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ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SLEEP HEALTH FOUNDATION NEW ZEALAND CHARITABLE TRUST

Annual Report 2018 Sleep Health Foundation

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


TABLE OF CONTENTS OUR CHAIR

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TRUSTEES

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OUR VISION

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OUR STORY

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KEY ACTIVITIES 2018

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OUR FOCUS

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KEY PARTNERSHIPS

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CURRENT ACTION AND CASE STUDY

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WARREN’S STORY

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A CLINICIANS PERSPECTIVE

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WHAT’S NEXT?

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ANNUAL RETURN SUMMARY

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FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

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For more information: The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Trust 04 979 3997 | contact@sleephealth.org.nz or visit sleephealth.org.nz Annual Report 2018 Sleep Health Foundation

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OUR CHAIR ELAINE REILLY Elaine Reilly is a positive and dedicated professional with a winning combination of academic qualif ications , a can - do at titude and ex tensive governance and leadership experience in a range of business sec tors . With an Honours Psycholog y degree and an M BA from a leading Scot tish Universit y, she ha s a unique blend of people and business skills . Elaine founded an award winning business consult anc y focusing on developing potential of individuals and teams .

CHAIR’S MESSAGE WHY SLEEP AND WHY NOW? You don’t need to be an expert to know the difference made from a good night’s sleep. What is less well considered is the cost of poor sleep. It goes way beyond feeling a bit grumpy and needing more coffee. For example, how many New Zealanders know that with insufficient sleep they run a higher risk of: •

Accidents

Reduced Productivity

Diminished Wellbeing – both mental and physical.

A recent study by our sister organisation, the Sleep Health Foundation of Australia, identified that poor quality sleep is highly prevalent in Australia, with one in five Australian adults experiencing some form of inadequate sleep. The costs are huge. The estimated financial costs was AU$26.2 billion in 2016-2017 composed of health system costs, productivity losses, informal care costs and other financial costs equivalent to $802 per person with inadequate sleep. If New Zealand is suffering at an equivalent level, the costs are enormous. They go well beyond the hard

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


measures with a $ sign in front of a number. The costs to society are also significant- making our roads, our workplaces and our homes riskier places to be. Sleep disorders and excessive daytime sleepiness equate to at least NZ$3.75 billion impost on our economy. You can read the whole report here: bit.ly/2w3Y810 I became convinced of the need for New Zealand to have some serious conversations and actions around sleep once these implications were explained to me by some of New Zealand’s experts in this field. I am now privileged to work with them on the Board of SHFNZ. As a board, we believe there are many key groups who have much to gain through ensuring sleep is considered carefully as a critical component of health, safety, wellbeing and productivity. Boards and Business owners - with a duty of care to employees and need to consider the health & safety implications of the workplace. Managers - charged with organising work, making things happen and keeping staff and workers motivated and productive. Parents - who can set the framework around a child to have good sleep habits - for life. Individuals and partners who may feel their sleep is less than optimal and need information and guidance GPs and Healthcare Professionals – sleep has such a pivotal role to health, and can cause or exacerbate so many other conditions. Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand aims to enable productive and progressive conversations and action plans to move sleep further up the agenda. Government, industry, the workforce, the public and the scientific community all need to be part of the solution. The science is clear that sleep problems are a significant public health issue for all New Zealanders. The Foundation’s perspective speaks to our role as advocates for equity - recognising that existing sleep health inequities are unfair, unjust and preventable - and the need for a specific and focused attention to this is a priority area for New Zealand. Let’s stop wearing lack of sleep as a badge of honour. Our wellbeing, and that of our whānau and society depend on it.

ELAINE REILLY Chair - Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand

PS. if you or someone you care about would like to support our endeavours, we have a simple membership application process on our website. The greater our membership the stronger our voice. Annual Report 2018 Sleep Health Foundation

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OUR TRUSTEES THE DEDICATED TEAM BEHIND THE SLEEP HEALTH FOUNDATION DR. ALEX BARTLE Elected Trustee Dr Bartle worked as a GP in Christchurch for 30years and developed the Sleep Well Clinics in 2000. He now has Sleep clinics throughout New Zealand. He completed his Masters in Sleep Medicine through Sydney University in 2009. Dr Bartle has been on the Education Sub-Committee of the Australasian Sleep Association for 10years, and an inaugural member of the Asia Pacific Paediatric Sleep Alliance (APPSA).

PROF. PHILIPPA GANDER PHD. ONZM. Elected Trustee Philippa is Director of the Sleep/Wake Research Centre at Massey University, Wellington. Philippa is interested in the health and safety challenges generated by current trends to restrict sleep and increase 24/7 work and tertainment. She works with government agencies, industries, and unions to develop new evidence-based solutions to these challenges. Her research has also helped profile who has sleep disorders in Aotearoa/New Zealand, with a view to improving the availability of diagnosis and treatment services.

SHIRLEY HULL RMA Commisioner, JP. Trustee (Independent) Shirley has been a Tararua District Councillor for 7 years. Other offices include RHAANZ member. She was a board member for Central Primary Health Organisation and is currently on the board of Pahiatua Community Service Trust. She brings not only significant governance experience but an ability to network with stakeholders and community. Being part of NZSHF for her is about getting the positive stories about how we enhance the sleep of our nation and securing the benefits this can reap as it ripples through the communities.

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


WARREN JONES Trustee (Independent) Proud to be part of a substantial humanity betterment project, Warren was made acutely aware of the field of sleep health, through his personal health journey. As a community-initiated project Sleep Health New Zealand seeks to build and maintain a sustainable resource; one that will contribute to lives being saved. As a Woodville Lions Club member, Warren takes pride in working as an effective foundation board member of this organisation.

ASSOCIATE PROF. ALISTER NEILL Elected Trustee Alister is a Respiratory and Sleep Physician at Wellington Hospital (CCDHB) and Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, University of Otago’s Wellington School of Medicine. He directs the WellSleep Laboratory & Research Group and is a member of the American Thoracic Society’s Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology Program Committee. He is the current President of the New Zealand Branch of the Australasian Sleep Association.

SARAH-JANE PAINE Elected Trustee Sarah-Jane Paine (Tūhoe) is a Senior Lecturer at Te Kupenga Hauora Māori and Co-Director of the Tōmaiora Research Group. She holds science degrees from the University of Otago and a PhD in Public Health (Massey University). She was a recipient of the HRC Eru Pōmare Fellowship in Māori Health (2008-2011) and Massey University Early Career Research Medal (2012). She has worked in sleep research for more than a decade, leading a series of surveys investigating inequities in sleep health between Māori and non-Māori. Current research involves the quantitative investigation of ethnic inequities in health and the determinants of health across the life-course, including projects focussed on racism and child/adolescent health, inequities in emergency department care and the economic costs of Māori health inequities.

LORA WU Elected Trustee Lora Wu is a sleep researcher and clinical psychologist based at the Sleep/Wake Research Centre at Massey University in Wellington. Lora’s research involves behavioural sleep health, sleep and performance, and managing fatigue in the workplace and among clinical populations. Her clinical practice is in the area of behavioural sleep health. Lora is committed to educating others about sleep and helping them achieve optimal sleep health.

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OUR VISION SLEEP, ALONG WITH DIET AND EXERCISE, IS ONE OF THE THREE PILL ARS OF HEALTH The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Charitable Trust’s vision is that of a community that recognises the importance of good sleep to health, personal wellbeing, public safety, productivity and quality of life, across the life-span. The Trust seeks to drive and support positive action providing relief for those afflicted by sleep disorders, and also for those affected alongside them. The Foundation aims to achieve this with programmes Informing, Educating, Advocating, Connecting and Resourcing the nation. The foundation will be staging a National Sleep Health Awareness week each year, in association with Lions Clubs, timed to conclude on World Sleep Day. The mission of the Sleep Health Foundation Trust is, through targeted education programs, to focus on government, corporate and community awareness, on the need for sleep health. The foundation is a registered charitable trust (CC54594).

DI D YOU KNOW? I f yo u a re h u n g r y, yo u k n ow yo u n e e d to eat . I f yo u a re t h i r s t y, yo u k n ow yo u n e e d to d r i n k . I f yo u a re sl e epy, i t i s yo u r b r a i n si g na llin g yo u n e e d to sl e ep .

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


IT IS A BIG STORY SLEEP, ALONG WITH DIET AND EXERCISE, IS ONE OF THE THREE PILL ARS OF HEALTH About a quarter of 20-60-year-old New Zealand adults report a sleep problem that has lasted for at least 6 months, with higher prevalence among Māori than non-Māori. However, this difference in rates disappears after taking into account socioeconomic deprivation, unemployment, and night work, all of which increase the risk of reporting a chronic sleep problem and are more common among Māori. Understanding the role of social factors is essential for improving the sleep health of all New Zealanders. The prevalence of sleep problems increases with each decade of age. Paine, S.-J., et al. (2004). Sleep, 27:1163.

DI D YOU KNOW? Yo u c a n b e co m e s o sl e epy t hat yo u w ill f a ll a sl e ep u n in te n t i o na ll y. N o a m o u n t of w ill - p owe r, t r a i n i n g , o r da n ge r w ill ke ep yo u aw a ke. T h e e f fe c t s of n ot ge t t in g e n o u g h sl e ep b u il d u p, day af te r day. Yo u ge t p ro g re s si vel y wo r s e b u t at t h e s a m e t im e yo u b e co m e l e s s a n d l e s s a b l e to ju d ge ju s t h ow ba dl y yo u a re d o i n g . D i f fe re n t sl e ep cha ll e n ge s acro s s o n e ’s li fe spa n , a n d ge t t i n g t h e r i g ht a m o u n t of q ua li t y sl e ep at each s t a ge of li fe i s key fo r h ea l t hy d evel o p m e n t a n d a gei n g .

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KEY ACTIVITIES THIS YEAR A BIG JOURNEY HAS IT’S FIRST STEPS This year we have progressed things on a number of fronts: 19 Apr 2017

The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Trust is registered

05-6 May 2017

We had our official launch at Sleep in Aotearoa 2017

07 Oct 2017

Lions 202M Cabinet presentation by Warren Jones and Philippa Gander

25/8 Oct 2017

SHFNZ Trust Board introduced at Sleep Downunder Conference, Sky City, Auckland

15 Nov 2017

Warren Jones and Alex Bartle attended SAANZ AGM in Auckland

23 Mar 2018

Warren Jones introduced SHFNZ at 202L Lions Conference Hamilton via videolink

We have given presentations across New Zealand to over 1000 people who have heard talks and presentations on Sleep Health; set up a Design Forum group, and worked with a number of public sector partners including the Health Promotion Agency.

DI D YOU KNOW? Over the longer term, not get ting enough sleep can seriously af fec t your physical and mental health. Adult s who usually sleep less than 7 hours are more likely to develop obesit y, t ype 2 diabetes , high blood pressure, hear t disea se, stroke, and die sooner than those who usually sleep 7- 9 hours .

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


OUR FOCUS WE AIM TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE Many aspects of life in 21st century New Zealand are at odds with getting enough restorative sleep on a regular basis, including increasing 24/7 entertainment and work (facilitated by the internet) and the mistaken belief that it is possible to cram more into a busy lifestyle by cutting back on sleep. Compelling new science indicates that not getting enough sleep on a regular basis may be contributing to some of our most pressing societal health problems including obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, as well as having accidents at work or while driving. New science is also pointing to the importance of sleep timing. The circadian body clock, a master pacemaker in the brain, is designed to keep us in step with the day/night cycle by tracking blue light, and it programmes us for sleep at night. Sleep at sub-optimal times in the body clock cycle is often shorter and less restorative. Changing the amount and timing of sleep on days off versus work days – known as social jet lag – increases the risk of poorer health. Among 815 non-shift workers in the Dunedin longitudinal cohort study, higher social jetlag scores are associated with being more likely to be overweight or obese, greater fat mass, nd meeting the criteria for metabolic syndrome [1]. The brain master clock does not adapt to shift work. Rotating shift work with night work is associated with increased risk of serious health problems. With increasing years of night work comes increasing likelihood of becoming overweight/obese, developing type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and of dying from lung cancer, cardiovascular disease and stroke [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]. We are all getting more blue light at odd times. Lighting in our homes and streets is changing from traditional incandescent bulbs to light emitting diodes (LEDs) with much higher blue light content, and there has been an explosion in use of hand-held electronic devices with blue-light rich screens (cell phones, i-pads, etc.). All this serves to confuse the circadian body clock. This rapidly expanding scientific knowledge fuels the need for raising awareness and advocacy for health sleep, and also holds promise for better solutions to some of our most important health problems. 1. Parsons, M., et al., Social jetlag, obesity and metabolic disorder: investigation in a cohort study. International Journal of Obesity, 2015. 39(5): p. 842-848. 2. Gu F, et al., Total and cause-specific mortality of U.S. nurses working rotating night shifts. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2015. 48(3): p. 241–252. 3. Brown DL, et al., Rotating nght shift work and the risk of ischemic stroke. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2009. 169(11): p. 1370-1377. 4. Pan A, et al., Rotating night shift work and risk of type 2 diabetes: two prospective cohort studies in women. PLoS Medicine / Public Library of Science, 2011. 8(12): p. e1001141. 5. Schernhammer ES, et al., Rotating night Sshifts and risk of breast cancer in women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2001. 93(20): p. 1563-1568. 6. Schernhammer ES, et al., Night-shift work and risk of colorectal cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2003. 95(11): p. 825-828.

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KEY PARTNERSHIPS WE VALUE THE COLLEGIAL RELATIONSHIPS WE ARE FORMING TO BUILD TRUST AND MUTUAL SUCCESS. AUSTRALASIAN SLEEP ASSOCIATION Thank you for inviting us to share space at conference and sharing your expertise and experience with us. We are very aware of the vital role ASA has played in our establishment phase, and value most highly the working relationship you extend to us. Message from ASA The Australasian Sleep Association, and in particular the NZ Branch of ASA, is thrilled to learn of the great progress being made by the SHF NZ. We look forward to working together to ensure a vibrant Foundation that will enhance knowledge of sleep health and sleep science within the NZ environment.

FISHER & PAYKEL HEALTHCARE Thank you for encouragement and practical support around our foundation processes, and venue facilitation.

MASSEY UNIVERSIT Y Thank you for hosting meetings and providing admin and technological support.

SLEEP HEALTH FOUNDATION (AUS) Message from the Chair of the Sleep Health Foundation Australia It’s fantastic to see that SHF NZ has been so successful in its first year of operation. While some of the early organisational steps may seem like small steps, they are critically important in building the foundations from which the bigger steps will happen. Congratulations. Best wishes, Emeritus Prof Dorothy Bruck, PhD Chair, Sleep Health Foundation

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


DI D YOU KNOW? A 20 0 8 h ea l t h e co n o m i c s a na l y si s e s t imate d t hat su cce s s fu l in s o m n ia t reat m e n t wo u l d s ave t h e N ew Zea la n d e co n o my $21 . 8 m illi o n p e r yea r.

FITZHERBERT ROWE LAW YERS Thank you for support and assistance in getting the Foundation established and under way.

UNIVERSIT Y OF OTAGO Thank you for support and assistance in getting the Foundation established and under way.

LIONS CLUB Message from Lions Past 202M District Governor, Rex Bullard In 2015 Woodville Lions Club initiated a project seeking to stimulate positive change in the area of sleep health. Action since has seen the formation and registration of this Trust to address discovered needs. The Sleep Health Foundation of New Zealand Charitable Trust (SHFNZ) is focussed on building a portal to the spectrum of issues that, individually or in concert, compromise a good night’s sleep. Lions are proud this ground-breaking initiative was an effective igniter for much-needed service and support to the large number of kiwis afflicted, or affected, by the destructive potential of poor sleep. Lions Clubs around the country will be active in promoting the sleep conversation during the Annual Sleep Awareness Week campaign. In all this we aim to raise understanding of the importance of sleep, to everyone.

DI D YOU KNOW? N ot ge t t i n g e n o u g h sl e ep ma ke s yo u sl e epy, m o re ir r i t a b l e, sl owe r (m e n t a ll y a n d p hy si c a ll y), cl u m si e r a n d m o re p ro n e to ma k in g e r ro r s , t a k in g r i sk s , a n d hav in g acci d e n t s . T h e s e e f fe c t s b u il d u p, day af te r day. Yo u ge t p ro g re s si vel y wo r s e b u t at t h e s a m e t im e yo u b e co m e l e s s a n d l e s s a b l e to ju d ge ju s t h ow ba dl y yo u a re d o in g .

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CURRENT ACTIONS OUR FIRST YEAR & MEMBERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES Most of our first year has been invested in building relationships, with a view to creation of a nation-wide Sleep Health Awareness

DI D YOU KNOW?

Week.

T h e re a re a w i d e r a n ge of

We are well progressed in discussions with Lions Clubs NZ and others to help amplify our messages during the 2019 world sleep day campaign, and the week we build around it. Equally important is establishing and growing our relationships with

f ac to r s t hat c a n di s tu r b t h e q ua li t y of sl e e p, in cl u din g p hy si o l o g i c a l , li fe s t y l e, a n d e nv iro n m e n t a l f ac to r s . At l ea s t 4 . 4% of M āo r i m e n ,

potential allies and supporters.

4 .1% of n o n - M āo r i m e n , 2 . 0%

Membership of the Foundation will be $40 for the part year until

of n o n - M āo r i wo m e n have

March 2019, when we will introduce a tiered membership programme to best reflect the needs of the specialisations and populations of

of M āo r i wo m e n , a n d 0 .7 % o b s t r u c t i ve sl e ep a p n o ea w i t h exce s si ve day t im e sl e e p in e s s .

our constituency.

A CASE STUDY INSIGHT WELLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL Sleep time moves progressively later as part of the developmental changes across adolescence. Teenagers also often have considerable variation in sleep timing and duration between nights with and without school the next day. For many, early school start times mean that they don't get enough sleep during the week. Knowing this, Wellington High School changed their start time from 09:00 to 10:30 for Years 12 and 13. This resulted in fewer reports of students losing sleep during the week and less sleepiness. In 2008, nearly all the students in Years 9 and 12 had at least one kind of technology in the bedroom. Those who report having more types of technology in their bedroom got less sleep on school nights. In a recent online survey, New Zealand teens reported using technology for about 2 hours between 9PM and 6AM. Borlase, B. J., et al. (2013). Sleep and Biological Rhythms, 11:46. Galland, B. C. et al. (2017). Sleep Health, 3:77.

DI D YOU KNOW? I n 20 0 8 a n e s t i mate d 13% of N ew Zea la n d e r s a ge d 20 - 59 yea r s (2 .317 m illi o n p e o p l e) ha d i n s o m n ia . T h e re i s n o fu n di n g i n t h e p u b li c h ea l t h c a re s y s te m fo r t h e in te r nat i o na ll y re co g n i s e d f i r s t li n e of t reat m e n t fo r i n s o m n ia , w h i ch i s co g n i t i ve b ehav i o u r a l t h e r a py. A 20 0 8 h ea l t h e co n o m i c s a na l y si s e s t imate d t hat su cce s s fu l in s o m n ia t reat m e n t wo u l d s ave t h e N ew Zea la n d e co n o my $21 . 8 m illi o n p e r yea r.

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


WARREN’S STORY THE EXPERIENCE THAT LIT A FIRE For the greatest part of these seven decades past I have been diagnosed as an asthmatic. Nothing special about that; especially since my early years passed in the fog created by caring parents lovingly converting anywhere around 150 cigarettes in to smoke, tar and ash. Each day. And every day. To survive more than sixty years before my first heart issue arose was, in hindsight, quite encouraging. An astute surgeon diagnosed my hitherto unknown HOCUM presentation, observing a condition I had apparently suffered some many years. Still not an outstanding story. But. It was considered credible that my health status was compromised in part through prolonged exposure to my smoker parent’s by-products, through chid and teenagehood. Jump forward another 8 years, and I present to my GP and friend, Larry Loo, with issues around my sleep patterns (or lack thereof!). Larry’s initial suspicion of my significant Sleep Apnea was both fully confirmed, and completely on target! But. I need to just back up the bus here. At that time I had been working on various creative production projects as an in-house and independant contract Director, Photographer, Editor and Writer for some forty-plus years. For the most recent time I was enjoying the privilege of working in the company of a truly vibrant and creastive team of professional communicators and promoters. In their open-plan environment small things such as notable personal traits, do get noticed. Like falling asleep whilst compiling a document. Waking to realise most of the screen’s real estate is filled with the letter ‘q’ is quite revealing. Or - even better snapping back to conciousness during a meeting and re-engaging in the discussion as if I had not been ‘gone’ for 30 seconds or more! Scarey stuff. My friends and colleagues have many times since shared their very gravest concerns for my wellbeing and safety, and I will be eternally grateful for their care and support. The point of all this really is my COSA affliction had come so very close to claiming me as a victim. A concurrent car collision, wherein I was likely asleep at the wheel, could have been my end. But from that point good things were to come. After some involvement, a CPAP device changed my life. On the very first night with it I slept like never before. The next morning my wife was quite concerned because of my deep slumber. She even shook me to confirm I was, in fact, alive! From that day my journey with sleep disorder began in earnest. Through personal experience I discovered our health services struggle to deliver quality support to those who, like myself prior to my diagnosis and treatment, present risk and danger every time they get behind the wheel. From back there then, to the here and now, is another story. And it is a good one.

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A CLINICIAN’S PERSPECTIVE COMMENT FROM ONE OF OUR TRUSTEES As a practicing Respiratory and Sleep Physician and academic working over 20 years I have seen both the enormous health benefits of treating sleep disorders and growing unmet need. There are few conditions that rival the gain in health related quality of life achieved by treating obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or dental appliances. Similar clinical benefit can be achieved by managing Insomnia with CBTi and using specific CNS stimulants for hypersomnia/narcolepsy. Unfortunately DHB based sleep clinics have been under-resourced such that they can only see the sickest patients and had to confine their expertise to OSA because of the current funding models. The kiwi epidemic of sleep disorders is being driven by rising levels of obesity, age, shift work, long work hours and increasing levels of anxiety. Public health initiatives are vital but this requires engagement with and sustained attention of government. An irony that should not be lost is that one of New Zealand’s our most successful companies, F&P Healthcare, leads the world in innovations for sleep breathing disorders but would be commercially defunct if it had to rely on the New Zealand health sector device sales even though we know there is a high disease burden from undiagnosed severe disease in this very same country. We have a better understanding of the community and economic impact of shift work and sleep restriction (insufficient sleep) on mood, work safety, productively (presentism). The SHF aims to broadly engaging with government & its ministries, the health sector, with business and regulators to ensure that its healthy sleep message is adopted. The Australasia Sleep Association is the lead professional body for sleep medicine and strongly supports the formation of the New Zealand Sleep Health Foundation. A MoU is being finalised outlining the shared vision and strategy goals. There is a tremendous opportunity provided through the formation of the Sleep Health Foundation of New Zealand to raise the profile of sleep disorders.

ASSOCIATE PROF. ALISTER NEILL Elected Trustee

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018

(M BCH B , M D, BSC)


WHAT’S NEXT? LOOKING FORWARD TO 2019 In March 2019 we will host our first ever Sleep Awareness Week. The objective will be to generate 1000 conversations across New Zealand about sleep health. We will do this through a number of activities including: 1.

Social and mainstream media campaigns

2. A series of fun activities focussing attention on sleep issues 3. Promoted widely by Lions Clubs and other networks throughout the country 4. Growing our membership and membership involvement 5. Participation in the World Sleep Day Organisation’s global campaign We will be seeking to engage a wide and comprehensive audience through social media activities.

DI D YOU KNOW? W h e n yo u slip in to a n u n co n t ro ll e d ‘ m i cro sl e ep’ yo u r b r a in s to p s p ro ce s sin g in fo r mat i o n fro m t h e o u t si d e wo r l d . I f yo u a re d r i v i n g , yo u w ill n ot s te e r a ro u n d t h e n ex t co r n e r o r s e e a ny o b s t acl e s i n yo u r pat h , u n t il s o m e t h i n g w a ke s yo u u p (e. g . t h e n o i s e of go in g in to t h e g r avel o n t h e si d e of t h e roa d).

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Annual Return Summary

Generated on:

8 October 2018

Registration Number:

CC54594

Charity Name:

The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Trust

Annual Return Reference:

AR001

For Year Ending:

31 March 2018

Charity Details Legal Name:

The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Trust

Trading Name: IRD Number:

121-819-597

Charity's Postal Address:

C-/ SWRC, Massey University Block 4, Level D Wellington Campus Wellington 6021

Charity's Street Address:

c-/ SWRC, Massey University PoBox 756 Wellington Campus Wellington 6140

Phone:

04 9793997

Fax: Email:

contact@sleephealth.org.nz

Website:

http://sleephealth.org.nz/

Facebook: Twitter: Social Network Name: Primary Contact

Alternative Contact

First Name:

Warren Jones

First Name:

Kat Teal

Email:

jonesy91946@gmail.com

Email:

contact@sleephealth.org.nz

Daytime Phone:

063765536

Daytime Phone:

049793997

Other Phone:

0273256004

Other Phone:

0276353998

Fax:

Fax:

Page 1 of 5

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


Officer Details Current Officers Name

Officer Type

Position

Position Appointment Date

Shirley Hull

Individual

Trustee

04/09/2018

Sarah-Jane Paine

Individual

Trustee

23/02/2018

Alexander John Bartle

Individual

Trustee

12/10/2016

Alister McKenzie Neil

Individual

Trustee

12/10/2016

Elaine Reilly

Individual

Trustee

12/10/2016

Lora Jade Wu

Individual

Trustee

12/10/2016

Philippa Helen Gander

Individual

Trustee

12/10/2016

Warren Jones

Individual

Trustee

12/10/2016

Officer Type

Position

Last Date as an Officer

Individual

Trustee

23/05/2017

Past Officers Name

Lance George Bickford

Purpose & Structure Purpose Charitable Purpose: The mission of the Trust is through targeted education programs to focus on government, corporate and community awareness about the need for sleep health. Sleep, along with diet and exercise, is one of the three pillars of health. Structure: Entity Structure: The entity is a charitable trust, the trustees of which are incorporated under the Charitable Trusts At 1957. Activity, Sector and Beneficiary Main Activity:

Provides advice / information / advocacy

Main Sector:

Health

Main Beneficiary:

General public

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16


People Paid work (average week) People employed full time:

0

People employed part time:

0

Average paid hours per week:

0

Volunteer work (average month) Total volunteers:

10

Volunteer hours:

250

Your Organisation Reporting Tier

Tier 4 (Can be used if annual operating payments are under $125,000 and charity has no Public Accountability.)

Provision of financial services

Does your charity, in its ordinary course of business, lend money (to or on behalf of others), or manage money or funds on behalf of others?

No

Income Spent on charitable purposes overseas

Over the last financial year, did your charity provide any goods or services overseas?

Over the last financial year did your Charity use any business income (e.g. sale of goods or services) for Charitable purpose overseas?

Over the last financial year, did your charity receive donations and use any of its funds for charitable purposes overseas?

No No No

Audit & Review

Is it a requirement of your charity's rules to have your performance report reviewed or audited? Please confirm that the performance report that you are submitting has been reviewed or audited: Reason why the performance report hasn't been reviewed or audited

Yes No

After advice we are looking into the possibility of changing the Trust Deed to not require auditing.

Related party transactions

Does your charity's performance report disclose any related party transactions?

No

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Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


Statement of Receipts and payments Operating Receipts

Donations, fundraising and other similar receipts:*

5,002

Fees, subscriptions and other receipts (including donations) from members:*

0

Receipts from providing goods or services:*

0

Interest, dividends and other investment receipts:*

0

Other receipts:*

0

Total receipts:

5,002

Operating Payments

Payments related to public fundraising:*

0

Volunteer and employee related expenses:*

0

Payments related to providing goods and services:*

4,013

Grants and donations paid:*

0

Other operating payments:*

75

Total operating payments:

4,088

Operating Surplus/Deficit Operating surplus/deficit:

914

Capital Receipts

Receipts from the sale of resources:*

0

Receipts from borrowings:*

0

Capital payments

Purchase of resources:*

0

Repayments of borrowings:*

0

Statement of Resources and Commitments Resources

Bank accounts and cash:*

914

Money held on behalf of others:*

0

Money owed to the entity by third parties:*

0

Other resources:*

0

Commitments

Money payable by the entity:*

0

Other commitments:*

0

Guarantees:*

0

Page 4 of 5 Annual Report 2018 Sleep Health Foundation

18


Supporting Information Certification Certifying Officer:

Kathryn Teal

Withhold Annual Return Withhold annual return:

No

Page 5 of 5

19

Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018


FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE COMMENTS The formation and registration of the Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Charitable Trust has, like many of the health-related trusts operating in our country, a back-story that is more than merely shows in an annual report. In our case it involved work and inputs in the form of service, opinion, ideas and financial support during the year prior to registration of this foundation; work that is not captured in our first report to the Charities Commission, as required by legislation. The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Trust Board records with gratitude inputs from a number of organisations and individuals, including, but not limited to: •

Fisher and Paykel Healthcare, for vital financial support with initial publications, legal engagement and facilitating meetings

Australasian Sleep Association, for seed funding to help enable the process of establishment of SHFNZ

Lance Bickford and Destination Manawatu, for support in publicly asset production and personal inputs to inaugural executive governance

Sleep/Wake Research Centre, its Director and Staff, for financial support, expert opinion, hosting activities and the free exchange of opinions and ideas that help make us who we are

Otago University Wellington for on-going collegial and financial support

Sleepwell Clinics for clinical perspectives, ‘coal-face’ experience and financial support

Fitzherbert Rowe Lawyers for seeing merit in our vision, giving expert and helpful opinion

Practicing Professionals in Sleep Health and related fields including Dr Alistair Watson and his team at MidCentral Health DHB, Dr Larry Loo GP and his team and Dr’s Andrew Veale and Michael Hlavac for their balanced and informed advice and support

The Sleep Apnea Association

and many more besides who have assisted in making this needed service a reality. Without these initiatives the likelihood of SHFNZ emerging as it has would almost certainly be compromised. Because of them the organisation is becoming well placed to deliver quality service and positive outcomes to our community.

Annual Report 2018 Sleep Health Foundation

20


The Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Trust 04 979 3997 contact@sleephealth.org.nz

www.sleephealth.org.nz 21

Sleep Health Foundation Annual Report 2018

Profile for SleepHealthNewZealand

Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Annual Report 2018  

Sleep Health Foundation New Zealand Annual Report 2018  

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