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Done-For-You Information Product – Kick Your Sugar Habit (Sample Content) Slideberry

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Slideberry Done-For-You Information Product

Kick Your Sugar Habit Home Study Program Sample Content To purchase, visit www.slideberry.com/info-product


Done-For-You Information Product – Kick Your Sugar Habit (Sample Content) Slideberry

  Table of Content

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Segment 1 §

Introduction

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Your Story

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Intention and Goal Setting

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Cultivate Awareness

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"Know Thy Enemy" - overview of sugar, its health impact, and where it is lurking in our food supply

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Root cause #1: Yin/Yang balance

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Bonus Tip: Herbs and Spices

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Mindset tip #1

Segment 2 §

Root cause #2: Energy Quick Fix

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Root cause #3: Stress

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Mindset tip #2

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Root cause #4: Dehydration

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Root cause #5: Low Protein Intake

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Root cause #6: Nutrient Deficiency

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Mindset tip #3

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Root cause #7: Non-Food Related Causes (Primary Food)


Done-For-You Information Product – Kick Your Sugar Habit (Sample Content) Slideberry

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  Today, sugar is found in many of the usual suspects, such as cakes, cookies, and candy. But you will also find it in canned vegetables, baby foods, cereals, peanut butter, bread and tomato sauce. It is often disguised in fancy languages, labeled as corn syrup, dextrose, maltose, glucose or fructose – you can refer to the handout called “the many names of sugar” for this information. So keep in mind, it really pays to spend the extra couple of minutes to read the ingredient list on the nutritional label! Even some so-called healthy foods contain a large amount of sugar. For example, a lemon poppy seed Clif Bar has 21 grams of sugar, an equivalent of 5 teaspoons. Compare that to a chocolate-glazed cake donut from Dunkin’ Donuts, which has only 14 grams of sugar, or 3 teaspoons. You may think your afternoon cup of coffee only has a little sugar… think again! A 16-oz Starbucks Frappuccino contains a whopping 44 grams of sugar – equivalent of 10 teaspoons – that’s like eating 3 donuts! No wonder with hidden sugar in this large quantity in our everyday foods, our society is faced with an explosion of hypoglycemia and type 2 diabetes. [You are welcome to use my little story here, if it’s appropriate for your audience. The other day I was browsing yogurt marketed to kids in small containers. I was quite surprised, and not in a good way, to find that those flavored yogurt contain 8 grams of added sugar per tiny serving! What frustrates me even more is how they are packaged and marketed as healthy foods for children, so parents are buying these products, thinking that they are good for their children, without knowing that they may actually be fueling the kids’ behavioral issues!] Speaking of children, fruit juices is another “gotcha” – although they sound healthy and often labeled as “all natural”, they may not be as nutritious or “good for you” as they claim. Items labeled as “juice drink” or “juice beverage” may not even be 100% natural fruit juice – sugar, corn syrup or other flavorings are often added, so again, it pays to read the labels. Even if the product is 100% fruit juice,


Done-For-You Information Product – Kick Your Sugar Habit (Sample Content) Slideberry

  Yin/Yang Imbalance

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Now I want to dive into the core of our program, and share with you how to cut your dependency on sugar. We first need to understand the reason behind our sugar cravings. When it comes to sugar, it is not simply that we don’t have the willpower or discipline to control our cravings – there are some deeper, physiological and biological reasons behind our urge. What I will do here is to help you understand why you have those uncontrollable cravings, and what we can do to reduce them naturally and gradually over time. When we understand the reason behind those cravings, we have a much better chance to outsmart them and curb them using ways other than sugar. First, I want to introduce the concept of Yin/Yang balance. Eating foods that throw our body out of balance can create food cravings. It is very helpful to look at this idea under the lens of Yin/Yang balance. This concept is grounded in how the energetics of foods is regarded in oriental medicine. We can put all our foods along the Yin/Yang spectrum. Yin foods are the ones that are cool and expanding in nature, while Yang foods are ones that are warm and contracting in nature. “Cool” and “warm”, in this context, have nothing to do with the temperature that the foods are served. Our body is very smart and is always striving for balance. So if you eat too much Yin food, your body will crave some Yang food to balance it out. And vice versa. It’s seems to be ok, except some of the extreme Yin and extreme Yang foods are not good for our health.


Done-For-You Information Product – Kick Your Sugar Habit (Sample Content) Slideberry

  Nutrient Deficiency

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Sugar cravings can also be our body’s way of telling us that we need certain nutrients, besides protein. These nutrients include chromium, carbon, phosphorous, sulfur, and the amino acid tryptophan. I work with my clients on an individual basis to pinpoint what nutrients their bodies may be lacking, and work on adding in foods that are rich in those nutrients. Here is a run-down of the “usual suspects”: 1. Chromium Chromium is an essential part of glucose tolerance factor, and is vital to regulating carbohydrate metabolism by enhancing insulin function for proper use of glucose in the body. It helps regular blood sugar level, prevents spikes and crashes, and therefore help reduce the need for quick sugar fix. People who have a high tissue level of chromium tend to have lower incidence of diabetes. High tissue level of chromium is usually linked to better soil supplies and a less refined diet. We can’t do much about the soil our food is grown in, but we can definitely eat a less refined diet consisting mainly of whole foods. Reduced chromium absorption is related to aging, diets that are stressful to the digestive system, as well as refined flour and sugar intake. Excessive fat intake can also inhibit chromium absorption. Brewer’s yeast is by far the best available source of chromium. About 2 tablespoons per day can supply most of our chromium needs. However, some people do not tolerate yeast very well, and find that it causes digestive discomfort or bloating. If you can tolerate yeast, it is a great addition to your diet. It supplies a lot of nutrients, and is a low-calorie and low-fat source. Following yeast in chromium concentration are beef, liver, whole wheat, rye, fresh chilies, oysters, onions, potatoes, tomatoes, wheat germ, green bell peppers,

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