Slave Magazine issue 9

Page 1

issue#9

london

free

online magazine

photography fashion culture art

Frank’s daughter nina nesbitt Jingna Zhang Rinat Shingareev Jacob birge & more


Slave Magazine

Slave Magazine Team

Avenue Road, N6 5DT London www.slavemag.com contact@slavemag.com

Ania Mroczkowska - Editor In-Chief / Co-founder Artur Dziewisz - Creative Designer / Co-founder Louise Munro - Editor In-Chief / Co-founder Kasia Mroczkowska-Writer/Editor Rena Niamh Smith-Writer/Editor


Slave Magazine

Cover picture by Julien Cozzolino


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Q&A with this issue contributors

Davide Ambroggio How old are you? I’m 35 years old. Where are you from? I’m from Treviso, a small city near to Venice but today I divide my time between Italy and Israel. If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I’d be an astronaut, of course! If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? I’ve always dreamed of collaborating with Marin Scorsese, maybe taking the backstage photos of one of his movies. My photography have been deeply influenced by his cinema. What are you a slave to? I’m slave to my rituals, my fixations... and beauty.


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Benjo Arwas

Boswell

JC Cerilla

How old are you? 27 and 3 weeks.

How old are you? I am 53.

How old are you? 27.

Where are you from? Tel Aviv, Israel.

Where are you from? I live in Detroit but work in Paris 3-4 times a year.

Where are you from? Born and Raised in Manila, Philippines now based in New York.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? World traveler.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I was a hat designer for years – I imagine I would be in the design field somehow.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Probably Paolo Roversi, Man Ray or Eugenio Recuenco…the amount of the simple creativity is dripping from them. What are you a slave to? POLAROIDS! I hate retouching ;)

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Rick Owens because he creates his own world – I have attended and photographed his shows in Paris for years - his beat is correct. What are you a slave to? Fashion/Beauty and wine.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I would probably be digging up artifacts, an archeologist. If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Cara Delevingne. Because I’m in love with her beauty and personality. What are you a slave to? Besides Photography? Hmm .. Beautiful women, Chuck Taylors, Good Music and Movies.


Rakeem Cunningham

Stefano Fepa

Jose Ferreira

How old are you? I’m 20 years old!

How old are you? I am 24 years old.

How old are you? 26.

Where are you from? I’m from Los Angeles, CA.

Where are you from? Florence, (Tuscany, Italy).

Where are you from? Portugal.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? If I wasn’t a photographer, I think I would be studying political science or maybe a writer. But honestly, I can’t see myself doing anything other than photography at this point.

If you weren’t a stylist what would you be doing? The Painter.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? Unemployed or travel the world.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? My dream-person to collaborate with is definitely Karin Drejer Andersson, lead singer of the duo The Knife, and solo artist with the Fever Ray project, because I always felt sort of connected with her emotionality, her artistic vision of her role as a disembodied entity that every time in her live performances a different form, as if her voice chose a body to possess.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Kate Moss, because is the best model.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Tim Walker, hands down. His style is so different than mine, but I respect and admire his work. His photos marry art and fashion in a way that no other person on earth can do. What are you a slave to? Well, I think I’m a slave to my art. Whether it’s photography, or designing something, I always try to make the best piece possible. I can almost get obsessive when I’m editing or working on a project.

What are you a slave to? Love.

What are you a slave to? I find working out everyday extremely important in my daily basis lifestyle. I wouldn’t refer my self to it as slavery, but more as an healthy matter or habit..


Slave Magazine

Tibor Galamb

Sasha Guseynowa

Caroline Hooerman

How old are you? I’m 28.

How old are you? I’m 21 years old.

Where are you from? I’m from Debrecen, Hungary originally.

How old are you? My age refers to my life experienceand therefore I should be at least 72 years old.

Where are you from? Moscow, Russia.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? Probably I would do something close to the movie making, for example directing :)

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I don’t know, really don’t know, I can’t live without my job.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Brad Pitt would be the person, because he is one of the best actors of our era, for me.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Tilda Swinton ! She’s great!

What are you a slave to? Still and moving images, design and architecture. Everything beautiful!

What are you a slave to? Beauty, art and food!

Where are you from? I was born in Germany. If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I would be a Filmmaker. If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? I would be working with Hedi Slimane as a Creative Director , because his visual concepts are timeless – as a designer or Photographer -Patti Smith as a writer and Muse - her body of work is an endless source of Inspiration for my Photography, with Craig Mc Dean for his Lighting Technique and Use of Photography and with David Bowie because he is able to constantly reinvent himself yet stay true. What are you a slave to? Challenges.


Sébastien Larreur

Hira Shah

Masa Hamanoi

How old are you? Thirty-three.

How old are you? I am 25 years old.

How old are you? 34 now.

Where are you from? I am from the far-west of Brittany, France.

Where are you from? I am from Pakistan

Where are you from? From middle of nowhere Ibaraki JAPAN.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? If I wasn’t a photographer I would be an historian.

If you weren’t a stylist what would you be doing? If I wasn’t a stylist I would be a photographer.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? Farmer.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? I would like to shoot with Codie Young. She is like a doll but she can also be creepy and mysterious.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? I would have loved to collaborate with late Alexander McQueen(R.I.P) and Nick knight.

What are you a slave to? I am a slave to the urge of create, internet and breakfast food.

What are you a slave to? I am a slave to collaborating with talented people and creating interesting work together.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? All the people from the world. A person from each country and let them wear their traditional cloth and photograph their group shot in a huge fields under the blue sky with posing and a big smile. That would be fun!! What are you a slave to? To chase my dream.


Slave Magazine

Miss Aniela

Dasha Mosolowa

Marilyn Mugot

How old are you? Twenty six… enjoying growing older in maturity but trying to get back to being a child in spirit.

How old are you? 29.

How old are you? I am 25.

Where are you from? Toronto, Canada. Originally Kiev, Ukraine.

Where are you from? Paris suburbs.

If you weren’t a stylist what would you be doing? Architecture.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I would be oriented in filmmaking. I love everything in touch with staging.

Where are you from? I live in Kent but I’m originally from Leeds. If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I’d be a journalist, but by this point, I’d be squirming out of the grasp of the employer to pursue my own independent form of truth-seeking. If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? C.S. Lewis, the author of the Chronicles of Narnia. I would collaborate on bringing his literary visions to photographic life. What are you a slave to? Good food and deep sleep.

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Recently at Fashion Week I watched Vawk runway show and I was blown away by gorgeousness, superior level of quality, refine taste of these designers and what they’d created. It was Art! For me, it’s definitely a goal to try get to that level of quality in what I do. I hope that at some point I’ll get to work with people as talented as them. What are you a slave to? I am a slave to perfectionism, high quality and beauty!

If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? There is nobody specially I would like to collaborate with. To me each person follows his own evolution inspired an whole. Everybody has a world in his mind, it’s up to you to make it real. I wish myself to keep working in the future with people who inspire me and whose passion devours. What are you a slave to? Myself.


Noor One

Matt Simmons

Jade Sukiya

How old are you? 25.

How old are you? 36.

How old are you? I’m 27 years old.

Where are you from? I currently live in Paris. But I was born in Toulouse, south of France..

Where are you from? Dallas TX.

Where are you from? I’m from the wonderful and friendly city that is Birmingham.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I’d probably be a chef, or the owner of a restaurant, or a food writer... If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Chino Moreno from the Deftones. I’ve been obsessed with him ever since I was a teenager. What are you a slave to? Beauty and British crisps.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? Drinking too much and playing in a punk rock band. If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Tilda Swinton. She’s just so damn interesting and good at what she does. What are you a slave to? Sex, lies, and video tape??? I suppose progress is the true answer. No matter how good I feel about something, or how much people praise me – I’m never really satisfied.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be doing? I think I’d do something that assisted creative people, so an agent or advisor or something along those lines. If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? Grace Coddington. Not only is she an absolute legend in general, I just want to take a peak in her head and be amongst all the amazing ideas she’s ever had and will continue to have. What are you a slave to? My job and all the stress, strain and joy than comes with it.


Slave Magazine

Zelig Wilson How old are you? I’m 22 year old. Where are you from? I was born in Togo in West Africa : I grew up half there and half in Paris :) If you weren’t a model what would you be doing? If I wasn’t a model I think I would do anything, I could be at medical school or do any money job so I can make music. If you were to chose a dream person to collaborate on a project with who would that be and why? If I could decide inside fashion I’ll shoot over 20 pages right away with Steven Meisel , Steven Klein or Txema Yeste among many others. What are you a slave to? Well I guess obsession is a kind of slavery and I’m totally obsessive person. I’ve been obsessed with success ,body,style,sex,food and above all Music. But I think what makes me obsessive and what I’m a slave to is Control. Yet I’m plotting to set myself free :)


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Top: Hegee Jacket: Sad Walli


noorone.com

Photography Noor One Assistant Marilyn Mugot Stylist Hege Edvardsen Stylist’s assistant Raïssa Louis Abraham Make up Artist Charlotte Chicot Models Lucas Valerdi & Jonathan Bauer Hayden @ Nathalie Models


Cap: Coincidence Sweater: Hegee Shorts: KTZ Shoes: Clea, Whatsize Rings: Private


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Top: Hegee Jacket: SAD WALLI Trousers: Martine Rose, Coincidence Shoes: Shoe The Bear, Whatsize


Lucas Poncho: KTZ Boots: Shoe The Bear, Whatsize Shorts: Sad Walli Sunglasses: Vintage Tights: Private Jonathan Top: Vintage Dress: Hegee Shoes: Camille Tanoh, Coincidence Trousers: Hegee


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Shirt: Sad Walli Trousers: Martine Rose, Coincidence Boots: Shoe The Bear, Whatsize Jacket: Shoots, Whatsize Scarf: Lutz Huelle


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Lucas Poncho: KTZ Boots: Shoe the bear from Whatsize Shorts: Sad Walli Sunglasses: vintage Tights: private Jonathan Top: Vintage Dress: Hegee Shoes: Camille Tanoh, Coincidence Trousers: Hegee Hat: Hegee


Lucas Shirt: Sad Walli Pants: Martine Rose, Coincidence Boots: Shoe The bear, Whatsize Jacket: Shoots, Whatsize Scarf: Lutz Huelle Jonathan Jacket: KTZ Trousers: Hegee Sweater: Hegee Shoes: Camille Tanoh, Coincidence


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juliencozzolino.4ormat.com

Photography Julien Cozzolino Stylist Sarah Delannoy Make up & Hair Juan Romero Model Zelig Wilson


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Jacket: Rynshu Pants: Gustavolins Shoes: Alain Quilici


Vest: Komakino Shirt & Shorts: BarnabĂŠ Hardy Shoes: Steffie Christiaens


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Vest: BarnabÊ Hardy Pants: Jean Paul Gaultier Bracelet: Tobias Wistinsen, L’Eclaireur Shoes: Alain Quilici


Cage Jacket & Shirt: Jean Paul Gaultier Pants: Rynshu Shoes STEFFIE CHRISTIAENS


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Jacket: BarnabÊ Hardy Shorts: Komakino Shoes: Alain Quilici Bracelet: Tobias Wistinsen, L’Eclaireur


joseferreira-photographer.com

Photography Jose Ferreira Styling Sara Soares@ C’est fantastique! Model Tamara Wolter @ Central Models


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Jacket: Pinko Shirt: Mango Culottes: Malene Birger Belt: Pepe Jeans Boots: Zara Hoop Earrings: Mango Ring: Swarovski Bracelet: Mango


Waistcoat: Pepe Jeans Top: Twin Set Skirt: Zara Scarf: Pinko Jacket ( on hands ) G.Sel Bracelets: Stylist’s Own Earrings: H&M Socks: Stylist’s Own Flatforms: Cheap Monday


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Synthetic fur coat: Manoush FW12 Silver Coat: Mango Shirt: Mango Pants: Zara Necklace with beads: H&M Studs Necklace: H&M Ring: H&M


Jacket: Pepe Jeans Long shirt: Diesel Top: Cheyenne Pants: Pinko Flatforms: Cheap Monday Large belt: H&M Slim belt: Diesel Bracelet: Swarovski Chain Bracelet: Pepe Jeans Earrings: H&M


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Perfecto: Patrizia Pepe Top: Mango Shorts: Patrizia Pepe Socks: Stylist’s Own Boots: Zara Belt: Diesel Necklace with beads: Diesel Chain Necklace: Alentus Spike Necklace: H&M Studs Necklace: H&M


Interview Chris Purnell Photography Ania Mroczkowska

‘I’m disappointed in the way the music industry has gone…’ Frank tells me. ‘…Songs are bought on iTunes one at a time, so there is more of a focus on singles, and in my opinion that is not how music should be made.’ he says. It’s hard to remember now just how much we cared about albums. And I think it’s hard to remember cause they’re not being made the same way as they once were. Something Frank wants to change.

Is that enjoyable?

Frank is a singer, songwriter, and has a plethora of other musical jobs - the way you have to when you want to remain in control of your career, or are a bit of a controlfreak. Frank’s current project, with other British musician Arthur, the electro/indie Frank’s Daughter, has an album due out in June, The Sound Of A Heart Unravelling, and has also just released a single, but not from the album, even though it has the same name as a track on the album, Fall Fully Backwards. ‘We thought we would let people discover that it was a completely different version.’ Frank says, aware that I was writing down everything he said, but perhaps not aware that it would be published.

We just finished a single, Fall Fully Backwards. Although there’s a song on the album called Fall Fully Backwards, it’s a total reworking of that song so we could put it out as a single.

I interrupted Frank while writing music from his home in London. Are you one of those people that has a hobby as a career, so it’s hard to take a break from it? Yeah. Day and night. It is just what I do - it consumes everything.

I don’t know. It’s something I’m just compelled to do. I don’t see it as, “I want to have some fun now, I’m going to do it.” or, “I need to earn some money, I’m going to do it”, it’s almost like an exorcism, I suppose. What are you working on right now?

Why is that? The album was written and recorded in a way that we didn’t intend to have singles. We saw the album as one piece. We weren’t sort of constrained by length or timings or fills, so songs fitted in to this kind of web of an album and they would have their tempos changed or their rhythms changed to fit within the structure of the album. And singles work in a different way to that, and although we felt Fall Fully Backwards would be a really good single, it needed a radio edit, and we didn’t want to start changing the construction of the song. We felt it would be better to do a reworking as a single that was its own thing.


MUSIC Slave

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Do you feel like you may have to change? I hope not. It was a really nice thing doing Fall Fully Backwards as a single, it was just something different. If we

Do you like singles? The feeling I’m getting from the way you are speaking, is that releasing a single seemed like it was something you both didn’t want to do. It was never part of the plan. The idea was to construct an album where all tracks would work together. I’m disappointed in the way the music industry has gone, in that songs are bought on iTunes one at a time, so there is more of a focus on singles, and in my opinion that is not how music should be made. Obviously there are probably people that do that very, very well, but I would never buy music like that. So, I really liked that idea of our song living its own little life separate from the album. We were tempted to call it something else, but we thought we would just let people discover that it was a completely different version. Do you see the singles market changing, and a return to artists making albums? There’s a side of me that hopes it will return to a body of work. We originally only recorded the album to go on vinyl. We gave ourselves a very strong set of restrictions so the album was that it would have an opening track and a closing track to side A, and an opening track to side B and a closing track to side B, and it would be constructed in terms of length in what would fit on a record. It wasn’t done in a nostalgic kind of way, it wasn’t done in a, “I want to use a really old camera” kind of thing, that wasn’t the idea, it was more to the fact that of a 30 year period where records were more important, they’d become a way of working that got the best out of that recorded moment or that 40 minutes, and all the records that I loved, that we loved, were fitted to those requirements, you know? I think as an artist, the gaps in between the songs and the gaps between side A and side B are really important. Those sort of measurements help create a rhythm within a record, and you can’t get that in iTunes.

had to keep doing it, and that’s all we could do, then I just couldn’t. I also don’t think there would be any point in changing. Musicians don’t make the money they used to make. We stuck to our guns and made an album that isn’t going to make us any money, so I don’t see what purpose creating a barrage of three minute songs to put on iTunes serves because you’re not going to make money doing that either. Was there something you were trying to get across with the album? I wanted to get in touch more with how I was feeling, and convey a feeling rather than a story - if it was going to be sad, I wanted it to really feel sad, as opposed to words trying to explain what sadness was. I really wanted to make sure that the lyrics and vocals where in the moment and so couldn’t lose the feeling - they are probably about 80% adlibbed. You haven’t always done it, so how did the adlibbing process come about? When we started recording I really wanted a different voice to what I used in the past. As part of that process, I’d record a lot of ideas, and when it came to recording those ideas as demos, I knew that I was losing something in the voice. And so the voice I found was very freeing. It was freeing not knowing the words and not being bothered if I wasn’t even singing words. We went to the Alps to start recording and we went with no songs. All the songs we’d written to that point, we left at home. We wanted to write from scratch, and try and keep as much of the adlibs and the fresh ideas in to the end and see how it turned out. On a couple of tracks we tried to re-record stuff but generally, nine times out of ten it just didn’t sound as good. Rather than feel the pressure of someone telling you how to record an album, we just decided to do our own thing and record an album our way. I’ve not sort of spent too much time thinking about it, but I think it would be more daunting now looking back, starting again. The idea of learning songs and learning words is a little bit more frightening than just going in and doing it. I like the excitement of how we did it.


MUSIC Slave

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Obviously the videos are important to you, as is the visual way you see everything, so is the band about music, or is the band something more?

If an album is art, then who do you make music for? I think we made this album for us. I think there’s a danger that if you start trying to make records for other people, or creating a fan base on social sites, then you go down that whole iTunes world, or cyber world, or whatever world you want to call it, but the world of where it’s just not about art anymore; it’s about units, and I have no interest in doing that. When did you begin expressing yourself through music and visual art? Probably art college. That was for a very short period of time for me. I left. But we have both always done a lot of art, and the other bands that we’ve done, we’ve always been really closely linked to doing the videos and doing the artwork. Do you find your videos important to the music? Yeah, I think - it’s something I’ve been struggling with, especially on the next video because I’ve got quite a lot of ideas that I want to do for it, but we’re not sure what the next single’s going to be yet, or if there’s going to be a single at all. There’s part of me that thinks it might be a really good experiment to do a video without the idea of the music to begin with. The established method is that a video should always be made after the song and should go with the song and should help the song move on, and so as an artist I want to challenge that. So are you making a music video or a short film? Well yeah that’s the question. What is it? Are you damaging the song by not helping it, or should it be something separate? That’s the question that I’m trying to work out at the moment. I’d just really like the videos to be little short films or ideas, like visual paintings, and if they can go hand in hand with the music as well, then great, but it’s not a necessity.

We’d love it to be more than music. The reason we both make music is a need to express something, and music’s the way that we’ve always been able to do that. Frank’s Daughter manifested itself into the album, and that seemed to be a really good way of expressing what we wanted to express at that time. Not being able to find anyone that would understand us in the same way visually is what forced us to make the videos and do the artwork. We didn’t do it to be controlling, we did it so we wouldn’t be misunderstood. I think the loss of creative control is what’s wrong with the modern record company idea. Sometimes bands don’t know what its single’s going to be or know what the record cover’s going to be like. When I picked up a Smiths album when I was younger, it felt like I was connected to Morrissey, because you knew he picked that cover and had a say in it all. Great bands once had a real connection to what happened to them. As a fan or a listener, your universe was expanded by the connection to those people’s universe. But the covers and the little things have lost all importance over the years. There’s just so much on Facebook and other social sites, even if someone did write something on there for their fans to read, chances are they’ve got someone doing it for them. Now, I think the idea of doing the videos and doing the artwork is to try to keep it all together for us - to make it meaningful. Again, for us, there was never any sort of idea that we were expecting to sell millions of records, it was just that we wanted to create something for us and we wanted it to represent us. So if right now music is the best way to express what Frank’s Daughter is at the moment, would that suggest that in 10, 20 years it’ll evolve into something else like a film or something like that? Yeah, that’s something we’ve been talking about. Most of the videos and ideas that we are coming up with are probably a little bit too big to make into a music video, so we’ve talked about making films. But most of our process is based on not being able to do stuff. When we went to the Alps to record the album, we didn’t have a massive studio, so we had to make the sounds we had work for us, and so part of the sound of the album is that lack of technology or lack of ability that was with us, and that’s how we’re making the videos. I like that.


MUSIC Slave

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franks-daughter.com


carolinehoermann.org

Photographer Caroline Hoermann Art Director Paul Taverna Stylist Sophia Batson Make up Fiona Thatcher Hair Leo Crews Model Kean @ Red Model Management/NYC Booker George Brown Shot at STUDIOS LIC/NYC


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Evening Gown: Tadashi


Jacket: Titanius Smoking Pants: Topshop Necklace: Delphine Charlotte Parmentier


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Dress: Titanius Necklace: Laruicci


Trousers: Topshop Top: NHA Khan


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Evening Gown: Tadashi Shoes: Cesare Paciotti


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Jacket: Titanius Smoking Pants:Topshop Necklace: Delphine Charlotte Parmentier


aniamphotography.com

PhotographY Ania Mroczkowska Stylist Kat Rembielak Make up & Hair Dorota Nowacka Model Ruby @ Profile


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Top: Love Mayka



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Dress: Dominic Milner


Top and leggings: Love Mayka


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Dress: Dominic Milner


Trousers and top: Dominic Milner


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Bodysuit: Dominic Milner


davideambroggio.com

Photographer Davide Ambroggio Make up Rossano Fasano Hair Valentina Zanerini Styling Maria De Los Angeles Monari Model Ana@ Allure Models Agency Assistant Hila Hazan & Luca Di Palma Location: Budrio Municipal Theatre


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Suit: Lavinia Turra Neckband: NGB Jewels Bracelet: Cecilia Risati Shoes: Les Amies Bologna



Slave Magazine

Suit: Lavinia Turra Neckband: NGB Jewels Bracelet: Cecilia Risati Shoes: Les Amies Bologna


Top: Smarteez Body: Tezuk Necklace: Contessa Rosafosca Ring: Gabriel Reinoso Shoes: Baldinini


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Leather Jacket: Lavinia Turra


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Top: Smarteez Body: Tezuk Necklace: Vittorio Ceccoli Bracelet: Cecilia Rosati


Leather Jacket: Lavinia Turra


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Interview Kasia Mroczkowska

Pre-Raphaelite nymphs, mangas, fantasy, dark fairytales - shaken, not stirred; they all seem to be winking at me from Jingna Zhang’s photos. As I later find out through her blog, Jingna is massively into the above. Drawing inspiration from the “magic worlds” she has been working on her own artistic projects, and at the same time crating images for the glamorous world of advertising. Not only about commercial success of her photography, but also about dreams, beautiful quotes, Motherland Chronicles and challenges with Jingna Zhang.


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At the age of only 24 you have not only managed to build a stunning portfolio, but also have already worked for big names in the industry including Montblanc, Mercedes Benz, Lancôme, Canon or Pond’s. How did you end up working for them? Like freelancing in any industries, you start off small, do any type of work you can find, do a lot of testing, so people you work with know you are great and would want to recommend you when, maybe, one day someone they know needs a photographer. And so through word of mouth it could eventually happen with bigger clients. For fashion and beauty, it’s really important to shoot editorials and have magazine credits. Art directors, creative directors, your potential clients, are looking at who the photographers are behind photographs they see and like in magazines or online. At the same time, an online presence can help you reach out even further internationally. My clients come from both a mix of both my online presence and through word of mouth after having worked with other creatives and clients. On Friday, January 11, 2013 you wrote in your blog about two types of dreams we all have; “the type that starts out when we are young and naive, and are filled with ideals and fantasies; and the type that is a secondary one on top of the first -- a goal, or milestones, something realistic, where the world and its realities has taught us boundaries, limits and inhibitions”. Apart from daydreaming and reading fairytales that you mention in your blog, do you use any other “techniques” to keep your child’s dreams alive?


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PHOTOGRAPHY

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I try to find things I used to enjoy as a child; looking up fantasy art, reading manga and watching animes…going out to nature; I was born in the suburbs and grew up next to a mountain. And also talking to artist friends about ideas, etc… Yesterday at Tate Modern I spotted an amazing quote in one of Roy Lichtenstein’s most famous paintings; it goes like this: “We rose up slowly as if we didn’t belong to the outside world any longer…like swimmers in a shadowy dream who didn’t need to breathe”. The very quote (I never seemed to focus on it previously) made me look at the painting in a new way and made me think about things that I wouldn’t end up thinking about if the quote wasn’t there… Being a writer I always tend to search for words, thoughts, stories that, as I always hope, are hidden behind visual forms of expression. You seem to be the kind of visual artist who is into written word…, I realize that you have already posted a long list of “inspirational reads” on your blog; but any new quotes / stories / books that have inspired you most recently?

That is such a poetic and beautiful quote. For me lately, I’ve been reading Hermann Hesse and Dorothy Dunnett. There’s a quote from Hesse’s Beneath the Wheel, I really like; it’s about beauty in things fleeting: “…there’s nothing more beautiful than fireworks in the night… they rise up in the darkness, and at the height of their beauty they double back and they’re gone. When you watch them, you’re happy but at the same time afraid, because in a moment it will all be over. The happiness and fear go together, and it’s much more beautiful than if it lasted longer”. Art books wise, I saw Yoshitaka Amano’s collected works in the 3-volume The Sky: The Art of Final Fantasy. It’s so incredible how much work he has done for the series, and how beautiful. What do you consider to be your greatest challenge so far? Fighting with myself over loving or hating my work. It happens daily, all the time. Sometimes I’m really happy about it and sometimes I really hate it. I know being self-critical is important for an artist, so I think it’s just about learning how to deal with it… I’m still trying…


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What do you think is the main difference between being self-taught and having a degree in Photography? The connections you might have established from a good school. But in the creative industry if you work hard enough, I don’t think there are any boundaries to this. Is there an option that you might be open to invite other photographers / visual artists to Motherland Chronicles or is it only Tobias Kwan’s and your territory? Yes, we are definitely considering inviting some artists we know. The project is still in its incipient stages, but we have started to approach artists for guest participations. Is there anything you would love to do, but still haven’t done?

zhangjingna.com facebook.com/zemotion twitter.com/zemotion

Idealistically, go into space. Realistically, learn how to paint and draw.

Motherland Chronicles: facebook.com/motherlandchr


Words Rena Niamh Smith

Rinat Shingareev is an artist whose work in oil on canvas incorporates famous faces to deliciously surreal effect. With a background in fine art, he studied first in Russia before finishing his degree in Italy. He has exhibited in Italy, Germany and Austria. His work has been featured in a number of international magazines, and Italian Maxim named him one of the most talented artists in the world. “I believe in the idea that my art should bring only positive emotions”, he says. “I see myself as an observer who comments on things that surrounds us and as an artist who is able to turn a mix of saturated colors, unusual situations and familiar personalities into pop-art iconography.” From the Obamas to Madonna via Prince Charles, the use of celebrities in his work draws directly on the work of Andy Warhol. He hopes to represent and toy with reality. ““The main purpose of my art is to transmit the spirit of an epoch through the people who play large roles in various spheres of our society — from politics to showbiz.” By using people we instantly recognise, Shingareev’s work challenges the viewer’s expectations despite the unusual scenarios he places them into. “I invite viewers to look at these unapproachable personalities from a different point of view, one which reveals more of their human qualities.”


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Self-Portrait - Oil on Canvas


Red Bull Jesus - Oil on Canvas


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Vladimir Putin - Oil on Canvas


Lady Gaga - Oil on Canvas


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Queen Elizabeth - Oil on Canvas


Barack Obama - Oil on Canvas


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Silvio Berlusconi - Oil on Canvas


jadesukiya.com

Photography Jade Sukiya Styling Isabella Kavanagh Model Joel @ Body London


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Polo: UNIQLO Bomber: Stylist Own


Brown Overall: Absolute Vintage White Polo: UNIQLO Bag: Burberry Boot: Doc Marten Harness: National Costume Theatre


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Skirt: Vintage Jager Shirt:Topshop Balaclava: Stylist own Long John: UNIQLO Shoes: Doc Marten


Tshirt: H&M Harness & Trouser: National Costume Theatre


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Polo: UNIQLO Braces: Topshop Jeans: Levi Bag: Burberry


Tshirt: H&M Harness & Trouser: National Costume Theatre


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Shirt: Burberry Skirt & Balaclava: Stylist Own Trouser: National Costume Theatre Shoes: Doc Marten Bag: Burberry


aniamphotography.com

PhotographY Ania Mroczkowska Stylist Kat Rembielak Make up Fiorenza Ferrara Model Mario@ D1 Models


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Jumper: Carlo Volpi


Wool Top and trousers: Carlo Volpi


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Coat: Moran Yi @Perry Nelvill Wool Trousers: Carlo Volpi



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Wool Top: Carlo Volpi


Jumper: Carlo Volpi


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Top: Sarah Sweeney@Perry Nelvill Trousers: River Island


Interview Rena Niamh Smith Photography Tibor Galamb Jacob Birge has what it takes to go light years in fashion. Based in Edinburgh, he graduated last summer and has already a steely-strong signature; the Jacob Birge Vision. His high-end designs are sculptural and futuristic; they might easily be the clothing of another world. Hi-tech fabrics in architectural silhouettes with strong shoulders, waists and hips, it is like armour, a powerful femininity. Reinventing the female form, he presents an edgy wardrobe for the thoroughly forward-facing woman. Rena Niamh Smith talks to him about the driving forces behind this dramatic outlook.


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Jacob Birge approaches fashion from a unique perspective. Dressed head-to-toe in his own design, neoprene sweatshirt and with large, space-age spectacles against a shaved head, he cuts a striking image as ambassador for an intellectual, space-age kind of fashion. Originally a maths prodigy, he studied an MA in Chemistry at the University of Science and Technology Cracow before making the transition to fashion. He is talented in so much more than clothing, although he uses it as medium to say something highly original. A multi-discipline artist, he makes electronic music, art installations and fashion films. Similarly dark and abstract as his high-end fashion line, they feed back into the same artistic outflow. He released an album, Variations in November 2011. Meanwhile, his graduate collection for Spring 2013 titled Symmetric Strategy was based on the relationship between human and technology. He wrote mathematical equations that he used to make musical sequences electronically; in turn, these made an image that determined the silhouettes for the collection. Symmetric Strategy is now available as an album, too. It is incredibly clever; he both set himself a design challenge and gave himself creative scaffolding.

Like a Pugh or a McQueen before him, the Birge aesthetic defies trends and will allow him to develop a point of view organically as opposed to reinventing himself every season. You will never see his work featuring pastel colours; instead, he uses strong colour tones and stronger shapes, particularly black, blue and red, to realise his ambitions. Graduating in June last year, he won funding in September that allowed him to set up a label, and has shown to have a smart head for business. His Autumn Winter 2013 collection Hortical was shown in a fashion film at London Fashion Week to critical acclaim. Featured in Vogue, I Heart and the Gola “Made in Britain” initiative among others, the collection is stocked on Not Just A Label, as well as in New York, Japan and Italy. Crucially, his work is wearable; he believes strongly in developing clothing with real women in mind. During GFW, Edinburgh College of Art worked with All Walks Beyond The Catwalk to help designers ground work in real women’s experiences. Students designed in partnership with fit models of different sizes to translate the experience of wearing into the form and function of pieces no matter how outlandish.


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Although is not making clothes for wallflowers, a healthy range of accessories from cuffs to headpieces to support his clothing line ensures a business-savvy approach to cutting-edge fashion. He makes single pieces that can be worn to singular effect as well as those looking for a headto-toe statement. They are the kind of wearable art to be treasured. The mathematical grounding of Birge’s design theory gives his work a structural steeliness, as if founded the pieces themselves are based on the aesthetics of irrefutable logic. Birge cites the Darren Aronofsky film Pi as an early influence. Darkly surreal, it is the story of a mathematician who becomes obsessed with finding a certain numerical sequence behind everything, from religion to the stock market to nature. Eventually driven to the brink of madness, it gives a glimpse as to the hypnotic power of maths. Drawing on his mathematical background in fashion, Birge brings a fresh perspective to design that is just as intoxicating.

Hi Jacob, thanks for talking to us. Tell us, what is the ethos of your work? My work reflects a modern time looking more to the future, but also considering a heritage of fashion and women body. We think about the women and her needs in an ultramodern way. Some people consider my work as a futuristic, but I believe that this is my definition of contemporary fashion. Who do you design for? My women are strong, fashion forward, open to new ideas, brave to break barriers within look and take a risk. She values structure and craftsmanship but also the softness and comfort. She enjoys powerful and modern silhouettes, with strong shoulder profiles, waist and contemporary look. She is always the centre of attention, never afraid of whom she is or portraying a strong statement.


When did you first know you wanted to be a designer? I started designing when I was around 16. When I was a teenager I always wanted to be a scientist, a crazy mathematician, I guess after I have seen Pi by Darren Aronofsky; or a musician. I was listening Oasis and Radiohead and was a great fan of Liam Gallagher and Jonny Greenwood. I guess I was admiring being a rude boy at one point, and introvert genius on the other hand. Unfortunately, I was not gifted for playing any instruments, but I was amazing in maths and science. At the same time, I had a friend and he had an older sister, she was so cool, and she was choosing outfits for him. We started wearing a high collar shirt and loose trousers when going out. It was a need for recognition and unique style among things which were not unique at all. We start to watch Fashion TV and try to adopt the style from the catwalk. There was a big boom for a designer called Arkadius; he always made a huge statement. Eventually,I forced myself to start to make my own clothes; I designed my first menswear blouse. I was quite bad in drawings, but good in maths, so I went to study chemistry, while still making and wearing my own clothes, which gave me a small fame around science students.

How did you make the move from science to fashion? Eventually in my fourth year, I participated in a fashion contest, Offfashion and won a 3rd Price. Next year I found another competition, this time Createurope Awards, in Berlin. I made a portfolio and garments, sent the application, and at the last moment I decided to apply again to Offfashion with the same collection that I had sent to Berlin. I got first Prize on Offfashion Awards and free entrance to fashion school based in Denmark, TEKO. One month later I moved to Denmark. I spent 2 years there, and eventually moved to Edinburgh to continue the BA. What inspires you to design? I guess that has changed over the years. When I started it was fashion seen on TV, ready to wear stuff, then I become more into Avant Garde, in pushing barriers. After Radiohead, I progressed to electronic music; Hail To The Thief by Radiohead was the best and the last good album from this band, who have since moved on to solving earth problems instead of focusing on making music. I started to listen musicians like Aphex twin, Autechre, Venetian Snares, SND, Carsten Nicoli, Suarepusher – very abstract and edgy music.


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I was inspired by abstract shapes, architecture, and music; music is a natural part of my life, so I do not even consider it as an inspiration, because there is many situations which I just cannot imagine without music, like walking on the street. But I guess it is about beauty in general. I see something and I just feel it is amazing, it is something I have never seen before, and I start to think how I can incorporate this with my fashion. Sometimes it is quite unconscious, some kind of reverb from the past. What were you inspired by this season? The name of the collection is Hortical; that means Horizontal VS Vertical. I have used Fibonacci Sequence (also called Golden ratio) to divide a woman’ s body with a horizontal and vertical lines .The visual representation of Fibonacci sequence was used to find an ideal proportion of a woman’s body – proportions which human eye recognize as an ideal. Following this thinking the Fibonacci “squares” gave us the idea where the lines of colour panels should be

placed, as well as the position of waistline, shoulder line, the length of the dress/skirt. In a more common sense, those extremes refer to humans and the changes that occur during their lifetime. Everything in nature has its ups and downs, causing us to appear to be in a state of equilibrium if viewed at from a distance. My designs try to describe people’s life by using the scientific method, with consideration for contemporary fashion and beauty. Your graduate collection fused music, maths and fashion. Tell us how this came about. With my graduate collection the idea was that I have created 6 mathematical equations, which I have put in the software, which I use to compose music - they generated the sequence of the midi notes. I have taken a snapshot of it, mirrored them and this way I got a different silhouettes. Those silhouettes, I have used in the collection, but some of the pieces, a lot of people referring to the insects – and I definitely see the point, and this is kind of echo from the past – the insects their shapes and structure I have always found interesting. My pre collection on the final year


was called MOTH. Now I guess I have taken the whole circle, because I start to be really addicted to fashion – I follow all the shows during all four fashion weeks. I try to have my conclusions and point of view about modern women now, and create some sort of statement, which has my fingerprints, but at the same time is current with fashion. In general, there is a need for beauty and visual aspects of it. What is your most exciting plan for 2013? The plan for the 2013 is to set up a sustainable brand, which adds value to fashion and have a unique style of women. Now, we are focusing on finding stockists and customers for our A/W 2013 collection. We would like to make a small pre-collection, a few pieces, much more plain in terms of silhouette, more commercial. We would like to present our S/S 2014 collection in September. We are not sure yet if we would like to do it in London or Paris, and in which form. These days, doing a show is very risky without certainty that it will reflect in our turnover, so as we did last season bringing a digital presentation as a show, we will try to break the barriers and come up with a new

way of presenting fashion. As a brand, we would like to find out niche and create strong customer base, and generate profits through accessories and consultancy; so, go shopping on our website! What is the most important lesson life has taught you? Professionally, you cannot change the world, you can only fit to it. If you think people will buy your clothes just because you designed them, that will never happen. You have to be aware about modern women, and conscious what she is usually wearing and try to make something similar, with your fingerprints on it. Personally, love is not worth to give up your passion. Love will be eventually gone, and your passion will be with you forever. But I believe I just follow what it was written in “The Fountainhead” by Ayn Rand – so if you are curious - just go for it. Finally, what are you a Slave to? I have to admit, I am totally addicted to the computer, this is the first thing what I do in the morning. The second thing without which I cannot function is very strong coffee in the morning – I do not open my eyes without it.


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masatoshi-hamanoi.net

Photography Masa Hamanoi Stylist Hideyuki Hayashi Hair Ken Tanuma make up Kento Utsubo photographer assistant Masaki Iwase stylist assistant Yuka Okumura model YUAN @Bellona Model Agency


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Top: Wolford, Fukuske Corporation Skirt: Nyte, Xanadu Tokyo Eye Piece: Daikichi, Xanadu Tokyo


Gown: Transvestite Shorts: Wolford, Fukuske Corporation Head Piece: Daikichi, Xanadu Tokyo


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Coat: Bowie, Lakic Shorts: Aixo


Dress & Snood:Transvestite  Ear Piece: Daikichi, Xanadu Tokyo


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Top: Wolford, Fukuske Corporation Skirt: Nyte, Xanadu Tokyo Eye Piece: Daikichi, Xanadu Tokyo


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Body Suit: Saphir East, Esteem Press Stole: A Degree Fahrenheit, 212 Co Ltd


Interview Yasmin Ali Photography Louise Munro Styling Laura Blyth SLAVE magazine welcomes back Scottish singer-songwriter Nina Nesbitt, last featured in issue 5, after she had recently signed to label BMG Chrysalis in December 2011. Big changes have been afoot since then. Nesbitt released her EP ‘The Apple Tree’ on iTunes to much success in Spring 2012, allowing her to negotiate a record deal with Island Records/Universal in June and work on a debut album in London, all before her eighteenth birthday. Nina gives SLAVE a candid insight into her experiences, inspirations for songwriting, and rising success in the music industry.


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All clothing - Godiva


2012 was a busy year for you, in terms of recording and touring, both in the UK and abroad. What was it like touring abroad in November of last year, at Songbird in Holland and at your solo dates in France and Belgium? Yes, 2012 was really busy but a lot of fun too. It was nice to get a chance to touch base with my fans outside the UK who have supported me for quite some time, as well as make some new friends at my headline shows. Songbird Festival in Holland was a really nice event which I would recommend to anyone who likes to discover new music. To return to Paris and Brussels with my own headline shows end of 2012 was amazing. I really enjoy travelling and to visit their beautiful cities again was an absolute privilege. How does it feel to be in a position now to headline your own gigs with your own band? It’s rather crazy to think that I performed my first solo headline gig just in February 2012 at a small CafÊ in Glasgow to an 80 people audience. A year later in mid-March 2013 I find myself headlining The Liquid Rooms in Edinburgh, playing a sold out gig in front of 600 people with my brand new band! Really overwhelming but I absolutely loved it. It makes me really happy to be able to share my music with so many people and see them enjoying it. When you hear them singing your lyrics back to you of some of the more well known songs of mine, it is a pretty special moment.

Before you signed, you were using YouTube as a medium to get your music heard. How important is social media as an interface with your fan base now? I begun posting videos on YouTube when I was just about turned fifteen to see what feedback I would get from the public. It was a great tool for me to use as I was too young to start gigging in most venues due to UK licensing laws and I was still at school studying for my grades. You Tube and Soundcloud were the mediums I used in order to reach out to people initially. Just before I was about to leave school I set up my own Facebook music page and begun sharing my music & news there and my fan base grew slowly but steadily. Social media has always been important to me as this is how I can connect with people all around the world and share music, pictures, live streams, hold competitions and all sorts of event information. The importance of using social media after signing to a major label remains exactly the same for me as before, this is how I interact on a daily basis with my fan base and have always done so. I really enjoy interacting with them directly over FB and Twitter and will continue to do so for as long as it is possible. Feedback from fans and having them involved in my musical journey in many different ways is very important to me and one of the best ways for this to happen apart from my live shows is through social media.


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You’re playing at home, at Scotland’s answer to Glastonbury, T in the Park this Summer, for the second year in a row. How does it compare playing to a home crowd compared to playing further afield? Playing to a home crowd is always really special, but can also be a lot more nerve-racking. Many of them are friends and family that come along, as well as fans that have been around from the days when I played to a crowd of just 20 people. T in The Park last year was amazing! I headlined the BBC Introducing stage and the tent was absolutely packed with a great crowd singing along and dancing. I’m really looking forward to coming back this year with my band to share some more new music with everyone at TITP. I always add a little special Scottish cover track as well with my home crowd at the end of my set which I love, it’s a great party atmosphere. Radio 1 named your song ‘Stay Out’ in its weekly feature as Scott Mills’ Big Thing. Radio 1 has long been a fixture in youth music culture. How important is airplay to you in the digital music age? Radio play is really important I feel as this is how many people find out more about you & your music that may not have come across you before. I notice from my FB messages and Twitter feed that this is how many new people discover my music. I was so happy when Scott Mills made Stay Out ‘The Big Thing’ on Radio 1 for a week. They have been incredibly supportive on Radio 1 and play listed Stay Out following this. I’ve also been in to play Innuendo Bingo on Radio 1 which was fun and I recently also performed at the Live Lounge Late session. How has your musical style evolved since your first release? My first ever release only had voice & guitar or voice & piano on the Live Take EP, which was only ever meant for demo purpose but I decided just to put it out there to fans anyway. Following this I produced The Apple Tree EP with

Jake Gosling, here I chose to add more instrumentation to most of the tracks such as drums and electric guitars for example. I really like experimenting with instruments & sounds when in the studio and I think this is pretty evident in the Boy EP as well as the brand new Stay Out EP due for release 8th April 2013. I guess my style has evolved from purely acoustics sounds to more of a mixture of instruments & beats along with a few stripped down ballads as well. You are cited as saying your songwriting originated through writing poetry at a young age and later setting words to music. Now that your musical skills have matured, what comes first - lyrics or melody in the process? I used to write short story books when very young and at aged 10 learnt to play the key board which then lead to me putting my stories to music, this is indeed how my early song writing evolved. I actually have no set pattern for how I construct a song. It really varies as it depends on what inspires a new song. It can be an observation I’ve made or a feeling and in that case often the lyrical content comes first or it can simply be a new riff I make and really like or a piano piece I write and then decide to write lyrics to them.I have even been found to be humming into my iPhone on the bus as an idea has come into my head of a new song. It’s a steady flow, I write all the time. Your trajectory to success has been likened to that of fellow female Scots KT Tunstall and Sandi Thom. How do you feel about these comparisons? It’s only natural that people compare me to other Scottish female artist and I like both KT Tunstall & Sandi Thom so I see that as a compliment. When a new artist emerges there is always a desire by people to compare their style to others, however, hopefully over time I will be able to make my own mark in the world of music and make Scotland proud of another female artist, fingers crossed!


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missaniela.com

Photography Miss Aniela Models Olla G, Natalia Red, Esti Rose Styling Lauren Eva Hair Virginie Barrault-Guignard, Tati Zarubova Make up Ania Gastol, Rhiannon Chalmers DESIGNERS LENKA PADYSAKOVA, KEVIN FREEMAN, BEYOND BURLESQUE, CLEA BROAD, DELLA REED


Model: Olla G Dress: Lenka Padysakova Collar & Headpiece: Clea Broad Styling: Lauren Eva Hair: Tati Zarubova Make up: Ania Gastol


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Model: Natalia Red Dress & Bolero: Renaissance by Kevin Freeman Collar: Velvet Eccentric by Della Reed Crown: Clea Broad Styling: Lauren Eva Hair: Virginie Barrault-Guignard & Tati Zarubova Make up: Ania Gastol


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Model: Esti Rose Dress: Beyond Burlesque Collar & collar worn as headpiece: Velvet Eccentric by Della Reed Styling: Lauren Eva Hair: Virginie Barrault-Guignard Make up: Rhiannon Chalmers


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Photography Matt Simmons Hair & Make up Alexandria Dixon Model Kelli White @Campbell Agency


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Photography Rakeem CunninghamAssistant Styling & Grooming Wilford Lenov Model Scott Neslage @ LA Models


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Tank Top: American Apparel Denim: American Apparel Blazer: Stylist Own


Shirt: American Apparel Pullover: American Apparel Shorts: American Apparel Belt: American Apparel


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Trousers: American Apparel Polo Shirt: American Apparel Jacket: American Apparel Shoes: Stylist own


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Shirt: American Apparel Pullover: American Apparel Shorts: American Apparel Belt: American Apparel


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T-Shirt: American Apparel Belt: American Apparel Trousers: American Apparel


T-Shirt: American Apparel Belt: American Apparel Trousers: American Apparel Shoes: Stylist own


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BOSWELLSTUDIO.COM

Photography Boswell Fashion Robert Lussier Model Marco Rodriguez@ Joy Model Management, Milan


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Shirt: Rick Owens


Tuxedo: Christian Dior Sex Necklace: D&G vintage


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Tuxedo: Christian Dior


Jacket: Rick Owens


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Denim Vest: Margiela


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Tuxedo: Christian Dior


Photography: Laura Sgherri Styling Stefano Fepa Model Fabio Ageno


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Hat: A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Coat: Calvin Klein Waistcoat: Antica Armeria Bresciana


Synthetic Fur Jacket: Authentic Army Camouflage Turtleneck: Emporio Armani Jeans: Replay Sandal: Antonio Barbato


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Hat: A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Coat: Calvin Klein Waistcoat: Antica Armeria Bresciana


Synthetic Fur: Giulia Carla Cecchi Knit Waistcoat: True Religion Trousers: Itor Throup Boots: Costume National


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Synthetic Fur: Giulia Carla Cecchi Knit Waistcoat: True Religion


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Synthetic Fur Turtleneck: Emporio ArmaniÂ


What was your main inspiration? The cyberpunk movement was the main inspiration for this shoot. I really wanted to shoot a black and white editorial, as I’ve been shooting more and more colorful series recently. I started my photography path with black and white, and wanted to come back to it. So, cyberpunk and retro futurist themes were the central point. I was thinking, dark, manly, dirty, but with a clean aesthetic to it. Something between classic black and white fashion photography, Deus ex (the video game), The Trial by Kafka and H.R Giger’s work, I guess.


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Lighting diagram

What was the concept for your shoot? The concept of “Dystopia” was to imagine a scenery, that would be dark, on the verge of post modernism, and also very still, not to say frozen. I really wanted to do something that was borderline sexy but mainly reflecting loneliness at night, and taking place in an industrial environment. We wanted to feature exclusively black outfits, therefore, it was a lot of work around textures and shapes, which was also a big part of the set itself. The location had to match with the clothes, and vice versa. Some info about your team/ why have you decided to work with them on this project? My team is like family to me. I really believe that if you want to achieve something honest and succeed in this industry, you have to surround yourself with hard working talented individuals, who believe in your vision and who are connected on the same artistic level as you are. I’m very lucky to have found those talented people: My make up artist was Charlotte Chicot, she’s been with me for a quite a while now, and I couldn’t have thought of a better person for the job. We worked on several series/photoshoots together, including one where she was crazy enough to cover girls

with glitter and crystals for almost 24 hours straight in a week end, so, from that on, she could do pretty much anything else. My assistant was Marilyn Mugot, an amazing photographer (who’s also published in this Issue) We’ve bonded recently over our mutual love for photography and our common vision of what self involvement should be, when you dedicate your life to this activity. I truly respect her work. She’s an amazing assistant too, as involved and professional as she can be on her own projects. My stylist was Hege Edvardsen, she’s a photo stylist, but also a designer, and has a brand called HEGE E, she arrived from Norway to Paris a couple of years ago, and we quickly met and started working together, she’s super talented and blond too, which adds to her charm. Her assistant was Raissa Louis Abraham, an aspiring stylist which I strongly believe in. Her taste in fashion is quite amazing, she’s got talent, and will go far in this industry. And finally for the models, Lucas and Jon both embodied the image of what I believe is a modern young man. Strong faces and deep expressions, with some sort of roughness and subtlety in their eyes. They fit the job perfectly and I loved working with them. I’d also like to thank Guillaume at Nathalie Models for his help and kindness.


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Technical info- lighting diagram, equipment used etc. I always have very simple light settings, I think you can achieve great light without having to spend millions on it. I’ve used a lot of the stage/room lights in the actual location: the night club of the Moulin Rouge. I also used neon lights, which is very recurrent in my work. I used a canon 5D mark II, with 50mm and 85 mm lenses, as well as a 420 Polaroid for a few pictures. What are your criteria when selecting magazine you want to be published with? I guess that it’s, primarily, a very subjective choice, according to one’s personal taste in visual art. In my opinion, a good magazine has to feature a certain standard of quality images and a global vision that speaks to me through the editorial choices. Slave is definitely one of these magazine. It’s modern, cutting edge and vibrant. A real pleasure to read. See full editorial at pages:14-23


What was your main inspiration? This shot was a large-scale production in a 12th-century church, over 2 days with 5 models. The location itself was the inspiration for the semi-theatrical styling with historical nuances and a modern fashion twist. I was inspired by the shoot we’d had with theatre costumes a few months back in Paris. Also, during the shoot itself, inspirations from Annie Leibovitz materialised. What was the concept for your shoot? (please send us a mood board, sketches etc.) I wanted a shoot that was more dramatic than my previous productions and had ‘period’ touches. Lauren Eva understood the semi-modern, semi-theatrical feel i wanted and gave plenty of references to brainstorm in the start: long gowns, interesting opulent accessories from designers, dramatic details and flowing shapes such as the long purple dress from Beyond Burlesque.


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Slave Magazine


Lighting diagram

Some info about your team/ why have you decided to work with them on this project? One of the key looks was the model Natalia Red in Kevin Freeman’s white silk dress and bolero which went perfectly with her skin tone and expression, and made for a fairytale and ice-queen-like look. This was the epitome of the drama I was seeking. I sought the input of hairstylist Tati Zarubova with whom I work on many of my shoots. She transcends the boundary of hairstyling into head-prop styling, which went wonderfully with the accessory pieces by Clea Broad and Della Reed. Tati has an amazing ability to prepare creative hair pieces that fit the mood of the styling but also to be efficient enough to meet the time restrictions on a big production. She added stalk structures to the heads of two models which created a genius allusion of a halo, really emphasising the striking quality of the models’ presence. Technical info- lighting diagram, equipment used etc. This shoot was just right for constant (film) light. The location, the incense and the dramatic tallness of the archi-

tecture went perfectly with cinematic LED and HMI lights by Lupolux. Sometimes the light was simple, providing illumination to the scene, as seen in some of my story. But for the images of Olla the light was behind her, with a little ambient illumination from the front, which created a strong, ‘stepping from Hell’ kind of ambience! I shot with a Canon 5D Mk II and two lenses: 24-70mm f2.8 and 85mm f1.2. What are your criteria when selecting magazine you want to be published with? I create varying work: some more magical and fairytalelike, and others darker and gothic. It is also important to regard what kind of models are in the story, and how they are presented: whether they look young, girly and playful, or more womanly and powerful. This will determine what kind of magazine I pitch to. The images in my story Holy Smokes are generally bold, a little haunting in terms of lighting and location, but also infused with an essence of beautiful drama. This conflict of elements drew Slave magazine to mind: as a place that toys with boundaries and stereotypes, breaks the mould and presents strong visual features. See full editorial at pages:122-129


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PHOTOGRAPHY

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Moodboard


benjoarwas.com

Photographer Benjo Arwas Styling Jonathan Storm and Wilford Lenov Model Asha Lannin @ Wilhelmina Models, Los Angeles Makeup & Hair Lina Hang Photo Assistant Drew Casey


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Crown: Marianna’s Designer Jewelry ( Style PR) Earrings: Fashion Forward Dress: Olena Dats Cardigan: Beija Necklace: Fashion Forward


Shell Dress: OYO, Busayo Earrings: Fashion ForwardÂ


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Crown: Marianna’s Designer Jewelry ( Style PR) Earrings: Fashion Forward Dress: Olena Dats Cardigan: Beija Necklace: Fashion Forward


Shell Dress: Nami Earrings: Fashion ForwardÂ


Slave Magazine

Shell Dress: Nami Earrings: Fashion ForwardÂ


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Jacket: On Aura Tout Vu Dress: Jitrois Antique Moroccan Belt Berbere Necklace & Berbere make up bag


marilynmugot.com

Photography Marilyn Mugot Make Up Tiphany Laboureur/Sarah Henry Stylist Fleur Huynh Evans Model Nastya @UPModels


Dress: Jitrois Satin Dress: Ninon Palisse Chocker: On Aura Tout Vu Scarf: Etro Brooches: On Aura Tout Vu


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Top: Ninon Palisse Belt: Jitrois Silk Pants: Gucci Platform Shoes: Louis Vuitton Berbere Coral and Silver Necklace


Slave Magazine

Dress: Jitrois Satin Dress: Ninon Palisse Chocker: On Aura Tout Vue



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Fur Jacket: On Aura Tout Vu Antique Moroccan Belt and Berbere Necklace


sashaguseynova.com

Photography Sasha Guseynova Style Ivan Zemlyakov, Anastasiya Solntseva Make Up & Hair Anastasiya Stepnova Models Dmitriy Bibko, Ekaterina Romanova @ Z’S Models Studio ZOOMLAB


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Accessories: Showroom BS, St. Petersburg Shawl: H&M


Shirt: TopShop Pants: Handmade Ivan Zemlyakov Shoes: TopMan Belt: Handmade Ivan Zemlyakov


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Slave Magazine

Him: Shirt: Showroom BS, St. Petersburg Accessories: Showroom BS, St. Petersburg Her: Dress: TopShop Accessories: Showroom BS, St. Petersburg


Shirt: Club D’amingo Pants: Gutos Shoes: H&M Belt: Topman


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Him: Shirt: Club D’amingo Jersey: All Saints Pants: Gutos Belt: Topman Glasses: H&M Accessories: Showroom BS, St. Petersburg Her: Dress: Phrrdi Accessories: H&M & Showroom BS, St. Petersburg


jcerilla.com

Photography JC Cerilla Styling Ivanna Goldenberg Makeup Artist Wenya Chang Hair Styling Maria Salazar Model Schylar @ Q Model Management


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Blazer: Barneys NY Sunglasses: Moschino


Blazer: Barney’s NY Leggings: Bar 111 Top: American Apparel Hat: New Era Necklace: stylist collection


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Jacket: Kenneth Cole Trousers: Robert Rodriguez Top: H&M Shoes: Calvin Klein


Bathing suit: Nike Jacket: Adidas Sneakers: DKNY


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Trench: Marc Jacobs Top: Puma Leggings: Puma Sneakers: DKNY


johannbona.com

Photography Johann Bona Styling Dasha Mosolova @Judy Inc. Make up & nails Carmen Rachel @Face Atelier Hair Katie Gabinet @Donato Salon Model Shelagh @Next


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Pants: Diane Von Furstenberg Blouse: BCBG Belt: Diesel


Jumpsuit: Evis Sandals: Loeffler Randall Purse: Dooney &


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Blouse: Dian Von Furstenberg Trousers: Pink Tartan Clutch: Vince Camuto


Blouse: Free People Trousers: Open Ceremony Purse: Juicy Couture Necklace: BCBG Shoes: Loeffler


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Skirt: BCBG Blouse: Diane Von Furstenberg


sebastienlarreur.com

Photography SĂŠbastien Larreur Stylist Hira Shah Clothing Designer Maria Hedmark Make up Elin Laine Model Josefine Erfass


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tiborgalamb.tumblr.com

Photography Tibor Galamb MUA Ksenia Orzel Hair Ryan McCreadie Styling Jacob Birge Vision Models Ruta Rimkunaite, Anna Freemantle @ Model Team



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Slave Magazine



Slave Magazine



Slave Magazine


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