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Slave Magazine Team Ania Mroczkowska Editor In-Chief / Picture Editor Artur Dziewisz Design & Art Direction Louise Munro Editor In-Chief / Picture Editor Kasia Mroczkowska Features Writer Rena Niamh Smith Features Writer

Slave Magazine Avenue Road, N6 5DT London www.slavemag.com contact@slavemag.com


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with this issue contributors

Giulia Brandimarti / Stylist

JC Cerilla / Photographer

How old are you? I’m 25.

How old are you? Twenty Something.

Where are you from? I’m from Rome .

Where are you from? Manila, Philippines.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? My I phone (hope there’s wifi connection )

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? My smart phone with Internet access so I could instagram, blog and share about my adventures on that Island.

What inspires you the most? Everything that surrounds me: a movie a photo, a painting, a person walking in the street. What are you a slave to? Nothing in particular. I don’t like to be slave to something, mostly in fashion because fashion means freedom of expression from our soul.

What inspires you the most? The people I take photos of. What are you a slave to? Music and the beach.


Slave Magazine

Morgan Chidsey / Photographer

Julien Cozzolino / Photographer

Cristian Di Stefano / Photographer

How old are you? Twenty- two years of day.

How old are you? Hi i’m here since 10250 days !

How old are you? More than you think and less than what I have.

Where are you from? Suburbs of Dallas.

Where are you from? I’m From France, Paris

Where are you from? From any place I enjoy being.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A loved one.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Probably my camera to keep the memories

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Interesting question! surely my sunglasses.

What inspires you the most? The delicate things: Flowers, emotion, love, light, wind, simplicity.

What inspires you the most? People on the street, I could watch them for hours

What inspires you the most? The movies.

What are you a slave to? Love // happiness.

What are you a slave to? I’m a slave to my work, the work that i love the most...photography

What are you a slave to? I’m not a slave to anything.


Sarah Ford / Photographer

Jack Goodman / Writer

How old are you? 30.

How old are you? 23.

Where are you from? Paris.

Where are you from? A little village in East Sussex.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A book to write to keep myself entertained in a creative way.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? First I would take a carefully selected person. An object would probably be a pen. For practical reasons the pen should probably double up as a knife. So a penknife I guess.

What inspires you the most? Music Videos! I could watch music channels for days and i should always keep a notebook close at those moments, because ideas keep coming and can disappear just as quick. What are you a slave to? My natural needs : eat good, laugh good, dream good, sleep good.

What inspires you the most? A successful underdog. What are you a slave to? Self-satisfaction.


Slave Magazine

Britta Hawkins / Photographer

Dawn Marie Jones / Photographer

Daniel Jung / Photographer

How old are you? 27.

How old are you? 32.

How old are you? A shaman told me that I’ve lived many lifetimes, so perhaps 2000 years or more.

Where are you from? I’m from the backwoods of Idaho right below Canada. Currently I live in Spokane, Washington near Seattle.

Where are you from? Wales.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Someone with island survival skills! And my camera. What inspires you the most? My inspirations come from the music world, films, and eccentric people. I am also trying to translate my attraction to bizarre art into my photography somehow. What are you a slave to? I’m a slave to shoes! I can’t stop buying them!

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? My Leatherman. What inspires you the most? Everything around me, dreams, life, passion... What are you a slave to? Ideas.

Where are you from? I grew up in San Francisco, CA and currently live in beautiful Los Angeles. If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Hopefully another person- it would be really boring with no one to talk to! If it were an object, probably something practical and provocative- like a knife. What inspires you the most? I’m a peak experience junkie- through the years I’ve gone out of my way to feed my addiction through artistic, physical, mental, and spiritual means. What are you a slave to? I’m not in to being dominated by anything or anyone.


Florence Leung / Photographer

Jemima Marriott / Photographer

How old are you? In my twenties.

How old are you? 30.

Where are you from? Vancouver, Canada.

Where are you from? Kent.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? My best friend.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? My boyfriend.

What inspires you the most? Any person, place or, object that captures my attention and elicits emotions from me, would inspire me to continue shooting, learning and trying new things.

What inspires you the most? Music videos, especially Lana Del Rays videos, outer space and the wonderful creative’s I get to work with.

What are you a slave to? Perfectionism.

What are you a slave to? At the moment? Gardening, definitely.


Slave Magazine

Paco Matteo / Photographer

Gabrielle Murphy / Photographer

Viktorija Pashuta / Photographer

How old are you? I’m 25 but I feel so much younger.

How old are you? 26.

How old are you? I’m 29.

Where are you from? I come from a wonderful place, Sicily! Now i live in Rome.

Where are you from? Melbourne, Australia.

Where are you from? Originally I’m from a small city in Latvia called Ventspils, but currently live in Los Angeles, California.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Sunscreen. What inspires you the most? I see pictures and paintings everyday and I think I’m pretty influenced by them but I think what inspires me more is people and faces I see in the street, what they wear, their facial expressions and stories they could have. Everyone has a past and a future, dreams, something to tell, I like to imagine it. What are you a slave to? Food, Internet and sex.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A huge empty notepad with a pen so I could draw my decent into madness! What inspires you the most? Well my inspiration changes just like my mood. Recently I went to see Sylvie Guillem and a couple other contemporary dancers dance at a theatre in London. The movements were abstract and unusual not polished and pretentious like most dance performances I have seen. What really struck me was the complete rawness of the dancing it seemed to make perfect sense even if they looked at times awkward or clumsy. It was fearless. What are you a slave to? Late nights of escapism and bottles of wine.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A talking dog to keep me company. What inspires you the most? Nature and people. There is nothing that can be compared to a walk on a deserted beach with my iPod - I can come up with tons of ideas of just because I’m feeling free. People inspire me most one look at a person and I see the whole creative concept right in front of me. What are you a slave to? Sometimes I’m a slave of my own imagination.


Elisa Perotti / Photographer

Michal Polak / Photographer

How old are you? I’m 31 years.

How old are you? 29.

Where are you from? I’m from Turin, Italy.

Where are you from? Łódź, Poland.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? I would take my photo camera and my cat.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A lighter.

What inspires you the most? Sandro Becchetti inspires me, he is a Italian photographer of the 70’s years; very contrast black and white and very cool composition. His pictures are contemporary also today.

What inspires you the most? Poverty and isolation.

What are you a slave to? I’m slave to my bed (I love sleep) and the beauty. Everything must be beautiful!

What are you a slave to? My demons.


Slave Magazine

Irvin Rivera / Photographer

Rachel Schraven / Photographer

Quincy Scott / Photographer

How old are you? 26.

How old are you? 27.

How old are you? I’m eternally 12.

Where are you from? Los Angeles, California.

Where are you from? NL – Utrecht.

Where are you from? I’m from New York via London, Paris, Munich, & Prague.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A camera.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? My Dog.

What inspires you the most? Films and works of other amazing artists.

What inspires you the most? Burning Man Festival.

What are you a slave to? Ice Cream and Art.

What are you a slave to? My Camera.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? A full service bar with bar staff. What inspires you the most? Grey weather, Road Trips, Landscapes. What are you a slave to? Wine + House Music.


Dorota Szafranska & Krzysztof Kowalski / Photographers How old are you? Dorota is 25, Krzysztof is 34. Where are you from? Poland. We are living in Toruń - Copernicus was born here. If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? ‘Lord of the flies’. What inspires you the most? Literature at its best: prose and poetry, Graham Greene and Ezra Pound just to name a few. What are you a slave to? Fashion. High fashion. We watch fashion, we think fashion, we try to be a part of fashion. We are devoted to the process of self development as artists.

Alex Taylor / Writer How old are you? 20. Where are you from? Doncaster, UK. If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Duct tape...or Alexa Chung...or both. What inspires you the most? Things which are strange and weird..things which go against the grain. What are you a slave to? The rhythm.


Slave Magazine

Patricia Villirillo / Stylist

Yuji Watanabe / Photographer

How old are you? I’m 24 years old.

How old are you? 26 years old.

Where are you from? I’m from the city where the parmesan cheese was born:Reggio Emilia. A lovely city in the north of Italy between Milan and Bologna.

Where are you from? Ehime, Japan.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? I donʼt really see the point of bringing anything if I am going to a desert island, however I might bring a razor. What inspires you the most? Cultures.. What are you a slave to? My determination.

If you were stranded on a deserted island what would be the one thing you would take? Diary to record my life. What inspires you the most? Everything. What are you a slave to? Retouching.


AlexanderAlvear.com

Photography: Alexander Alvear Styling: Yoshihiro Hidaka Grooming: Takahiro Okada Post-Production: Ellen Tan Model: Tomas Fernandez at VNY Model Management


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Shirt: Vintage Balmain BowTie: Ralph Lauren


Coat: OAK Pants: Dior Homme


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Suit: Vintage Valentino Tie: J. Crew Shirt: Club Monaco


Coat: Vintage Yohji Yamamoto Shirt: Uniqlo Pants: Alexander Wang


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Shirt: Jil Sander Belt: Vintage Pants: Vintage Valentino


rachel-photography.nl

Photography: Rachel Schraven Styling: Babette Tielrooij Make up & Hair: Christel Man at Oozaga agency Model: Christa at de Boekers


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Pants: Christa van der Meer Soks: Nike Heels: Duran Lantink Necklace: H&M Bracelet: stylist own


Suit: Vintage Sunglasses: H&M Wedges: Chrissie Houtkooper


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Earclips :vintage Pants: Duran Lantink Blouse: H&M Comme des Garcons


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Earclips: Vintage Blouse: H&M Comme des Garcons Necklace: H&M


Dress; Jolka Wiens Earrings: River Island


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Suit: Duran Lantink Coat: Christa van der Meer Wedges: Chrissie Houtkooper Necklage: H&M Necklace: Stylist own


danieljungphoto.com

Photography: Daniel Jung Make Up Artist: Shyann Swisher Model: Chanon Finley / Wunder Management


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Skin: Face Atelier Ultra Foundation Eyes: Makeup Forever Flash Color- White and Turquoise


Skin: Face Atelier Ultra Foundation Lips: Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Lip Tar- DEMURE Eyes: Makeup Forever Flash Color- Fuchsia Eyeliner: Kevin Aucoin basic eyeliner- Black Mascara: Makeup Forever- Smokey Lash


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Skin: Face Atelier Ultra Foundation Lips: Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Lip Tar- LYDIA Eyeliner: MAC Fluidline- Macroviolet Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Eyecolor- LYDIA


Skin: Face Atelier Ultra Foundation Lips: Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Lip Tar- TRAFFIC Eyes: Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Lip Tar- BETA Makeup Forever Flash Color- Brown and MAC-Glass


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A talk with Katarzyna Konieczka By Kasia Mroczkowska

On paper, Katarzyna Konieczka is a costume and fashion designer; in practice she seems more eager to define herself as a kind of experimenter. Fascinated by deformation, willing to induce emotions, she keeps on experimenting in the field of fashion, the result of which are mind-boggling, rather uncomfortable to wear and rather impossible to forget creations. Even, the queen of originality, Lady Gaga, could not resist the temptation to once steal Konieczka’s sense of style… You once mentioned Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, as a source of inspiration for your collection. You also said: “I associate deformation with inner beauty”; can you elaborate on that?

Ugliness can often be heart-rending, and deformation is something rare; therefore it can be interesting. Fashion can be bland and boring; I am a part of the generation that needs adrenaline, as we were growing up without any taboos. We don’t belong to puritan reality; our emotional boundaries have been altered. My generation is something like “bored children of war”. We are bored, we feel secure and we are thrill-seeking. And I like to induce emotions; how do I do it? I just drape, dye and sew fabric to make it look like a scar. Lace patterns seem to look like bugs slithering on a carcass, and the very dress resembles flayed flesh; but at the same time this outfit makes you think about Baroque, it is femme fatale and classic. You are a bit scared, but you like it as well. It is a skilful manipulation. It is like subliminal message; it makes you subconsciously admit that being scarred excites you; or that, what should disgust you, delights you.


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Costume design and style: Katarzyna Konieczka Photography: Maciej Boryna Make-up and hair: Ania R贸zga/ MILK Model: Paulina Klimczak/New Age Production: Ania R贸zga / MILK


Photography: Sylwia Makris


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Marina Abramovic- now loved and admired by everyone including the world of pop, show business and fashion, stressed in many of her interviews that for a long time her art was treated with incomprehension and rejection. Have you ever experienced rejection and incomprehension of your projects and ideas? Of course, incomprehension is my daily bread. Don’t worry about it, and don’t complaint. There are other things that matter… But thank you for mentioning Marina Abramovic. To be honest, I haven’t heard about her before. And now having read about Abramovic, I think that you need to be a bit crazy to keep on doing your own thing regardless of what people think. You need to really believe in what you do, and you need to be a bit of a sadist and masochist at the same time. I have just thought about what my sister said to me when, at the age of 14, I hand made my own shoes. In glue fumes I had been experimenting with different fabrics and pieces of rubber for a month; and finally when having accomplished my mission, I left my room in a really euphoric state, I heard: “You moron, you don’t make shoes, you buy them!” And then for a short while I ended up thinking that I made a fool of myself, because for the whole month it hadn’t occurred to me that making my own shoes was a bad idea. “I don’t look like a fashion designer…” -you wrote me in your e-mail. You also said in one of your TV interviews that you are not interested in fashion

trends at all. It was costume, not fashion design that was your major. At the same time you are described by all fashion gurus, including Vogue, as a fashion designer…;but do you like being defined as a fashion designer? I don’t necessary like this title. It definitely helps people to understand what I do…, but in the end, I’m like the ugly duckling in the world of fashion; I just don’t fit. I think that what I’m doing is more like a fashion experiment. In general, most of my ideas need time to be understood. Did you see your costumes in the fashion world when you started? Have you ever considered any other place for them? In the beginning I was focusing on photos. I love beautiful photos, and till now they are a crucial part of my projects. They tell stories from the past or the future. I give my fabrics an aged look; also I often bleach them – I sort of freeze them in a way, and this can trigger your imagination. So in the beginning there were photos and maybe film as well… I entered the fashion world a bit later..., I showed my costumes at Fashion Week Poland as a part of Emerging Designers competition. Even though I did not win it, I was featured on Vogue UK web page, and it made me believe in myself; there were only three photos chosen from the whole Fashion Week Poland, and one of them was of my work.


Lady Gaga- let’s talk about her weird connection with you… To make a long story short; Gaga’s assistant borrowed your costumes, they were sent back to you, and then in the video clip “You and I”, Gaga ends up wearing something that looks like a slightly modified copy of your own work. -The end-…In my opinion that is plagiarism, and plagiarism is commonly considered a theft. So we can say that Lady Gaga has stolen your work. Why someone, who can afford anything, doesn’t buy the original copy from a young designer, but steals it? They ordered my costumes, I sent them and they where in New York were “You and I” clip was made. I think that they didn’t use my costumes, because they realised she wouldn’t be able to sing in them. So, they’ve ended up making more comfortable version. The costume they have created looks a bit different than the original version, but it still looks very much alike. I didn’t want to take legal action against them, even though I had offers from lawyers who were eager to help me. Like I said, the original version has been a bit modified; I would just lose my energy… David Lynch once said that ideas are the most important. And what is the most important to you? Originality, I suppose. Originality makes everyone unique, different. You just need to understand that no matter how fucked up you are, that’s the way you are, you need to accept that, and you need to do our own thing, because that’s the only true path to success. And if it happens that people love what you do, that’s what strokes your ego the best.


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Photography: Sylwia Makris


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Photography: Marcin Szpak


aniamphotography.com

Photography: Ania Mroczkowska Model: Jordan at D1 Styling: Katarzyna Re Make up & hair: Marta Gacka


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Blue fury collar: Giselle Ganne Top and Dress: Obscure Couture


Jacket: Nympha London


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Necklace: Hayley Kruger Red top: Obscure Couture Lather jacket: Tsemaye Binitie@Lewis and Leigh Shorts: Topshop


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Black fury collar and knuckle: Giselle Ganne White top: Tsemaye Binitie@Lewis and Leigh


Top: Jacob Birge Vision @Lewis and Leigh


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Top: Nympha London


graphicsmetropolis.com

Photography: Irvin Rivera Wardrobe & Designs: MASAI PAYAN Assistant Photographers: Benjamin Kui,Mike Deliguin, Darwin Abad Models: Raina Hein AT Photogenics, Hannah Jones AT LA Models Stylists: Wilford Lenovwith Jose Galeana Hairstylist: Tokiko Inoue Make-up Artists: Tokiko Inoue, Amanda Carrete Special Thanks to Stephanie Lim-Rosales for the crutches and wheelchair


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Dress: Masai Payan Ring: Marianna Harutunian Flower Ring: Marianna Harutunian Cuff: Marianna Harutunian Necklace: Sway Chic


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Dress: Masai Payan Flower Ring: Marianna Harutunian Necklace: Sway Chic


Hannah: Dress: Masai Payan Mouth Piece: Marianna Harutunian Black Candy Spike: House of Devali Ring: Sway Chic Raina Dress: Masai Payan Necklace: Sway Chic Cuff: La Maison de Fashion Porcupine spiked Heels: House of Devali


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Dress: Masai Payan Flower Ring: Marianna Harutunian Necklace: Sway Chic


Dress: Masai Payan Necklace: Sway Chic Cuff: La Maison de Fashion Porcupine spiked Heels: House of Devali


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Nic Dunlop on Burma – pushing for a new paradigm Words: Jack Goodman

To willingly take on a twenty-year photography project takes, I presume, passion and patience in equal measure. You might think that the creative minds of today’s world, in this age of the instantaneous, would not have the will or see the reason, to attempt a project of such length. But there are those, like Nic Dunlop, who have taken on such an undertaking. These projects are the photographic annals of modern times that give our tweets, likes and emails, a visual sense of context. Nic Dunlop, the acclaimed Bangkok-based photographer and journalist, arrived in Burma in 1995 and was, he confessed, ignorant of this Southeast Asian country’s history or political situation. But it was within his first or second visit to Burma, a country whose people were effectively imprisoned by a violent and tyrannical military dictatorship, that he decided to take on a project that would honestly and properly capture Burma’s diverse people and the complexities of its governance and society. He felt a duty, through his photography, to plug the gaps in the way that the media had, up until then, reported on the dictatorship and to fully portray life living under it. He told me that: ‘I think it was John Birt, Director General of the BBC, who said that “news has a bias against understanding”

– well I’d go a step further and I think it can actually be extremely divisive. I felt Burma was simplified by the media and activists to such an extent that it didn’t foster a degree of understanding as to how a military regime, that is universally despised, can hold onto power for so long. So I set off and thought “I’ll bide my time to really make sense of all of this”. When people talked of oppression I wanted to show people what it looked like.’ The book is called ‘A Brave New Burma’ and is a photographic sketch of over two decades of military rule. Burma is not a country you can briefly ‘sum up’, or shrug your shoulders at. In my experience, people who have been in any way involved with Burma, be it through work or travel, feel an almost duty-bound sense to talk about their experiences. Nic was no different. Whilst I had a vague idea of what I wanted to talk about, I quickly realised that it would be far more fruitful to change tack and let the conversation flow without too much constraint. Nic, having only recently completed this photographic journey, was incredibly engaging to talk to, but specifically about, as I indicated earlier, why he wanted to produce the book. It was a running theme throughout our conversation how he felt that the Western media insufficiently portrayed Burma and presently threatens to treat the country as a closed book case.


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‘We in the West impose the same narrative, the same paradigm, the same stories over and over again and I felt that was really unhelpful and really quite uncreative. This book is about how we choose to view the rest of the world, we want everything to be simplified into polar opposites of great moral simplicity. I think Burma was a classic case of that. It wasn’t that that was necessarily wrong because that is where I started from too. I feel that the more I learnt the less I knew, in a way. You have Aung San Suu Kyi representing the ordinary Burmese pitted against the vile and brutal regime and that was it.’ By plugging the gaps that the traditional media are forced into leaving empty, ‘A Brave New Burma’ is more of a catalogue of time, rather than a piece of artwork or investigative journalism. Or this is how Nic viewed his own work, maybe modestly, because in fact it could easily be perceived as both artwork and investigative journalism. His photographs are direct and reveal the diversity of Burma that he hoped would promote the richness of the country’s humanity. ‘I look for something striking in an individual and often it can be a rather androgynous quality. I tried to put together images that were graphic or iconic that would somehow act as a template’.

Inspired by John Pilger, Cartier-Bresson and James Fenton, Nic Dunlop amalgamates art and politics through intensive research before any shots are taken. This research is self-evident in some of his photos, where he has gained extraordinary access to a military regime so cut off from the world. There are images of forced labourers, generals and prisoners. It is an exposé of every harsh reality of the regime. The images speak volumes, paradoxically beautiful and disturbing at the same time, but consistently powerful. Nic was keen to explain how important it was to include a lot of text to accompany the photos and to describe the transformations in Burma’s history that the pictures portray. He told me that ‘the way to reconcile art and politics is to have a caption, which is writing.’ In his own words, the dictatorship in Burma was almost invisible. There were of course visible manifestations of the terror of the regime such as the government responses to the 1988 riots and the 2007 monk protests and people understood their ‘place’ – you couldn’t criticize the government or you would be put in prison or into forced labour. However he told me how we heard so much about the despicable regime, but when you visit the country there is no tangible evidence of despotism or tyranny. ‘You arrived in Rangoon and the soldiers are inconspicuous because of the fact they are not there, they are nowhere to be seen. So where is military dictatorship?’


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This is not to say that he feels that the regime should be any less despised, far from it, rather he feels that it simply means that the situation is too complex to simply regard the Burmese narrative as evil military versus ‘the people’. This is why Nic feels the over riding question and issue at stake with new Burma is the military, where has it gone? How can it go from being all-powerful to nothing? We cannot see it anymore, but then you couldn’t before, how do people know that anything has really changed? ‘This is what interests me about the whole reform process: where did it come from? Despite all the coverage, there’s very little new material coming out…… We haven’t actually heard why the military decided that they would step aside, why has this military reform programme been tolerated? Remember the Burmese military is the single biggest employer in Burma – when you know that you tend to think away from monolithic organization that is hated by the vast majority of the population and suddenly it becomes a bit more complicated. They are the one institution in the country that is yet to be touched by the reform programme and there is no sign that it will change at all. Already the Americans are talking about direct contact. This is the military that is being universally condemned by the Americans over and over again. That’s all fallen away and nobody has thought

now, hang on a minute, what about the military, they are still there? You put people in civilian clothing and instantly they’re a complete democrat?’ There is an impassioned yet slightly anguished tone to our conversation, a reflection of Nic’s assessment of the precarious, uncertain and fragile state of Burma today. But throughout he is careful to word his responses to my questions, giving his convictions a sense of real gravitas – you would expect nothing less from someone who has spent so much time in Burma. In recent weeks there have been a number of outbreaks of sectarian violence spreading across the country, in particular the targeting of Muslims by Buddhists, urged on by hate-filled, radicalized monks. As Nic said ‘You can’t just expect to lift the lid of military dictatorship and expect to find a peaceful Buddha land and everyone getting along together.’ So how does one look forward? In 2010 the military officially stepped down from power. The international community and recently the EU have lifted its trade sanctions, there is to be an election in 2015 and tourism is booming. Much of Burma’s recent history has been told through the prism of the pro-democracy campaigner and national icon Aung San Suu Kyi. But Dunlop has serious grievances with that point of view and doubts whether it is useful at all.


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‘Everyone wants to believe in her and in a messy world everyone wants to hear a voice of moral clarity… But she has made a transition from being an icon to being a political figure so therefore she should be treated as one and she will come under attack and be criticized, and she has failed. But then we have also built her up into something that she was never in the first place. The expectations of her ability are impossibly high she can only fall. I have to say I think she has fallen far further than I thought she would. Not coming to condemn violence as a pacifist and a Buddhist is striking.’ Nic’s views, such as his view of Aung San Suu Kyi, may shock or surprise people. But he is right to refrain from being over-presumptuous about Burma, and certainly the role of Aung San Suu Kyi and what she represents and the way she ticks boxes for the Western media and public, is a problem. One feels that works such as this will only help to enlighten people about the diversity and significance of Burma as a country. This can only be a good thing. This book has morphed from a collection of photographs, unique and stylish, into something more, something that people will learn from. The way Nic Dunlop talks about Burma, with so much clarity and knowledge, is almost infectious. This is a book that reminds you of the need for

independent artists who are determined and dedicated to pursue a project that will ensure that their art has real truth and meaning. Nic Dunlop’s lens cap shut for the last time in Burma in 2010, the year in which Burma changed its political course when the first elections were held. Yes there are troubles ahead, but as Nic told me, there are some small steps that need celebrating that have changed the lives of ordinary Burmese people forever. ‘People are no longer afraid to talk and express their opinions openly... The lifting of that fear so they can actually take control of their own opinions. That’s a massive step and very difficult to put back in the bottle.’


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jcerilla.com

Photographer: JC Cerilla Styling: Jessica Park Hair and Makeup: Cherry Le Model: Cassandra at Wilhelmina


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Dress: Clover Canyon


Shirt: Prabal Gurung x Target Pants: Joe Fresh Shoes: Model’s own


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Shirt: Faith Connexion Sunglasses: Ksubi


Dress: Clover Canyon Shoes: Model’s own


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Shirt: Zara Pants: Marni x Current/Elliott


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Shirt: Faith Connexion Blazer: Elizabeth & James Pants: Joe Fresh


jemimamarriott.co.uk

Photographer: Jemima Marriott MUA: Jenni Muir Model: Fern at The Model Team/ Profile Models


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Coat: Jaeger Top: Vintage Pam Hogg Leather Jacket: Vintage Ring: Topshop Bracelet: Models own


Tops: Vintage Pam Hogg Jeans: Highway Shoes: Aldo


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Top: Vintage Pam Hogg Leather Jacket: Vintage Trousers: Topshop Shoes: Aldo


Tops: Vintage Pam Hogg


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Top: Vintage Pam Hogg Jeans: Highway Shoes: Aldo


federicosorrentino.com

Photography: Federico Sorrentino Art direction & styling: Patricia Villirillo Make up & hair: Eleonora Devecchi Model Model: Gustavo AT Beatrice Models Management


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Hat: New Era T-shirt Guess Jacket: Vintage


Hat: New Era T-shirt Guess Jacket: Vintage Shorts: Guess


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T-shirt: Dior Jacket: Vintage Trousers: Belstaff


T-shirt: Ralph Lauren Jacket: Gucci Trousers: Adidas Shoes: Nike


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Sweatshirt: Adidas Trousers Prada Shoes: Nike


elisaperotti.com

Photographer: Elisa Perotti Stylist: Olympia De Molossi Model: Francesca Make Up Artist: Andrea Lovarini


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Body: Stylist Own


Jacket: Formalibera Slip: H&M Shoes: Manuela Gomez


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White Dress: Formalibera Shoes: Manuela Gomez


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Jacket: Formalibera Slip: H&M Shoes: Manuela Gomez


Tom and Jack inside their motorhome Photo by Ania Mroczkowska

Interview by Alex Taylor


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Photo by Tom Johnson

‘With a joint love of exploring, meeting strangers and being in situations way out of our comfort zones, we came up with ‘Another Britain’’ Photographers Tom Johnson and Jack Eden have just completed the first part of their three part project ‘Another Britain’. With a strong desire to capture all things weird and wonderful they set out to explore all areas of Britain, documenting the different characters and personalities which make up what is quintessentially British to them. Each photo has a strong personality, acting as an intimate visual portal into a piece of British life travelling around Britain, capturing a true representation of life on this little island.

What were your aims and what did you hope to achieve? Like many of our generation, we find that the pace of change in the visual media, and in all areas of society affected by technology, is both phenomenal and bewildering. The idea of ‘Another Britain’ was born from this impulse – our desire to put a visual ‘marker’ down in the fast shifting sands, to capture and hold the zeitgeist – for a moment at least. The last seismic shift in Britain’s society and culture to us seems to have been in late 1970’s and 80’s. That generation of photographer’s experienced and recorded the shock to their visual landscape, which was perhaps on a scale similar to our own. Did you set out to capture particular types of society?

What made you decide to do this project? On a road trip in France last summer we decided we wanted to explore Britain and capture ‘true’ images of the country we had grown up in. This time last year I (Tom) went to America and assisted Magnum photographers Jim Goldberg & Alessandra Sanguinetti, on their ‘Postcards From America’ project. This included driving, logistical planning & general photographic assistance. This experience really helped with planning out this project.

We really wanted to show a true representation of what we saw, we didn’t differentiate between classes. We photographed what we saw and were honest about it. We are travelling from city to city documenting the places, communities, traditions and cultures that make Britain the way it is. It seems like a more representative ‘survey’, to be photographing a broad cross-section of social imagery across the whole country, rather than focusing on particular regions.


Photo by Jack Eden

Inspired by photographers from the 1970’s/80’s they have chosen to travel in a vehicle which to them is symbolic of this time, a 1980’s motorhome, a mode of transport which for many Brit’s carries countless connotations of dreary, wet bank holidays slowly lurching down motorways on the way to campsites with illustrious names such as ‘Sandyballs’ and ‘Foggy Bottom’, conjuring up images belonging to ‘Carry on Camping’. But for these two photographers it symbolised a forgotten era of Britain, after all, what’s more British than a rusty, old motorhome.

Wanting to make visual comparisons with the 70s/80’s, we consciously chose to travel in a vehicle of that period. This was both to heighten our awareness of the disjunction in time, and also to invite attention from the public we are photographing, who might find the vehicle reminiscent of that period.

How’s it been driving across Britain in the motorhome?

How have people you’ve met reacted to you?

We shot Part I of the project between March & April which saw some of the coldest weather in a long time. We were constantly battling with the freezing cold - snow & ice and biting wind. We were on the road for about three weeks and throughout that time the only heating we had was a small gas cooker - as the motor home is quite old the gas heater was dodgy so we decided against using it. We fought illness and eventually had to cut the journey a week short as Jack got flu & the weather was getting too bad. My lip has only just healed a month later with a large cut in it due to constant exposure.

What are your essentials for on the road? Fur lined coats, candles and a paper map for when everything else fails.

We got a mixed reaction from people. We meet the majority of our subjects on the streets. We strike up conversations with strangers, and before we attempt to photograph them we explain what we are doing, try and make some kind of connection and learn something about them. These short meetings can often lead to other experiences and opportunities. Some of the people we meet on the street at night produce some of the most interesting (and harrowing!) experiences. In some of the cities it can get quite dangerous, and we have had to get out of some tricky situations. In the next part of the trip, one of the main things we are trying to portray is the binge-drinking culture that we see as serious social problem facing our generation.


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Photo by Tom Johnson


Photo by Tom Johnson


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Photo by Jack Eden

Has the project been as you expected so far?

What does part ll involve?

We travel to an unknown place every day; nothing can really prepare you for that. The majority of people we came across were really nice and inviting. The interest we’ve got from people on the road and online has been overwhelming. It was as we expected as this is what we love to do, explore places unknown to us and try and take something from each new experience

Part II is going to involve much more, Part I was quite experimental, and we were both quite new to the process. Due to the great response we have had we are going to utilise social networking to find deeper and more personal experiences. We want to harness this, and using a GPS interactive map you will be able to locate us on the map and suggest places in your town for us to photograph. Part II kicks off in July this year.

Have you come across any complications?

The exhibition for Part l kicks off on June 17th at a fantastic space called 4749 Tanner Street (London Bridge) and it will be on for three days. The good people there have been amazing and share our enthusiasm for the project. Then Part ll begins, so look out for us on a road near you! And feel free to contact us to show us around your city.

The motorhome is a bit of a heap, it doesn’t really do hills in South Wales in the Rhondda Valley we were struggling up and down the winding roads at 10mph. After this we broke down and drove into the midlands with a broken throttle at 3 in the morning. Aside from this the cold was our main problem. We got very used to sleeping with as much clothing on as we could. Do you feel more engaged with Britain now? Living in London gives you a snapshot of society as a whole. But actually experiencing what’s beyond the M25 is truly fascinating. We hope our images can portray that and get more people interested in what represents the true Britain.

This is part one of a three part series, each exploring different parts of the British Isles. In part two they will go on to explore different cities around the South of England before heading up to Scotland. Before then you can see the ‘Another Britain’ exhibition at 47/49 Tanner Street on June 17th – 20th.


Photo by Tom Johnson


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Photo by Jack Eden


cristiandistefano.com

Photography: Cristian di Stefano Stylist: Patty Cereijo Make-up & Hair: Laura Leon Production: Efti Stylist Assistant: Jose Quesada, Sera Veliz & Ana Rivas Model: Jessica at Blow


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Blazer: Ba&sh Tank top: Stella Forrest Trousers: Sonia by Sonia Rykiel Belt: Stylist’s own Shoes: Robert Clegerie Necklace: Pedro del Hierro Bracelet: Claire’s


Body: Eres Jacket: American Retro Trousers: BleuLab Shoes: Robert Clegerie Necklace: Bimba & Lola Bracelet Left: Bershka Bracelet Right: Bimba & Lola Sun Glasses: Oliver Goldsmith for Optica Toscana


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Denim Shirt: Barbour Lurex Pants: Lola Li Socks: Bimba & Lola Sandals: Jimmy Choo Earrings: Bershka Belt: Magpie


Dress: Alfredo Villalba Parka: Cossy Bracelet: Bershka Necklace: Pedro Del Hierro


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Blazer: Ba&sh Tank top: Stella Forrest Trousers: Sonia by Sonia Rykiel Belt: Stylist’s own Shoes: Robert Clegerie Necklace: Pedro del Hierro Bracelet: Claire’s


flotography.ca

Photographer & Producer: Florence Leung Co-producers: Alex Gorshkov and Iliya Alexander Nodel Models: Eva G. for Richard’s International Model Management Clayton D. for NEXT Canada Models, Scott W. for Lizbell Agency Matthew C. for Numa Models Wardrobe Stylist: Alexa Kellee Make-Up Artist: Eunice S. Lee Hair Stylist: Eros Liu Photographer Assistant & Videographer: Harry Ma Wardrobe Stylist Assistant: Taylor Ramsey


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Eva Bustier: Topshop Skirt: Unique Spiked Epaulets: Tamara Montes Claros Scott (center) Watch: Diesel Pants: UNIQLO Boots: Abington Belt: John Galliano Clayton (right) Pants: Alberto from Georgio’s Belt: Hugo Boss


Bodysuit: Chantelle Paris Necklace: Topshop Earrings: Vintage Embellished Heels: Badgley Mischka Bracelet: Carolee Lux


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Jeans: Versace Watch: Skagen Boots: H&M


Eva Bustier: Tamara Montes Claros Skirt: Topshop Bangles: Citrine: The Stones Necklace: Vince Camuto Scott Suit: Tombolini Shirt: Sand from Georgio’s


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Matthew (left) Pants: Alberto from Georgio’s Belt: Hugo Boss Shoes: Steve Madden Eva Bustier: Topshop Skirt: Unique Spiked Epaulets: Tamara Montes Claros Pumps: ZIGIny Clayton (right) Pants: Alberto from Georgio’s Belt: Hugo Boss Watch: Skagen Boots: H&M


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sarahford.fr

Photographer: Sarah Ford Stylist: Gemma Bedini Make up: LG Hair: Kevin Rajsavong Model: Sacha d’Alessandro Special Thanks to the Gong Tower


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Jewelry: Model’s own Dress: H&M


Jewelry: Model’s own Top: Maison Martin Margiela High waist panty & stockings: Intimissimi


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Sweatshirt: Givenchy Jeans: Levi’s


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Dress: Paule Ka Vest: Zara Belt: Tamzin Lillywhite @Mise en Cage Jewelry: Bordelle @Mise en Cage Shoes: Pleaser


Necklace: Model’s own Bracelet: Tamzin Lillywhite @ Mise en Cage Top: All Saint Legging: Sandro Shoes: Zara


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Bolero: Vintage Skirt: Top Shop Jewelry: model’s own


Polish film director, Krzysztof Kieslowski, once said that at some point of his career he ceased making documentaries, as he felt that this form made him cross certain boundaries that shouldn’t be crossed. Are there any boundaries in documentary photography that according to you should never be crossed?

with documentary photographer Michele Palazzi Environmental Photographer of the Year, Michele Pallazi shares his thoughts on beauties and challenges of documentary photography.

Interview by Kasia Mroczkowska

I’ve always thought that documentary and journalism have different boundaries – that is why I prefer to define myself as a documentary photographer rather than a photojournalist. I believe that the point of view of the photographer can imply his personal interpretation of the subject in a documentary project. In my opinion, it is fundamental to give the viewer a clear idea about the focus of the project. But being clear about the fact that I am merely presenting my personal view is very important to me. The boundary that I would not cross is to pretend objectivity. You have been taking photos in different countries portraying different issues, situations, problems…. What factors influence your choices of topics for your projects? The most important thing is asking yourself why you are interested in a particular issue. In my case there is always


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a personal reason rather than a journalistic one. In my ongoing project in Mongolia for example, my first intent was to try to understand the modernization process by analysing the cultural shift between the ancestral culture of a country and the Western dream that substitutes it. What has been the most difficult or the most awkward situation for you as a documentary photographer so far? One of the difficulties is related to the subject matter. For example, photographing migrant workers is little appreciated by their employers. Another and even bigger difficulty is getting a real and personal approach with the subjects I am photographing. But this is also the most interesting and challenging part of my work. “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” – said Robert Capa. What does define a good documentary photographer according to Michele Palazzi? It’s simple; I am just looking for the moment of truth in my pictures. I often feel that when I didn’t get the right picture, it is just because I didn’t get deep enough in the situation I’m photographing, I didn’t get involved enough…

Which of all your photos are you the most proud of, and why? As it happens often, some pictures I used to love are not my favourites anymore, and vice versa. I think of my pictures as something dynamic; I am most satisfied when I feel an interaction between the photograph and myself, catching a moment of intimacy…One of my last images, I feel close to, is from the Mongolia project. There are two nomad kids putting the prints, which I brought them from a previous trip, in their family album. It makes me proud to think that my work becomes part of their family album, and that what I am doing has an impact on someone else’s life too. However, this image did not make it into the final edit of the project.


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gabriellemurphy.com

Photography: Gabrielle Murphy Stylist: Tomas C Toth Retoucher: Sean Mounce


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Jacket: Jh.Zane


Coat: Xander Zhou Dress: Ava Catherside Boots: Jil Sander


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Coat: Xander Zhou Dress: Ava Catherside


Coat: Jh.Zane Tee: Ava Catherside


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Jacket: Jh.Zane Trousers: Xander Zhou


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Trousers: Jh.Zane


fabiobozzetti.jimdo.com

Photographer: Fabio Bozzetti Stylist: Giulia Brandimarti Model: Korlan Madi MUA & Hair: Sofia Alvarez Carreno


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Coat: Joviva Pants: Zara Sunglasses: Asos


Dress: Labor Limae Necklace: Chiara BCN Socks: H&M Shoes: Zara


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Waistcoat: M.C. Finella Necklace: Chiara BCN Bangle: Ramide Jewels Pants: Joviva Shoes: Prada


Coat: Labor Limae Pants: M.C. Finella Shoes: L’F


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Jacket: Mango Shirt: COS Pants: M.C. Finella Necklace: Ramide Jewels Shoes: Dr Martens


Fashion Design Interview by Rena Niamh Smith

Croatian duo Andreja Bistricic and Maja Merlic have a found a common language in distorted, deconstructed approach to clothing. Andreja studied womenswear at Central Saint Martens before interning at Alexander McQueen, while Maja is an architect by training. Great minds combined, they are inspired by patterns and colours produced when Polaroid pictures are exposed to intentional spills of chemicals and exposure to different temperatures. This produced the brand’s unusual name, a mirror image of the word “polaroid”. To add a further dimension of dualism, their unisex philosophy brings a symmetry between women’s and men’s lines. Fresh from showing at Fashionclash in Holland, they talk us through their work. You have mentioned that you are inspired by modern wastelands, and a lot of your shoots are done in concrete, harsh jungles. What is it about these that fits with your work? We are inspired by street and subcultures, so the logical path was to use those kind of locations. We always choose locations that speak their own forgotten stories,

it is more of impulsive way of thinking, the same as we make our collections and decisions for our work. The other thing is that we always work with a fantastic Croatian photographer Sanja Bistricic whose signature is everything raw - environment, models and photography itself - but she is still very focused on details and lightning. Through years she has become the third member of DIORALOP. Describe your creative process. The starting point of all of our collections is a print playing off colors is our intentional signature. So guided by that, the first thing we do is to work on prints, to decide which colour palette we will use and to choose fabrics. At the same time we begin our research and making sketches. Sketches become prototypes, sometimes we need to make a few of them, other times we are satisfied with the first one. Finally, after all of the hard work, we have a catwalk show and we make a campaign which is really important for us. It is a cherry on a top of a cake, while the most of the people see only this part of presentation of our work.


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You come from two different ways of backgrounds, how do you balance out your talents? Architecture and fashion may be two different backgrounds, but they are similar in many ways. Construction, textures and planning in architecture are perfectly applied in fashion too. So balancing between these two fields is pretty simple for us not only because of similarities of different backgrounds but also because we think alike, sometimes we don’t even need to discuss, which we find very important. Your pieces have been designed for men and women and there are a lot of parallels between the two. How do these work together? For our design, separation of gender is an irrelevant norm. Our first collection was for women only, but lots of boys came to our showroom and bought the clothes. Thus we realized that we should do menswear also. But there is no difference. In our showroom everybody is buying everything.


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Is duality important to your work?

we called new beginnings, new creative cycle in our career which is turning into reality.

Yes-No. Is androgyny important to what you do as a whole? Do you dress in an androgynous way yourself? Androgyny is important to us, we would like to erase the boundaries between sexes and gender stereotypes. And yes, we dress in an androgynous way ourselves. Maja a bit more, Andreja not so much, but she is obsessed with shirts. The Autumn Winter 2013/4 collection is named 4 and you have spoken about how it is inspired by the 4 elements, the 4 seasons, the power of 4. Does 4 hold a magical power for you? Number 4 has always represented the number of creation, as well as the beginning of material existence and matter itself, as in the first four days God created everything material. By naming this fourth collection “4�

Tell us about the collaboration with Underground; they sponsored your catwalk show. DIORALOP & Underground Shoes met on Capsule Fashion Fair in Paris in September 2012. We have been fans of Underground Shoes since always, so we started to hang out and fell in love with each other instantly. We became really good friends so when we were thinking about the shoes for aw 2013/2014 show, Underground Shoes fit perfectly in our concept. They were kind enough to lend us the shoes and even to come to our show. Do you have any future collaboration plans? We would like to use this opportunity to make an open call for everybody interested in collaborations. This year we have made our first step into product design with a young Croatian design studio Manufakturist and we will definitely continue this practice in future.


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Gress: Anna Cichosz Glasses: I Am


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Photographers: Dorota Szafrańska & Krzysztof Kowalski Model: Oliwia Dolinska at VOX Stylist: Serafin Zielinski Mua: Anna Czapnik Hair: Ola Dubiel


Top: Mohito Dress: Anna Cichosz Necklace: H&M Bracelets: H&M & I Am


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Glasses: I Am Scarf: H&M Top & Skirt: Camaieu Bag, Necklace & Shoes: H&M Rings: I Am


Glasses: H&M Coat: ZARA Blouse: Mohito Skirt: Mohito Shoes: H&M


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Glasses: I Am Shirt: Camaieu Belt: C&A Leggings: H&M Coat: ZARA


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Coat: Anna Cichosz Top: H&M Glasses: H&M Leggings: C&A Shoes: H&M


Photoraphy: Michał Polak Styling: Michał Polak Assistant: Janek Kwiatkowski & Tomáš Typovský Model: Pete Wyszyński/ AMQ


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Top- Ima-Mad Jacket: Bola Joggers: Vintage NiqÄ b: Oman Sneakers: Adidas


Top: ODIO tees Trousers: Jakub Pieczarkowski Watch: models own Backpack: Vintage Pashmina: from India Sneakers: Puma


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Jacket: Nike Top: Vintage Shorts: Jakub Pieczarkowski Joggers: Bola Watch: Vintage Shoes: Tunisia


Top: Vintage Mask: form Iran


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Top: ODIO tees Trousers: Michal Polak Blanket: from Mexico Sneakers: Nike


yujiwatanabe.book.fr

Photography: Yuji Watanabe Stylist: Naoko Soeya Hair: Kiki Make-up: Yui koretomo Model: Nafrayou


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Silver neoprene dress: Sass & Bide Crytal and gold necklace: Uriel Salas Metallic clutch bag: Muveil Black corns: Lisa Shahno


Trench coat: Wanda Nylon Graphic swimsuit: Herve Leger by Max Azria Plexi necklace: Sarah Angold


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Body conscious graphic top: Herve Leger by Max Azria Latex brassier with studs: Model’s own Triangle earrings: Galaxxxy


Body conscious graphic dress: Herve Leger by Max Azria Crystal and gold necklace: Uriel Salas Psychedelic glove: La Bagagerie


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Top: American Apparel Body conscious print skirt: BCBG Max Azria Harness, choker, ribbon cuffs: Zana Bayne


pashutaphotography.com

Photographer: Viktorija Pashuta Stylist: James The Beloved Make Up: Christina Henry Model: Dierdre at Elite


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Purple Zebra Top: 90’s Versace Belt & Shorts: Glitter Death Boutique Heels & Socks: Stylist’s Own Chain Harness: Kittenhawk Back Pack: 90’s John Paul Gaultier


Britney T: James The Beloved Floral Bell Bottoms: Gita Salem Socks, Jewelry, Shoes: Stylist’s Own


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Sea foam Green Crop Top & Tunic : Gita Salem Chain Harness: Kittenhawk Hat & Shoes: Stylist’s Own


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Britney T: James The Beloved Floral Bell Bottoms: Gita Salem Socks, Jewelry, Shoes: Stylist’s Own


Artist

Kay Harwood makes fictitious portraits, which draw together visual fragments and ideas from diverse sources to include contemporary fashion culture, early photographic ephemera, the Western film genre and religious iconography. Delicately worked in oil paint or a combination of varnish, oil and collaged paper, the original component parts of the figure are seamlessly woven together by Harwood. Obsessive undercurrent themes including adoration, possession and desire add a sense of unrest to the paintings coupled with the precise control of the materials applied and restrained palette. The resulting pieces are at once strangely familiar and disquieting, defying both place and time. Currently living and working in London, Kay Harwood was born in the United Kingdom in 1978. Completing her studies at The Royal Academy and The Slade Schools, London, her work has since been widely exhibited in the UK, Europe and the USA, and is held in a number of important collections. Harwood will present new work as part of ‘Portrait of a Life Half Known’ which brings together four solo presentations at Simon Oldfield London, from 27th June - 9th August 2013. For more information please visit www.simonoldfield.com


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Man Adorned with Seabirds


Woman Adorned with Flowers


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Me and My Seabirds


Ever and Ever


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Woman Adorned with Succulent Plants


You


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Think of Me when Faraway


quincyscott.com

Photographer: Quincy Scott Wardrobe Stylist: Mike Stallings Hair/ Makeup: Junya Nakashima Models: Cameron at New York Models, Nathaniel at New York Models, Miguel at Request, Marcus at Request


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(left to right) Camron Top:Religion Tights: dkny Nate Top: Religion Tights: topman Marcus Top:Religion Tights: topman Miguel Top: Religion Shorts: Phillip Lim Tights: h&m


Hoodie: Armani Exchange Sweater: Religion Shorts : Phillip Lim Tights: Top Man


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Top: Religion Shorts: Topman Tights: DKNY


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Top: Phillip Lim


Top: Kotoba


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Top: Religion Shorts: Topman Tights: DKNY


morganchidsey.com

Photographer: Morgan Chidsey Photo Assistant/videographer: Vernon Mullen Fashion Designer: Reagan Whitaker Hair and Makeup: Elaine Barnett Select styles from: Black Swan Theory


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Gown: Reagan Whitaker


Outfit: Reagan Whitaker


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fur coat: Grandma’s vintage


Artist

Sick of ethical values getting lost in an endless pursuit of fame and materialism, new London based self-taught artist and actor Jonny Burt has been producing art as a statement to a “Schizophrenic society with a serious identity crisis�. In 2009 Jonny achieved Distinction in Fashion Design & Illustration from Wimbledon College of Art, before going on to graduate in 2012 with a First Class Honours BA degree at Warwick University reading English & Theatre. Jonny Burt presents a passionate reaction to the dehumanising effects of 21st century life, offering a satirical study of fractured identity in a culture where the relentless pursuit for fame becomes aligned with an ominous sense of looming mortality. The subjects in his work often feature young children, not only to suggest who the true victims are, but also to reveal our own regressive and dependent condition in a mediatised and commodified existence.

Jonny Burt tends to begin working in monochromatic pastels to represent this loss of humanity, later juxtaposing with collage and high contrast colours to conjure a jarring seductiveness to the disturbing imagery and thus evoke the absurd and often sadistic contradictions of modern life. Jonny Burt’s arguably cynical response to the notion of fame is likely compounded by his first-hand experiences as an actor working in both London and L.A. In an age dominated by reality shows and the gross sexualisation of our youth, the line is blurring rapidly between fame and infamy: Just how far will people go to be famous in the next ten years? Where are the limits to the exploitation of human beings?


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These Shards of You and Me


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Regressive Two


Poser


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Rose, Mary & Time


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Regressive Zero


juliencozzolino.com

Photography: Julien Cozzolino Styling: Amany Behounna Hair & Make up: Sylvie Mainville Model: Veronika at Evidence Models


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Fishnet dress: Emilie Renard Chain belt: Vintage Earrings: H&M


Top: Blancs Manteaux Pants: Desigual by Lacroix Heels: Zara Jewels: Vv jewels


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Jacket : Sylvia Rielle Shorts: Sylvia Rielle Earrings: Vintage Necklace: Vv Jewels


Top with basque: Sylvia Rielle Pants : Desigual Heels: Zara Jewels: Vv jewels


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Jacket: Blancs Manteaux Leather pencil skirt: La Petite PoupĂŠe Noire Heels: Nunc Earirngs: Vv jewels


therosewoodbeast.viewbook.com

Photography: Britta Hawkins of The Rosewood Beast Model: Jessi Cochran Styling: Jenny Stabile


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Skirt: Vintage


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Tights: Wolford Folk Sweater: L.L. Bean Shirt: Liz Claiborne


Tights: Wolford Shirt: Liz Claiborne


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Boots: Doc Martens Tights: Wolford Dress: Vintage


pacomatteolicalzi.tumblr.com

Photographer: Paco Matteo Li Calzi Styling: Alexia Mingarelli Mauro Boccia Make-Up & Hair Style: Melissa Marcello Model: Malte at Fashion Model Management


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Shorts: Peb Shirt & Jacket: Camo Biella Shoes: Clarks Original  


Chino: H&M Jersey: Camo Biella Jacket: Peb Parka: Sostantivo Maschile Sunglasses: Vintage  


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Chino & T-Shirt: Peb Trench:  Vintage Remake by Carel Van Laere  


Jacket & Shorts: Camo Biella Polo Shirt: Sostantivo Maschile Jersey: Lacoste Bag & Papillon: Pifebo Vintage Shop Shoes: Vintage


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Shirt: Peb Papillon: H&M Jacket & Shorts: Camo Biella Galsses: Vintage Shoes: Fred Perry


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stoyanovandjones.com

Photography, Concept & designs: Dawn Marie Jones at Stoyanov & Jones Photography Styling & Co-creator: Megan Cunningham Hair: Chris Dickson at Dickson Reid Makeup: Lauren Gollan Skinbase: IQ Beauty Photography Assistants: Stanislav Stoyanov & Roger McDougall


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The reproduction of any part of this publication is strictly prohibited without prior permission from Slave Magazine, including titles, logos, and graphics. Exceptions are granted for press and blogs were there is a link a back to slavemag.com and full credits are included and for downloading to media devices for personal use. The views expressed in Slave Magazine are those of the contributors and are not necessary shared by Slave Magazine. All rights reserved. Copyright Švv Slave Magazine 2013 See website for full terms and conditions. slavemag.com


Slave Magazine issue10