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TEEN ART PARK

EXECUTIVE REPORT & DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS


Designmatters would like to thank the Surdna and Ayrshire Foundations, whose generosity and commitment made this project possible.


table of contents 1.

Project Team, Partners and Acknowledgements

08

5.

Design Proposals

36

2.

Executive Summary

12

6.

Scenarios for Implementation

56

3.

Contextual Research

16

7.

Recommendations

64

3.1 Geographic Boundaries

8.

Appendices

66

3.2 Methodology

A. Structural Drawings: FreeSol

3.3 Limitations

B. Structural Drawings: ChairMock

3.4 County, City and Local Indicators

C. Structural Drawings: Hub

3.5 High School Indicators

9.

References

3.6 Unemployment

4.

Research Process and Design

26

136


Project team, Partners & Acknowledgements 6

7


Teen Art Park: Executive Report & Design Recommendations was prepared by the Designmatters Department at Art Center College of Design.

PROJECT INITIATOR // DESIGNMATTERS, ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN

Mariana Amatullo, Vice President Elisa Ruffino, Director

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

David Mocarski, Department Chair

PROJECT LEADS // DESIGN

James Meraz, Professor

RESEARCH

Savitri Lopez Negrete, Consultant

DESIGN TEAM // FREESOL

Anycia Lee

CHAIRMOCK

Adam Patrick Easter Cottingham

HUB

Seth Baker

COMMUNITY LEADS // THE ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Scott Ward, Executive Director

FLINTRIDGE CENTER

Brian Biery, Director

COMMUNITY ADVISORS //

Learning Works Charter School ArtWORKS DayOne Room 13 at Muir High School La Pintoresca Teen Education Center Mustangs on the Move ONYX Architects Western Justice Center

SPECIAL THANKS // 8

Brian Biery Scott Ward Elisa Laris

Designmatters http://www.designmattersatartcenter.org As Art Center’s social impact department, Designmatters is where local, national and global issues are encountered head-on. Participants are in the world, with the world. An engaged mode of art and design education that forms creative leaders, Designmatters provides the know-how and aspiration to shape the futures we truly desire for a more sustainable and equitable world. Through research, advocacy and action, Designmatters engages, empowers and leads an ongoing exploration of art and design as a positive force in society. Flintridge Center http://www.flintridge.org For decades, the communities of Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena have struggled with lack of economic opportunity, declining public education and youth/gang violence. We address poverty and violence in two key ways. First, with prevention programs—mentoring and afterschool programs that serve more than 1,000 youth every year who are severely at-risk for dropping out of school or joining gangs. Second,through intervention programs—reentry services, apprenticeship preparation training and individualized support. We steer individuals away from crime, violence and incarceration by reducing barriers to employment and developing skills for self-sufficiency. Armory Center for the Arts http://www.armoryarts.org The Armory’s mission is to build on the power of art to transform lives and communities through creating, teaching and presenting the arts. In Pasadena and Altadena, the Armory partners with the City of Pasadena and many community groups to offer free after-school art classes in parks, libraries and community-based organizations located in Northwest neighborhoods. Learning Works Charter School (LWCS) http://www.publicworksinc.org/lw The mission of the Learning Works Charter School (LW) is to provide a personalized, rigorous academic program and relevant life skills to traditionally underserved, at-risk students in grades 9-12 who have withdrawn or are in danger of withdrawing from mainstream education without attaining a high school diploma. LW addresses the needs in our community by offering a program to give these disengaged students an educational choice designed to meet their specific needs, distinct from the traditional programs that have not served them well. CONTACT INFORMATION For further information on Teen Art Park please contact: Helen Cahng, Art Center College of Design, Designmatters Department 1700 Lida St., Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2310 helen.cahng@artcenter.edu Brian Biery, Flintridge Center, 236West Mountain St., Suite 106, Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 449-0117 Brian@flintridge.org Scott Ward, The Armory Center for the Arts, 125 North Raymond Ave., Pasadena, CA 911003 (626) 792-5114 sward@armoryarts.org

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Executive Summary 10

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executive summary Today, there is widespread understanding among policymakers, community leaders, designers and educators that creating public spaces that build flourishing, inclusive communities and promote a sense of belonging, local identity and social networks is a difficult undertaking. Imagining such spaces that target a teen demographic not usually served by any planning or creative process becomes even more of a challenge. Polarization between rich and poor, high unemployment and participation in gangrelated activities are some of the issues that categorize this age group specifically in Pasadena and its unincorporated neighbor, Altadena. In spite of these negative statistics, direct engagement with local at-risk teens in these areas, revealed that they have both the aspiration and drive to develop their talents and channel their energy into positive, constructive pursuits if given the platform and opportunity for such endeavors. The Teen Art Park Project is the result of a cooperation between project initiator Designmatters, a department within Art Center College of Design, and 29 community partners including Flintridge Center, Armory Center for the Arts and Learning Works Charter School. Across two academic terms, student design teams collaborated with the underserved teens and community stakeholders to develop unique platforms that encapsulated the teens’ aspirations by offering flexible “spaces” as outlets for individual and collective creative expression. This report, in turn, validates the need for these design interventions as they propose an alternative to potentially destructive behaviors through the canvas, the wall or the loudspeaker. The document begins by highlighting and analyzing relevant demographic information to establish the context underpinning the projects. This is followed by demonstrating design insights and

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“This report...validates the need for these design interventions as they propose an alternative to potentially destructive behaviors through the canvas, the wall or the loudspeaker.” guidelines developed from direct participation with at-risk youth. Three finalized designs: FreeSol Graffiti Lounge, ChairMock and Hub, are described and visualized and, finally, an economic and social argument is created for the implementation of Teen Art Park as a lasting asset for youth and community at large. The project has been generously funded by the Surdna and Ayrshire Foundations, institutions dedicated to fostering sustainable communities through principles of social equity and healthy environments. For further information on the Teen Art Park Project please visit: http://www.designmattersatartcenter.org/proj/teen-art-park-aplace-for-artistic-expression-2/

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Contextual Research 14

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contextual research This section describes the contextual research on which the Teen Art Project is based. Data is surfacing from the collation and subsequent analysis of information from the U.S. Census, Department of Education, local organizations and field research vis-ĂĄ-vis the vulnerability of teens in specific locations within Pasadena and Altadena.

METHODOLOGY The demographic research was approached in a multifaceted style, analyzing data on various scales from county-wide to census tract and using a range of indicators such as race and age to reveal an accurate representation of the communities in Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena. A number of sources were used, including the U.S. Census and the Department of Education. In order to gauge the accuracy of these sources, our project partners, Flintridge Center and Armory Center for the Arts, were consulted and contributed a great deal of local knowledge. Selected indicators were strategically chosen and graphically represented to provide a snapshot of the current social and economic environment for the local community and particularly teens, consequentially exposing their needs.

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GEOGRAPHIC BOUNDARIES The map to the right shows the citywide boundaries of Pasadena and Altadena on its northern edge. Altadena is an unincorporated area of Los Angeles county, and for the purposes of this report only its populated areas are shown, as its boundaries extend farther north into the San Gabriel Mountains. Residents of Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena have struggled with lack of economic opportunity, declining public education and youth/gang violence (Pasadena Star News, 2013; Pasadena Public Health Department, 2013; The Armory for the Arts, 2013), thus, the focus of this demographic research. In addition, Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena has 67 percent of all high school enrollment, making youth an important focus and priority in this community. The area’s boundaries are North Arroyo Boulevard to its west, Lake Avenue to its east, the 210 freeway to the south and the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains to the north.

Figure 1 Boundary map of Pasadena, Altadena and Northwest Pasadena/West Altadena. Map adapted from: City of Pasadena, 2012; Thomas Guide, 2008; U.S. Census Bureau, 2000.

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Pasadena Altadena Northwest Pasadena/ West Altadena

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“...a higher percentage of population under 19 years... producing a significant need for youth services.� LIMITATIONS The U.S. Census American Community Survey was used to show the most current data for Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena. This has obvious advantages yet also limitations, particularly that this data is taken from a sample size of the population rather than the entirety, increasing its margin of error. Another limitation is data that is represented as an average since economic characteristics of Pasadena and Altadena are such that areas of affluence are in close proximity to areas of deprivation, thus skewing the reality of these geographies. COUNTY, CITY AND LOCAL INDICATORS Demographic indicators were compared on three scales: Los Angeles County, greater Pasadena and Altadena and the underserved areas within Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena. By comparing statistics on these three scales it is evident that in most cases NW Pasadena and W Altadena have higher levels of poverty and lower levels of education than both the county and city. It is also interesting to note that this area has a higher percentage of population under 19 years than both the county and citywide, producing a significant need for youth services.

LOS ANGELES LOS LOS COUNTY ANGELES 9,818,605 residents ANGELES COUNTY 9,818,605 residents COUNTY

Population under 18 years Persons 25 and over Population under 18 with yearsno high school diploma

8%

Persons 25 and over with no high school diploma All persons living(16 under income level Unemployment yearspoverty and over)

8%

Unemployment (16 years and over) All persons living under poverty income level All persons living under poverty income level

PASADENA ALTADENA PASADENA 180,878 residents PASADENA ALTADENA 180,878 residents ALTADENA

Population under 18 years

24% 24%

81,979 residents

24%

16%

8%

16% 16%

20%

Persons 25 and over Population under 18 with yearsno high school diploma

17% 20%

Population under 18 years Unemployment (16 years andhigh over) Persons 25 and over with no school diploma

10%

Persons 25 and over with no high school diploma Unemployment yearspoverty and over) All persons living(16 under income level

10% 13%

Unemployment (16 years and over) All persons living under poverty income level

10%

17%

20%

17%

13% 13%

All persons living under poverty income level

NW PASADENA W ALTADENA NW PASADENA 81,979 residents NW PASADENA W ALTADENA 81,979 residents W ALTADENA

28%*

Population under 19 years*

28%* 27%

Population under 19 with years* Persons 25 and over no high school diploma Population under 19 years* Unemployment (16 years andhigh over) Persons 25 and over with no school diploma

9%

Persons 25 and over with no high school diploma All persons living(16 under income level Unemployment yearspoverty and over)

9%

Unemployment (16 years and over) All persons living under poverty income level

9%

All persons living under poverty income level

18

24%

Population under 18 years Persons 25 and over with no school diploma Unemployment (16 years andhigh over)

9,818,605 residents

180,878 residents

Figure 2 Demographic comparisons between Los Angeles County, City of Pasadena and Altadena and Northwest Pasadena/West Altadena. Source: U.S. Census, 2011; U.S. Census, 2010; U.S. Census, 2008-2010; U.S. Census, 2005-2009 Maps adapted from: City of Pasadena, 2012; LA County GIS Data Portal, 2012.; Thomas Guide, 2008; U.S. 24% Census Bureau, 2000.

28%* 27% 18%

27%

18% 18%

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HIGH SCHOOL INDICATORS The high school indicators are particularly important since they apply directly to the project’s target user. Students from John Muir High School, Rose City High School and Learning Works Charter School had the most involvement in the process and development of Teen Art Park alongside Art Center students. These are also three of the most underserved schools in the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD), all residing within the Northwest Pasadena area. They all have very poor indicators where more than threequarters of students are socioeconomically disadvantaged, up to 98 percent participate in Free or Reduced-price lunch, confirming high levels of poverty in these communities and an extremely disproportionate racial makeup of predominantly Hispanic and Black students. The dropout rate reaches as high as 28 percent among these three schools, much higher than the district-wide average of 6 percent and county average of 5 percent. According to the Quality of Life Index in 2011, “55% of students in the Pasadena Unified School District live in households that are below the federal poverty guideline thresholds” (City of Pasadena Public Health Department, 2011), resulting in subtantial need for resources among this population.

“...three of the most underserved schools in the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD), all residing within the Northwest Pasadena area.”

Challenge

Vulnerability to high school dropouts

Opportunity

Create platforms to keep teens interested and engaged

Rose City High

Learning Works

737 students

77 students

326 students

Racial makeup

Racial makeup

Racial makeup

82%

Figure 3 High School student indicators. Source: Department of Education, 2012; Learning Works, 2013. Hispanic or Latino Black or African American White Two or more races Filipino Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Asian

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John Muir HS

70%

98%

Students participate in Free or Reduced-Price Lunch

Students participate in Free or Reduced-Price Lunch

Students participate in Free or Reduced-Price Lunch

86%

75%

94%

Students are socioeconomically disadvantaged

Students are socioeconomically disadvantaged

Students are socioeconomically disadvantaged

16% 39%

13% 51%

28% 31%

Students dropout of school

Students dropout of school

Students dropout of school

Students are English Learners

Students are English Learners

Students are English Learners

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Challenge

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High unemployment among youth and specific ethnicities

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Develop youth skills, socially and in the craft of their choice

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Figure 4 Maps showing NW Pasadena/ W. Altadena’s unemployment average and unemployment by age through data from 13 census tracts. Source: U.S. Census, 2005-2009 Maps adapted from: City of Pasadena, 2012; Thomas Guide, 2008; U.S. Census Bureau, 2000.

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UNEMPLOYMENT The maps to the left divide NW Pasadena and West Altadena into census tracts in order to gain a more precise understanding of unemployment in the area rather than as a whole. The top left map shows the unemployment average based on the total workforce population in the area by census tract ranging from 2 percent to 12 percent. These rates are not drastically different than the countywide unemployment at 8 percent. However, the map on the bottom right shows a very different reality compared to the unemployment rate for 16 to 24 year olds. Unemployment for 16 to 24 years olds has a much wider spectrum and reaches as high at 42 percent in some census tracts. Similarly, the graph below evaluates unemployment through the lens of race, comparing rates among whites, African Americans and Hispanics. The graph shows the high level of disparity, with African American rates doubling the rates of unemployment of whites.

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Unemployment average

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Unemployment by Race in NW Pasadena/ W Altadena

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Black or African American

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50%

Figure 5 Graph depicting unemployment by race in NW Pasadena/ W Altadena. Source: U.S. Census, 2005-2009.

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Census tracts in NW Pasadena/ W Altadena

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Unemployment by age 16-24

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Research Process & Design 24

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research process & design

“We like art and tagging because we want to be seen and heard.� Direct engagement and participatory methods were used with local youth during the two-term course to inform the design process for the Teen Art Park. These critical points of engagement included workshops and dialogue with youth, teens and community leadership from Learning works, Flintridge, and La Pintoresca Teen center. Field trips to relevant locations and experiences such as Writerz Blok in San Diego, focus group research and arts nights, where both youth and local stakeholders could comment on the designs as they developed as well as test full-scale design prototypes. The interaction between the Art Center design students and the local teens was the most crucial component of the design process, revealing the youth’s aspirations, passions, challenges and drivers. The following images illustrate these moments of participation as well as the feedback teens expressed during the design process.

Figure 6 Engagement and participation of local youth in Teen Art Park.

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ARTNIGHT, OCTOBER 2011 Two terms of research and design development culminated in an Art Night event that provided the opportunity for teens to test out full-scale prototypes of the pieces that their feedback had informed. These pieces included Freesol Graffiti Lounge, ChairMock and HUB. The response from the teens was overwhelmingly positive and they expressed reactions of inspiration, motivation and pride. The following pages show the ways in which the youth interacted and used the design pieces as well as their reactions during individual interviews.

Figure 7 Local youth testing out Teen Art Park prototypes during ArtNight in October 2011.

“The response from the teens was overwhelmingly positive and they expressed reactions of inspiration, motivation and pride.�

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Figure 8 The diagram shows the extremes in which teens live and the balance that Teen Art Park seeks among these influences.

F R E

Networking and skill development

ION

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ADULT

Positive and safe environment Opportunities for social and private space

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A place for self-expression “seen and heard�

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CHILD

DESIGN GUIDELINES The guidelines below outline the features that the design pieces aim to address in the Teen Art Park. The need for these elements to be present at Teen Art Park are derived through a combination of demographic indicators, the interests and desires expressed by youth participants as well as discernment by the designers of each piece.

SE

DE N O PE I S I ND V R EN E P CE U S

FEEDBACK ANALYSIS Building on the youth responses throughout the research and design process, it is evident that teens would like to assert themselves in the world but are often limited by their age and circumstances. For example, they have a desire to be seen and heard but also a responsibility to use their energies in a positive and safe manner. Seeking this balance is not only an essential part of these formative years, it is also a fundamental concept for the design of the Teen Art Park. The diagram below shows the extremes in which teens live; they are neither children nor adults, they want their freedom but are still dependent, and they have the innate desire to express themselves in creative ways but also need safety and supervision. Teen Art Park aims to create a balanced environment among these influences, catering to teen interests and catalyzing positive self-expression in social and artistic ways.

*

Accessible and appealing to a diversity of youth TEEN ART PARK 31


underlying design criteria: youth participation & aspirations A place for self-expression “seen and heard”

Motivates me to keep up my own style and develop my graphic skills.

Positive and safe environment

Makes me feel inspired and creative. We like art and tagging because we want to be seen and heard.

Art materials are expensive, we don’t have the money for it but it’s what we want to do most.

It makes me feel at peace and connected to the world. We want a place of our own, just for teens, but also a safe environment.

Opportunities for social and private space

Networking and skill development

Accessible and appealing 32 to a diversity of youth

The first thing that comes to my mind is that I wanna make art!

These pieces make me feel like drawing.

I want to build on my skills so one day I can go to art school and have a successful career.

They are inspirational and they make me want to draw more. I like the colors and different styles.

I feel entertained and curious because the pieces are so different.

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Design Proposals 34

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freesol graffiti lounge DESIGNED BY ANYCIA LEE

“Multifunctional lounge that accommodates making, viewing performing and communicating.” Freesol Graffiti Lounge is a transformative structure for creative self-expression that includes a lounge area, a performing stage and detachable painting boards for graffiti and art making. The lounge strives for an innovative approach to design both socially and environmentally, as it is built on an understanding of the implicit needs of the community, particularly at-risk youth. Developed on four principles, the lounge accommodates making, viewing, performing and communicating all within the limits of space. In the making area, the teens will get a chance to exhibit their creative ability. The inner space is customizable so that the users may adjust the number of painting boards they wish to have. On the performing stage, teens will be able to give inventive yet professional performances. The art they create will be the backdrop while they perform, making the lounge all the more unique and personal to the teens’ culture. As a consequence of viewing the creative works displayed and performed, the teens become role models for the younger siblings and the community can positively and naturally encourage the teens’ talents. FreeSol Graffiti Lounge is not just a transformable structure for creative self-expression, but a place where teens can thrive by being recognized for their work within their own community.

Figure 9 Tagging Teens tagging panels on Freesol Graffiti Lounge that can be removed and displayed as artwork.

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at a glance FOOTPRINT 11 ft. x 16 ft. x 5 ft. BUDGET RANGE $1000-$1500 (based on additional elements) BUILDING MATERIALS LIST Steel and wood panels BUILDING NEEDS Manpower, 5 to 7 people for construction; 2 people once built PORTABILITY Optional wheels and can be taken apart to move.

Figure 10 Performance space Teens using platform as a performance space to creatively express themselves and provide entertainment for other community members.

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Figure 11 Basketball Freesol Grafitti Lounge includes a basketball hoop for teens who have an interest in sports and to increase outdoor physical activities for youth in the area.

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chair mock DESIGNED BY ADAM PATRICK EASTER COTTINGHAM

“...durable, mobile and flexible oversized communal seating that is easy to install and dismantle.” The ChairMock concept was born out of the oversize lounge chairs built for the first and second term of the Teen Art Park project. The final design builds on the feedback garnered from the teens and the other stakeholders with the idea being to replicate the features that worked from the early design iterations and accentuate them as much as possible in the new design. Durability and mobility are the two main issues that are addressed by ChairMock. By using all steel parts for the frame and a net material for the seat that can be easily replaced (like a basketball net), the usability over time will greatly increase. The entire chair can be disassembled and reassembled with simple tools as the majority of components are “off the shelf”. The addition of locking wheels at the base allows the chair to be mobile or stationary, as theuser prefers. Further personalization can be achieved by using the DIY panel inserts that are easily attached with zip ties. The entire ChairMock can be flatpacked for easy shipping, transportation and assembly.

Figure 12 ChairMock Social Space ChairMock is mobile and can be configured in different ways to delineate social space for teens to interact, network and relax.

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at a glance FOOTPRINT 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 5.5 ft. BUDGET RANGE $380 (cost decreases with increased volume) BUILDING MATERIALS LIST 1.5 in. Hollaender Speed rail fittings (two #9, six #5, four #11, one #7) 55 ft. of 1.5 in. steel tube 3 ft. x 9 ft. Sports Netting Two 9 in. CNC wire bent “hooks” (ex. basketball rims) BUILDING NEEDS Manpower, 1 person can assemble as a kit in less than one hour. PORTABILITY Optional caster wheels and can be taken apart to move.

Figure 13 Usability ChairMock is designed as an oversized lounge chair to emphasize playfulness and can also seat up to two teens comfortably. It includes an open back to accomodate backpacks and other personal belongings.

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hub DESIGNED BY SETH BAKER

“…mobile seating and sound amplification ‘Boom-tubes’ combine to offer customizable experiences.” HUB is a series of public space and landscape elements that work together to address the needs of teenagers. Giving them a safe place to express themselves, to be seen and heard, to explore and grow or just hang out. Since the teenage years are such a transitional time and so much about defining one’s identity, the landscape elements are designed to allow the users to play a role in defining the space so that it’s not just a place, but their place. HUB was designed to layer over existing spaces to help teens be more visible and play a bigger role in public life. The components of the system are modular so that they can fit into a wide variety of spaces, and take on different shapes to suit those spaces. “Boom-tubes” work as anchors in the system with the umbrellalike amplification and seating areas. The covered seats provide shelter during the day and light up at night to add atmosphere and safety. Most importantly, the Boom-tubes offer a place where teenagers can develop and share their identity with a power-free amplification system that boosts sound from phones or other devices, while also containing the sounds to a relatively small area, avoiding nuisance to others. “Roller-stools,” seats for one or two that slide on in-ground tracks, allow the space to respond to the ever-changing situations and requirements of the teens. Groups can roll over to the Boom-tube and listen to music together or individuals can roll away to spend time alone. The built-in tracks allow for this flexibility and also prevent the Roller-stools from walking away. The bright colors and rounded forms keep the space lighthearted and add an element of play, without making it a playground. “Parked-stools” are the stationary cousins to the Roller-stools and function as secondary anchors for groups to gather around. 46

Figure 14 Hub Environment This image shows how mobile and fixed elements of Hub function together in an environment.

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at a glance FOOTPRINT 20 ft. x 50 ft. and larger BUDGET RANGE Boom Tube: $4000-$8000 Roller Stools $500-$800 Fixed Stools $100-$200 (cost decreases with increased volume) BUILDING MATERIALS LIST Spun steel, spun aluminium, steel rod and tubing, cast iron, fiberglass, recycled rubber, plywood, cast polyethylene, cast iron, rubber wheels, nylon powder coating, nuts and bolts BUILDING NEEDS N/A PORTABILITY Boom-Tube is portable, stools are not

Figure 15 Plan View This image shows Hub in plan view and how elements can be configured to group together and disperse to create both social and private spaces.

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roller /parked stool Figure 16 Views of roller and parked stools. Renderings show exploded views and functionality of mobile and fixed stools.

Foam seating Seat base

Frame

Wheels

Track

Roller-Stool on track

Roller-Stool with wheels exposed

Anchor base

Exploded view

Roller-Stool frame

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Roller-Stool frame on track

Section of Roller-Stool

Roller-Stool side base view

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boom tube Upper shell Boom dome Phone comb Stand

Phone comb holds music device Seating mats Lower Shell

Boom-Tube front view

Boom-Tube seating

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Phone comb holds music device and Boom dome amplifies and contains sound within the area creating a power-free amplification system.

Boom-Tube section

Boom-Tube exploded view

Figure 17 Boom-Tube Views Renderings show exploded views and detailed materials for Boom-Tube.

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Scenarios for Implementation 54

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scenarios for implementation Positive self-expression

Social Space

Networking/skill development

Private Space

FREESOL Teens can express themselves through art, performance or sport, offering platforms to be seen and heard.

Seating and art elements provide social space for teens to gather.

Panels are removable so teens can share their artwork.

Teens can use this as private space or just an area to relax.

Friends comfortably sit together and listen to music.

Mobile seating allows gathering and socializing space for teens.

Teens can use ChairMock as working space and to network.

ChairMock can provide secluded space to think or spend time on one’s own.

The power-free amp amplifies the music from an Ipod.

Teens socialize by configuring the Roller-stool elements.

Configurations of seating can provide space for networking.

Teen has a space to play music on his own.

CHAIRMOCK Figure 18 Individual Uses The diagram to the right illustrates how each design responds to the design guidelines through their diversity of uses. Freesol offers multiple outlets for positive selfexpression such as tagging, performing and sport. ChairMock offers playful seating that can be configured to create creative social space as well as private space. HUB provides a unique form - Boom-Tube that amplifies sound for teens that are more musically inclined.

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HUB

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Figure 19 Collective Uses Although Freesol, ChairMock and HUB can function individually, they provide an array of creative possibilities collectively. Together they offer the space for a teen community to emerge, benefitting from sharing knowledge, skills and building networks. By having the pieces function collectively, there are more opportunities for interaction and for a consistently activated space for teens.

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Figure 20 Permanent Scenario Ideally, Teen Art Park will be a permanent installation in the Pasadena and Altadena community - providing a lasting asset for the teen population in the area. The Mail Order “Permanent” Scenario illustrates a very simple process of ordering the pieces for Teen Art Park either individually or collectively and installing them as permanent fixtures in the local environment.

Mail Order “Permanent” Scenario

Figure 21 Temporary Scenario The Pilot Project “Temporary” Scenario offers a means to gain further support for Teen Art Park by offering a transitory experience of the pieces - building momentum as they are placed in different settings over time. This scenario calls for more attention to creating an identity for the system, increasing “buzz” through the movement of Teen Art Park from place to place. The goal of this scenario is to ultimately gather enough support to become a permanent installation for the community.

Pilot Project “Temporary” Scenario

Fabrication

Delivery

Self-Assembly

Permanent Use

Temporary Use

Assembly Team

Transportation Transportation Fabrication

Assembly Team

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Temporary Re-Use

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Recommendations 62

63


RECOMMENDATIONS The challenges that at-risk teens face in areas of Pasadena and Altadena are pockets of high unemployment, vulnerability to dropping out of school and a stark contrast between affluence and poverty. However, there are also many opportunities for the success and personal development of youth in the area by providing chances for teens to cultivate their passion for the arts and engage inpositive self-expression. Teen Art Park is a platform for teens to develop, showcase and expand their talents, increasing their self-confidence, aptitude and enjoyment of a space that is made just for them. The engagement with local teens during the two-term studio revealed that youth want to be “seen and heard,’ and many times artisitic expression is a vehicle for this desire. It may be through tagging, singing, performing, painting or socializing with their friends, and Teen Art Park offers multiple facets for self-expression that are uniquely tailored to the local youth. The three designs developed for Teen Art Park - Freesol Graffiti Lounge, ChairMock and HUB - are meant to be permanent community assets not only responding to the needs and desires that the youth expressed but also facilitating positive and interesting activities in which teens can engage to reduce negative associations toward this young population in the community. Teen Art Park is easily implementable and can be introduced through existing spaces, such as schools and community centers, where youth are present, or on an open space that is accessible to several groups. It should be a space that offers a level of indirect supervision and safety, but also critically important is to create a space of freedom and expression which will maintain a sense of ownership and a feeling of authenticity of the space among teens.

64

“...critically important is to create a space of freedom and expression which will maintain a sense of ownership and a feeling of authenticity of the space among teens.”


66

Appendices

67


Structural Drawings: Freesol 68

69


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PLAN

FREESOL GRAFFITI LOUNGE SECTION 01 scale as noted

ROOF PLAN 70

A0 71

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

AXON

FREESOL GRAFFITI LOUNGE

SECTION 01 scale as noted

ELEVATION 72

A 1.0 73

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


DETAIL

4

DETAIL

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

3 FREESOL GRAFFITI LOUNGE SECTION 01 scale as noted

74

1 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DETAIL

DETAIL

2

A 2.1

75


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

FREESOL GRAFFITI LOUNGE SECTION 01 scale as noted

76

1 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DETAIL

DETAIL

A 2.2

77


DETAIL

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1 FREESOL GRAFFITI LOUNGE SECTION 01 scale as noted

A 2.3 78

79

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


Structural Drawings: ChairMock 80

81


Hollaender Speed rail No 9 x2 No 11 x4

*Shown with optional casters

No 7

No 5 Tee x6

Chairmock

Page 01 scale as noted

1 1/2 Steel tube

82

APEC

83


No 9

Chairmock No 9

No 11

No 5

No 5 No 11

Page 02

No 5 No 11

*Shown with optional casters

No 5

No 5

APEC

No 7 No 11

84

No 5

A1 85


Structural Drawings: Hub 86

87


8

5

6

7

D

4

2

3

1

D

.11

.35

C

C

12.71

3.44

6.00

B

B

1.50

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

1.50

A

6.00

88 8

7

6

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

flexible cast plastic

B

FINISH

REV

TAP3_Boom_comb

SCALE: 1:4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube phone comb

2

1

89


8

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

1. upper shell 1

2. boom dome

A D

D

3. phone comb

2

4. stand 5. seating mats

3

6. seating suface C

C

7. seating substrate

4

8. support fins (stand)

5

9. lower shell

6 7 B

8

B

9 A

SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 16

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

90 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

various

FINISH

various

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Boom_Components

SCALE: 1:16

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube section

2

1

91


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

1. holes drilled for mounting 2. cutouts for stand arms

D

D

3. lip for mounting to upper shell with fastening plates 4.97

3 C

C

1 2

A B

B

14.06

.15 SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 16

A 62.35 UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

92 8

7

6

5

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

plate steel base need to be replaced with a tubular steel tripod base for mobile applications

FINISH

spun aluminium anodized or powder coated

COMMENTS:

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

2

Boom Tube boom dome

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Boom_dome

SCALE: 1:16 1

93


8

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

1. holes drilled around perimeter for mounting hardware D

D

1.25

1 R30.46

R31.71

C

C

5.20

B

B

63.33 .15

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

USED ON

NEXT ASSY

94

APPLICATION

8

7

6

5

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

plate steel base need to be replaced with a tubular steel tripod base for mobile applications

FINISH

steel placel powder coated

COMMENTS:

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

2

Boom Tube dome to upper shell fastening plates

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

A

REV

TAP3_Boom_Fplate

SCALE: 1:16 1

95


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

D

D

C

C

R3.38 R32.18

1.00 120.00째 B

B

.62 R.35 UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED:

A

DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

64.33

USED ON

NEXT ASSY

96

APPLICATION

8

7

6

5

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

Styrene Butadiene Rubber (Eco Turf )

FINISH

color TBD

mats are cast from Eco Turf (Styrene Butadiene Rubber) or comparable product. http://www.ecoturfsurfacing.com

COMMENTS:

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Boom_mat

SCALE: 1:16

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube seating mats

2

1

97


8

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

65.43 D

D

19.94

C

C

47.38

83.95

B

B

16.56

15.27

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

66.11 A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

98 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR.

A

MFG APPR. Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

FINISH

REV

TAP3_Boom_overall

SCALE: 1:16

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube

2

1

99


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

65.43 D

D

19.94

C

C

47.38

83.95

B

B

16.56

15.27

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

66.11 A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

100 8

7

6

5 galvanized

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

FINISH

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR.

A

MFG APPR. Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

various

B

various

REV

TAP3_Boom_overall

SCALE: 1:16

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube

2

1

101


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

62.68

D

D

6.02 5.02

C

C

62.68 B

.50

A

.15

B

.55 5.02

.40

SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 16

5.32

A

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

102 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

fiberglass

B

FINISH

REV

TAP3_Boom_plate

SCALE: 1:16

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube seating surface

2

1

103


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

2

64.84

3

60.11

D

D

1

6.30

C

C

1. milled edge 2. hole for center pole of stand

B

3. holes drilled for attachment to brackets on stand

2.36 26.90

.19

.75

6.30

.56

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

64.84

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

104 8

B

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

3/4 inch marine grade plywood

FINISH

clear poly sealer

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

Boom Tube plywood seating substrate

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

the seating substrate should be radially divded into three equal pieces to fit around the center pole and to fit within standard lumber sizes

2

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Boom_ply

SCALE: 1:16 1

105


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

1. plate for mounting to the ground

120.00째 4

2.00

2. seat support fins

D

3.00

D

3. mounting brackets for plywood seating substrate

64.64

24.00

C

4. mounting plates for securing upper shell

C

.50

4.50

3

7.91 4.50 3.90 B

B

2

33.79

1

69.54

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED:

A

DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

8.76

.50

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

5.78

106

64.64 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

welded plate + tubular steel

FINISH

galvanized

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

plate steel base may need to be replaced with a tubular steel tripod base for mobile applications

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Boom Tube stand

2

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Boom_stand

SCALE: 1:16 1

107


8

7

6

5

4

2

3

1

D

D

29.99

C

C

29.99

B

.56 13.56 1.00

B B

3.50

B

SECTION B-B SCALE 1 : 8

1.50

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

108 8

7

6

5

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

ENG APPR.

Q.A.

MATERIAL

mold to be created to cast for this part

FINISH

COMMENTS:

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_ConcreteStool.1

SCALE: 1:8

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Fixed Stool

MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

concrete

TITLE:

CHECKED

2

1

109


8

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

D

D

C

C

B

B

1.00

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED:

26.38

DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

110 8

7

6

5

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

Styrene Butadiene Rubber (Eco Turf )

FINISH

color TBD

mats are cast from Eco Turf (Styrene Butadiene Rubber) or comparable product. http://www.ecoturfsurfacing.com

COMMENTS:

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_mat

SCALE: 1:4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Fixed Stool seating mats

2

1

111


8

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

D

D

19.00

C

C

.50

.50

B

B

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

112 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

bar steel

B

FINISH

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_Axel

SCALE: 1:4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool caster axel

2

1

113


8

6

7

5

D

4

2

3

1

D

14.98 .99 .99

.53 C

C

B

B

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

114 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

tubular steel

FINISH

powder coated

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_AxelShaft 115

SCALE: 1:2

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool axel support shaft

2

1


8

7

5

6

4

2

3

1.60

1

.25

D

D

.25 .75

.25

16.35

C

C

.30

B

B

.35

.75

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

116 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

tubular steel

FINISH

powder coated

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

tubular steel with crimped ends and machined holes for mounting

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_brace

SCALE: 1:2

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool steel tube brace

2

1

117


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

37.99 .28 D

6.00

1.22

1.60

1

.80 5.00 3.80

.50

D

2 28.14

C

C

2 19.01 1.00

.96

5 2.33

.96

1. holes or mounting frame 2. sill to hold hoop support

37.99 B

3

6 4

B

3. axel shaft hole 4. axel support shaft sleave 5. set screw

6. fastening hub for steel tube bracing UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

118 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

cast iron

FINISH

powder coated

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_Carriage

SCALE: 1:8

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool carriage frame

2

1

119


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

D

D

6.22

.50

C

C

.50 A B

B

2.00

SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 2 A UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

120 8

7

6

5

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

Mv Master Carr part number: 2211T13

FINISH

TITLE:

CHECKED

COMMENTS:

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_GuideWheel 121

SCALE: 1:1

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool guide wheels

2

1


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

1. carriage frame

2

4

2. shell mounting plate

5

D

6

D

3. bolted connection 4. support hoops 5. steel tube bracing 6. bolt w/ friction bolt

3 C

C

7. iron wheel 8. axel support shaft

1

9. axel 10’ set screw 11. guide wheel

B

B

12. set screw 5 7 10

9

6

8

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

6 12

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

11 122 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

various

FINISH

various

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_Guts 123

SCALE: 1:8

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool carriage components

2

1


8

A

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

D

D

C

C

A

C

C

SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 8

B

B

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

124 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED

A

ENG APPR. MFG APPR. Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

FINISH

TAP3_Pouf2.1_Guts2

SCALE: 1:8

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

REV

2

1

125


8

7

5

6

4

2

3

1

1. holes drilled to recieve steel tube bracing D

D

1

29.65

27.75

C

C

1 B

B

.75

.75 UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

126 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: MATERIAL

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

FINISH

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

tubular steel

B

powder coated

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_hoops

SCALE: 1:8

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool support hoops

2

1

127


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

3.25 D

D

C

C

.50 .50 A B

B

1.50

SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 2

A

3.25

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

128 8

7

6

5

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

Mc Master Carr, part number: 2305T92

cast iron

FINISH

TITLE:

CHECKED

COMMENTS:

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_IronWheel

SCALE: 1:2 WEIGHT:

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool iron caster wheel

2

1

129


8

6

7

5

4

2

3

1

D

D

C

C

B

B

1.00

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED:

26.38

DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

130 8

7

6

5

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

Q.A.

MATERIAL

Styrene Butadiene Rubber (Eco Turf )

FINISH

color TBD

mats are cast from Eco Turf (Styrene Butadiene Rubber) or comparable product. http://www.ecoturfsurfacing.com

COMMENTS:

A

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_mat

SCALE: 1:4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool seating mat

2

1

131


8

5

6

7

4

2

3

1

2 D

D

.28 1. spun steel or fiberglass shell 2. holes for mounting to carraige frame C

3. tray to receive seating mat

1

30.00

C

3

28.05 A B

B

.56 12.13

SECTION A-A SCALE 1 : 8

A

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES TOLERANCES: FRACTIONAL ANGULAR: MACH BEND TWO PLACE DECIMAL THREE PLACE DECIMAL

A

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF SETH P. BAKER AND ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WTHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF SETH P. BAKER OR ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN IS PROHIBITED.

132 8

7

6

5

INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER:

USED ON

NEXT ASSY APPLICATION

4

MATERIAL

spun steel or fiberglass

FINISH

powder coated

NAME

DATE

DRAWN

TITLE:

CHECKED ENG APPR. MFG APPR.

A

Q.A. COMMENTS:

SIZE DWG. NO.

B

REV

TAP3_Pouf2.1_Shell 133

SCALE: 1:8

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

3

Roller Stool shell

2

1


References 134

135


California Department of Education, 2012. 2012 Growth: Academic Performance Index (API) Report (John Muir High, Rose City High, Learning Works!). [Online] Available at: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/ dataquest/ [Accessed 28 January 2013]. California Department of Education, 2012. Cohort Outcome Data for the Class of 2010-11: District Results for Pasadena Unified 1964881. [Online] Available at: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ [Accessed 22 February 2013]. California Department of Education, 2012. Cohort Outcome Data for the Class of 2010-11: School Results for John Muir High. [Online] Available at: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ [Accessed 28 January 2013]. California Department of Education, 2012. Cohort Outcome Data for the Class of 2010-11: School Results for Learning Works! [Online] Available at: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ [Accessed 28 January 2013]. California Department of Education, 2012. Cohort Outcome Data for the Class of 2010-11: School Results for Rose City High. [Online] Available at: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ [Accessed 28 January 2013]. California Department of Education, 2012. Enrollment by Grade for 2011-12: District Enrollment by Grade. [Online] Available at: http:// dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ [Accessed 11 January 2013]. California Department of Education, 2012. School Demographic Characteristics, 2012 Growth, API Report. [Online] Available at: http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/Acnt2012/2012GrthSchDem. aspx?allcds=19-64881-1936103 [Accessed 11 January 2013]. City of Pasadena Public Health Department, 2013. NW Pasadena Data. [Document] (Personal Communication, 14 January 2013). City of Pasadena Public Health Department, 2011. Pasadena/Altadena: Quality of Life 2011 Index. [Online] Available at: http://www.ci.pasadena.ca.us/EkContent. aspx?theme=Green&id=6442456361 [Accessed 5 January 2012].

136

Learning Works, 2013. Student Profiles. [Online] Available at: http://www.publicworksinc.org/lw [Accessed 28 January 2013] Pasadena Star News, 2013. Learning Works school ‘chasers’ getting attention on Pasadena streets. [Online] Available at: http:// www.pasadenastarnews.com/news/ci_22507161/learning-worksschool-chasers-getting-attention-pasadena-streets [Accessed 15 February 2013]. The Armory Center for the Arts, 2013. 2012 Pasadena PUSD Useful Stats. [Document] (Personal Communication, 24 Decmeber 2012). U.S. Census, 2011. American Community Survey DP02: Selected Social. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/ nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2011. American Community Survey S0201: Selected Population Profile. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census. gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml [Accessed 12 December 2012] U.S. Census, 2011. LA County Quickfacts. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_ facts.xhtml [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2010. Altadena Quickfacts. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_ facts.xhtml [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2010. Pasadena Quickfacts. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_ facts.xhtml [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2008-2010. American Community Survey DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics. [Online] Available at: http:// factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults. xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2005-2009. American Community Survey B01003 Total Population. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census. gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012].

137


U.S. Census, 2005-2009. American Community Survey B01003 Total Population, Geography Census Tract 4602,4603.01,4603.02, 4609, 4610, 4611, 4615, 4616, 4617, 4619, 4621, 4622. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/ searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2005-2009. American Community Survey DP02 Selected Social Characteristics, Geography Census Tract 4602,4603.01,4603.02, 4609, 4610, 4611, 4615, 4616, 4617, 4619, 4621, 4622. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/ faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2005-2009. American Community Survey DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics, Geography Census Tract 4602,4603.01,4603.02, 4609, 4610, 4611, 4615, 4616, 4617, 4619, 4621, 4622. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/ faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012].

IMAGES City of Pasadena, 2012. City of Pasadena Zoning Map. [Online] Available through: http://www.ci.pasadena.ca.us/Planning/Zoning_ Map [Accessed 9 January 2013]. LA County GIS Data Portal, 2012. Los Angeles County Outline. [Online] Available through: http://egis3.lacounty.gov/ dataportal/2013/01/09/l-a-county-boundary/data_portal_uploadsla_county_outline-2/ [Accessed 12 December 2012]. Thomas Guide, 2008. s.l., s.n. [Flintridge Center]. U.S. Census Bureau, 2000. Census Tract Outline Map Pasadena 34.209479N, 118.180854W. 1:24000. U.S. U.S. Census Bureau: Department of Commerce.

U.S. Census, 2005-2009. American Community Survey S2301: Employment Status. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2. census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012]. U.S. Census, 2005-2009. American Community Survey S0101 Age and Sex. [Online] Available at: http://factfinder2.census.gov/ faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t# [Accessed 12 December 2012].

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Tap report 05 29 2013 spreads