Issuu on Google+


I U 1

S E

S 1


Slave Magazine Team Ania Mroczkowska Editor In-Chief / Picture Editor Artur Dziewisz Design & Art Direction Louise Munro Editor In-Chief / Picture Editor Kasia Mroczkowska Features Writer

Slave Magazine Avenue Road, N6 5DT London www.slavemag.com contact@slavemag.com


slavemag.com


Slave Magazine


q & a with this issue contributors

Alex Taylor/ Writer

Alisa Berezhnaya / Photographer

How old are you? I’m 20.

How old are you? 27

Where are you from? Doncaster, UK

Where are you from? I was born in Ukraine, but live in Paris, France

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Probably a cat, I’m pretty independent but always appreciative of my own home.

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Wolf What superpower would you like to be gifted with? Time manipulation

What superpower would you like to be gifted with? Flight, it’s got to be the best way to travel. What are you a slave to? My imagination and ambitions

What are you a slave to? My work, fashion, talented people, Trent Reznor (NIN) and androgynous beauty.


Slave Magazine

Andrea Zvadova / Photographer

Bradford Bird & Alistair Vlok / Photographers

How old are you? 32

How old are you? Collectively we’re 70.

Where are you from? Slovakia

Where are you from? Both Londoners by now as we have been here for over a decade each, but originally South African.

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Flying horse

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Dogs

What superpower would you like to be gifted with? Teleporting would be definitely my favourite superpower but surely I’d love to posses many many more if possible. What are you a slave to? I’m not sure if I am slave to anything in particular. Freedom wins over a slavery. But I love to be with my loved ones, people who can I laugh with and talk to a lot, I love great food, inspiring art, untouched nature and when the things are going right way and I love to be loved.

What superpower would you like to be gifted with? Time travel What are you a slave to? Still having to work for a living


Christoph Klutsch / Photographer

Hanna Hillier / Photographer

How old are you? thirty something..;-)

How old are you? 22

Where are you from? Frankfurt, Germany. If you were an animal, what animal would you be? My girlfriend associates me with a mole, I see myself elegant as a panther and I would love to be a cute kitty cat (cause girls love kitty cats).

Where are you from? Bow

What superpower would you like to be gifted with? I’m already gifted and sometimes turn to a vermilion-red version of hulk. What are you a slave to? I’m a slave to the rhythm.

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Tiger What superpower would you like to be gifted with? To heal What are you a slave to? Rap music


Slave Magazine

Isa Silva / Photographer

JC Cerilla / Photographer

Jose Ferreira / Photographer

How old are you? 25

How old are you? 27

How old are you? 26 years old

Where are you from? Portugal

Where are you from? Manila, Philippines

Where are you from? Portugal/Lisbon

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? An elephant What superpower would you like to be gifted with? To fly What are you a slave to? A big emotions

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Since I was born in the year of the Tiger, I would say Tiger.

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? White tiger

What superpower would you like to be gifted with? Whatever Superman has I want that. What are you a slave to? I’m a slave to my photography and to my life.

What superpower would you like to be gifted with? To fly What are you a slave to? Goverment


Juan Carrera/ Photographer

Koutarou Washizaki / Photographer

How old are you? I’m 28 but age is just a number, who cares?

How old are you? 28

Where are you from? I’m from Buenos Aires, Argentina and lived in Tokyo for the last 8 years.

Where are you from? Japan

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? I would be a human and love animals! I’m happy to be what I am. What superpower would you like to be gifted with? I would like to be gifted with the power of Invisibility to get into any place without being observed and shoot everything I would like to! But I think everyone is gifted with super powers. What are you a slave to? I’m a slave to my passion, I can’t stop loving photography!

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Dog What superpower would you like to be gifted with? I would be happy if my body did not need sleeping. What are you a slave to? Working and shopping!


Slave Magazine

Nicholas Hayward / Photographer

Shawn Reinoehl / Photographer

How old are you? 19 years old

How old are you? Not old enough to know better :)

Where are you from? Clevedon, a small town near Bristol. I’m now based in London.

Where are you from? Mile high city & been in NYC for over 5 years

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? A black panther, enjoying freedom and adventure in dark forests. What superpower would you like to be gifted with? The ability to shape shift. What are you a slave to? My art, ideas and exploring new fashions and artists.

If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Emperor Tamarin What superpower would you like to be gifted with? The ability to give anyone super powers What are you a slave to? My computer


Photography: Hanna Hillier Stylist: Sabina Emrit Make-up : Amy Rose Macdonald Hair: Danny Defreitas Models: Natalie & Lyza@storm rob@select jace@next

I C

T O

’

S M

P

HANNA-HILLIER.COM

L

I

T

E

C D

A


Slave Magazine

Natalie wears: Dress: ASOS Earrings: H&M Bag: Next Ring H&M Small ring: Vintage Boys wear: Trousers: Zara Man & models own


Blazer: Topshop


Slave Magazine

Natalie wears: Bodysuit: Motel Rocks Shoes: Schuh Earrings: H&M Rings: Vintage Rob wears: Trousers: Zara Man Jace wears: Trousers: Models own


Slave Magazine

Natalie wears: Shirt: Vintage


Natalie wears: Jacket: Topshop Trousers: Zara Bag China Doll Boutique Rings: Stylists own Watch: Models own Male models wear: Trousers: Zara man & models own


Slave Magazine

Lyza wears: Swimsuit: We Are Handsome Belt: Vintage Skirt: Vintage Bondage Natalie wears: Shirt: Finders Keepers Skirt: Limited Edition Atmosphere


Natalie Wears: Jacket: Topshop Jace wears: Trousers: Zara Man


Slave Magazine

Top: Hemyca


h

e WEAREADVENTURERS.COM

a

v

e

n

f

a

c

ed Photography: weareadventurers Model: Danielle Hayes @ Darley Models (Australia) Make-up & Hair: Jamie Richardson Clothing Labels:: Material By Product and Nevada Duffy


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Y O U B E

N E E D

T O

I N T R U S I V E

S O M E T I M E S An encounter with Sean Smith by Kasia Mroczkowska


Slave Magazine

I left Sean Smith’s exhibition, On the margins, feeling even more curious than before. Prior to visiting the Dissenters’ Chapel and Gallery of Kensal Green Cemetery where the exhibition was held, I had presumed that my research regarding this award-winning photographer and film-maker for the Guardian, where he has been on staff for twenty-five years, was rather complete. I had been aware of Smith’s international recognition for his coverage of conflicts and wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon and DR Congo. I had watched Iraq 10 years on: a photographer’s story, Endgame in Afghanistan and Inside the surge more than once, and carefully studied his pictures. My interview questions had been prepared in my head long before I went to see the exhibition. Visiting On the margins not only opened my eyes to a slightly different side of Smith’s work, but also made me more curious about his persona, changing my initial plan for the interview I was soon going to make. First of all, the showcased pictures of junkies, prostitutes and all sorts of ‘marginalized people’ made me think that ‘war photographer’ wouldn’t be the one and only label you could put on Sean Smith’s work. Second of all, thanks to the exhibition’s invigilator, Regina, who turned out to be an invaluable source

of information regarding Smith’s biography, I managed to discover a couple of intriguing facts about his life. As she saw me talking to myself while closely examining pictures of ‘gut men’, she explained, to my utter surprise, that Smith himself worked as part of the slaughtering team in the 70s. Through my conversation with the invigilator I also found out that there is something special about the ring that Smith has been wearing on his finger for many years now. Another interesting clue I was given, was the book. The theory of my close friend, Eric, says: ‘never judge the book by its cover, but always judge people by the books they read’. According to On the margins press release, I was handed; it was reading Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle that Smith mentioned alongside meeting the mother of his children when speaking about things that happened to him through working in a slaughterhouse. Having left the exhibition, I immediately got hold of The Jungle that turned out to be the famous novel documenting the brutal conditions in the Chicago stockyards at the turn of the century. I also ended up erasing the previous questions from my head and started filling my notebook with words followed by question marks: ‘slaughterhouse?’, ‘the book?, ‘the ring?’...


“How did you find out about the ring?!” he asks me, seeming rather surprised, when we finally talk in a café in the heart of Dalston. Thin, irregularly shaped ring is less impressive than I imagined it to be, but its story is definitely one of a kind, and relates to the times when Smith worked in “a small slaughterhouse in Cambridge”. ”Nails and different stuff dropped out, and suddenly the ring dropped out of cow’s stomach. I rubbed it on the apron, and it turned out to be a cheap, gold ring. It was a bit too big, so I squashed it not to lose it. I ended up wondering who it belonged to, and how the cow came to eat it with the grass…” It is always interesting to think about coincidences that lead to certain situations and the story of Sean’s ring sounds a bit like Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale, The Brave Tin Soldier that, in a way, could be read as a story about coincidences and their consequences in life. So, how did it actually happen that young Sean Smith ended up working in a slaughterhouse? “I was unemployed at that time; at some point I moved down to Cambridge and was staying on someone’s settee. I went to the job centre and applied for a job, any sort of job. And when I got it, in the beginning I didn’t quite know what to expect; so when the guy asked me about experience,


Slave Magazine

I said I once skinned a rabbit or something like that / smiles/. When I started the job, it was winter, so the smell wasn’t so bad…, and I was really grateful to get some work. At that time there was a lot of youth unemployment, the situation was really bad, and I thought that this was what I would be doing for the rest of my life until I got sucked…”/laughs/ For the future documentary photographer and filmmaker, slaughterhouse appeared to be an interesting place to observe. “Most of the crew were Poles, or ex prisoners of war, and the guy who did the killing was the SS bloke; but he wasn’t a bad person, he was a lovely guy, actually. Most of the guys were near retirement. It was this weird, little world where all those people got stuck at the end of their lives, still killing things.” That ‘weird, little world’ was not only interesting to watch, but it also inspired and at some point turned out to be ‘a step forward’. “I was taking pictures when I was working in a slaughterhouse. Finally I had some money, so I could buy a new camera, and I could afford to get the photos processed. Those were black and white pictures at that time. I didn’t know how you could make a living out of taking pictures, but I was doing it, because I just wanted to do it…”

And there was also The Jungle, he discovered at that time, and would always perceive through the prism of his own experience; “of course the slaughterhouse where I worked wasn’t like that massive slaughterhouse in Chicago, and no one was in I desperate straits like the characters in the book; but it was definitely something about being slightly trapped in the kind of life that you didn’t particularly want to be in…” Having left slaughterhouse Smith moved back to London; among odd jobs he did at that time, there was making paint kettles and press braking. At some point he ended up freelancing for The Times and Time magazine. He was also “doing ‘paparazzi stuff’ for around a year; sort of, fell into it by an accident, photographing Lady Diana and royals…” One of the common assumptions is that paparazzi are the kind of people who would have lots of fascinating stories to tell about VIPs they photographed, but Sean Smith seems not to be able to think of any; “they were just boring and uninteresting people”, he recalls. In general, from the very beginning Smith wasn’t rather excited by the prospect of working as paparazzo for the rest of his life. “People have an idea that you just took pictures of Diana and they were worth a fortune, but they often weren’t; and I wasn’t really cut out for it.”


From then on, he started getting closer and closer to what he was cut out for; in some strange way it seems to me, that meeting Paul Raymond in the late 80s was some sort of good omen. “I wrote a letter to Paul Raymond asking if I could take photos at Madame Jojo’s and backstage, and to my surprise I got an answer back. It was his right-hand man, Carl Snitcher, who called me in. And finally I met Paul Raymond who let me take as many pictures as I wanted. I don’t know why, but I kind of liked him, there was something soulful about him.” It was 1988 when Sean Smith joined the Guardian and since then has worked in all areas of photojournalism, including war photography being a big a part of his work. As a natural born pacifist who is generally scarred by the slightest signs of violence (even people brawling in the street make me run in the opposite direction), I am curious to find out what a man, who is not a soldier, feels when being sent into a conflict zone. “It keeps changing, it is never the same. It is always a bit of a struggle to go. You always want to make it mean something. You do not want to just show dark sky with smoke. You always try to tell a certain story in pictures rather than just words.” And what about natural human feelings like, for example, fear?


Slave Magazine

“You need to think about that beforehand and embrace it. Of course you might get injured, or worse, or whatever; but you cannot worry too much once you are there. You need to do your worry before you go, and then what happens, happens. But you always have to think what could happen beforehand, not to pretend that something bad couldn’t happen to you. So, embrace it, and then get on a plane, and go.”/smiles/ In comparison to other types of documentary photography, pursuing war photography seems to have one advantage - it must be easier to take pictures of people in conflict zones, as they wouldn’t even notice you’re there; but is that true? “It’s usually difficult to take pictures anywhere if you haven’t talked to people about it before. For instance, when I photographed US soldiers in Afghanistan, in the beginning they tended to be suspicious, because it didn’t exactly go brilliantly there, and there was lots of criticism everywhere. Basically, you just need to take your time, because people wouldn’t just be like: welcome, join us, take our pictures and film us…” Whenever I ask a question expecting Sean Smith to make a generalization on a certain topic, it appears to me that he doesn’t really like generalizing. Are there any boundaries documentary photog-

rapher should never cross?’ “I don’t think so. I don’t think you can have a definitive like ’this is the boundary that shouldn’t be crossed’. I think that usually this is, sort of, the test of time. When you think about Marcel Duchamp and his famous urinals – at that time you could say: ’I would never do that’, but then he did it and it worked, it made people think. There are things that I wouldn’t do perhaps, but you couldn’t legislate it, because someone else could do it in a different way and make people look at something differently.” His ‘non-generalizing’ approach can be sensed when he speaks about ‘people living on the margins’ whose pictures constitute considerable part of his work. “Most of the people I photograph are not sort of ‘light’, but it doesn’t mean they are horrible people. In a way that’s the sort of problem with life, isn’t it? Someone can be a complete psychopath, but that’s an illness and they should be treated…Whereas most of the bad things, that happen, are done by pretty nice people who are not psychopaths, but they end up doing terrible things. And coming back to the slaughterhouse where I worked, god knows what the SS bloke was involved in during the war, probably some terrible things; but he was not a psychopath, he was a lovely guy. And that’s always uncomfortable, because it


would be easier if some people were just monsters.” And coming back to ‘on the margins’ concept of the exhibition, why pictures of slaughterhouse workers as part of it? After all, people working in slaughterhouses play rather important role in the society largely dominated by meat eaters. As Smith explains, “it was more sort of personal feeling when I was working there. It wasn’t a bad job actually, it was better paid than some of the other factory jobs…But there is always that thing to do with killing.“ But doesn’t it reveal hypocrisy of meat eating society? ”It goes beyond that, because everyone is going to die at some point, and we don’t really want to think about it. That’s why we’ve got all those rituals to come to terms with it, like funerals, or different ways in different countries…So it all relates to this side of life that you kind of want to push away; whether it’s that you eat meat, but don’t want to know where it comes from, or more generally coming to terms with the fact that you, yourself, will die at some point…” Remaining objective seems to be one of the most challenging aspects of documentary photography, but can one be truly objective? As Smith points out “you cannot be completely objective.”, because “you are sub-


Slave Magazine

jective every time when taking a picture of the very small bit of the world that happens to be happening in front of you. The problem of subjectivity begins when you don’t take a picture, because it doesn’t suit what you think.” And how to deal with people’s ‘I- do –not- wantto –have- my –pictures- taken’ reaction? “Sometimes you come across people, who don’t want to have their pictures taken, and later they are angry that no one was taking pictures; so things change, you know. When you think that something should be documented, you should take pictures, no matter if people want it, or not. And if it’s a war, that’s not a private thing, that’s a public thing. In general, you need to be intrusive sometimes.” And following Robert Capa’s recipe, you also need to ‘be close enough’, am I right? “What makes a good picture? Raising a question and making someone look at something in a slightly different way. If it’s just pretty patterns, then it’s not enough; it is important to look at the world around you and ask questions about it.”


obli Photography: Bradford Bird & Alistair Vlok Styling: Chloe Andrea @ Infidels Make-up & Hair: Sarah & Toni Models: Aluad @ BossModels Cape Town, Naoumie @ Max Models Jewellery: www.pichulik.com Bikinis and Latex dresses: Stylists own


Slave Magazine

q

ue


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


W

E

L

C

thisisvermilion.de

O

M

E

T

O

T

H

E

J

U

N

G

L

E

Photography: Christoph Klutsch@ Matrix Studios London Stylist: Lida Lund Make-up & Hair: Chris Schild@ 21 Agency Model: Anastassija Makarenko@ Muga Models


Slave Magazine


Dress: Mary Katrantzou (vintage) Jewelry: Vintage


Slave Magazine

Panties: Triumph Long necklace: Pamela Love Short necklace: Rosantica Bracelets: Vintage Pumps: Alexander Wang (vintage)


Dress: Mary Katrantzou (vintage) Jewelry: Vintage


Slave Magazine

Overall: Zara Jewelry: Stylist’s own


Panties: Agent Provocateur Suspenders: Agent Provocateur Stockings: Agent Provocateur Pumps: Kurt Geiger Necklace: Bounkit (customized) Rings: Stylist’s own


Slave Magazine

Overall: Zara Jewelry: Stylist’s own


I n troduci n g P a ris a L ou v el Words: Alex Taylor Photos: Leoni-Blue Styling: Hannah Oakley

Chances are that you may not have heard of singer songwriter Parisa Louvel, and it’s time to change that. With a dark, primal sound, Parisa seemingly appeared from nowhere and has already managed to capture a huge amount of attention. Through her debut EP ‘Monochrome’ Parisa has shown just what she can do.  Dramatic thumping drums are paired with Parisa’s wonderfully powerful vocals to create a uniquely engaging sound.  The four EP tracks highlight her talent for song writing, and she assures me that there’s far more still to come. Without having toured or having label backing she has taken a fresh ‘DIY’ approach to her music, directing her own solo career along exactly the path she wants it to take.

How did you first become involved in music? I started off in musical theatre when I was 8, so I was used to performing and singing/acting in front of a large audience. I was writing poems and stories in my spare time, really dark stuff about heartbreak which I knew nothing about. I was all imagination as a child, it’s still with me now, and that helps when it comes to writing. At 10 I was putting melodies to my poems and recording them onto cassette’s through a karaoke machine I had in my bedroom. Everything I sang was so melancholy; it’s a miracle I have grown up with a pretty optimistic attitude. When I was 15 I did some writing sessions with a family friend who was a brilliant singer and songwriter. He taught me not to be so poetic with my lyrics and that sometimes simplicity is more emotionally affective. Since then I have been writing songs, but I am still learning and still finding myself as a writer and singer.


Slave Magazine


As well as her music Parisa also has a successful modelling career. Why the move from modelling to music? How have you managed to blend them?

right. I am so grateful for the support I am getting from people in these early stages. I’ve barely scratched the surface yet, so I am excited about what the future holds.

I wouldn’t consider myself at any point before the music as a model. Anything I have done before has just been chance, luck, fun, whatever you want to call it. The music always came first. I was writing lyrics and putting melodies to them before I hit my teens, so music isn’t an afterthought; it’s always been on my mind. That’s not to say I don’t love modelling projects, and being a part of that industry too. I find it a fascinating business, and I am somewhat obsessed with the fashion industry. In fact I have just announced that I am represented by Select Model Management, which is really exciting for future projects, especially to be part of such a credible team. I feel pretty lucky that both music and modelling fit hand in hand together for me so nicely. Music will always be the main objective, but modelling is a major bonus.

Where did you record the EP?

You’ve just released your first EP titled ‘Monochrome’, how has that been? Was it difficult choosing which song to release first? It’s been a great start to everything. This is the first time I have even shown anyone what I have written myself, it’s the first step. I was told to just do covers as that’s what “people want” but I was like, fuck it, I’m just going to make an EP of my own songs and see what people have to say. Everyone’s been so positive and excited about it. I wasn’t expecting that. You have to take into account no one knew I existed, I’ve come out of nowhere, no live shows, no label spending £££’s on advertising…so to have such positive feedback on the first music I’ve recorded is more than alright. ‘Here We Go Again’ has so much energy, it was obvious to me that it had to be the leading track for the EP. Everyone finds something different to like in each track on the EP though, which lets me know I’m doing something

I recorded the EP in London, Soho. It’s not really a music studio, it’s used mainly for voice overs, and tv shows/ films. It was an amazing space to record in though, however unorthodox it may have been. Your songs have a charmingly dramatic feel about them, what singers/bands have influenced your sound? I am usually more inspired by a song than an artist but if I’m feeling like I’m losing inspiration these are the current artist’s I bookmark…Björk, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Fleetwood Mac, Santigold, Oh Land, M83, Lana Del Rey… Your lyrics are a key element of your songs, they’re very poignant and thought-provoking, as a songwriter are you very critical about your own work? And does it anger you that a lot of modern music is less about lyrics and more about sales? I am extremely critical of my own work, I am never satisfied, but I am learning to curb that, it’s not beneficial to pull your work apart. I actually think lyrically in this EP I was playing it safe, trying to keep it as simple as possible, as it was the first EP. Now I am comfortable with the process of writing and recording so I am finding my lyrics are maturing. It doesn’t anger me, but it’s frustrating to know a single can get to number 1 with the lyrics being a repeated line about the size of some woman’s arse. Where’s the future Leonard Cohen, Paul Weller, and Jeff Buckley?


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine

If you were able to collaborate with anyone, who would it be? You know what, I was thinking about this the other day, and Miles Kane ‘Rearrange’ came on my playlist and I thought that’s the one. Yeah, I’d love to collaborate with Miles Kane. Playing live with him would be insane, he’s a top frontman. I love your latest song ‘Here we go again’. I also think the video works perfectly with it. Who did you work with to create that video? I had the concept for that video written out before I finished the EP, I had watched ‘The Wicker man’ (1973) and the darkness within the film inspired me. So I ran with this cult theme, the masks and the fire…a little witchcraft never hurt anybody. The first video ‘Voodoo Intro’ was inspired by Warhol films I’d been watching religiously and of course Edie Sedgwick who I am a little obsessed with. So there was a whole 60’s factory girl feel going on, then with ‘Here We Go Again’ it was more Fleetwood Mac 70’s inspired. I love both era’s so I think visually whatever I do will reflect my attraction to those two decades. With both of them I wrote out the story line, what I wanted and how, then I created a mood board for each. I had a meeting with Leoni-Blue who had directing experience who put a talented team together. Then we made my ideas happen. It feels like you put just as much effort into your videos as the actual songs. Do you find it easy to think of video concepts for songs? Do you enjoy filming and creating the videos? Well, its part of the creative process for me, I can’t listen to music without picturing a video or story in my head for it. It was important to have the videos for the EP come

from me, I like being in as much creative control as humanly possible. No one is going to fully understand what I’m envisaging more than myself, so why leave it to someone else to do it for me. I enjoy it too, yeah it can be a bit stressful juggling everything but I love it. I love seeing it all come together, I feel like a proud mother. What can we expect from your live show?  I haven’t planned any live shows yet. There’s no rush. My main focus at the moment is building up my body of songs. As much as its killing me and I want to just do a tour right now, I know it’s worth waiting. I want to give people the best version of myself. You can expect a real show when it comes to it though; I’m a completely different animal on stage. The one thing I have always been is a performer. So I hope when the dates are up for live shows, everyone knows what they’re getting themselves into hahaha. What’s next for you? I’m currently planning a third video for the Monochrome EP’s ‘In Lust We Trust’ but I’m also working on songs for the next EP. I’ll be collaborating with different artists and producers which I’m really excited about. When I am half way through the second EP I hope to be doing some live shows showcasing the first EP and the newer tracks, with a few fun covers.


Slave Magazine


col d d a r k e y es nicholashayward.co.uk

Photography&Styling: Nicholas Hayward Make-up: Chloe Hilaire Hair:Tracy Grabs Models: Jessica Lawrence & Ryan Young


Slave Magazine


Garments: Julia Santilli


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine

Garments: Emily Greenen


Female model left: Garments: Emily Greene Male Model right: Garments: Pip Paz-Howlett


Slave Magazine

Female model left: Garments: stylist own Male model right: Garments: Pip Paz-Howlett


sti ll b or n koutarouwashizakiphotography.com

Photography: Koutarou Washizaki Stylist: Mayumi Mataba Make-up : Misato Washizaki Hair: Show Fujimoto Stylist Assistant: Jose Quesada, Model: Holly M @ M and P models


Slave Magazine

Leather coat: Ming Pin Tien Inner: Stylist own


Leather Jacket & skirt: Ming Pin Tien


Slave Magazine

Jacket & shirt: Ming Pin Tien


Leather coat, inner & shoes: Ming Pin Tien


Slave Magazine

Jacket, Trousers & shoes: Ming Pin Tien


aniamphotography.com

woo d

k

ds Photography: Ania Mroczkowska Stylist: Kat rembielak Grooming: zofia gluzinska Models: Luke&charles@d1

i


Slave Magazine

Luke is wearing: Top : NaDi


Charles is wearing: Red trousers: Supreme Shirt:LF Marky Luke is wearing : Shorts :Trukfit Shirt :LF Marky


Slave Magazine

Luke is wearing: Shirt : Cukoo Trousers: Tim Labenda


Charles is wearing : Jacket , shirt and shorts: NaDi


Slave Magazine

Luke is wearing: Top,shorts and cap: NaDi


Charles is wearing : Shirt : NaDi Shorts: Trina Lindegaard


Slave Magazine

Charles is wearing: Shirt: Empires Union Trousers and top: Trina Lindegaard


t i m e shawnreinoehlstudio.com

2

Photography: Shawn Reinoehl Stylist: Rene Garza Hair: Gregory Alan @ www.ididthehair.com Make-up: Daniella @ Workgroup-ltd.com Model: Jaunel Mckenzie @ FUSION


Slave Magazine

Top: Camilla and Marc Earrings: Iosselliani


Shirt: WESC Trousers: Joanna Mastroianni  Shoes: Doc Martens Necklace: Iosselliani


Slave Magazine

Dress: Emerson Vest: Mango Shoes: Maloles Earring: Laruicci


Slave Magazine

Top: Camilla and Marc Trousers: Mango Shoes: Doc Martens Earrings: Iosselliani


Blazer & Shirt: Mara Hoffman Leggins: Hue Shoes: Esquivel Necklace: Iosselliani


Slave Magazine

Jacket: Camilla and Marc Shirt: Benson Trousers: Cynthia Rowley Shoes: Andrew Kayla Bracelets: Laruicci


be h i n d t h e sce n es of Oblique with Bradford Bird & Alistair Vlok

1. What was the concept for your shoot? We wanted to shoot something visually conceptual that included the work of very talented local (Cape Town) jewellery designer called Pichulik (www.pichulik.com) and felt that a theme around Afrofutursim would be the most fun and effective way of doing it. From there we took colouring inspiration from Tretchikoff (who resided in Cape Town near to where we shot it), the retro futuristic vulgarity of Grace Jones, the incongruence of the Space Odyssey 2001monolith and the pure physicality of the Masai Warrior. We wanted a location that felt sparse and planetary and settled on a salt pan 2 hrs east of Cape Town. 2. Some info about your team/ why have you decided to work with them on this project? We have shared a similar aesthetic vision for a while and decided it was high time we shot something together. For this shoot we brought in our own flavour of local style and saw where it led us. We also sourced a local talented stylist, make-up artist and hair stylist through word of mouth and they proved to all be invaluable.


Slave Magazine

Moodboard

3. Technical info For this shoot, we used both a Canon 5Dii & Nikon D800 camera - using a combination of natural light with reflectors as well as a Profoto 7b pack with 2 bare bulbs - the wind was a major issue, so no modifiers were possible. We had a LOT of light being Summer in South Africa, so the 7b was just used as a fill flash to minimise harsh shadows. 4.What are your criteria when selecting magazine you want to be published with? A good overall aesthetic and a good eye for quality imagery. We like to be associated with magazines who have great taste!

Lighting diagram


be h i n d t h e sce n es of Cold Dark Eyes with Nicholas Hayward

1. What was the concept for your shoot? Please attach reference pictures/ mood board/sketches etc. For this shoot, I decided to base my ideas on the Biblical story of ‘Adam and Eve.’ I chose this story because of the themes and symbols. I will researched into fine art paintings, looking into other artists interpretations such as Lucas Cranach, Rembrandt and Ernst Fuchs. I then progressed to moving my ideas towards a more contemporary, almost sci-fi approach telling of the story. But still delved into exploring themes of temptation and redemption. 2. Some info about your team/ why have you decided to work with them on this project? Everyone I worked with for this project is a good friend of mine, and I’ve met him or her through university, being flat mates or various other links. They’re all so special to me as they helped me progress with this project, and helped shape my vision. I have worked with a number of them before, and will continue to do so frequently.


Slave Magazine

Moodboard

3. Technical info. 35mm camera, Tripod, Reflector, Continuous lighting / Available light, Beauty Dish, Spotlight 4.What are your criteria when selecting magazine you want to be published with? When selecting which magazine I want to be published in, I always choose wisely with whether the vibe of the photo shoot suits the magazine, if the magazine would work with the chosen subject matter, and if my images are strong enough to meet the standards but also hold a quality to stand out against others. For this shoot, SLAVE was my choice as I felt it’s slick, polished reputation was the perfect platform in which I wanted to display my images and I am hugely thankful they allowed this to happen.

Lighting diagram


joseferreira-photographer.com

T

r

a

i

le

r

t

r

s

h

a

Photography: Jose Ferreira Stylist: Barbie Doll Marketers by Catarina Botas e Sara Abreu Make: Sara Fonseca Hair: Carla D’oliveira Model: Angelina@ Central-Models


Slave Magazine

Robe: Production Bikini Top: H&M Shorts: Topshop Rings: H&M Shoes: Gant


Necklace: Ăœterque Bra: H&M Body: Triumph Pants: Nuno Baltazar Bracelets: Mango Rings: H&M


Slave Magazine


Earings: Ăœterque Top: H&M Pants: Nunu Velez Rings: H&M Shoes: Mango


Slave Magazine

Glasses: Partyglasses Top: H&M Skirt: Miguel Vieira Rings: H&M Shoes: Miguel Vieira


Earings: Üterque Rings: H&M Necklace: Mango Body: H&M Belt: Nuno Baltazar Shoes: Luís Onofre


Slave Magazine


s e e r

a t d k

isasilvaphotography.com

Photography: Isa Silva @ V - Photo Agency Stylist: Sara Soares Make-up & Hair: Paulo Varela Model: Andre Chee @ ELITE

v h a


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


AN

O

andreazvadova.com

N

Y

A

A

M

Photography: Andrea Zvadova Model: Roberta@Exit model management Bratislava Jewellery: Dana Tomeckova


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


Slave Magazine


wit

h

out alicephotolab.com

be

a

ty Photography&Styling: Alisa Berezhnaya Make-up & Hair: Omar Bouker Model: Zelig@Mademoiselle Agency, Paris

u


Slave Magazine

Leather vest : House of Vice


Plastron: Odette Bombardier


Slave Magazine

Leather neck piece: House of Vice


Leather neck piece: House of Vice


Slave Magazine

Leather vest : House of Vice


a

Photography: Eric Ouaknine  Stylist: Mickaël Carpin Make-up: Stéphane Dussart Hair & Hairpieces: Hélène Rabu  Production: EOP Paris Models: Echo Nittolitto Camille C @ H Model Management 

be

n

c

a

d

a

n ericouaknine.com

rose


Slave Magazine

h

Dress: Akris Necklace plexiglass & earrings: Philippe Ferrandis Long necklace: valĂŠrie ciccarelli Cuff: Swarovski Shoes: Versace


Slave Magazine

Swimsuit: Seafolly Necklace: Margiela MM6 Earrings: Reminiscence Right hand cuff: Swarovski Left hand bracelet: Gas Ring Philippe Ferrandis Shoes: Christian Louboutin Bag: Dsquared2e


Slave Magazine

Swimsuit: La Perla Necklace & Earrings: Swarovski Right hand ring & bracelets: Reminiscence Left hand ring: Swarovski Bag: Coach Shoes: Guiseppe Zanotti Sunglasses: Acuitis Bag: Dsquared2


Slave Magazine

Swimsuit: Eres Belt: Patrizia Pepe Necklace, earrings & cuff: Philippe Ferrandis


Slave Magazine

Left: Swimsuit: 8huit Silk scarf: Michel Lebrun Cape: Wanda Nylon Ring: Philippe Ferrandis Bracelet: Margiela MM6 Shoes: Jean Michel Cazabat Right: Bikini: Dsquared2 Earrings & ring: Joanna Laura Constantine


w

h

er

e

is

f

juancarrera.com

reed om

Photography: Juan Carrera @Bloomy Inc Stylist: Yoshiki Make-up & Hair: Makoto @ Artistic Cube Ny Model: Timothee Bertoni @ Donna Models Tokyo

Denim Kimono Jacket: Hirotaka Shintani Leather Shogun Armor: Hirotaka Shintani Long-Sleeve: Hirotaka Shintani T-Shirt: Hirotaka Shintani  


Armorhead Cap: Os Accessories @ Fake Showroom Jacket: Hirotaka Shintani Runner Shorts Worn On Top Of Trousers Trousers: Hirotaka Shintani  


Slave Magazine

Cap: Johnlery @ Fake Showroom Upcycled Triple T-Shirt: Hirotaka Shintani Trousers: Hirotaka Shintani Prawnkiller Cuff: Os Accessories @ Fake Showroom Shoes: Macaronic


Slave Magazine

Leatherwearing Collar: 99%Is- @ Fake Showroom Sweatshirt: Hirotaka Shintani Trousers: Hirotaka Shintani


Multi-Scarves Haori Coat: Hirotaka Shintani Skirt Pants: Hirotaka Shintani Shoes: Macaronic  


Slave Magazine

Cap: Johnlery @ Fake Showroom Whalesucker Choker: Os Accessories @ Fake Showroom Draped Sweatshirt: Hirotaka Shintani Long T-Shirt: Hirotaka Shintani Trousers: Hirotaka Shintani


Cropped Jacket: Hirotaka Shintani Cardigan: Hirotaka Shintani Shirt: Hirotaka Shintani Trousers: Hirotaka Shintani Cap: Johnlery @ Fake Showroom


Slave Magazine


L

ost

i

n

a

T

n

r

sl

jcerilla.com

a n

tio Photography: JC Cerilla Stylist: Jessica Park Make-up & Hair: Cherry Le Model: Emily@ Wilhelmina


Slave Magazine

Dress: Maison Martin Margiela for H&M Shoes: Alejandro Ingelmo 


Top: Zara Skirt: H&M Shoes: Prabal Gurung for Target 


Slave Magazine

Dress: Maison Martin Margiela for H&M Shoes: Alejandro Ingelmo 


Top: Joe Fresh Skirt: Maje Shoes: Zara


Slave Magazine

Lyza wears: Top: Joe Fresh Skirt: Maje


Slave Magazine

Dress: Calvin Klein 


Her ginger hair blowing in the ice cold wind; the air smelled like fire. She was so close within the reach of my hands, and at the same time so distant and beautifully cold like an ancient statute in a Greek church full of mystic light. The very moment I saw her she enchanted my heart, put a spell on my soul and made my whole body burn with desire. In the beginning I knew nothing more than her name was Red. A friend of mine once told me: “They say this girl is wild; wild like a fiery horse…” and I’m not sure if I really wanted to know anything more.

r e d By Kasia Mroczkowska

Her eyes, with long red lashes like theatre curtains, always seemed closed keeping her away from the mundane world. Her Parisian chic, hoarse laugh, long, white fingers holding green cigars, made me sweat and made me swear. Now when she’s gone, it’s just those pieces, still so vivid and bright, that I can keep deep within myself; forever. I still vividly remember those days when she was there, passing me in the corridors, passing me in clouds of tobacco fumes, when wiping mysterious tears from her rosy cheeks, when laughing, when talking to her bad, handsome boys, when adjusting her blue stockings… Passing me – an invisible ghost of flesh and bone that didn’t exist in her dreamy world. That year when everything was about to end, September came with bright red leaves storming the streets like flames. I couldn’t breathe being madly in love, being madly in pain; and waiting, desperately waiting for her to pass me again. “This girl is in trouble”- said to me my friend, when giving him all my savings, I received a photo of her from his hands. I’m not sure if I managed to hear anything else; as my eyes so hungry, so desperate to see her again, were immediately caught by the image of her white hips, wet lips, silk underwear …., nothing else. I started to dream more and sleep less. I started to follow her every night step by step, wherever it took through the corridors of her secret life. Gothic restaurants with black crystal chandeliers, long halls of medieval hotels covered with blood red carpets, small luxurious pubs on the top of the hills discretely hidden from everyday life - this is where she used to spend her nights hanging around with strange old men and their kinky old wives, while the town was asleep.


Slave Magazine

Scared by barking of black guard dogs, walking back home before dawn, dirty with mud and wet with rain, falling on my warm unmade bed, I felt there was no turning back; my destiny was to follow her like a shadow, wherever it took. The day I first saw them, ice cold wind kissed my cheeks. Three disturbingly handsome men with perfectly sleek haircuts, black mustaches and long, black leather coats, like three big crows written by Grimm brothers, landed in the grassy field at dawn. They came to our town in big, black Cadillac. The red leaves started to fade away. Since then she was always with them. Since then something changed, and I kept watching her even more carefully, wherever they went. There was an aura of petrifying mystery every time the three black crow men were closing the doors behind her. The doors of abandoned gothic churches. The doors of hotels with red curtains. The doors of mystery. I was not close enough anymore… That year when everything was about to end her beauty was more ravishing than ever. Dressed in flaming red velvets, stepping out of shiny Cadillac, she could be the Queen of Beauty and Mystery, and she was the queen of my tearing pain. I will never forget the last day I saw her. The sun was setting down over the horizon like a great ball of fire. She was arguing loudly with a ‘crow man’, her red hair was blowing in the wind like flames. I was hiding behind the big, oak tree; scared, confused and too far away to understand anything. And then he hit her in the face. And he hit her in her stomach. My Queen of Beauty and Mystery fall on the ground; I closed my eyes and my heart tore apart. When I opened my eyes, my Queen of Beauty and Mystery covered with mud, covered with blood got into the Cadillac. But before she had disappeared in the darkness, she turned back and looked towards the big oak with dreamy, wet eyes, as if she knew I was out there – her faithful worshipper, forever. And then they drove away so fast. They disappeared so suddenly as if they hovered with big, black wings into the void. That night I couldn’t sleep, smoking one cigar after another, and when I finally fell into a dream at dawn, I found myself inside that gothic church where they used to disappear behind the closing doors. In that dream I was a

ghost floating around empty chambers. I could see everything from the bird’s perspective and could walk through the walls. When suddenly I heard that hoarse, charming laugh, I knew it was her waiting for me somewhere. Chamber by chamber I was getting closer and closer to the charming sound of her laughter. And finally when I went through the last wall, I saw old gramophone on the blood red fluffy rug playing and playing her laughter. When I woke up, I felt strange, unbearable sadness and sudden hot flush in my head. Troubled and sad, I decided to visit my friend next day. “They say you get, what you deserve” – said to me my friend, putting back morning paper with the bold, black headline of the article full of blood in every line. “(…) and they called her Red(…) her dead, massacred body was found on the banks of the river by the local forester at 5.30 a.m. this morning. The man said he never saw anything like(…).” That day my parents found me unconscious on the cold floor in my room. “I must have taken a bit too many painkillers to ease the unbearable pain in my chest” – I told them – “…but the pain is still there…” And then the snow fell and everything faded away. Everything turned white, so blankly white. Not a single drop of red hint anywhere. And everything stopped, and my whole body froze in the lack of motion when they put me in a white hospital bed. “Time will heal the pain” – they said closing the door without a handle. I closed my eyes and stayed in my dreams where everything was sweetly red. *** Post Scriptum For those who cried, When I woke up, the spring came with red tulips and golden beams of sun. I left my bed where I left my pain. I went to the boulevard and saw them there; all so alive and full of smiles. She was tall and her hair was gold, her smile was wild. And then I went to cemetery, so silent and mystic with red tulips everywhere. I cut those tulips one by one, all red, blossomed, so full of life, I gave them to her and since then she was mine.


I

S

U

E

1

2

S


Slave Magazine

Submissions by 1st October 2013


The reproduction of any part of this publication is strictly prohibited without prior permission from Slave Magazine, including titles, logos, and graphics. Exceptions are granted for press and blogs were there is a link a back to slavemag.com and full credits are included and for downloading to media devices for personal use. The views expressed in Slave Magazine are those of the contributors and are not necessary shared by Slave Magazine. All rights reserved. Copyright Švv Slave Magazine 2013 See website for full terms and conditions. slavemag.com


Slave Magazine issue 11