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UP FRONT | Chatter

Calendar Watch February 1 Without “The Colbert Report,” will people still celebrate Superb Owls? February 2 The groundhog’s day to shine February 14 Valentine’s Day February 16 Presidents Day February 17 The Fattest of Tuesdays February 19 The Year of the Sheep begins

ON THE PAGE HISTORY WITH A BANG

Steely-eyed sheriffs and dastardly outlaws, scouts and hunters and bartenders in rowdy saloons … settling the Western frontier was a rough, dangerous business, and firm words weren’t going to cut it. The rifles and handguns that were instrumental in America’s westward expansion are lavishly portrayed in “A Legacy in Arms,” a fresh OU Press publication by Richard C. Rattenbury, with photographs by Ed Muno. The expansive coffee-table tome concentrates on the 19th century, drawing on the extensive and well-documented collection of armaments housed within the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. After a quick primer on the ways the industry overall changed over the course of the 1800s (moving from an individual craftsman to a specialized factory model; product-oriented to processoriented), the bulk of the book’s pages is devoted to chronicling in detail some of the greatest hits from the truly great arms makers: Colt, Remington, Winchester, Smith & Wesson. It closes with some special examples of artistry in engraving and inlay. An art book and history lesson in one, Rattenbury’s compendium is consistently on target for lovers of the period and its firepower.

SHARING ESSENTIAL STORIES

“We have watched him explode as a great performer in feature films, television and stage. To work with him on the Oscars is the perfect storm, all of his resources and talent coming together on a global stage.” - Producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, about Neil Patrick Harris hosting the 87th Oscars ceremony on Sunday, February 22 16 SLICE // FEBRUARY 2015

The familiar maxim that those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it has a more hopeful corollary: those who do learn from the past can forever be inspired by it. Because people don’t require special training or personal fortunes to become examples and help bring about change – a powerful example of proof is coming to the Oklahoma History Center February 7, with the debut of “Children of the Civil Rights.” Directed by Julia Clifford, the film recounts the story of the OKC sit-in movement, a non-violent series of protests in which activist Clara Luper and local children (some of whom will attend the screening and its Q&A) went where they were not allowed, and quietly began amassing a group of supporters changing minds. Their courage is worth celebrating, and their impact demands remembering; visit childrenofthecivilrightsfilm.com for more information, and plan to get tickets at the door. This month will also see a new avenue for celebrating cultural contributions through cinema, as deadCENTER presents its first Black History Month Film Festival on February 21. The movie experts will work with the Coltrane Group, Bare Bones Film Festival and Inclusion in Art to select a full slate of screenings showing at the Oklahoma History Center and Cinemark Tinseltown, as well as classes and activities, with the aim of establishing a foundation for building increased collective awareness in the future. For details and listings, visit bhmfilmfestival.tumblr.com.

PHOTOS: NEIL PATRICK HARRIS BY EVAN AGOSTINI, LUNCH COUNTER ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OPUBCO

CULTURAL CHRONICLES FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH

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Slice February 2015  

Slice is a lifestyle magazine serving central Oklahoma, featuring restaurants, events, shopping and culture.

Slice February 2015  

Slice is a lifestyle magazine serving central Oklahoma, featuring restaurants, events, shopping and culture.

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