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Slave Magazine Team Editor In-Chief / Picture Editor: Ania Mroczkowska Editor In-Chief / Picture Editor: Louise Munro Design & Art Direction: Artur Dziewisz Features Writer: Kasia Mroczkowska Slave Magazine London www.slavemag.com


Cover Picture: Ania mroczkowska


Š Hanna Hillier


Q&A

with this issue contributors

Gidi van Maarseveen, 28  Photographer

Ann Russell, 27  Writer & Fashion Stylist

Where are you from? 

Where are you from? 

Amsterdam, The Netherlands   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Scotland   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Dreamer, perfectionist, mother, hard-worker, quirky 

A lover not a fighter   What are you a slave to?   Fashion, food and fun 

What are you a slave to?   My little daughter Ella and my work


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Arne Grugel, 32  Photographer

Chris Callaway, 30

Photographer

Christopher Park, 30

Photographer

Where are you from? 

Where are you from? 

Where are you from? 

Berlin   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Oklahoma & California   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Belfast   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Avocado Salt Pepper Lemon Marmalade   What are you a slave to?

Pelican, Rose, Pecan Pie, Tongue, Door   What are you a slave to?

Decisive, indecisive, no… definitely decisive   What are you a slave to?

Creating my world

Temptation

Originally, my mother. Now, photography, film, and my landlord


Tim Hans, 24

Photographer

Fenia Labropoulou, 46

Photographer

Where are you from? 

Where are you from? 

Los Angeles, California   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Athens, Greece   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Skateboarder, Creator, Aspring nomad, Epicurean, Explorer   What are you a slave to?

Experiment, Passion, Truth, Simple, Determination   What are you a slave to?

The endless quest for new images

Light

Francisco Gomez de Villaboa, 29  Photographer Where are you from?  Andalucía, Spain   Please describe yourself using 5 words Optimistic, Compromised, Dreamer, Adventorous and Passionate   What are you a slave to?   I am slave to trying to understand and capture people’s essence of human being. There is an instant much shorter than a second when people show their real expression and emotion to go back to their mask. I am slave to the realness.


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Photographer

Rozen Antonio, 30

Photographer

Marco Di Fillippo, 41  Photographer

Miss Aniela, 27

Where are you from? 

Where are you from? 

Where are you from? 

Rome   Please describe yourself using 5 words

London   Please describe yourself using 5 words

Born and raised in Cavite, Philippines; now base in Dubai, UAE

Futuristic, Creative, Ambitious Vegan Photographer   What are you a slave to?

Deep, instinctive, honest, imaginative, melancholy   What are you a slave to?

Raw food

Thought - and tea

  Please describe yourself using 5 words Colours, lights, creativity, imagination, vision   What are you a slave to?  I’m not a slave of anything but I’m obsessed with creative minds...


Photography = Great responsibility Gérard Rancinan talks to Kasia Mroczkowska about XXL, Paul McCarthy, The Raft of Illusions, and the great responsibility of photography.

Fresh off the train from Paris to London, Gérard Rancinan meets me at the Opera Gallery where his solo show, XXL, is held this month. When I ask about the hidden message behind XXL, “Well, I’m not too tall myself, you know,” he jokes in response. As a matter of fact, Mr Rancinan is not a tall guy, but at the same time, it seems that his bubbly personality and passionate approach to his profession will never let him go unnoticed in a crowd. It also inevitably translates into his works. As he continues talking about XXL, within seconds his facial expression changes from smiley into serious. “XXL constitutes of six huge pictures; we have already presented them in different museums in the world, and for the first time we want to present all these six pictures together. London and this gallery are perfect for that. Also it is a big challenge, as each picture is about 2.35 x 4 to 5 meters large, and it is not easy to print them, because the paper is always in three parts,” he explains. Some of Rancinan’s meticulously crafted photographic visions, like for instance The Raft of Illusions inspired by Théodore Géricault’s The Raft of Medusa, constitute direct references to the paintings of the great masters. There are numerous examples of contemporary artists who tend to go back in time in search for inspiration for their own works. What always intrigues me about using the past to talk about the present is the artist’s main motivation behind it. Gérard Rancinan exactly knows what his main motivation is, “to talk about our society,” he answers without a trace of hesitation. And then adds, “In fact I don’t care

about Géricault; of course I admire his style of painting, but, it’s not the most important. What really matters is that I want to make a reference to what is currently happening. In case of Géricault’s painting I was thinking about immigration. I remember when I was on a plane coming back from Hawaii; I opened Libération, and there was a small black and white picture of the beach and immigrant raft coming from Morocco; when I saw that picture I instantly thought about The Raft of Medusa. And then I thought that nothing has changed regarding our society; of course now we have TV and mobile phones, but people still have the same hopes, the same minds…” According to one of the theories of my best friend Eric, a former sociologist and currently a fledgling art critic, an average viewer hardly ever reflects upon the hidden meaning of a visually stunning piece of art. According to Gérard Rancinan it all depends on the context of ‘where’ and ‘who’. “If a picture is in a museum people seem to want to read the message behind it, and in a gallery it seems to be a bit different. In a museum you very often present the complete series, it instantly makes people think about the message behind them. Sometimes when you present a picture in a gallery for sale it changes a lot. I remember showing Batman Family in an art gallery in London; a banker comes in, wearing a black suit and holding a black suitcase he looks exactly like the batman from my picture…He bought the picture, but he didn’t care about its meaning; to him it was just its visual side, so sometimes it’s like that, you know.”


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The Feast of the Barbarians, 2013 - 235 x 350 cm Silver Print Aluminium frame under Diasec Š Studio Rancinan


And does Gérard Rancinan believe that contemporary art is still able to change things, save the world? “An artist today can say many things, but not many artists are sincere. Too much of it is just decorative art; it’s terrible! To me Paul McCarthy is the best, because he talks about our society, he is the one who says: ‘Look, you are stupid!’, and it takes a lot of courage to do that. I try to be in the middle, you know. The problem is artists need to earn money as well. My work is very expensive to produce, so in the end I need to sell as well.” Coming back to Paul McCarthy, his face covered with ketchup is one of the many famous faces depicted by Rancinan in his very own characteristic style. From Fidel Castro standing on the rocks with the storm approaching behind his back to John Paul II kissing the ground, all his portraits seem to have one thing in common - a unique element of narrative. “I always try to disappear behind my camera. The portraits I shoot are not classic poses. In each portrait I try to create a fusion between the person I photograph and what they represent to me,” explains Rancinan. “To take the portrait of Paul McCarthy, I met with him on Broadway. Once we sat down, he asked: ‘OK, Gérard, so are you ready to take my picture?’, but I said: ’No Paul, I do not want to shoot this kind of portrait.’ ‘So, how do you want to do it?’ he asked. And then I said: ‘I imagine that you have ketchup in your mouth, you look at the camera and then you spit’. ’Are you crazy?’ he asked me, ‘It would look like I’m spitting ketchup on people…’ But I managed to provoke him, and in the end he covered his face all over with ketchup. It looked so impressive! To me that picture is a perfect portrait, because it is not beautiful, but it has an element of performance. And I did the same thing with Castro; in the beginning he said: ‘OK, Gerard take my picture’, and I said: ‘No, we have to go outside, you have to provoke America!’ He was standing on the rocks, and suddenly a big storm arrived behind him, and I took his picture. It was incredible, we were very lucky! I like to ‘provoke’ such types of portraits.” It seems obvious to presume that trying to provoke that unexpected element that makes many of Gérard Rancinan’s portraits so unique means lots of pressure at the same time. “Of course! It’s terrible! There is always a pressure. When you have The Pope in front of you and you are taking his picture, in a way you are in a competition with god, because you stop time. If I took a picture of you this very moment; now you are young and beautiful, but in few minutes you will leave, and in thirty years you will look different. And maybe your children would look at that picture and say: ‘Wow! This is my mother, but it is not the same woman, she looks different. But I will keep your image with me, and to me you will always be the girl from the picture. It is a big responsibility. I am always nervous about it. I can’t sleep before my photo shoots. You never want to miss anything, and you always have just one chance. The responsibility of photography is so important for me, because by taking a picture you stop time! You stop time!”


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Decadence, 2011- 235 x 470 cm Argentic print mounted on Plexiglas in artist’s frame Š Studio Rancinan


On the way back from Disneyland, 2011 - 235 x 450 cm Argentic print mounted on Plexiglas in artist’s frame Š Studio Rancinan


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The Raft of Illusions, 2008 - 217 x 320 cm Argentic print mounted on Plexiglas in artist’s frame Š Studio Rancinan


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Riots, 2013 - 180 x 280 cm Argentic print mounted on Plexiglas in artist’s frame Š Studio Rancinan


Skateboarders A Global Typology Portraits by Tim Hans

Often misunderstood and proud of the fact, skateboarders share a persistence of mindset that drives their success. Landing that first kickflip does something to rewire a person’s neurons — the timid turn bold; the innocent, experienced; satisfaction is attained through progress; and most importantly, more is never enough. As a sport in transition to mainstream attention, some of the individuals photographed have dreams of making it. Others are the last of a dying breed. But careful reflection on each individual evokes a true sense of what it means to be a skateboarder. They do it because it’s what they love; it’s their Rushmore. You may not get it, but look in their eyes — they don’t need you to.


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www.callawayimages.com

Rebound Therapy Photography& Collage : Chris Callaway Models provided by : Photogenics


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From Sweden To Portsmouth: The journey of Karin Park. Interview by Chris Purnell Pictures by Ania Mroczkowska Make Up & Hair: Maria Mckenna Styling: Malcolm Mafara

Karin Parks is very busy. Something I didn’t know until forty-five minutes into my wait for her so we could begin the interview. What I already knew was that Swedish born singer and keyboardist had won four Norwegian Grammies, and has a raft of highprofile fans like David Bowie. But unsure of how much weight being called the biggest pop star in Norway held, I listened to ‘Shine,’ her new single, and her effort to bring her darkly poppy, electro-infused, Hot Chip-esqu sound to the UK mainstream with the help of her new Portsmouth based label State of the Eye. What I have since come to know is that her unusual Shire-like childhood, Norwegian fame, her formative years in Japan, famous fans, and her statuesque physique can cloud the fact that she is a creative musician with a strong point-of-view. But we asked about the other stuff. I’m listening to your new track, Shine, a lot. It’s strangely hypnotic and danceable. I was wondering if the lyrics are written to someone, or you had someone in mind when writing it. It just seems like a painful love letter.   I wrote it to someone I really care for, so that he’d know I’ll be around no matter how bad things get. Life isn’t easy, but we can try to make it a bit better for each other.   What do you want people to take from it?   I picked up a hitchhiker the other day. She said the song was a real hitchhiking track. So people make up their own minds about what to take from it. When I write it, it means something to me. But when people listen, they make it their own. That’s pretty cool.

I have read a lot about you, but even though there is a lot of information out there about your early life, you still seem mysterious. I was wondering if you want to remain mysterious, or if I am making that up.  I don’t feel I’ve tried to be mysterious. Quite the opposite. I’ve let people interview me in my house and do all sorts of things. But I think I naturally don’t give away much. Not as an artist and not as a person either. But I mean, in these facebook days you seem mysterious if you don’t put your breakfast on facebook. I am good at listening and taking things in. And then I turn it in to songs. That should be enough for an artist, no?   Where did music enter the picture for you?   I’ve been singing since I was 2 years old. I never got tired of it. I probably knew a hundred songs by heart when I was 4.   When did you think that music was going to be your life?   I’ve never really thought about anything else. It sounds weird maybe, but I never had any options in my mind. I think everyone in my family always knew that was the only thing for me.   Did you have a dream back then of how you wanted your life to go?   As a child I wanted to be a popstar. Then when I started to write music, the songs became more important and I wanted to write my own songs and move people with them.


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Jacket and skirt: ZDDZ


What was growing up like?   The village where I grew up was small and safe and our family was a proper music family with everyone playing at all corners of the house. My brother got his first drum kit when he was 3. I had my first band at 11 and we rehearsed in the living room. But we also moved to a missionary school in Japan for some years. My parents got a job there. I had never been outside Sweden by that point so it was a big change. I think that made our family very close. And it certainly made us all get a different view on life.   What did your parents do?   My parents were teachers. And my dad was a principal at the missionary school.   Looking back, how do you feel about that time now? I think I was very lucky to have encouraging parents. I remember listening to them as a kid one night when they thought I was sleeping. My dad said, ‘Karin really is a bit of a weird one, isn’t she?’ My heart sunk and I nearly started to cry where I sat at the top of the stairs listening to them at the kitchen table downstairs. And then my mum said, ‘Yes, she truly is. But that’s why we love her so much, isn’t it?’ Those words have meant a lot to me.   Your music is dark, and you have said you explore the darkness, as you didn’t really get a chance in the church. That suggests to me that the church limited you. How do you feel about music then, and now?   The church gave me a stage to perform at from a very early age and I got a lot of practice even if I wasn’t always keen to get up on Sundays and sing. I wouldn’t have been the stage persona I am today without that practice. But as a thinking child I didn’t take in all the religious stuff as hard facts. I knew better. But the church opened my mind to all sorts of things rather than limit me even if it wasn’t their intention maybe. I’m too curious to just buy in to a religion. To think for myself is so much more interesting and I have a vivid imagination. To explore darkness is really to explore the reality of life.  

Your brother is the drummer in your band – how did that come about?   At one point, I really needed someone in the band who could do a bit of everything. That understood the music from more than one aspect. My brother is very multitalented musician and a sound engineer too, but I didn’t know if it would work between him and me. We didn’t live in the same country and hadn’t spoken much for years. But we tried it and it worked really well. Eventually, we didn’t need anyone else in the band. He does pretty much everything. I couldn’t do without him now and he’s been in the band for 10 years.   What are the challenges of working with family? That my brother always sees me as his sister. So when I need him to treat me as a professional, I’m still just his sister.   How do your parents feel about your career now?   I think you have to ask them. But my impression is that they are really proud that I managed to follow my dream. They feel sick about my music sometimes, but some songs they really love. What was the impetus to come to the UK?   I got signed by a UK record label. I was about to sign with SONY in Sweden but I went for the smaller label in the UK instead. Best choice I’ve ever made. I’ve worked with them for 4 years now and they’re great. The UK is very refreshing.   What’s the dream for you now?   I want to go to LA this year. I’ve never been, but something is calling for me there. Apart from that, I want my record to do really well so I can keep on doing this.


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Jacket and shirt: ZDDZ


www.gidivanmaarseveen.com

Voyage Photography: Gidi van Maarseveen @ Benjamin Braddock Styling: Babette Tielrooij Make up / hair: Christel Man @ Angelique Hoorn Model: Lucia @ Elvis Models


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Collar: COS Shirt: Tijme Veldt Necklace and Earrings: ivy & liv


Chain: Jan Boelo Pants: Anbasja Blanken Glasses: vintage Ring: Cristel Ball


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Sweater H&M Pants: Matthijs Hat: Phintage Chain: Zara


Jacket: Weekday Apron: Laura dolls Cap: Diesel Necklace: Cristel Ball Leggings: Weekday


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Pants: Jivika Biervliet Sweater: COS Collar: COS Jacket Guess Necklace: Cristel Ball


The Next Generation by Ann Russell

Fashion innovation is at the heart of London Fashion Week thanks to Fashion Scout, the champions of new design talent. Now in its seventeenth season, the celebrated showcase has given hundreds of emerging designers the opportunity to present their collections on a catwalk and the platform to promote their label around the world. Fashion Scout’s alumni reads like a who’s who of desirable designers including Peter Pilotto, Felder Felder, David Koma and Eudon Choi. Looking to the next generation we spoke to two rising stars – George Styler and Sarah Ryan - both hailed as ‘Ones to Watch’ for Autumn/Winter 2014 and beyond. February was a great month for you both. Tell us about your time in London presenting at Fashion Scout. George: “I was really excited to show my work in London. Travelling is my greatest inspiration and London is like a small world of its own. I discovered so many wonderful nationalities and cultures in the city. For me, London is the capital of fashion. It’s the only place where young designers are taken seriously and given a prominent platform to show off their work.” Sarah: “Fashion Scout massively helped me as it was quite daunting coming out of university and realising that you’re on your own without your tutors or network of classmates. I’ve been on a huge learning curve and I’m really proud of the collection I showed. I was in the process of moving to London when I found out about Fashion Scout so I decided to stay in Ireland and focus on making the collection the best it could be. The fashion industry is very oversaturated so it’s important to find likeminded people that will take time to stop and critically think about your work. I’ve been fortunate to be part of Fashion Scout straight out of university and it’s given my work a brilliant platform.”

Tell us about your journey from graduate to independent designer. George: “I’m a textiles design graduate from The College of Textiles, Design, Technology and Management in Belgrade. My career began at a local fashion house called ‘Todor’ where I designed ranges of clothing for men, women and children. I was given a wide range of experience and learned about printing, embroidery and knitwear which then became my passion. I decided to present my first independent collection for FASHIONCLASH Maastricht in 2012 and subsequently at Belgrade Fashion Week. My first experience in London was last February at the International Fashion Showcase where I held an exhibition of my work. “ Sarah: “I’m fresh out of university and am so grateful to have presented at Fashion Scout so early in my career. I found out we were part of Fashion Scout in December last year so we had 3 months to get ready. It was an intense time but also really rewarding. I’ve also interned at Roksanda Ilincic and Gareth Pugh where I had the opportunity to go to London and Paris Fashion Week which was a great experience. I had quite a lot of responsibility including pattern drafting, textile development, running the studio and dealing with press. These skills have all helped me develop my own business.” What’s special about your Autumn/Winter 2014 collection? George: “I’ve brought together a variety of international cultures exploring the connections between different people in our modern society. By combining styles from different parts of the world I wanted to suggest that we are all connected together. You can see elements of Africa, as well as the Balkans, South America and Britain in my work. I fully embrace the past, present and future by using traditional styles to represent contemporary ideas. The collection is called ‘Network’ which also refers to the interweaving and interlacing of materials that are characteristic of my work.”


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Designer - Sarah Ryan Model - Li-Ann Smal @Distinct Model Management & Storm Models Makeup - Debbie Taaffe  Photography - Alex Hutchinson


Sarah: “With this collection I showed some pieces that are more wearable. My graduate collection was quite conceptual because I think it’s important to explore that avenue whilst you’re still at university but moving forward the pieces I showed at Fashion Scout were much more wearable whilst retaining my signature style.” Neither of you studied in London, how have your roots influenced your design aesthetic? George: “I was born in Bosnia and Herzegovina but have spent most of my life in Belgrade where I currently live and work. Serbia has a very rich culture but it’s hard coming from a country out with the UK because I wasn’t educated here. I like to be present as a designer in London as much as possible but it’s better for my pieces to be made at home in Serbia because it’s cheaper and also gives me a point of difference.” Sarah: “Moving from the city back to my quiet home environment in Ireland has hugely inspired me. My family network is very influential. They’re completely unique to me and are always introducing me to new things. My graduate collection was based on my two brothers who are both surgeons. I used their occupations coupled with their personalities to create specific silhouettes and looked at how muscles react with one another to help or hinder the body’s movements.” How do you use fabrics to communicate your vision? George: “I have a passion for knitwear and like to play with colour and texture. Knitwear gives me the opportunity to do this freely and I recently discovered 3D knitwear which I used in my current collection. It’s very difficult to find materials in my country because it’s a very small market but I try to source things locally as much as possible. That’s why I chose to design knitwear because it’s easier to order the yarns. I then create my own materials as it’s more interesting to have original fabric than buying it on mass.” Sarah: “My technique was developed at college in the January of my final year. I spent hours experimenting with different materials and fabrics. Eventually I found the right one and the process became easier. I predominantly use rubber and leather for the main structure and underneath there are delicate wools and soft chiffons. I like mixing harder and softer elements with one another. They look like they’re not comfortable but they really are!” Describe the different elements of your design process and the challenges you typically face. George: “To create a collection I follow four main stages - making sketches, selecting yarns, producing the garments and promoting them. I need to take on many different roles from designing

to managing my studio and doing as much PR as I can. I also decorate all the garments myself. The biggest challenge for me is finding investment in my business. The pieces I create aren’t commercial, they’re used in magazine shoots but typically don’t sell to the general public. After my next collection I hope to generate more funding. Thankfully creativity is never a challenge, I always have new ideas.” Sarah: “I hand make everything myself. I have two or three people who help me as and when required but most of the time I work on my own. The pieces are quite time intensive and each one can take up to a week to make so it really involves lots of motivation on my part and hours and hours of experimentation. I have an idea of the end point in mind but I allow the pieces to evolve organically. I place a huge emphasis on craft based processes like weaving that are time consuming but very worth it.” Who is your customer or who would you like them to be? George: “My customer is a young and independent person who likes to be different and wear garments that look like works of art. The pieces you see on the catwalk are quite eccentric but it’s encouraging that nobody has compared my work to other designers which reinforces the idea that I’m completely original.” Sarah: “I don’t agree with boxing people in by age, weight or career choice. For me my customer is someone who wants to wear beautiful, unique things. Ideally I’d love to see my work on someone like Tilda Swinton. Everyone engages with fashion differently and it’s quite exciting when someone likes your work when you didn’t necessarily think they would.” What are your plans for the rest of 2014? George: “I intend to present another collection at Fashion Scout in September. If I don’t do this there’s a chance people might forget me so I need to keep promoting my work and present some strong Spring/Summer pieces. I would like to grow the company and intend to continue designing womenswear and menswear but introduce a series of swimwear, underwear and accessories next season. “ Sarah: “This year I just want to keep creating. I’m quite fortunate in the sense that I’m not tied to anything and there’s no pressure to go in a specific direction so it’s just important that for next season I create completely original work and continue to grow. I’ve had lots of great feedback and opportunity from Fashion Scout so I’m going to take advantage of that and move my studio to London as soon as possible. Hopefully I’ll be able to show again in September.”


Photographer: Andrija Rancic Designer: George Styler Hair: Ucha Hair Mua: Goran Kukolj Models: Andrea Radosavljevic, Nevena Trninic, Katarina Rancic, Joksimovic Bojan


lafenia.com

SoRRow Photographer: Fenia Labropoulou Art direction: Celebrity Skin Makeup / hair: Renos Politis Model: Jessica at Ace Photo assistant: Artemis Cavallaro Styling assistants: Stefano Pepe / Marios Karavasilis Location: Studio 146


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Jewel on Helmet: T+O Helmet / Top / Neck: Celebrity Skin Skirt: Leon by Ilias Wia


Hat: Marios Karavasilis for Leon Dress / Neck: Celebrity Skin Cape: Mi-Ro Shoes: Jeffrey Campbell Skull: Natasha Papazoglou


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Dress & Fake Fur: Mink Pink Neck / Belt / Skirt: Celebrity Skin Jewel: T+O Gloves: Boudoir Shoes: Jeffrey Campbell


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Hat: Marios Karavasilis Neck / Short Pants: Celebrity Skin Coat: Mi-Ro Top: Underground Jewel: Fotios Ballas Shoes: Jeffrey Campbell Opposite page: Jewel on Helmet: T+O Helmet / Long Skirt / Top / Neck: Celebrity Skin Short Skirt: Leon by Ilias Wia Bag: Anna Smith Shoes: Jeffrey Campbell


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Le Joueur de R么les Photography & Postproduction: Gomez de Villaboa Model: Nahel Drici @ Supa Model Management Styling: Jade Wise Hair: Chloe Oakes Make up: Julia Wren using NARS Photo Assistant: Marcos Ocana Fashion Assist: Flo Moss

Blue silky scarf: Top Shop Black backpack: Cambridge Satchel Company


White linen Dungarees, cardigan and shoes: Vivienne Westwood Belt worn as blindfold: Stylist’s archive


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Cream cape and Cream trousers: Vivienne Westwood MAN


Black and white checked suit: Vivienne Westwood MAN White shoes: Vivienne Westwood Gold label Customised neckpiece: Jade Wise


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Grey tuxedo and white shirt: Rake Black Shoes & White Linen scarf: by Vivienne Westwood


www.arnegrugel.com

Reporter Photographer: Arne Grugel Photographer Assistant: Ana Catala Styling: Julia Quante Hair & Make Up: Kim Keusen at Ace Fury Collective Models: Sophia at Mega Models and Paul at Viva Models


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Coat: Denham Shirt: Ben Sherman


Her: Coat: Ganni Dress: Dawid Tomaszewski Him: All: Herr von Eden


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Her: Pants & Coat: Malene Birger Blouse: Achtland Earrings: Ina Beissner Him: Coat: Herr von Eden Pants: Sissi Gรถtze Shirt: G-Star


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Her: Overall: Monki Coat: Odeeh Shirt: Filippa K Ring: Akkesoir Him: Suit: Ben Sherman Shirt: Henrik Vibskov


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Her: Top: Odeeh Coat: Herr von Eden Bag: Dimitri Earrings: & Other Stories


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www.marcodifilippo.com

Voyage Photographer: Marco Di Filippo Stylist: Rainer Metz Hair: David Lee Grenda @ Blossom Berlin Make Up: Trine Marie Skauen Model: Lysann @ Mega Models Assistent: Phuong Lam Production: www.tmstudio.no Location: Concept Store M Berlin Special Thanks to: Ăœmit!


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Short vest: Vibe Johansson Long vest: XCONCEPT


Leather jacket: Sasha Kanevski Pants: Ade Velkon Necklace as headpiece: Theobalt


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Mask: Sasha Kanevski Rings: Ricarda Enderweit


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Sweater: Ivanman Headpiece: Little Shilpa


Leather jacket: Vibe Johansson Mask: Sasha Kanevski


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Jacket: SDOD Heels: United Nude


www.rozenantonio.com

LosEncantos Photographer: Rozen Antonio Models: Wekafore, Muhanad Stylist: Ushi Sato Make-Up Artist: Brianzon Acallar Production Assistant: Gyn Mendoza


whole look: Angel de Jesus


whole look: Benj Uy


whole look: Angel de Jesus


whole look: Benj Uy


whole look: Angel de Jesus


whole look: Benj Uy


www.chrisparkphotography.com

The Futurist Photography: Chris Park Styling: Ann Russell Model: Tara Nowy  Make up: Carol Fairfield Hair: Carlina Cicognani Photographers assistant: Daniel Hearn


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Leather cuff top: Zara: Panel Skirt: Jacob Birge Vision


Dress and cape: Natalie Adamson-Wain


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White dress: Jacob Birge Vision


Panel top: Jacob Birge Vision Leather shorts: Vintage


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Plastic mac: Joanne McGillivray Black body: Topshop


www.missaniela.com

Lordship Photographer: Miss Aniela Stylist: Minna Attala Stylist’s assistant: Becky Smith Photographer’s assistants: Tim Charles Matthews & Ian Mears


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Model: Marta Razza Dress: Sorapol Underskirt: National Theatre Costume Archive Headpiece: Stylist’s own Shoes: Sorapol Hair: Doubravka Marcinkova Make-up: Rhiannon Chalmers


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Model: Natalia Doktor Dress: Busardi Collar: Della Reed Silk neck ruff: National Theatre Costume Archive Headpiece: Clea Broad Shoes: Stylist’s own Hair: Tati Zarubova Make up: Monica Storrs


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Model: Gemma Huh Corset, bloomers, half pannier cage skirt & fontage headdress: National Theatre Under garment: Stylist’s own Ballet shoes: Dancia Silk fabric draped over skirt: Berwick Silks Hair: Tati Zarubova Make-up: Rhiannon Chalmers


The End


The reproduction of any part of this publication is strictly prohibited without prior permission from Slave Magazine, including titles, logos, and graphics. Exceptions are granted for press and blogs were there is a link a back to slavemag.com and full credits are included and for downloading to media devices for personal use. The views expressed in Slave Magazine are those of the contributors and are not necessary shared by Slave Magazine. All rights reserved. Copyright Š Slave Magazine 2013 See website for full terms and conditions. slavemag.com


Slave Magazine issue 14