg- piggt@rcschools.net

Courses Academic Pathways @ Oakland

IB & AP Pat hwa y : ( ch o o s e 3 ) English HL Frenc h SL Spanish SL His t or y of t he Amer icas HL Twentie t h Centur y His t or y SL Psyc hology SL/HL Biology HL Chemis tr y SL Mat h Studies SL Mat h HL Visual Ar t SL Music SL/HL Theatre HL Infor mation Tec hnologies SL/HL AP English III-Language and Com position AP English IV-Lit er ature and Com position AP U.S. His t or y AP European His t or y AP Wor ld His t or y AP Biology II AP Chemis tr y II AP Physics AP St atis tics AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Fine Ar ts Pat hwa y : ( ch o o s e 4 ) Visual Ar t I Visual Ar t II Visual Ar t III Visual Ar t IV Phot ogr aphy I Phot ogr aphy II Gener al Music Music Theor y Ins tr ument al Music (Jazz Band) Ins tr ument al Music (Concer t Band) Ins tr ument al Music (Wind Ensemble) Ins tr ument al Music (Percussion Ensemble) Ins tr ument al Music (Color Guard) Vocal Music (Concer t Choir) Vocal Music (Women’s Choir) Vocal Music (Chamber Choir) Vocal Music (Jazz Choir) Musical Theatre

Theatre Ar ts I Theatre Ar ts II Theatre Ar ts III Theatre Ar ts IV Theatre Ar ts Design ROTC Pat hwa y : (choose 3) JROTC I JROTC II JROTC III JROTC IV 2 Year s Subs titut es for Wellness 3 Year s Subs titut es for Gover nment 3 Year s Subs titut es for Per sonal Finance

Mat h/Science Pat hwa y : (choose 10) Physical Science Honor s Physical Science Pr inciples of Tec hnology 1 Pr inciples of Tec hnology 2 Biology I Honor s Biology I Advanced Honor s Biology 1 Advanced Placement Biology Honor s Chemis tr y I Advanced Honor s Chemis tr y I Advanced Placement Chemis tr y II IB Chemis tr y 3 SL Honor s Physics Advanced Placement Physics Honor s Anat omy and Physiology Environment al Science Honor s Ecology Algebr a Algebr a I Honor s Algebr a I Advanced Honor s Algebr a I Algebr a II Honor s Algebr a II Advanced Honor s Algebr a II Geome tr y Honor s Geome tr y Advanced Honor s Geome tr y Algebr a & Tr igonome tr y Honor s Pre-calculus Advanced Honor s Pre-calculus AP Calculus/Advanced Placement Calculus AB AP Calculus/Advanced Placement Calculus BC Honor s St atis tics Advanced Placement St atis tics IB Mat h Studies SL IB Mat h HL3 IB Mat h HL4 Humanities Pat hwa y : (choose 12) English I Honor s English I Advanced Honor s English I English II EOC English II Honor s English II Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide




Advanced Honor s English II English III Honor s English III IB English III HL Advanced Placement English III English IV English IV: Communications for Life Honor s English IV Advanced Placement English IV English IV: Dual Enrollment IB English IV HL Jour nalism: Pr int Media Jour nalism: Audio/Visual Creative Wr iting Speec h Honor s Spanish I Honor s Myt hology Spanish I IB Spanish AB Initio I Spanish II IB Spanish AB Initio II Honor s Spanish II Spanish II for N ative Speaker s Spanish III for N ative Speaker s Honor s Latin I Honor s Latin II Advanced Honor s Latin III Advanced Honor s Latin IV Honor s Frenc h I IB Frenc h AB Initio I Honor s Frenc h II IB Frenc h AB Initio II U nit ed St at es His t or y Honor s U nit ed St at es His t or y Advanced Placement U nit ed St at es His t or y U nit ed St at es His t or y: Dual Enrollment Wor ld His t or y Honor s Wor ld His t or y Advanced Placement Wor ld His t or y U.S. Gover nment U.S. Gover nment Honor s Wor ld Geogr aphy Honor s Wor ld Geogr aphy Economics Economics Honor s Per sonal Finance Psyc hology Honor s Psyc hology IB Psyc hology SL 3 & 4 IB Psyc hology HL 3 & 4 IB 20t h Centur y His t or y SL

Career/Technical Pathways @ Oakland Ag r iculture Pat hways: Agr iculture Mec hanics & Engineer ing 

Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

A g Mec hanics & Maint enance A gr iSciences A gr iculture Power and Eq uipment Pr inciples of A gr icultur al Engineer ing

Veter inar y & Animal Science A gr iScience Honor s Small Animal Care Hor se Science Ve t er inar y Science Honor s

B u s i n e s s Te c h n o l o g y Pa t h ways : Business Management Accounting I Business Management Honor s Vir tual Ent er pr ise I Business Financial Management & Accounting Accounting I Accounting II Business Management Banking & Finance Accounting I Accounting II Banking and Finance Administrative Assist ant Int ergr at ed In put Tec hnologies eBusiness Communications Adminis tr ative Management Communications Development Int ergr at ed In put Tec hnologies eBusiness Communications Adminis tr ative Management Public/Non-prof it Management & Admin istrative eBusiness Communications Adminis tr ative Management Business Management Web/Multimedia Mgmt/Webmaster Int er active Multi Media Web Design Essentials Web Design Applications

Fa m i l y & C o n s u m e r S c i e n c e Pa t h ways : Teac hing Training Ser vices Famil y and Consumer Science Child & Lifespan Development Life Connections Teac hing as a Profession Famil y

& Community Ser vices Famil y and Consumer Science Child & Lifespan Development N utr ition & Foods


Life Connections Pre K- Ear l y Childhood Education & Ear l y Childhood Devel opment and Ser vices Famil y and Consumer Science Ear l y Childhood Education Career I Ear l y Childhood Education Career II Teac hing as a Profession Inter ior Design Famil y and Consumer Science Int er ior Design Housing Life Connections Fashion Design Famil y and Consumer Science Fashion Design & Merc handising Textiles and Apparel Life Connections

Food & Beverage Ser vices: Culinar y Ar ts I Culinar y Ar ts II Culinar y Ar ts III La w Enforcement Ser vices: Cr iminal Jus tice I Cr iminal Jus tice II Forensic Science Inves tigation La w Enforcement Ser vices & National Secur ity : Cr iminal Jus tice I Cr iminal Jus tice II Cr iminal Jus tice III Per sonal Care Ser vices: Pr inciples of Cosme t ology Design Pr inciples of Cosme t ology Chemis tr y of Cosme t ology

Mar keting Pat hways : Mar keting Communications Mar ke ting I Honor s (Econ) Mar ke ting II Honor s Adver tising & Public Relations Merc handising Mar ke ting I Honor s (Econ) Mar ke ting II Honor s Re t ail Oper ations Recreation, Attractions, Spor ts & Enter t ainment Mar ke ting I Honor s (Econ) Tr avel & Tour ism Spor ts & Ent er t ainment

Healt h Science Pat hway :

Healt h Science Education Anat omy & Physiology Medical Ther apeutics Clinical Int er nship

Trade & Industr ial Pat hways: A utomotive Tec hnology : Tr anspor t ation Core Br akes & Sys t ems Engine Per for mance Electr ical/Electronics St eer ing/Suspension Constr uction- Masonar y & Concrete: Cons tr uction Core Masonr y I Masonr y II Design

Communications: Honor s Visual Communications Honor s Digit al Design & Imaging I Honor s Digit al Design & Imaging II Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide




Course Description: C ur r i c u l u m & Tec hnology Ed. Agriculture: Agriculture Mechanics & Maintenance #5151, Grades 10-11

interested in Pre-Veterinary Science, Agribusiness, Plant and Soil Science, Pre-Forestry or Animal Science degrees. The successful operation of a greenhouse involves a variety of practices, ranging from the management of the facility to the marketing of greenhouse products. Understanding greenhouse management principles are needed to be profitable and to successfully operate landscaping, floriculture, and gardening industries.

Small Animal Care #5171, Grades 10-12

Agricultural Mechanics includes standards to prepare students for operational procedures for a shop or a home environment. Students learn basic skills in areas including welding, electricity, land measurement, and plumbing. As students enter the 21st century, they need to have skills that can be used in a rural or an urban environment.

This course studies companion animals and their care including handling, facilities, healthcare, grooming, animal rights and welfare, and also legalities. This course also discusses the economic and social importance of small animals.

Agricultural Power and Equipment

Horse Science

#5152, Grades 11, *2 credit course, **Prerequisite: Successful completion of Agricultural Mechanics or teacher approval. Agricultural Power and Equipment includes basic information and laboratory activities on small engines, tractors and agricultural equipment maintenance, repair and overhaul. The standards address competencies for electrical motors, hydraulic systems and fuel-powered engines.

AgriSciences #5171, Grades 9, * Prerequisite: 7th grade Terra Nova Performance Level 70% and above Agriscience is designed to develop the basic theories and principles involved in animal science, agribusiness, agricultural mechanics, and natural resource management. This course includes leadership and personal development skills through FFA membership. Meets science credit requirements for high school graduation and college entrance.

AgriSciences Honors #5171H, Grades 9 Accelerated hands-on instruction to prepare students for advanced levels of biology and subsequent sciences for the university bound students who are interested in an Animal and Veterinary Science focus area. The content area covers ecology, biological processes, sexual and asexual reproduction. This course includes leadership and personal development skills through FFA membership. Meets science credit requirements for high school graduation and college entrance.

Agriculture Engineering #5178, Grades 12, *2 credit course, ** Prerequisite: Successful completion of Ag Power and Equipment Agricultural Mechanics includes standards to prepare students for operational procedures for a shop or a home environment. Students learn basic skills in areas including welding, electricity, land measurement, and plumbing. As students enter the 21st century, they need to have skills that can be used in a rural or an urban environment.

Greenhouse #5167, Grades 11-12 This course is available for dual credit through MTSU for students



Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

#5168, Grades 10-12 Horse populations in the state have continued to grow, and as a result, equine economic impact has increased. Horse Science is designed to develop basic understanding of equine handling, health, maintenance, reproduction, selection, management, and their social and economic impact.

Veterinary Science Honors #5176H, Grades 11-12 Advanced standards will familiarize students with competencies required in a veterinary science career. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of large and small animal species, animal reproduction and physiology, and animal health and nutrition. Additionally, students will focus on the veterinary industry, veterinary specializations, and college preparation.

Business: eBusiness Communications #3704, Grades 9-12 This course will address the use of Internet developing concepts, particularly those related to web browsers, navigators, search engines, on-line communication methods, home and web site concepts, transfer of data, downloading files, security procedures and Internet navigational tools.

Personal Finance Honors #3766H, Grades 9-12, *1/2 credit course Personal Finance is a course designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets; simulate use of checking and saving accounts; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.


Business Management #3707, Grades 9-12 Students in Business Management will develop a foundation in the many activities, problems, and decisions that are intrinsic to the management of a successful business, as well as an appreciation for the importance of these responsibilities. Areas to be examined include business organization, ethical and legal responsibilities, communication, decision-making, personnel, safety, professional development and related careers. By gaining an understanding of these areas, students will be better prepared to enhance the business decisions of tomorrow.

Honors Virtual Enterprise (Econ) #3762H, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Any upper level Business or Marketing course, **Teacher Approval, 2 credits divided into A and B years. Virtual Enterprise International (VE) is a simulated business environment. The VE students will be involved in actual on-the-job work experiences, including accounting, human resources, management, administration and marketing. The only difference between the VE and an actual business is that no material goods are produced or legal tender exchanged. However, services will be provided. Working in a team, the student will develop and enhance oral and written communication skills through initiative, responsibility and creativity.

Business Basics #3722, Grades 9-10, *1/2 credit course This course provides an in-depth study of fundamental concepts, free enterprise trading practices, and the various players in the economic system. Topics include the production, marketing and distribution of goods and services, as well as the roles of financial institutions, the government, and the individual within the free enterprise system. Students will explore various careers related to the economy. International trade and economics have become an integral part of business economics.

Accounting 1 #3779, Grades 10-12 This course covers the basic accounting skills involved in the three main types of businesses: sole proprietorship, manufacturing partnership, and corporation. Students will learn the skills necessary to record business transactions and analyze the financial condition of a business. They will become proficient in using software for accounting on the computer. They will learn to use the program Microsoft Excel to keep a personal budget.

Accounting 2 #3780, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Acounting 1 Accounting II is an advanced study of concepts, principles and techniques that build on the competencies acquired in Accounting I used in keeping the electronic and manual financial records of a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. Departmental, management, cost and not-for-profit accounting systems are explored.

Banking & Finance #3756, Grades 11-12 *Teacher Approval Banking and Finance is a course designed to challenge the student with real banking and financial situations through a partnership with a local financial institution that would bring resources of mentors, seminars, and hands-on experience with day-to-day operations. Completion of this course will provide students with a basis for secondary education in finance and special job skills in banking and financial institutions. Ethical issues will be presented in the course.

Interactive Multi Media #3746, Grades 9-12 The student will apply keying, typography, layout, and design skills in this course. The student will be proficient in using interactive multimedia tools to develop electronic presentations. Creative design, persuasive communications, and language arts skills are applied through research, evaluation, validation, written, and oral communication. Typography, layout and design guidelines are applied. Copyright laws and ethical practices are reinforced in creating and formatting various presentations that require imported data/graphics, digital, audio, and video clips. Team development will also be stressed as students work on multimedia project(s). Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in business and industry.

Web Design Essentials #3768, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite: Interactive MultiMedia This course, which is designed as the first level of Web Design, will teach students workplace and leadership skills for advancement into the Web Design Application course. Keying and layout design skills are essential. Students will develop Internet research techniques for business; acquire navigation mapping skills; effectively use a Web site; study fundamental concepts of digital commerce transaction security; examine related social, legal and ethical issues; study electronic financial management practices, and integrate the elements of Web Design. Web Design Essentials focuses on the language, structure, and essential concepts and principles of page layout and design and the ethics related to the production of Internet presentations. Typography layout and design guidelines will be applied in the design of Web pages. Upon completion of the course, a student will be able to evaluate, implement, and apply the use of technology in Digital Commerce and Web Page Design for business.

Web Design Applications #3769, Grade 11-12, *Prerequisite: Web Design Essentials This course, which is a project-based continuation of Web Design Essentials, teaches students work-related skills for advancement into post-secondary education and/or the workplace. The course will provide the concepts and applications that may lead to business industry certification. Course content includes exposure to advanced Web design, graphics, animations, and the complex site design. The course content provides students the opportunity to acquire advanced skills in both theory and practical application of Web design and of leadership and interpersonal skill development.

Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide




Adminstrative Managment #3727, Grades 11-12 This capstone course provides advanced training, including hands-on experiences, for students pursuing a career in business technology. Skills developed in previous courses will be incorporated and enhanced through a multi-tasking environment using a variety of input technologies. Procedures and concepts are related to information processing systems, administrative/information management, problem solving, reasoning, team-building, time management, business standards, feasibility studies, cost/budgeting, professional leadership, ethical and legal issues, and mathematics and communications. Production and administrative skills are developed to meet industry’s standards. The student will play a variety of roles in completing tasks. Team activities will be evaluated as a group. Collaboration with other courses can enhance students’ learning and expand their experiences. This course may articulate to a post-secondary program.

Keyboarding: Document Layout #3727, Grades 9-12, *1/2 credit Designed to teach students correct keying techniques and basic skill in operating the computer keyboard.

+IB Information Tech SL/HL #3695, Grades 11-12 The IB Diploma Program Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts. Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social sciences, it also considers social and ethical considerations that are common to other subjects in group 3. Students come into contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This increasingly widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions with regard to the social and ethical considerations that shape our society today. ITGS offers an opportunity for a systematic study of these considerations, whose range is such that they fall outside the scope of any other single discipline.

Integrated Input Technologies #3730, Grades 11-12, *10th grade by teacher recommendation This is a capstone course in which students will learn necessary skills in problem solving using current and emerging integrated technology to include a variety of input technologies such as advanced keyboarding, scanning, speech recognition, handwriting recognition, and the use of a mouse in the production of mailable business documents. The course focuses on student choice, accountability, and competency. Students work toward the attainment of high-level employable competencies in areas which may include, but are not limited to, integrated software applications, computer systems, communication systems, networking, ethical issues, human relations, leadership, self-management, and workplace management. Students may choose



Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

areas of specialization and achieve industry certification in areas such as word processing, spreadsheet applications, database design and management, multimedia presentations, schedule and contact management, etc. This course may articulate to post-secondary education.

High School 101 #3795, Grade 9, *1/2 credit High School 101 is an innovative, project-based strategy class designed to prepare students to succeed today in the classroom as well as tomorrow in the workplace. This unique 10-unit resource teaches students vital 21st century skills in an engaging, interactive environment.

Marketing: Exploring Marketing Management #5014, Grade 9, *1/2 credit course This course is designed to introduce and provide an overview of marketing and management, as well as employment opportunities available in these fields. Students will explore important marketing concepts, functions, personality traits, and communication necessary for marketing and managements careers.

Marketing I Honors (Econ) #5000H, Grades 10-12 This course is a study of marketing concepts and principles used in management. Students will examine challenges, responsibilities and risks managers face in today’s workplace. Subject matter includes finance, entrepreneurship, risk management, marketing information systems, purchasing, human resource skills, and leadership development. A credit in Marketing I may substitute for the required credit in Economics for Dual or Technical path students whose technical focus is marketing and who complete all pathway requirements.

Marketing II Honors #5001H, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Marketing I This course is a study of marketing concepts and principles used in management. Students will examine challenges, responsibilities and risks managers face in today’s workplace. Subject matter includes finance, entrepreneurship, risk management, marketing, information systems, purchasing, human resource skills, and leadership.

Marketing Co-op #5098, Grades 12 Work-based learning (WBL) is not a class. It is a method of instruction that enhances a related class in which a student is enrolled. Credit earned in work-based learning is through the certain Marketing class in which the student is enrolled at the same time as the WBL experience. The credit is recorded as an additional credit in that class. The WBL experience does not replace the regular class instruction time. Only seniors (16 years or older) may utilize the WBL method for credit.


Advertising & Public Relations #5016, Grades 10-12 Advertising and Public Relations focuses on the concepts and strategies associated with the dynamic and changing means of communication in order to promote products, services, ideas and/or images. This course encourages students to examine this field from the viewpoints of the creative staff, business person, and consumer.

Sports & Entertainment #5023, Grades 10-12 Sports and entertainment marketing is a specialized course designed to offer students an opportunity to gain knowledge and develop skills related to the growing sports and entertainment industry. Students will develop skills in the areas of facility design, merchandising, advertising, public relations/publicity, event marketing, sponsoring, ticket distribution, and career opportunities as they relate to the sports and entertainment industry.

Retail Operations #5022, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Marketing I

emphasis. Course content will introduce new technology, effects of forensic analysis, and career opportunities.

Criminal Justice III #5332, Grade 12, *Prerequisite: Criminal Justice I & II In Criminal Justice III, students will apply knowledge gained in Criminal Justice Careers I and II through the use of research exercises. American Psychological Association (APA) research guidelines, a professional standard, will provide the format basis. The course will call upon students to engage in a variety of professionally used information-gathering techniques, including conducting interviews, making observations at courthouses, researching, formulating, and evaluating statistical data through Place-Based Learning. The individual and group activities will help students develop problem-solving and teamwork skills in conjunction with development of academic skills.* This program uses as its foundation work-place related experiences. Students are expected to travel outside the classroom as part of their research-gathering activities that will provide more context, detail, and real-life activities. This course is designed for seniors in preparation for continuing education in the areas of criminal justice careers.

Forensic Science Investigation #5331, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Criminal Justice II

Retail Operations offers students the opportunity to learn marketing skills needed in the fast-paced world of retailing. In this course, the student will learn that retailing is a significant and vital component to the United States economy and is quickly becoming an integral part of the global economy. Throughout the course the student will be made aware of the importance of retailing in its various forms as the final step in getting products and services to consumers in the marketplace. This course may be specialized to a specific area such as fashion retailing.

Forensic science applies the knowledge and technology of science for the definition and enforcement of such laws. It is an introductory course that focuses on practices and analysis of physical evidence found at crime scenes. The fundamental objective is to teach the basic processes and principles of scientific thinking and apply them to solve problems that are not only science related, but cross the curriculum with critical thinking skills.

Travel & Tourism

Construction Core

#5003, Grades 11-12

#5730, Grades 9-10

Travel and Tourism is a growing industry encompassing a variety of business and employment opportunities. This course prepares students for gainful employment and/or post-secondary training in the industry of travel and tourism. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the industry and its career opportunities and by developing the human relations, communication, and technical skills needed for advancement.

Law Enforcement Services: Criminal Justice #5330, Grades 9-12 This course focuses on areas comprised of planning, managing, and providing judicial, legal, and protective services. The course is an overview of the legal justice system and builds a better understanding of the development of laws on state, federal, and international levels.

Criminal Justice II #5331, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Criminal Justice I This course will provide students the opportunity to analyze local, state, federal, and international laws. Students will participate in mock trials and field trips with legal and protective service career

Construction:

Construction core is a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge applicable to all construction trades. Topics covered include safety, construction drawings, site layout, hand and power tools, linear and angular measurements, and application of algebraic and geometric principles to construction problems.

Masonry I #5735, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisites: Construction Core & Algebra 1 Masonry I is a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge related to masonry construction in residential and commercial structures. Topics covered include safe practices, interpretation of construction drawings, basic laying techniques, masonry reinforcement, arch construction, and accommodations for weather. This course gives students an introduction to the skill and knowledge base typically required for apprentice masons.

Masonry II #5736, Grades 11-12, * Prerequisites: Masonry 1, Geometry, & Physical Science, ** 2 credit course divided into A and B sections. Masonry II is a course in which students will learn and practice intermediate skills related to masonry construction in residential and commercial structures. Topics covered include safe practices, Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide




advanced interpretation of construction drawings, design of panel and curtain walls, construction planning and scheduling. This course gives students a substantial skill and knowledge foundation typically required for apprentice electrians.

Family & Consumer Sciences: Child and Lifespan Development #5610, Grades 10–12 Child and Lifespan Development prepares students to understand the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth and development throughout the lifespan. Instructional content includes child development theories and research; prenatal development; infants and toddlers; preschool years; middle childhood; adolescence; adulthood; geriatrics; death and dying; careers; and leadership, citizenship, and teamwork.

Family and Consumer Science #5603, Grades 9

teaching as a profession, and foster respect for the teaching profession. Students will gain knowledge and skills that will establish a foundation for a successful pathway to a teaching career. Content standards guide students to discover challenges, opportunities, and rewards of a teaching career. Content includes history and current issues of education; teacher roles, responsibilities, and characteristics; self-exploration and understanding; the teacher and learning processes; human growth and development; teaching career opportunities and preparation; and components of instruction.

Interior Design #5611, Grades 10 – 12 Interior Design is a specialized course focusing on the interior of living environments. The course includes instruction in the fundamentals of interior design; the application of skills, knowledge, and design principles to the living environment; interior design occupations and careers; universal and “green” design; and professional and marketing skills. Instruction includes academic integration and technology applications.

Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) is a comprehensive, foundation course designed to assist students in developing core knowledge and skills needed for successful life planning and management. Content includes human development; family and parenting education; resource management; housing and living environments; nutrition and foods; textiles and apparel; leadership development; and career preparation. A unique focus is on the management of families, work, and their interrelationships. The course provides a foundation for further study in specialized related career areas.

Housing

Family & Parenting

Nutrition and Foods is a specialized course designed to help students understand the nutrient value, appetite appeal, social significance, and cultural aspects of food. Students will examine the role of nutrition in the prevention of health conditions, such as obesity, and the promotion of optimal body performance throughout the life span. The course offers students opportunities to develop skills in the safe and sanitary selection, preparation, storing, and serving of food; meal management to meet individual and family nutrition needs across the life span; and optimal use of food resources.

#5606, Grades 10–12 Family and Parenting focuses on the significance of the family as a basic unit of society and the impact of parenting roles and responsibilities on the well-being of individuals and society. Instructional content includes family, individuals, and society; relationships; communication; multiple roles; parenting roles and responsibilities; careers; and leadership, citizenship, and teamwork.

Life Connections #5623, Grades 11–12 Life Connections is a course designed to assist students in making a successful transition from high school into the post high school environment. Students will be empowered to take action for the well-being of themselves and others as they effectively manage the roles and responsibilities created by family, career, and community interactions. The role of communication in establishing and maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships is emphasized. Skills related to decision making, problem solving, critical and creative thinking, technology, and workplace readiness practiced in Life Connections will provide students with an understanding of how to plan for and manage careers in an ever-changing workplace.

Teaching as a Profession #5622, Grade 12 Teaching as a Profession is a course designed to capture the interest of secondary students as potential teachers, introduce students to

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

#5614, Grades 10 – 12 Housing is a specialized course designed to prepare students to understand the influences affecting housing decisions. Emphasis is on using available resources effectively to meet individual housing needs.

Nutrition and Foods #5609, Grades 10–12

Textiles and Apparel #5619, Grades 10 – 12 Textiles and Apparel is a specialized course designed to build foundational skills in the selection, production, and alteration of textile and apparel products. Areas of study include social, psychological and physiological influences; fibers and fabrics; textile design and production influences; manufacturing systems; and career options and preparation.

Fashion Design & Merchandising #5621, Grades 10 – 12 Fashion Design and Merchandising is a specialized course designed to introduce students to the world of fashion. Areas of study include fashion fundamentals; principles and elements of design; career options and preparation; product selection and maintenance; and consumer strategies. Instruction includes academic integration and technology applications.


Personal Finance #5613, Grades 11–12, *Dual and Honors credit available , **1/2 credit course Personal Finance is a course designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real-world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets; simulate use of checking and saving accounts; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.

Early Childhood Education Careers I #5650, Grades 10–12, *Need Teacher Recommendations Early Childhood Education Careers I (ECEC) will launch students on a career pathway into the field of early childhood education and may lead to entry level employment and/or post-secondary education. Content will provide a foundation in the concepts of child development theory and afford students the opportunity to integrate knowledge, skills, and practices required for careers in early childhood education and related services.

Early Childhood Education Careers II #5660, Grades 11–12, *Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education I Early Childhood Education Careers II prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into postsecondary education. Content provides students the opportunity to apply child development theory, develop and implement learning activities for young children, and integrate knowledge, skills, and practice required for careers in early childhood education and related services. Laboratory experiences offer schoolbased and/or work-based learning opportunities. Students will spend a minimum of 30% of instructional time in laboratory experiences.

Early Childhood Education Careers III #5661, Grades 12, *Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education II Early Childhood Education Careers III (ECEC) serves as a capstone course and further prepares students for employment and/or entry into post-secondary education in the early childhood education and services industry. Students will obtain knowledge and skills in administration and management. They will explore areas related to instruction and services of special needs children.

Food & Beverage Services: Culinary Arts I #5656, Grades 10–11 This course, which is the first level of Culinary Arts, prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into post-secondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the industry and its career opportunities and by developing food preparation and service and interpersonal skills. Laboratory facilities and experiences, which simulate commercial food production and service operations, offer school-based learning opportunities.

The Culinary Arts Competencies state student participation in FCCLA/Skills USA and catering events are an integral part of the course. During the school year, Culinary Arts students are required to meet the below-stated hours for completion of the course. Students have the opportunity to choose their assigned hours based on the events that are being catered by Culinary Arts. There will be a professional dress requirement and responsibilities that are assigned to each job/event. It is the students’ responsibility to keep a signed log of their hours on the appropriate forms to be turned in at the end of the school year. 15 catering hours.

Culinary Arts II #5657, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I This course, which is the second level of Culinary Arts, prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into post-secondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by demonstrating the principles of safety and sanitation, food preparation skills, and teamwork to manage an environment conducive to quality food production and service operations. The Culinary Arts Competencies state student participation in FCCLA/Skills USA and catering events are an integral part of the course. During the school year, Culinary Arts students are required to meet the below-stated hours for completion of the course. Students have the opportunity to choose their assigned hours based on the events that are being catered by Culinary Arts. There will be a professional dress requirement and responsibilities that are assigned to each job/event. It is the students’ responsibility to keep a signed log of their hours on the appropriate forms to be turned in at the end of the school year. 25 catering hours.

Culinary Arts III #5658, Grades 12, *Prerequisite: Culinary Arts II This course, which is the third level of Culinary Arts, serves as a capstone course. It too prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into post-secondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to apply the marketable culinary arts skills they have acquired by assuming increasingly responsible positions including participation in a cooperative education experience. The Culinary Arts Competencies state student participation in FCCLA/Skills USA and catering events are an integral part of the course. During the school year, Culinary Arts students are required to meet the below-stated hours for completion of the course. Students have the opportunity to choose their assigned hours based on the events that are being catered by Culinary Arts. There will be a professional dress requirement and responsibilities that are assigned to each job/event. It is the students’ responsibility to keep a signed log of their hours on the appropriate forms to be turned in at the end of the school year. 35 catering hours.

Design Communications: Honors Visual Communications #5759H, Grades 9-11 Visual Communications is a course that provides a foundation in aesthetic concepts and applies these concepts to the visual art, design, printing, and photography industries. Course content provides the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the visual Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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communications industry and its career opportunities and by developing leadership, teamwork, and technical skills. Varying degrees of aesthetics are required, along with the ability to interpret many aspects of life and technology. Course content is also related to other pathways.

Honors Digital Design & Imaging I #5762A, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisites: Visual Communications, **Maximum 2 Credits This level course covers the principles of design and general layout procedures. Content will cover electronic systems and software programs used in graphic design, page composition, image conversion, and digital printing. Advanced knowledge and skill in graphic design and digital imaging will be enhanced in a graphic design laboratory facility through experiences, which simulate the graphic design and digital photography industry, and school-based and work-based learning opportunities.

Honors Digital Design & Imaging II #5762B, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisites: Visual Communications & Digital Design I, **Maximum 2 Credits This level course covers advanced principles of design and layout. Content will cover electronic systems and software programs used in graphic design, page composition, image conversion, and digital printing. Advanced knowledge and skill in graphic design and digital imaging will be enhanced in a graphic design laboratory facility through experiences, which simulate the graphic design and digital photography industry, and school-based and work-based learning opportunities.

Health Science: Anatomy/Physiology #5512, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisites: Health Science Education In this course, students will examine human anatomy and physical functions. They will analyze results of abnormal physiology and evaluate clinical consequences. A workable knowledge of medical terminology will be demonstrated. It is suggested that this elective course be offered to students in grades 11-12. This course may articulate to postsecondary education. This course may be offered for one unit of science credit if the teacher is endorsed in science or for one unit of vocational credit.

Clinical Internship #5501, Grade 12 * Teacher recommendation **Prerequisite: Health Science Ed., Medical Therapeutics, and Anatomy/Physiology This class provides hands-on experience after completion of Health Science Education and Medical Therapeutics. This class is conducted in the various health care agencies in the community. Insurance cost: approx. $35.00/ must purchase scrubs (red and/or dark blue). Each student must have physical, 3 hepatitis vaccines, and TB skin test prior to beginning rotation at clinical site. Students must provide own transportation to and from clinical site with proof of driver’s license and automobile insurance required. Must have 3.0 GPA, have nine or less absences for the prior year, have three teacher recommendations, and no history of behavior problems. Students may be dropped from Clinical due to excessive tardies, habitual ISS or OSS, theft, or not following the rules.

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

Health Science Education #5509, Grades 9-10 This course is an introduction to broad topics that serve as a foundation for the Health Science cluster. The topics covered include growth and development, nutrition, medical terminology, history of health care, careers in health care and their educational requirements. Skills are taught with each unit such as medical asepsis, vital signs, CPR and first aid.

Medical Therapeutics #5506, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite- Health Science Education This course provides knowledge and skills to maintain or change the health status of an individual. It includes career research of various health care professions and their scope of practice, medical legal requirements, monitoring the patient status by various methods based on age, and physical and social needs. The student learns various skills including vital signs, CPR, basic first aid, and basic pharmacology. They also learn the ingredients to a healthy life style by use of fundamentals of wellness and disease prevention.

Automotive Technology: Transportation Core #5702, Grades 9-10, *1/2 credit course The Transportation Core course prepares students for all subsequent transportation courses. Students explore career opportunities and requirements of a professional service technician. Content emphasizes beginning transportation service skills and workplace success skills. Upon completing this course, students may enter automotive service technology, diesel equipment technology, leisure craft service technology, collision repair and refinish technology, or aviation maintenance.

Engine Performance #5711, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Transportation Core and Brake Systems, OR Electrical/Electronics, **2 credit course This is a course that prepares students for entry-level positions or advanced training in engine performance. The course covers electronic ignition and distributor ignition systems, fuel management, exhaust emission control, and computer input and output signals and will identify the different types of sensors used by automotive engine computers. Students will perform inspections, tests, and measurements for diagnosis and perform needed repairs. Education and experiences simulate automotive service industry operations through the use of training aids and modules and offer school-based learning opportunities. Course content prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Engine Performance test, for entry-level placement in the workforce, and for entry into post-secondary education. This course is accepted for credit at the Tennessee Technology Centers.

Automotive Brake Systems #5712, Grades 10-12, **Prerequisite: Transportation Core This course offers training in the diagnosis and repair of hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical systems used in standard and anti-lock brake systems. Course content includes diagnosis, repair, and/or service technology of hydraulic and antilock brake systems to original equipment


manufacture (OEM) specifications. Educational experiences simulate automotive services industry operations through training aids, laboratory facilities, and school-based learning opportunities. Course content prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Brake System test, for entry-level placement in the workforce, and for entry into post-secondary education through the use of aids and modules and work-based learning opportunities. Course content prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Electrical and Electronics test.

Electrical/Electronics #5713, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Transportation Core and Brake Systems Electronics is a course that prepares students for entry-level positions or advanced training in automotive electrical and electronics systems. Students apply principles of electronics to automotive technology and develop diagnostic skills. The course provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by training in the use of digital and analog voltmeters, ohmmeters, and amp-meters; as well as oscilloscopes, testlights, load-testers and specialized electrical test equipment. Education experiences simulate automotive service industry operations through the use of training aids and modules and school-based learning opportunities.

Personal Care Services: Principles of Cosmetology #5338, Grades 10-12 Principles of Cosmetology is the first level of cosmetology, and it prepares students with work-related skills for advancement into the Design Principles of Cosmetology course. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire basic fundamental skills in both theory and practical

applications of leadership and interpersonal skill development. Content stresses safety, environmental issues, and protection of the public and designers as integrated with principles of hair design, nail structure, and cosmetic procedures. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the cosmetology industry.

Design Principles of Cosmetology #5339, Grades 10-12 Design Principles of Cosmetology is the second level of cosmetology and prepares students for work-related skills and advancement into the Chemistry of Cosmetology course. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills in both theory and practical application. Advanced knowledge and skills in hair design, nail artistry, and cosmetic applications will be enhanced in a laboratory setting, which duplicates cosmetology industry standards. Upon completion and acquisition of 600 hours, students are eligible to take the Tennessee Board of Cosmetology manicuring examination for a Tennessee Manicure License.

Chemistry of Cosmetology #5340, Grades 11-12 Chemistry of Cosmetology is the advanced level of cosmetology and it prepares students to perform work-related services using chemicals in the cosmetology industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire foundation skills in both theory and practical applications. Laboratory facilities and experiences will be used to simulate cosmetology work experiences. Upon completion and acquisition of 1500 hours, students are eligible to take the Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology examination for a Tennessee Cosmetology License. Upon completion and acquisition of 600 hours, students are eligible to take the Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology Manicuring examination for a Tennessee Manicuring License.

Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: English Courses- Summer reading is optional except for Advanced Honors and AP courses

English 1- #3001 Students study the fundamental skills of grammar and literature. Emphasis is placed on the following study areas: vocabulary, spelling, grammar usage, sentence structure, writing skills, literacy, and reference tools. Literary terminology and interpretation are included in the study of non-fiction and short story selections, poetry, drama, and the novel. All elements of the course are taught with examination performance indicators in mind for writing, reading, viewing and representing, and speak and listening.

Advanced Honors English I #3001AH, *IB/AP students only Students will prepare for the advanced IB curriculum through literature analysis and appreciation, as well as through developing skills in expressing through essay and commentary writing. Particular emphasis will be placed upon looking deeply at literature through an understanding of allusion.

English

English I Honors- #3001H This course offers a combination of advanced grammar and composition skills along with a study of literature. Honors students study the strategies for standardized test taking, essay writing, and a variety of contemporary and historical outside reading and writing sources. Students will use technology for writing enhancement and advanced instructions in research skills. Students will also participate in creative group and individual projects. This course is designed for the most serious student and careful consideration is suggested before reserving a seat in this class. All English I Honors students must take the End-of-Course exam.

English II- #3002 The course includes basic elements of English grammar and will include more advanced elements. Composition skills in usage, punctuation, and sentence structure will be reinforced. The literature study will include the elements of the short story and the short novel in the first semester. A modern drama and/or non-fiction will also be examined. Each semester, literary terminology and new vocabulary will be introduced, as well as problem-solving strategies, communication skills, and the gathering and usage of information.

Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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Advanced Honors English II #3002AH, *IB/AP Students only Students will prepare for the advanced IB curriculum through literature analysis, introduction to literary criticism, and study in historical literary context. Particular emphasis will be placed upon looking deeply at literature through an understanding of historicism and intertextuality.

English II Honors- #3002H This course is designed for the sophomore student who excels in the study of grammar and literature. Emphasis is placed on the development of advanced skills in grammar composition. Students should be able to concentrate on the development of style (sentence variety and transition) rather than on the mechanics of grammar and on the different types of paragraph writing. The Harbrace College Handbook will be used to write and correct papers. All students must pass the English II End-of-Course exam in order to receive a high school diploma.

English II Inclusion- #3002I GW English II- #3080 English III- #3003 In this course the student will reinforce his/her prior knowledge of grammar usage, punctuation, and sentence structure. An emphasis will be placed upon strengthening vocabulary skills. Writing will focus on various types: comparison-contrast, reason, example, description, incident, and point of view. Although various types of writing will be practiced, a special emphasis will be placed upon persuasive writing skills. A chronological survey of American literature is incorporated into the course of study.

English III Honors- #3003H The course is a chronological study of American literature beginning with the Puritan Period and progressing as far into the 20th century American literature as time will allow. Grammar study is done primarily through the writing assignments. The students also have weekly vocabulary study. Since this class is designed for the most serious student, careful consideration is suggested.

IB English III HL #3004, Grades 11-12 *IB coordinator approval needed Students will fulfill the requirements of the IB curriculum, including an intensive analysis of English, American and World literature from a global perspective. Students will develop their understanding of literary theory and criticism and develop their expression through both written and oral discourse.

English III Inclusion- #3003I AP English III- #3013 The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and to become skilled writers who can compose for a variety of purposes. By their writing and reading in this course, students should become aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effective writing. This course is intended to

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

parallel college composition and allows students to write in a variety of forms on a variety of subjects. The purpose of this course is to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose that is rich enough and complex enough for mature readers.

English IV- #3005 The course will be divided into a chronological study of literary periods including Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, and Romantic. Written and oral expression will be integrated into the study of the literature. Vocabulary, writing, and computer technology are also part of the course study. When possible, films and videos will supplement the text.

English IV Honors- #3005H This course is a chronological study of English literature, and to a lesser extent, the historical events out of which the literature grew. Beginning with pre-Roman Britain, the student will examine Roman Britain and then move through the literature and history of the Old English, Middle English Period, Renaissance, Restoration, Neo-classicism, Romanticism, Victorian, and contemporary Britain. The students will study the major works of each period. In addition, the students will develop their writing skills by writing essays and by writing a research paper. Grammar study is conducted through their writing assignments. Weekly vocabulary study is also part of the program as is some oral work.

IB English IV HL- #3006 AP English IV- #3014 Literature and Composition is a rigorous year-long course that provides students with a challenging learning experience equivalent to an introductory year of college literature course work. Students enrolling in English IV AP English Literature and Composition are expected to have mastered skills in reading and writing Standard English. Required summer reading and mid-year reading, writing, and research assignments may be assigned during the course. Through engagement in the careful reading and critical analysis of literature and through the reading of selected notable literary works in English, American, and World Literature, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. The main goal for the course focuses on students developing critical standards for interpreting the effects writers create through the artful manipulation of language. Students will analyze literature from the point of view of the writer as well as the reader to determine effects of style, structure, diction, imagery, use of detail, rhetorical devices, figurative language and syntax. Additionally, students will engage in discussion of the social and historical values reflected in the context of the literature in relation to their own lives and experiences. Writing about literature is a key component of the course work. Writing assignments will focus on the critical analysis of various genres in literature and will include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. Intensive vocabulary study drawn from the class reading selections, as well as from other sources, is an essential component of the course work.

English IV- #3005G, 2 periods for December graduates. English IV Inclusion- #3005I English IV Dual Enrollment- #3005D, Early Day


Journalism- Print Media

create literary composition in a variety of genres and publish their work.

#3008P, Grades 10-12 Applications are taken in the spring of the previous year. The objective of the print journalism class is to produce the Patriot yearbook. Students are responsible for planning, developing, producing, and distributing the book. The course content involves the study of page design, copy writing, use of graphics, basic and digital photography, desktop publishing, and type styles. Staff members must be willing to assume full responsibility for workshops and after-school meetings.

Journalism-Audio/Visual Media #3008A, Grades 11-12 This course is designed for upperclassmen who desire to learn the skills of newscasters, feature interviewers, and technicians in the field of radio/television. Students will be trained in broadcasting skills, interviewing, and editing of video. Camera work, as well as camera maintenance, will be included.

Creative Writing #3012, *Prerequisite: English II Creative Writing is a course in which students study, analyze, and

Content Area Writing- #3081W OHS Administration will assign students to this class in lieu of electives when appropriate.

Honors Mythology- #3099 Students study the myths of Greek and Roman legend, which will provide them an understanding of allusions made to myths in literature, art, music, psychology, medicine, and advertising. This course will be especially helpful to the college-bound student who has not taken a Latin course.

Speech- #3015, Grades 10-12, *1/2 credit course. The elective speech course offers the novice speaker a number of opportunities to organize and prepare public speaking assignments. It also offers a “laboratory setting� for the beginning speaker to stand in front of a live audience and present his/her practiced performance. In addition to public speaking, further performance opportunities include oral public reading. Students will learn the role of communication model, spatial relationships, delivery styles, and the effectiveness of language, gestures, and organizational techniques. Daily reading assignments and class notes/handouts provide necessary information

Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: Instrumental Music: 4 credits max. Jazz Band #3530J, Grades 9-12, *Audition or Director Approval The Oakland Jazz Ensemble is open to 9-12 grade music students by audition and/or Director Approval. Students taking this course develop musicianship and specific performance skills through group and individual settings for the study and performance of the varied styles of instrumental jazz. Through understanding the elements of jazz, students develop their creative skills through improvisation, composition, arranging, performing, listening, and analyzing. Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. Students are provided with opportunities to experience live performances by professionals during and outside of the school day. In addition, students will perform a wide variety of public performances throughout the community and at various jazz festivals. Students must participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend the learning in the classroom. Jazz Ensemble members must also be enrolled in another band and/or choral ensemble on their applied instrument.

Concert Band #3530C, Grades 9-12, *Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of a middle school or junior high instrumental program The Oakland Concert Band is open to 9-12 grade music students who have completed at least one year of a middle school or junior high school instrumental music program. Students in this ensemble will

Fi n e & Pe r fo r m i n g Ar ts

develop elements of musicianship such as tone production, intonation, technical skills, reading and notating music, listening skills and analyzing music. Students are provided with opportunities to experience live performances by professionals during and outside of the school day. In addition, students will perform a wide variety of public performances throughout the community and at various festivals and concerts. Students must participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend the learning in the classroom. A limited number of rehearsals and performances may be scheduled outside of the school day. Students are encouraged to take weekly private lessons on his/her applied instrument. Members are also encouraged to audition for the Tennessee Mid-State Band clinic.

Wind Ensemble #3530W, Grades 10-12, *Audition or Director Approval The Oakland Wind Ensemble is open to 10-12 grade music students by audition and/or Director Approval. Students in this advanced ensemble will develop elements of musicianship such as tone production, intonation, technical skills, reading and notating music, listening skills and analyzing music. Students are provided with opportunities to experience live performances by professionals during and outside of the school day. In addition, students will perform a wide variety of public performances throughout the community and at various festivals and concerts. Students must participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend the learning in the classroom. A limited number of rehearsals and performances may be scheduled outside of the school day. Wind Ensemble students are encouraged Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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to take weekly private lessons on their applied instrument. Members are also expected to audition for the Tennessee Mid-State Band clinic in addition to various other auditioned band clinics and festivals such as the Tennessee Tech Festival of Winds and Percussion as well as the MTSU Wind Band Conference.

Percussion Ensemble #3530P, Grades 9-12, *Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of a middle school or junior high instrumental program The Oakland Percussion Ensemble is open to 9-12 grade percussionists who have completed at least one year of a middle school or junior high school instrumental music program. Students in the Percussion Ensemble are automatically members of the Concert Band, Wind Ensemble and Marching Band. Percussion Ensemble members will perform with these groups throughout the school year. Students must participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend the learning in the classroom. A limited number of rehearsals and performances may be scheduled outside of the school day. Percussion Ensemble members are encouraged to take weekly private lessons on their applied instrument. Members are also expected to audition for the Tennessee Mid-State Band clinic in addition to various other auditioned band clinics and festivals such as the Tennessee Tech Festival of Winds and Percussion as well as the MTSU Wind Band Conference.

Music Theory #3514, Grades 9-12 Students taking this course develop skills in the analysis of music and theoretical concepts. Students will develop ear training and dictation skills, compose works that illustrate mastered concepts, understand harmonic structures and analysis, understand modes and scales, study a wide variety of musical styles, study traditional and nontraditional music notation and sound sources as tools for musical composition, and receive detailed instruction in other basic elements of music. Students have the opportunity to experience live performances by professionals during and outside of the school day.

IB Music SL/HL #3518, Grade 11 IB Music SL consists of a Musical Perception and Analysis course along with a Group Performance (SLG) course. Ensemble music making will allow students to develop creatively their knowledge, abilities, understanding and skills through performance. Students will also develop use of appropriate musical language and terminology to describe and reflect their critical understanding of music. Students will strengthen their development of perceptual skills in response to music and their knowledge and understanding of music in relation to time and place. Students who seek entrance into the IB Music SL program are recommended to complete one course of Basic Music Theory within their Freshman or Sophomore year. These students will then complete the IB Music SL course during their Junior year. This course will give students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world. Students will learn to recognize, speculate, analyze, identify, discriminate and hypothesize in relation to music. This class will include the requirements set forth by the IBO: the study of the Prescribed Work; the study of Musical Genres and Styles; and, the completion of the Musical Investigation.

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

Students will complete the Group Performance (SLG) requirements in Band, Choir or another ensemble approved by the IBO. Students must submit recordings from two or more public performances. Participation in at least one OHS performance ensemble throughout the student’s four years is expected. Private instruction on the IB student’s applied instrument is highly recommended.

Color Guard (Flags, Rifles and Sabers) #3530G, Grades 9-12, *Audition This is a performance course that is a direct extension of the Oakland Band program. This course is only open to members of the Marching Band Color Guard (Flags, Rifles, and Sabers). Students in this class participate in the Marching Band during the first semester performing at local, state, regional and national competitions, football games, and in area parades. Activities utilize a wide variety of materials and experiences and are designed to develop techniques appropriate within the Color Guard genre, including individual and group instruction in performance repertoire and skills. Students develop the ability to express their thoughts, perceptions, feelings, and images through movement. All Color Guard members must be enrolled in the Color Guard class in order to participate. Some exceptions may apply by Director Approval only.

Choral Music: 4 credits max. Concert Choir #3531F, Grade 9-12 Concert Choir is a non-audition mixed choir for freshman through seniors. This is a beginning choir that meets everyday and learns and builds upon the fundamentals of singing, reading music, and choral repertoire. They sing a variety of music from the classics to today’s pop and perform in The Variety Show, Veteran’s Day Program, Annual Christmas Concert, Valentine’s Day Concert, Spring Choral Concert, and compete in Choral Festival.

Chamber Choir #3531C, Grades 9-12 *Audition required This is the premier performing choir at Oakland High School. Students should have previous choral experience. Although advanced study in music theory and music history is included in the curriculum for this choir, this is mainly a performance choir. One performance per six weeks is required. These performances include, but are not limited to, the annual Variety Show, performances of the National Anthem at various sporting events, Holiday Concert, Spring Broadway musical, Spring Concert, and one or more festivals throughout the year. Students are expected to perform as soloists, or in small ensembles as needed throughout the year. Chamber Choir members are encouraged to audition for Mid-State and All-State choirs. Private vocal instruction is encouraged. This course may require after-school rehearsals, performances and/or field trip(s) that will be used as part of the evaluation process.

Women’s Choir #3531W, Grades 10-12 *Audition required Any female student is encouraged to enroll in this class which is designed to focus on the female voice. There is continued study in music reading, part singing, vocal development and performance skills. Many performance opportunities are available to students in


this class, some of which are collaborative concerts with the Chamber Choir. Women’s Choir members perform in the annual Variety Show, Holiday Concert, Spring Concert and other performances throughout the year. Students are encouraged to audition for MidState and All-State choirs. Private vocal instruction is encouraged, but not required. Concert attire must be purchased, but the cost may be curtailed through fundraisers and/or scholarships.

Jazz Choir #3531J, Grades 11-12 *Audition required This choir is a select ensemble designed to enhance the advanced vocal student’s choral experience. Jazz music from the early 1900’s to present day will be studied and performed. Students in this class should have previous choral ensemble experience. The students in this class should exhibit solid music reading skills and have a working knowledge of vocal techniques. Participation in the All-State and Mid-State Choirs is encouraged and emphasized. Private vocal instruction is encouraged. This course may require after-school rehearsals, performances and/or field trip(s) that will be used as part of the evaluation process. Students must also be enrolled in Women’s Choir or Chamber Choir.

General Music #3505, Grades 9–12 General Music is offered to any student in grades 9 – 12. In General Music, we study the history of Western music, Global music and popular music of the 20th century, as well as reviewing basic music notation and theory. One six-week period is dedicated to learning basics on the keyboard and guitar. There is also an opportunity to use the music skills learned in this class to compose music. There is no performance requirement for this class. It is one full credit.

Musical Theatre #3524M, Grades 10–12 A team-teaching and collaboration of theatre and music teachers meet the state standards incorporating comparison and intergration of art forms by analyzing traditional theatre, dance, music, visual arts, and new art forms. Students will read and notate music, sing alone and with others, perform a varied repertoire of music, and act by developing, communicating, and sustaining characters in improvisations and informal or formal productions. An audition is required.

Theatre Arts: Theatre Arts I #3520, Grades 9-12 Drama I students focus on dealing with stage fright and using the body as an interpretive and communicative tool. Individual and group performances are included. The objectives of Drama I include promoting self-esteem, developing interpretive and creative thinking skills, and promoting team-work. Students will study, critique, perform, and participate in a variety of theatre-based learning experiences. We will study theatre history, acting methods, Reader’s Theatre, and plays along with a performance in the Annual Variety Show jointly produced with the Choral Department. The Variety Show is mandatory and will have after-school performances and rehearsals which students must participate. Students must also critique one

theatrically sponsored show per semester. Incoming freshmen may register.

Theatrical Design #3524, Grades 11-12, This is a “behind-the-scenes class.” Students will participate in the design concept of an entire show playing many different roles: costume designer, makeup designer, set designer, etc. Students will study the history of the stage, costuming, publicity, and makeup including: Corrective, Middle Age, Old Age and Fantasy Makeup. Students will also participate in painting the scenery for shows and the upkeep of the theatre. After-school participation on one show per semester is mandatory for a grade. Students may fulfill this requirement by being an Usher, being on the Makeup Crew, Costume Crew, Sound Crew, Light Crew, Prop Crew, or Stage Crew for The Variety Show, Fall Show or the Spring Show.

Theatre Arts II #3521, *Prerequisite: Theatre I, **This class is by audition only, This class goes more in depth with opportunities to practice the craft of acting, study plays, perform monologues and scenes, practice theatrical makeup (corrective, middle age & old age), studying Alfred Hitchcock, and participating in the Annual Variety Show (which is mandatory & requires after-school rehearsal). Students must also critique one theatrically sponsored show per semester.

Theatre Arts III #3522, *Prerequisite: Theatre I & Theatre II, **This class is by audition only. This class requires multiple performances and extensive after-school rehearsals. Students will participate in the Annual Variety Show, the Fall Show, play “Santa” to the Pre-school class, and the Spring play. Students will also study film, perfect acting skills, write & study plays, and experience theatre in various forms. Students must critique one theatrically sponsored show each semester.

Theatre Arts IV #3523, *Prerequisite: Theatre III, **This class is by audition only. This class requires multiple performances and extensive after-school rehearsals. Students will participate in the Annual Variety Show, the Fall Show, play “Santa” to the Pre-school class, and the Spring play. Students will also study film, perfect acting skills, write & study plays, and experience theatre in various forms. Students must critique one theatrically sponsored show each semester. Students will research a famous actor/ actress from the Golden Age of Hollywood for a Senior Project.

IB Theatre HL #3546/3547, *Prerequisite: Theatre I & II The aims of the program in Theater Arts are to help students understand the nature of the theater; to understand it by making it as well as by studying it; to understand it not only with their minds but with their senses, their bodies and their emotions; to understand the forms it takes in cultures other than their own; and through this understanding better understand themselves, their society and their world. Students in this course engage in four areas of theatrical studies: 1) development Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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of performance skills, 2) world theater studies, 3) practical play analysis, and 4) actual theater production. Higher level students will also be required to complete an individual project.

Visual Arts:

4 credits max.

Visual Art I #3501, Grades 9-12 This course introduces students to the elements and principles of art. Students learn drawing, design, color, and composition. A variety of production techniques are stressed in conjunction with art history.

Visual Art II #3502, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite: Visual Art I Basic drawing skills, painting, and sculpting skills and techniques will be reviewed with an emphasis on students taking a creative and individual approach to each. Students will explore the essential techniques of each discipline and use of a variety of media to complete assignments.

Visual Art III #3503, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite: Visual Art II, Visual Art III is an advanced art class in all areas of visual art. Projects build on skills learned in Visual Art I and II and allow more time for work in media of particular interest to the individual student.

Visual Art- Photography #3503P, Grades 10-12, * Prerequisite: Visual Art II

plore composition using film and digital cameras. Darkroom practices and modern computer techniques will be explored.

Visual Art-Photography II #3504P, Grades 12, *Prerequisite: Photo I This class will focus on more advanced techniques of photography that build on Photo I skills. Students will explore larger formats of film and more advanced levels of digital photography.

Visual Art IV #3504, Grades 10-12, * Prerequisite: Visual Art III This course is designed for the student who would like to focus on specific media and concept approaches. Emphasis will be placed on: painting and drawing, print-making and fiber arts, pottery and sculpture, and jewelry making. In each of these areas of study, the student will be exposed to an extensive variety of techniques, styles, approaches, and materials.

IB Visual Arts SL #3437, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisites: Visual Art I and Visual Art II IB Visual Arts is designed to give students with some previous art experience a chance to develop more deeply an independent exploratory attitude towards art production and an active investigative approach towards art history. Students will engage in critical evaluations of their own works as they grow towards finding their own unique artistic voice that is enriched by historical studies and an introspective look at their current environment. Course work will consist of developing and producing original artwork and independent research and development of ideas in an investigation workbook.

This class will focus on the basic techniques of photography that ex-

Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: Spanish I #3021, Grades 9-12 Spanish I focuses on the development of beginning reading, writing, and speaking skill. Students learn basic vocabulary used in everyday conversations and the grammar needed to conduct simple dialogues. Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups to practice oral and written language. The history of Spanish-speaking countries (mainly Mexico and the Central and South American countries) is introduced through research projects, guest speakers, videos, and hands-on learning opportunities.

Spanish I Honors #3021H, *Required for IB Diploma Students This course is a level of study which incorporates high levels of oral and written language acquisition, and allows for a deeper understanding of language and culture.

Fo re i g n L a n g u a ge

Spanish II #3022, Grades 9-12, *Prerequisite: Spanish I Spanish II continues with the development of speaking, reading, listening and writing skills. Comprehension and discussion of selected reading passages are also incorporated. The student will study the culture and history of Spain. The target language is used as much as possible with a combination of English to insure that all students understand the material being presented.

Spanish II Honors #3022H This course is a continuation of Spanish I Honors incorporating high levels of oral and written language acquisition, as well as cultural study.

IB Spanish AB Initio I #3065S, *Required for IB Diploma Students This course is an advanced course designed to elevate the level of

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide


Spanish knowledge both cultural and linguistic to meet the standards as set by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The class is conducted in Spanish. The class focuses on advanced writing, reading and speaking skills. An advanced level of knowledge of Spanish is required to successfully complete coursework.

IB Spanish Initio AB II #3066S, *Required for IB Diploma Students This course is an advanced course designed to elevate the level of Spanish knowledge both cultural and linguistic to meet the standards as set by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The class is conducted in Spanish. The class focuses on advanced writing, reading and speaking skills. An advanced level of knowledge of Spanish is required to successfully complete coursework.

Latin I Honors #3031H, Grades 9-12 Students are introduced to the classical world through the study of Latin vocabulary, grammar, and translation, as well as Roman history, culture, and mythology. Students in this course will benefit from an increased understanding of English composition and derivatives.

Latin II Honors #3032H, *Prerequisite: Latin I Latin II begins with a review of the basic grammar rules, then continues to add vocabulary and advanced grammar, will translate selected works of major Latin writers and do special studies centered around Roman culture and history, English derivatives, and the use of Latin in English, and original Latin.

Latin III Advanced Honors #3033AH, *Prerequisite: Latin II This combined class is designed for the school with small enrollments in Latin III and IV. Students will receive a credit in either Latin III or IV.

Latin IV Advanced Honors #3034AH, *Prerequisite: Latin III

Course Description: English as a Second Language (ESL)

English as a second language follows the state of Tennessee curriculum framework. Instruction starts where the student needs to begin, perhaps with basic survival skills. Instruction in Standard English continues in the areas of speaking, reading, writing, understanding spoken English. American cultural practices, customs and more are discussed. Non-English speakers may get 2 credits in English.

ESL English I- #3001ESL ESL English II- #3002ESL ESL Content Reading- #3081ESL ESL IA- #3075A

Students study the Roman poet Virgil and translate portions of his Aeneid. Literary analysis, as well as poetry scansion, is a part of this study.

French I Honors #3041H, *Required for IB Diploma Students This course is an advanced level of study in which the learning of vocabulary and grammar is faster-paced, leaving more time for higher level communication activities. Students are given more opportunities to use the language in more advanced situations in order to develop speaking, reading and writing skills. Listening activities play an integral role to develop students’ ability to understand native speakers. Language acquisition activities relate to different aspects of the French culture so that linguistic and cultural learning are intertwined. The class is conducted primarily in French as students work toward becoming effective communicators and proficient French speakers.

French II Honors #3042H, *Required for IB Diploma Students This course is designed for the accelerated student and is a continuation of French I Honors. The study of grammar and vocabulary is continued, while emphasis is placed on advanced speaking, reading, writing, and listening activities, always incorporating culture. The class is conducted almost exclusively in French.

IB French Initio AB I & IB French InitioAB II #3065F/3066F, *Required for IB Diploma Students This two-year course will take place over the junior and senior year after completion of French I and French II Honors. With a solid foundation for the language already established, students use the language as a means to acquire a deep understanding and appreciation for the French culture. Communication is key with constant practice in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. At the end of the senior year, students will take rigorous exams which test their abilities in these four main communication areas. The majority of the assessments will be graded externally by the IB organization. This course aspires to produce internationally-minded students capable of being successful on a global scale because of their understanding and appreciation of other cultures as well as their ability to effectively communicate in a second language.

English as Second Language (ESL) ESL IB- #3075B ESL IIA- #3075C ESL IIB- #3075D ESL III- #3075E ESL IV- #3075F ESL V- #3075G ESL World Geography- #3075H Spanish II for ESL- #3022E Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: Maximum 4 credits in addition to lifetime wellness and JROTC

Wellness Health #3303H, Grades 9-12 *1/2 credit This class is combination of classroom work and physical fitness. The course content consists of seven interrelated strands which include the following: nutrition, personal fitness and related skills, mental health, disease prevention and control, substance use and abuse, sexuality and family life, and first aid. Personal fitness and nutrition are emphasized and integrated throughout the course. Students are provided opportunities to explore how content areas are interrelated. Students acquire knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions regarding their health and well-being throughout their lifetime.

Wellness Physical Education #3303P, Grades 9-12 *Cost: $4.00 for P.E shirt and $4.00 for lock with a $2.00 refund when lock is returned, **1/2 credit The numerous activites in the physical education program include daily warm-ups for each student, followed by individual and team sports. These activities provide carry-over values for leisure time activities. Students are required to dress out in gym clothes purchased through the P.E. dept. The physical education requirement may be met by substituting an equivalent time of physical activity in other areas.

Drivers Education #3321, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite: At least 15 years of age before or during the semester of enrollment Drivers Education includes a minimum of thirty class hours of instruction and six hours of experience behind the wheel. Current problems on the highway are presented along with laws governing highway use. The primary objective is to make the student a safe, responsible, and defensive driver.

Army Junior Officer Training Corps (JROTC) **Note: two credits in JROTC will substitute for one credit of Wellness Health & PE, three credits will substitute for Government and Financial Preparedness. The Army JROTC program curriculum consists of four (4) courses of leadership education training (LET 1-4) offered each year. Successful completion of at least three units of credit (LET 1-4) in the JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college senior ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military services. Students will be required to wear an Army dress uniform once a week. The curriculum is designed to teach students the value of citizenship, leadership, service to the community, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment, while instilling in them self-esteem, teamwork, and self discipline. Additionally, JROTC prepares students for responsible leadership roles while making them aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. The program is a stimulus for promoting graduation from high school, and it provides instruction and rewarding opportunities that will benefit the student, community, and nation.

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

Health & PE

LET 1-Basic Development #3331, Grades 9-12 This first term of JROTC curriculum develops better citizenship, selfreliance, leadership and responsiveness to constituted authority in each student. Additionally, students gain knowledge of basic military skills, an appreciation of the role of the Armed Forces in support of the national objectives, an appreciation of the importance of physical education to the accomplishment of these objectives and lifelong skills of character and discipline.

LET-2 Advanced Leadership Development #3332, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite-JROTC LET 1 The second year of the JROTC program will prepare the student to become a better leader within the cadet battalion. Techniques of communication are highlighted to enhance the student’s ability to convey a message through writing and instructing. Leadership skills training are taught to focus on leadership values and good judgment. Career opportunities are explored through both military and civilian channels.

LET 3- Advanced Leadership Development #3333, *Prerequisite: JROTC LET 2 The third year of JROTC further involves students as leaders. In developing leadership skills, students will learn: 1) to display leadership potential through problem-solving and supervisory situations and 2) to demonstrate the basic management skills and decision making process. As a LET 3 cadet, a student will be required to demonstrate all aspects of close order drill to junior cadets. Cadets receive training in financial preparedness through the National Endowment for Financial Education.

LET 4- Expanded Leadership Development and Mentoring #3334, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: JROTC LET 3 The fourth term of JROTC will primarily emphasize the practical application of the cadet’s leadership duties and responsibilities within Oakland High School and the cadet battalion. The course focuses on creating a positive leadership situation, negotiating, decision-making, problem solving, planning, team development, project management, and mentoring. This course also provides the opportunity to demonstrate leadership potential in an assigned command or staff position within the cadet battalion’s organizational structure.


Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: Students will be placed in a math sequence based on their projected ACT. For planning four programs, students will begin with the recommended math and go in the math sequence for 4 years. **Please note that Algebra II and Geometry may be taken in reverse sequence, depending on the course of study and scheduling needs. ALL OTHER COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN SEQUENCE.

Content Math- #3081M Algebra #3102, Grade 9

Mathematics

Algebra II #3103, Grades 9-12 This course includes the following information: matrices, linear programming, three variable systems, three dimensional graphing, three variable inequalities, permutations, combinations, prediction lines, lines of best fit, normal distribution, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, radicals, complex numbers, translation of functions, quadratic functions, high order functions, rational functions, inverse functions, and trigonometry. Teaching strategies include cooperative learning, handson application. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

This course includes operations of polynomials, applications of exponents including negative and zero, applications of radicals, solving a variety of equations including absolute value, radicals etc., solving, graphing, and applying inequalities, relations, linear functions, absolute value functions, systems of linear functions, permutations, combinations, algebraic rational expressions, and quadratic functions. The teaching strategies include technology, hands-on, cooperative learning, and application. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Algebra II Honors

Algebra I

Advanced Honors Algebra II

#3102C, Grades 10-12

#3103H, Grades 9-12, *Prerequisite: Algebra I This course has the same curriculum as Algebra II, but is taught with more depth and at a faster pace. Some pre-calculus concepts are introduced at this level. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

#3103AH, Grades 9-10, *IB/AP program students only

This course includes operations of polynomials, applications of exponents including negative and zero, applications of radicals, solving a variety of equations including absolute value, radicals etc., solving, graphing, and applying inequalities, relations, linear functions, absolute value functions, systems of linear functions, permutations, combinations, algebraic rational expressions, and quadratic functions. The teaching strategies include technology, hands-on, cooperative learning, and application. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Summer work as stipulated by the high school is required for this course. More depth and a faster pace are expected at this level. Many pre-calculus and trigonometric concepts are investigated. The students are expected to be self-motivated and capable of working independently and in groups. The student can expect to be assigned problems with minimum guidance from the teacher. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Algebra IA- #31023, 9th grade, Semester 2, *1/2 credit

Geometry

Algebra IB- #31024, 10th grade, Semester 1, *1/2 credit

#3108, Grades 10-12 This course includes coordinate geometry, transformations, the concepts of points, lines, planes, angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, logical reasoning, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, polyhedral, circles, spheres, cylinders, and cones. The student is asked to investigate and draw conclusions based on the investigations. Teaching strategies include technology, hands-on, and applications. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Algebra I- Honors #3102H, Grades 9-12 This course has the same curriculum as Algebra I but is taught with more depth and at a faster pace. Some Geometry and Algebra II concepts are introduced at this level. The student is expected to be self-motivated and capable of doing independent as well as group work. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Advanced Honors Algebra I #3102AH, Grades 9, *IB/AP students only This course has the same curriculum as Algebra I Honors, but is taught with more depth and at a faster pace. Some Geometry and Algebra II concepts are introduced at this level. The student is expected to be self-motivated and capable of doing independent as well as group work. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Resource Algebra IB- #31025, Grades 9-12 Resource Algebra IA- #31026, Grades 9-12

Geometry-Honors #3108H, Grades 10-12 This course includes the same concepts taught in geometry but with more depth and at a faster pace. Some Algebra II, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus are included. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Advanced Honors Geometry #3108AH, Grades 9-10, *IB/AP program students only Summer work as stipulated by the high school is required for this course. More depth and faster pace is expected in this class. The student must be self-motivated and capable of independent work or group work. The student can expect to be assigned problems to work with a Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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minimum amount of guidance from the teacher. (Note: The student will take an End-of-Course exam upon completion.)

Resource Geometry IB- #31085, Grades 9-12 ResourceGeometry IA- #31086, Grades 9-12 Algebra & Trigonometry #3124, Grades 10-12, *Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry This course prepares the student to take the ACT and will help the student have a better understanding of Algebra II and Geometry. The topics covered in this course are applications of trigonometry, trigonometric functions, understanding functions, applications of matrices, and sequences and series.

Pre-Calculus Honors #3126H, Grades 11-12 *Prerequisite: Advanced or Honors Algebra I & II The topics in this course are trigonometry, conics, statistics, and understanding of all functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, matrices, and limits. When this course is complete, the student will be able to go into Calculus.

Pre-Calculus Advanced Honors #3126AH, Grades 11-12 *Prerequisite: Advanced Honors Algebra II The topics in this course are trigonometry, conics, statistics, and understanding of all functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, matrices, and limits. When this course is complete, the student will be able to go into Calculus.

Advanced Placement Calculus AB #3127, Grades 11-12 *Prerequisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and Pre-calculus The topics outlines by the College Board are as follows: functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, and integrals. Students have the option of taking the nationwide Advanced Placement Examination administered by the College Board.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC #3128, Grades 11-12 *Prerequisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and Pre-calculus An advanced Calculus course. All of the AB topics will be covered in addition to analysis of planar curves in parametric, polar and vector forms; Numerical solutions to differential equations using Euler’s method; using L’Hopitall’s Rule; Antiderivatives by parts and simple partial fractions; Improper integrals; solving logistic differential equations; and Polynomial Approximations and Taylor series. This course should only be taken with

teacher approval.

Advanced Placement Statistics #3129, *Prerequisite: Algebra II This course acquaints students with the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will frequently work on projects involving the hands-on gathering and analysis of real-world data. Computers and calculators will allow students to focus deeply on the concepts involved in statistics. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Statistics.

Honors Statistics #3136H, *Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry Through the investigation of meaningful problems students will represent, describe, explore, and analyze data; perform statistical experiments including deciding what and how to measure; plan a study; anticipate patterns; produce models; use probability and simulation; confirm models, and explore statistical inference.

IB Math Studies SL #3140, Grades 11 This course is for students with varied mathematics backgrounds and abilities. More specifically, it is designed for the students who do not consider math a strength and those who do not anticipate a need for mathematics in their future studies. Students taking this course need to be already equipped with fundamental skills and a rudimentary knowledge of basic mathematical processes.

IB Mathematics HL3 #3104, Grades 11 & 12 This course is for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in previous mathematical concepts and have good problem solving skills. Students anticipating a need for mathematics in their future studies should take this course. Students with an interest in possibly studying physics, engineering, and technology should take this course as well as students with an interest in mathematics, and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

IB Mathematics HL4 #3106, Grades 11 & 12 This course is for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in previous mathematical concepts and have good problem solving skills. Students anticipating a need for mathematics in their future studies should take this course. Students with an interest in possibly studying physics, engineering, and technology should take this course as well as students with an interest in mathematics, and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

Course Description: Life Skills Program Life Skills classes are for those students with moderate to severe disabilities. Emphasis of this program is placed on functional and vocational skills needed for independent living. Curriculum incorporates functional academic, daily living, personal-social and occupational goals

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

Resource/ Special Education

and objectives. This program includes transition services to prepare students for work and other post-secondary issues.


Psychological Evaluations School psychologists provide evaluations to students to determine initial and continued eligibility for special education services. Schools psychologists attend IEP meetings of eligible students to interpret testing results and to provide educational recommendations.

RISE Social Studies- #9408S General Studies- #9113 Focus on Adulthood- #9499A

Resource English 1- #9111A

Planning for Transition- #9499B

Resource English 2- #9111B

Transition to Career- #9310

Resource English 3- #9111C

Self-Advocacy- #9350

Resource English 4- #9111D

Career Prep 1- #9498A

Business English- #9111E

Career Prep 2- #9498B

Job Skills Math- #9108

Career Prep 3- #9498C

RISE Math- #9408M

Career Prep 4- #9498D

RISE Science- #9408S

Work Study- #9498E

RISE English- #9408E

TRC- #9498TRC

Course Description:

Team Wellness PE/Health

PE Baseball- #3301BB

Weight Training S1 Football- #3302FB, *1/2 credit course

Weight Training Male Athletes- #3302MA

Wellness Male Athletes- #3303MA, Grade 9

Weight Training Female Athletes- #3302FA

Wellness Female Athletes- #3303FA, Grade 9

Weight Training Football Varsity- #3302V

Wellness Football- #3303FB, Grade 9

Weight Training Football JV- #3302JV

Wellness Baseball- #3303BB, Grade 9

Co u r s e De s c ri p t ion: Students will be placed in appropriate levels in science based upon their grade level and their performance in previous science and math classes. Performance on past standardized test scores may also be used. All information used will be made available to parents at their request.

Physical Science #3202, Grade 9-10 Physical science is a course that explores the relationship between matter and energy. Students investigate force and motion, the structure and properties of matter, the interactions of matter, and energy. Students will be expected to experience the content of Physical Science through inquiry learning. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the course.

Physical Science Honors #3202H, Grade 9-10 Honors Physical Science includes the same areas of study as Physical

S c ience Science but is designed for the accelerated student who is able to apply algebraic and problem solving skills. Students will be expected to experience the content of Physical Science through inquiry learning in both classroom and laboratory settings. Group and individual projects, library research, and other college related skills are developed and practiced. Honors Physical Science provides a foundation for advanced studies in chemistry and physics.

Principles of Technology I #3220A, Grade 10-12, *Prerequisite: Biology I and Algebra I Principles of Technology is a course in applied physics that provides instruction in the fundamental principles of mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems by integrating academic concepts with technical laboratory experiences. Students develop confidence in their ability to understand and apply mathematical and scientific concepts through problem solving situations in laboratories that simulate experiences in the field of work. This course satisfies a science credit for students pursuing the college path. Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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Principles of Technology II #3220B, Grade 11-12, *Prerequisite: Principles of Technology I and Algebra I, ** Teacher Recommendation required Principles of Technology II is an advanced course in applied physics and related topics that uses the skills and technology needed to meet the demands of our 21st century society. Students must be able to work with their hands and minds to solve more complex challenges. This course satisfies a science credit for students pursuing the college path.

Biology I #3210, Grade 9-10 This course provides the student with an understanding of the diversity and unity of living things by studying cell structure and function, photosynthesis, genetics, plant physiology, classification of organisms, microbiology, body systems of invertebrates and vertebrates, and ecological relationships. The students will have an opportunity to develop a curiosity for science through laboratory work.

Biology I Honors

class is utilized as the internal assessment grade for Biology HL. Finally, all biology students will be required to complete the Group 4 project in which students integrate their personal research with other scientific disciplines offered at the school.

Chemistry #3221, Grades 10-11, *Prerequisite: Algebra I & Biology I Chemistry I is a laboratory science course in which students study the composition of matter and the physical and chemical changes it undergoes and the environment in which these changes take place. In this course, students will use science process skills to investigate the fundamental structure of atoms, the way they combine to form compounds, and the interactions between matter and energy. Students will explore chemistry concepts through an inquiry approach as it relates to the interaction between chemistry, the environment, and everyday life.

Chemistry I Advanced Honors #3221AH, *Prerequisite: Honors Physical Science or Biology I and Algebra I, **IB/AP only

This course will cover the same topics in more detail as the regular biology course.

Advanced Honors Chemistry includes the same areas of study and expectations as Honors Chemistry I. This course is designed for those students who intend to graduate with at least four (4) credits in science. Students will be exposed to greater challenges and depth study than Honors Chemistry I.

Advanced Honors Biology I

Chemistry I Honors

#3210H, Grade 9-10

#3210AH, Grades 9-10, *IB/AP only This course will cover the same topics in more detail as the regular biology course with an emphasis on IB teaching strategies.

Resource Biology A - #32105 Resource Biology B - #32106 Advanced Placement Biology II #3217, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: General Biology and Chemistry This is a full year course of study covering biological systems in more detail than General Biology. Extensive work will take place in the laboratory. Topics that may be explored include the cell’s organization, function, and reproduction, energy transformation, human anatomy, and organisms’ evolutionary and adaptive processes. An outside research project will be required. These concepts are typically studied at the college level but are available to students willing to prepare to take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring. This course is designed for the serious student who is willing to devote extra hours to complete the work. Careful consideration should be made before reserving a seat in this class.

IB Biology HL3 & 4 #3218, Grades 11 & 12 This course is intended to prepare students, through two years of coursework, for the IB Examination of a Higher Level Biology course in the 12th grade. Through this course the students will develop a fundamental knowledge of a limited body of facts. However, the students will gain a broad understanding of the principles of Biology and their applications throughout the world. The students are also expected to conduct a minimum of 45 hours of laboratory research. This component of the

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

#3221H, Grades 10-11, *Prerequisite: Algebra I & BiologyI Honors Chemistry is a more advanced study of chemistry. The student will be involved in independent research, projects, and competitions. Students are expected to apply information, calculations, and higherlevel thinking skills to demonstrate a more in-depth understanding of chemistry.

Advanced Placement Chemistry II #3225, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Chemistry This is an advanced study course covering the compositions, properties and reactions of substances; behaviors of solids, liquids and gases; acid/ base and oxidation/reduction reactions; atomic structure; chemical formulas and equations. Additional topics may include nuclear reactions, classes of organic compounds, organic reactions and biochemistry. This curriculum requires extensive laboratory work as well as an outside research project. Students in this course will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring. This course is designed for the serious student who is willing to devote extra hours to complete the work.

IB Chemistry III SL #3223, Grades 11-12, *IB students only. Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigation skills. It is called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment.

Physics Honors


#3231H, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisites: Algebra II or Geometry Physics is the study of the relationship between matter and energy and how they interact. Using the inquiry method, students will investigate mechanics, thermodynamics, waves and sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students will operate as individuals and group members in a technology and laboratory rich environment.

Advanced Placement Physics #3231AP, *Prerequisite: Advanced Honors Chemistry and Pre-Calculus This course follows the curriculum specified by the College Board. It is a college level survey course for high-achieving and self-motivated students. Students will take the Advanced Placement Examination administered by the College Board.

Anatomy and Physiology- Honors #3251, *Prerequisite: Biology I and Honors Chemistry I Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the body’s structures and respective functions at the molecular/biochemical, cellular, tissue, organ, systemic, and organism levels. Through laboratory investigations, students will study anatomical orientation, support and movement, integration and regulation, transportation, absorption and excretion, and reproduction, growth and development. The study of anatomy and physiology prepares students for a variety of pursuits such as health care, sports, and fitness careers, as well as taking an active part in their

own health and wellness.

Ecology- Honors Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Biology I, Chemistry I or Physics Honors Ecology is an advanced course that enables students to develop an understanding of the natural environment and the environmental problems the world faces. Using group laboratory and field experiences, students will investigate the following: fundamental ecological principles, human population dynamics, natural resources, energy sources and their use, human interaction with the environment, and personal and civic responsibility. Particular emphasis will be placed on local environments. Students will develop an environmental awareness as a basis for making ethical decisions and career choices.

Environmental Science #3260, Grades 11-12 This course will provide information about the need for interdependence of all organisms, conservation of natural resourses, population growth studies, studies in behavior and adaptation, an unpolluted environment, and energy conservation. Emphasis will be placed on the awareness of, concern for, and action on problems in the environment.

Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: World History #3401, Grades 9-12 The purpose of this course is to study ancient, medieval, and modern cultures of the world, both East and West, and come to a better understanding of how past social, political, and economic events have influenced the world in which we live. Lecture, cooperative learning, authentic learning, class presentations, and individual and group projects will be included. Students will develop writing, note taking, and organization skills, as well as social skills.

World History Honors #3401H, Grades 9-12 This expanded course will broaden perspectives of students as they study ancient, medieval, and modern cultures of the world. Current events will be spotlighted as to the linkage and origin these events have with the past. Presentation, debates, simulations, projects, and additional reading are all part of this course, in addition to developing writing and reading skills and a desire to learn more about the world around them.

Advanced Placement World History #3449, Grades 9-10 This course is designed for the accelerated student who wishes to place greater emphasis upon historical analysis, writing, research, and documentary study. Students have the option of taking the nationwide Advanced Placement Examination administered by the College Board.

Social Studies

U.S. History #3405, Grade 11 Students are expected to be strong readers and writers and be intrinsically motivated. Curriculum will focus on the period from the Civil War to 1995, in line with the Tennessee state curriculum.

Advanced Placement U.S. History #3440, Grade 11 This course provides an opportunity for high school students to take a college-level course in high school. Students will prepare to take the Advanced Placement exam in U.S. History for possible college credit. Students must be prepared for an intensive and comprehensive college-level course and should have advanced analytical, writing, and verbal skills. Students are expected to read extensively from historical monographs and journals, follow independent study programs, and pass comprehensive exams. All students will take a comprehensive exam at mid-term and at the end of each term. Careful consideration should be given before reserving a seat in the course. Students must be willing to devote extra time to completing required course work.

U.S. History Honors #3404H, Grade 11 This course attempts to split the difference between an AP and regular level U.S. History course. Students are expected to be strong readers and writers and be intrinsically motivated. Curriculum will focus on the period from the Civil War to 1995, in line with the Tennessee state curOakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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riculum. Students will also be required to complete a research project on an historical topic of their choice as part of the course requirements.

U.S. History Dual Enrollment #3440D, Grade 11-12, *Early Day course

U.S. Government #3407, Grade 10-11(1/2 credit), *Honors credit section available This course spans two basic areas. The first and the longest period is the federal government. Students learn the important events leading to the writing of the Constitution and then spend two weeks studying the Constitution. Important freedoms in the Bill of Rights and Supreme Court cases defining those freedoms as well as a survey of Congress and the Legislative, Judicial, and Executive Branches concludes the federal government study. The last area of study covers state and local government with special emphasis on Tennessee and Rutherford County.

World Geography #3410, Grades 9-12 World Geography is taught with the format of five basic themes with each being used to study geography and the role it plays in our lives. The themes are as follows: location, place, human/environment interaction, movement, and region. The focus of the course is two-fold: physical geography and cultural geography. The student will study the earth and the ways of people live and work on it; the way places on earth differ and how people organize themselves and use the earth’s resources; the location of place and the relationships between people and their environment.

World Geography Honors #3410H, Grades 9-12 This course is designed for the accelerated student who wishes to place greater emphasis upon investigated research, writing, and documentary study of world geography.

Economics #3431, Grade 12 (1/2 credit), *Honors credit section available Macroeconomic and microeconomics concepts will be addressed. Students will participate in the exploration of news articles, Internet, and other written materials to achieve the aims of this course. The aims of the course are to gain understanding of fundamental economic concepts and their application to a variety of economic systems; to gain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to function efficiently in a technologically expanding global economy; and to understand the roles individuals, businesses, and government agencies play in the economic world. Topics such as inflation, economic growth/recession and their corresponding relationship to the economy will be included.

Psychology #3433, Grade 10 (1/2 credit) This elective course is studied to enable the student to have a better understanding of human behavior and personality. The textbook will serve as a guide with videos, research projects, and surveys to give the students more information. The students will be expected to participate in cooperative learning activities, class discussions, and

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

other class assignments.

Psychology Honors #3433H, Grades 11-12 Students will study the development of the individual personality. The six social studies standards of culture, economics, geography, government, history, and group dynamics will be integrated into the study of the science of human behavior. This course is designed for the accelerated student and gives students an opportunity to explore human behavior more in-depth. Students utilize skills of critical thinking, communication, identification, description, application analysis, comparison and contrast, and evaluation.

IB Psychology SL 3&4 #3434, Grades 11-12 *IB Students only; coordinator approval necessary

IB Psychology HL 3&4 #3436, Grades 11-12 *IB Students only; coordinator approval necessary

IB History of the Americs HL 3&4 #3406/3409, Grades 11 & 12 * IB Students only; coordinator approval necessary IB History of the Americas (HOTA) is the first year of the IB History HL two-year course. The focus is United States history, but we will also study developments in Canada, the Caribbean, South America, and parts of Latin America. The first year we will study six topics related to the Americas (Movements of Independence, The Mexican Revolution, The Emergence of America in Global Affairs, the Great Depression in the Americas, United States foreign policy 1945 to 1995, and the Civil Rights Movement). Students study each of these topics in depth through lecture, discussions, research, and thorough analysis of a variety of primary and secondary sources. Students should expect to take one test, compose one scholarly essay, and take 5 quizzes per six-week marking period in addition to regular homework assignments.

IB 20 th Century History HL #3413, Grades 12 * IB Students only; coordinator approval necessary IB 20th Century History is the second year of Higher Level. It is like no other history course taught in high school. Like an Advanced Placement course, it is very demanding as far as content is concerned and requires higher level thinking skills, but those are practically the only similarities. The main difference between IB and AP history is that AP tries to cover a broad range of material and IB concentrates on depth of study. Instead of being a survey of 20th century history, we study four topics and then several subtopics. The topics are: rise and rule of single party states, the Cold War, 1945-1995 and peace and cooperation: international organizations and multiparty states. In addition to these broader topics, we zero in on the prescribed subject Cold War, 1960-1979 for document-based study. The entire second semester is devoted to an in-depth study of various aspects of the Cold War. Most of the class consists of reading and discussing historical documents and excerpts from books. All tests are essays. Students also complete an historical investigation that is 20% of their IB final assessment.


Co u r s e D e s c r i ption: ACT PREP #3097, Grades 11-12, *Prerequisite: Algebra I and/or II, Geometry, English I & II, Life Science, Earth Science, and/or Biology I. **1/2 credit course Students will complete activities that pertain to preparation, review and progression of mathematics, English, and science as they apply to the material covered on the ACT.

National Merit Prep #3097N, Grades 11-12, *1/2 credit course

Service Learning #9395, Grades 12, *periods 6 & 7

Early Day

Special Courses

Teacher Aide #9305, Grades 12, *Teacher approval necessary

Library Aide #9301, Grades 12, *Librarian approval necessary

Main Office Aide #9201, Grades 12, *Administrative approval necessary

Annex Office Aide #9210, Grades 12, *Administrative approval necessary

Guidance Aide #9303, Grades 12, *Guidance approval necessary

#9310E, Grades 12, *periods 6 & 7

Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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International Baccalaureate Diploma/Certificate Program Founded in 1968 the International Baccalaureate Program works with 1,903 schools in 124 countries worldwide serving students aged three to nineteen. The diploma program is offered at 520 public and private high schools in the United States. Six high schools in Tennessee are authorized to offer the diploma program. An IB diploma leads to a qualification widely recognized by universities around the world for the high standards it represents. The diploma program encourages students to ask challenging questions, think critically, develop a strong sense of one’s identity and culture, and develop an ability to communicate with and understand others from different cultures and backgrounds. It includes a broad and balanced curriculum for students enrolled, and the program emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to learning with the student as an active participant. Students who choose to enroll in the diploma program study languages, a social science, an experimental science, mathematics, and an elective (most likely in a fine arts subject). Wherever possible, subjects are approached from an international perspective. Students who enroll and who satisfy the rigorous demands of the diploma program demonstrate a strong commitment to learning. They develop mastery of subject area content and mastery of skills and discipline necessary for post secondary success. The goal of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program is to produce critical thinkers with a well-rounded global perspective on learning.

What are the advantages of an International Baccalaureate Diploma / Certificate Program? - Participating in active learning that involves critical thinking, independent research and verbal communication - Having a program that emphasizes the “whole” student - Participating in interdisciplinary group and individual projects - Gaining an international perspective on education - Requiring student involvement in extracurricular activities, for both school and community (diploma program only) - Provides alternative forms for assessment allowing students opportunity to show what they have learned - Includes emphasis on academic integrity and honesty - Earning possible admission and scholarship opportunities at prestigious universities - Earning college credit at many universities

What are the qualities of a successful IB student?

What is included in the IB curriculum?

Students who are successful in the IB program often have the following qualities: - Self-motivated - Inquiring mind - Organized - Academic integrity - Participates in school and community activities - Good time management skills - Good attendance record **It is also beneficial to have a passion for learning, curiosity, and strong writing skills.

Students who enroll in the IB diploma program must complete and test in six areas: 1) Language A

For more information contact the program coordinator, Todd Williamson at 904-3780 ext.23936 or williamsont@rcschools.net

Oakland High students who enroll in the IB diploma program are able to meet requirements set by the local school board, the state, and the International Baccalaureate diploma program.

2) Language B

3) Individuals and Society

4) Experimental Sciences

5) Mathematics

6) Arts or Electives

Three unique components make up the remaining portion of an IB diploma: 1) Theory of Knowledge- a critical thinking course designed to teach students how they learn across all subject areas 2) A 4,000 word extended essay researched, documented, and written on a topic of choice 3) Creativity, Action, and Service (CAS) - 150 blended hours of school activities and community service over a period of the junior and senior year. The diploma program requires that students meet defined standards and conditions to be awarded a diploma, including earning a minimum of 24 points on IB exams.

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Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide


2010 – 2011 Test Dates ACT www.act.org Sept. 11, 2010 Oct. 23, 2010 Dec. 11, 2010 Feb.12, 2011 Marc h 9, 2011 ( 11 t h gra d e o n l y ) Apr il 9, 2011 Jun. 11, 2011 *All r egis tration deadlines TBA

PL A N 10t h gra d e

Oct ober 26-28, 2010

SAT (t ent at i ve )

Oct ober 9, 2010 N ovember 6, 2010 December 4, 2010 Januar y 22, 2011 Marc h 12, 2011 May 7, 2011 June 4, 2011

PSAT/NMSQT Oct ober 13, 2010

AP www.collegeboard.com AP exams t ake place over a twoweek time span in t he mont h of May eac h sc hool year. * Re s u l t s a r e p o s t e d i n J u l y

End of Cour se Testing tba 2011

TC AP Wr iting Assessment 11t h gra d e

Febr uar y 3-4, 2011

We encourage you to take advantage of the many programs we have available for you at OHS. Our curricular offerings are varied; there are many clubs, organizations, and athletic teams that you may join. Your involvement and dedication will determine what you gain during your tenure here. Get involved… make a difference! Clubs organizations and sports teams are listed below:

Clubs & Organizations BPA Band Be t a Cheer leading Sq uad Chess Chor us Cultur al Awareness Dance DEC A FC A Frenc h Fu ture Teac her s of Amer ica Habit at for Humanity Int er act JOB JROTC Key Club Leo Model UN Club Mu Alpha The t a Renaissance Science Club Spanish Honor Socie ty SPEAK Student Congress Tennessee Tomor row Theatre Young Democr ats Young Republicans Quill & Scroll FBL A FCCL A FFA HOSA SKILL S USA -VIC A: Aut omotive Car pentr y Gr aphic Communications

Sports Teams: Football Golf (B&G) Soccer (B&G) Cross Countr y (B&G) Volleyball (G) Baske tball (B&G) Wres tling (B&G) Baseball Tr ac k (B&G) Tennis (B&G) Sof tball (G) Swimming (B&G) Rugby (B&G)

Rutherford County School Calendar 2010 - 2011 8/4/10 First Day for Students, Abbrevi ated (2 hours) 8/5-6/10 No School for Students 8/9/10 First Full Day for Students 9/6/10 Labor Day (Schools Closed) 9/15/10 Early Dismissal Day for Students (3 hours, 15 minutes) 10/4–8/10 Fall Break (Schools Closed) 10/19/10 Early Dismissal Day for Students (3 hours, 15 minutes) 10/21/10 Parent Teacher Conferences 11/16/10 Early Dismissal Day for Students (3 hours, 15 minutes) 11/24–26/10 Thanksgiving Break (Schools Closed) 12/17/10 Abbreviated Day (2 hours) 12/20/10–1/4/11 Winter Break (Schools Closed) 1/05/11 Students Return from Winter Break 1/7/11 MLK Holiday (Schools Closed) 2/21/11 Presidents’ Day (Schools Closed) 2/16/11 Early Dismissal Day for Students (3 hours, 15 minutes) 3/10/11 Parent Teacher Conferences 3/20–3/25/11 Spring Break (Schools Closed) 3/28/11 Return from Spring Break 4/22/11 Good Friday (Schools Closed) 5/26/11 Work Day (No School for Students) 5/27/11 Last Day of School, Abbreviated Day (2 hours)

Oakland High School • Curriculum Guide

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2009 - 2010

Oakland High School Course Offerings  

2010 Course Book

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