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Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood 46

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FORT BEND

FORT BEND Collaborative Community Design Initiative. No. 5 SPECIAL EDITION: HARVEY Community Design Resource Center 2018

EA CL R L EA A CL CLE CL K R L EA AR EA E AK R L LA R AK KE LAK E E E

Briefing Book

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Granada Theater Jensen Square, Google Maps

2


Introduction (Harvey)

5

Eastex | Jensen (Harvey)

7

History

13

Context

17

Demographics

27

Opportunities

37

Participants and Sponsors

51

Figure Ground Land Use Drainage and Parks Transportation Health Population and Age Race and Ethnicity Housing Income Education Bridging Barriers Re-Activating Jensen Transit Connections Co-op Strategies Resilient Housing

3


Tropical Storm Allison Track, 2001

Hurricane Ike Track, 2008

2015-2016

AUG 24, 2017

A HISTORY OF FLOODING

HURRICANE HARVEY

Houston suffered two major flood events in the years preceding Harvey, the Memorial Day Flood in 2015 and the Tax Day Flood in 2016.

4

AUG 26, 2017

On Thursday Harvey is upgraded from a tropical storm to a hurricane. 30 inches of rain is forecast in isolated instances. Supermarket shelves empty as residents make preparations.

ABOVE: Harvey Timeline (Based on Analysis and Graphics by Matthew Nguyen, Constanza PeĂąa, Victor Romo, and Cristina Trejo)

Hurricane Harvey Track, 2017

On Saturday Harvey makes a second landfall and weakens to a tropical storm. Rain forecasts for Houston are measured in feet. Several cities implement curfews and roads begin closing. HISD cancels school for the next week.

AUG 25, 2017

On Friday Harvey is upgraded to a Category 4 storm and makes landfall at 10pm near Rockport. Several counties call for voluntary and mandatory evacuations. Tornado and flood warnings are issued. HISD closes schools.

AUG 27, 2017

Heavy rainfall begins Saturday night and by early Sunday morning neighborhoods begin flooding and high water rescues by boat and helicopter are being televised live.


Introduction At the time of this publication, it has been nearly a year since Hurricane Harvey made landfall and slowly circled around the greater Houston area for five days. Harvey left behind over 150,000 flooded homes and a maximum recorded rainfall of 47.4”. It took only one month before the city seemed to be functioning normally. But the tragedy unfolding for thousands of families continues behind the closed doors of flooded homes and temporary hotel rooms. While natural disasters are equal opportunity events, the resources to recover are not. As civic leader Keith Downey notes: “The storm hit many underserved communities long before the hurricane arrived.”

The slow motion flood disaster that inundated Houston is evidence of a new climate normal. In the wake of this new normal we must begin to define and build towards greater resiliency—not just in preparation for the next disaster, but to ensure everyday resiliency. The fifth biennial Collaborative Community Design Initiative, titled “Floods” is a partnership with four Houston neighborhoods that were severely impacted by Harvey: East Houston, Eastex/Jensen, Edgebrook, and Kashmere Gardens and Houston/Trinity Gardens. This Briefing Book is for the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood.

AUG 28, 2017

THE NEXT WEEK

AUG 29, 2017

THE AFTERMATH

In an unprecedented move, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers begins releasing water from reservoirs in west Houston. The release is to avoid a collapse that would inundate downtown Houston. The release floods thousands of homes near the reservoirs.

The rain from Hurricane Harvey begins to taper off, and by late Tuesday most neighborhoods would not see any more rain. The highest recorded rainfall in Harris County is 47.4”. An estimated 30,000 are in Houston shelters.

Professionals, volunteers, and communities begin cleaning up. Donation drives and distribution points are set up across the city. Individuals are prompted to contact insurance companies and apply for FEMA assistance. Some begin returning to work.

SIX MONTHS LATER

Some reconstruction efforts begin. Nearly 894,000 FEMA applications are filed by the November deadline. An estimated 150,000 structures flooded in Houston. Houston residents must now consider whether to rebuild or permanently relocate. Many still reside in temporary, sometimes makeshift, homes. FEMA hotel programs extended through June 2018.

Eastex | Jensen Location Map

ONE YEAR LATER

Over $2 billion in Recovery Funding is finally allocated to the City of Houston and Harris County for rebuilding. Codes and policies are being rewritten to mitigate flood risks. Efforts are lagging to ensure residents are more informed and prepared for future disasters.

THE FUTURE

THE MONTH AFTER

Mucking, demolitions, and citywide cleaning continues. Some schools reopen. Displaced families relocated to temporary housing. Insurance and FEMA agents begin property inspections.

5


I-45 Halls Bayou Watershed

Eastex Jensen

White Oak Bayou Watershed

Hunting Bayou Watershed I-10

I-69

ABOVE: Halls Bayou, Hunting Bayou and White Oak Bayou Watersheds and Eastex Jensen Super Neighborhood

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Eastex | Jensen The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood is located north of downtown Houston. The neighborhood is located at the intersection of three watersheds, Halls Bayou to the north (which is part of the larger Greens Bayou watershed), Hunting Bayou to the south, and a small section of the White Oak Bayou Watershed on the southwestern boundary of the neighborhood.

Tidwell St

d

ch R

Hirs

Jensen Dr

The Harris County Flood Control District data indicates that of the 154,170 homes flooded during Harvey 48,850 were within the 100-year floodplain and 34,970 within the 500-year floodplain. While 70,370 flooded homes were not in an identified floodplain hazard area.

Parker Rd

d Toll R

Flooding along Halls Bayou has been a persistent hazard for residents, businesses and property owners. Flooding has been documented at least 14 times since 1970. During Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, more than 13,000 homes in the Halls Bayou watershed flooded.

Halls Bayou

Hardy

The largest portion of the neighborhood is in the Halls Bayou watershed. The Harris County Flood Control District is currently undertaking improvements along Halls Bayou as part of the “Halls Ahead� project.

Little York Rd

Crosstimbers St

ABOVE: Flood Map Floodway 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain BELOW: Bentley Street Photo by Jessica Trujillo

FEMA Flood Hazard Maps indicate the northeast section of Eastex | Jensen, adjacent to the Halls Bayou, is the area most vulnerable to flooding. Hundreds of properties have already been bought out in this area to mitigate future flooding. 7


ABOVE: Inundation Level Monday August 28, 2017 1 a.m.

ABOVE: Inundation Level Tuesday August 29, 2017 1 a.m.

6

6”

Wednesday

Tuesday

5

Monday

5.5

Sunday

Saturday

4.5

5” 4”

4 3.5

3”

3 2.5

2”

2 1.5

1”

1

8/30/2017 13:00

8/30/2017 1:00

8/29/2017 13:00

8/29/2017 1:00

8/28/2017 13:00

ABOVE: Hourly Rainfall Totals, Halls Bayou at Jensen Drive Harvey Event: August 26, 2017 - August 30, 2017

8/28/2017 1:00

8/27/2017 13:00

8/27/2017 1:00

8/26/2017 1:00

0

8/26/2017 13:00

0.5

0

1680 Halls bayou @ Jensen Drive Top of Bank

Stream Elevation

56

Top of Bank

54 52 48

8.30.2017

38

8.29.2017

40

8.28.2017

44 42

8.27.2017

46

54’ 50’

50

8.26.2017

EN

ABOVE: Inundation Level Sunday August 27, 2017 1 a.m.

08.26.2017

08.27.2017

08.28.2017

08.29.2017

08.30.2017

ABOVE: Stream Elevation, Halls Bayou at Jensen Drive Harvey Event: August 26, 2017 - August 30, 2017 Source: Harris County Flood Warning System

8

46’ 42’


The Harris County Flood Control District has compiled Hurricane Harvey rainfall data for gages across the county. The Eastex | Jensen gage, located at Jensen Drive and Halls Bayou, was used to identify maximum rainfall in the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood. The total rainfall over the five-day event was 35.2”. Compared to other rain gages across Harris County, and the maximum rainfall of 47.4”, the rainfall in this area was moderate. Halls Bayou topped its bank in the early morning hours of Sunday August 27, 2017 and remained over the top of bank until late afternoon on Tuesday August 29, 2017. The maximum stream elevation peaked at 57.5’, which is below the 100-year flood level of 58.3’. In this location, Halls Bayou has never reached the 500-year stream elevation of 59.7’. The maximum stream elevation was recorded during Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, at 58.9’. According to data from the Harris County Flood Control District, 10,164 homes were flooded in the Halls Bayou Watershed, roughly 7% of the 154,700 estimated flooded homes county wide. FEMA estimates from September 2017 reported 1,404 of these homes were in the Eastex Jensen Super Neighborhood, or roughly 14% of all flooded homes in the Halls Bayou Watershed.

4 days

Harris County Maximum Recorded Rainfall Eastex/Jensen Rainfall Kashmere Gardens Rainfall Edgebrook Rainfall East Houston Rainfall

35.2” 36.2” 38.2”

26.7” 28.7”

2 days

29.5” 18.3” 18.8”

1 day

12.6” 14.2” 14.8”

4.0” 5.3” 6.1” 6.8”

1 hour

34.6”

25.6”

2.4” 3.7” 6.0” 3.9”

20.9” 20.1”

17.0” 14.8”

5.9” 7.2”

14.2”

7.9”

2 hour

35.2”

18.9”

7.6” 9.4” 10.7”

3 hour

43.9”

23.2” 20.6”

12 hour

6 hour

47.4”

11.9” 10.5”

TOTAL RAINFALL =

35.2”

ABOVE: Harris County and Neighborhood Maximum Recorded Rainfall Source: Harris County Flood Control District

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Tract 2305

Tract 2220

Tract 2211

Tract 2210

Tract 2209

Tract 2208

Tract 2207

Tract 2201

Socioeconomic Vulnerability Persons below poverty

Income and poverty impact a family’s capacity to prepare for, react to and recover from a disaster

Civilian (age 16+) unemployed Per capita income Persons (age 25+) with no H.S. Diploma

Household Vulnerability Persons aged 65 and older

Seniors, children and single parents are more vulnerable to a disaster than other population groups

Persons aged 17 and younger Civilian noninstitutionalized population with a disability Single parent household with children under 18

Minority Status and Language Vulnerability Access to information can be a challenge for those with language barriers

Minority (all persons except white, non-Hispanic) Persons (age 5+) who speak English “less than well�

Housing and Transportation Vulnerability Housing in structures with 10 or more units

Access to transportation and quality housing that is outside of designated risk zones reduces vulnerability

Mobile homes estimate At household level, more people than rooms Households with no vehicle available Persons in institutionalized group quarters

Overall Social Vulnerability Vulnerability ranking compared to U.S. Census Tracts (75% and over indicates social vulnerability)

ABOVE: Social Vulnerability Index Tracts in the top 10%, or at the 90th percentile (Indicate high vulnerability) Tracts below the 90th percentile Source: Social Vulnerability Index (2014), https://svi.cdc.gov/map.aspx

10

86%

89%

78%

97%

86%

98%

98%

97%


The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood has a very high Social Vulnerability Index as indicated by the ATDSR of the Centers for Disease Control utilizing 2014 Census data. Social vulnerability refers to the resilience of communities when confronted by external stresses on human health, including natural or human-caused disasters. The social vulnerability index is the “degree to which a community exhibits certain social conditions, including high poverty, low percentage of vehicle access, or crowded households.� Each of these conditions can impact a community’s ability to recover. The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood includes eight Census tracts: 2305, 2220, 2211, 2210, 2209, 2208, 2207 and 2201. An analysis of the specific social vulnerabilities are provided in the table to the left. Each of the eight Census tracts that comprise the neighborhood are in the highest vulnerability category, averaging 91% compared to tracts across the United States.

2220

2211

2210 2305

2209

2207

2208

2201 ABOVE: Eastex | Jensen Census Tract Map BELOW: Bentley Street, Photo by Jessica Trujillo

Of these tracts, two in particular have exceptionally high vulnerability at 98%, 2208 and 2207. Data from the 2016 American Community Survey indicates that these two tracts have the highest barriers to resiliency. In tract 2208 the majority of households are single parents with children, who are renting, and many of these households have incomes below poverty. In addition, in 2016 this tract had the highest percent of children under the age of 18, at 36% of the population.

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History The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood has a long and important history. In 1933, Epsom Downs opened in the northern portion of the neighborhood near the intersection of Jensen Drive and Tidwell. On opening day over 25,000 spectators came to watch the horse races and test their luck. The Race Track closed four years later in 1937, when betting became illegal. The site provides a window into the historic transformation of the neighborhood and Jensen Drive. Epsom Downs after closing, became the Epsom Downs Drive-In, which for a short time was a Spanish language theater. Once the Drive-In was shuttered, the site became the Tidwell Transit Center, which is what it is today.

1944 Aerial

The majority of the Eastex | Jensen neighborhood developed after the end of World War II, with the rise of the automobile. Jensen Drive, which becomes Humble Road north of the neighborhood was, and continues to be, the primary commercial corridor in the neighborhood. By the 1950s Jensen Drive was bustling with shopping and entertainment. Two theaters, both built in the late 1940s, drew residents from throughout the area. Weingarten’s Grocery served area families, Prince’s Hamburgers was a social gathering place, Jensen Square provided retail space and was anchored by innovative modern buildings, like Standard Brand TV and

Appliances. A shopping center along Luell Street, perpendicular to Jensen Drive, provided additional attractions, including one of the theaters. Once the Eastex Freeway was completed in the mid-1950s, Jensen Drive began a slow decline. Today, the theaters are closed, Weingarten’s is a Family Dollar store, and the innovative architecture of Standard Brand TV and Appliances has been modified beyond recognition. Yet, the beauty and utility of Jensen Drive has not been diminished. The street remains the central corridor in the neighborhood.

1978 Aerial

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A timeline of the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood illustrates the transformations that occurred in our cities as we became more dependent on the automobile and freeways. Jensen Drive, once a thriving corridor, has experienced decades of disinvestment following the construction of the Eastex Freeway.

The Center Theater or North Houston Theater opens in 1948

The Granada Theater opens a year later, in 1949

1948

1949

1933 1937

1946

Epsom Downs Race Track opens in 1933 on Thanksgiving day. The track closes less than four years later, in March of 1937. Later the same site would be home to the Epsom Downs Drive-In Theater, and is currently the Tidwell Transit Center.

In 1949 Houston produces the first freeway plan, the Eastex Freeway is included in the plan.

In 1946 Jensen Drive is established as the primary highway to and from cities north of Houston, including Humble. At this time new shops and entertainment venues begin to be developed.

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1950

Weingarten’s Grocery opens in 1950 on Jensen Drive. Today, a Family Dollar occupies the original building.


In 1955 the Standard Brands TV and Appliance Store an anchor in Jensen Square is featured in Houston Magazine for its modern architecture. By 1978 the store was closed. In 2018, the building remains at the southern end of Jensen Square but has been substantially modified.

1955

1978

2018

1955

By 1955 the Eastex Freeway is complete and Jensen Drive begins a slow decline.

In 2018, there are many vacant storefronts along Jensen Drive, while historic structures, such as the Granada Theater, await transformation and re-use.

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Little York Rd

Parker Rd

Tidwell Rd

d

hR

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Hirs c

Kelley St

I-69

d Toll R

Jensen Dr

Hardy

Crosstimbers St


Context The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood, located north of downtown Houston, developed along the spine of Jensen Drive. The Hardy Toll Road defines the western boundary, and the Eastex Freeway runs north and south through the eastern section of the neighborhood. Halls Bayou traverses the northern portion of the neighborhood. The neighborhood began developing in the middle of the twentieth century and today is nearly fully developed. Small subdivisions comprised of modest single-family homes make up the core of the neighborhood. Subdivisions include Huntington Place, Croyden Gardens, Epsom Downs and many others.

ABOVE, Right: Figure Ground BELOW, Left to Right: Granada Theater and Area Park Photos by Pooja Shetty and Mario Lopez OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Aerial Map

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ABOVE. Left: Vacant Land Vacant ABOVE, Right: Commercial and Industrial Land Use Commercial Industrial BELOW: Senior Housing

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The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood is a historic community, with the majority of development occurring immediately after World War II. In 2016, single-family homes made up 74% of all housing units, compared to 45% in Houston. In the same year, large apartments comprised just 6% of all housing, compared to 22% in Houston overall. Small apartment developments (2-19 units) account for 16% of all housing in the neighborhood, below the 27% found in Houston. The median year that housing was constructed ranges from the early 1950s to the late 1960s. The age of housing is consistent across every Census Tract. Commercial uses are concentrated along Jensen Drive, Tidwell Road and the Eastex Freeway. Industrial uses are scattered throughout the neighborhood. Vacant land is also concentrated along Jensen Drive, illustrating the decades of disinvestment in this corridor. In total there are 969 acres of vacant land, of which the majority (582 acres) is residential. The vacant land along the spine of Jensen Drive is an opportunity to re-imagine the future of this important corridor.

74%

45%

ABOVE: Residential Land Use Multi-Family Single-Family RIGHT: Housing by Type, 2016 Eastex | Jensen Houston Source: ACS 2016

27% 75% 3% 5% Single Family Detached

Single Family Attached

22%

16% 6% Small Apartments (2-19 units)

Large Apartments (20 or more units)

1%

1%

Other

19


Little York Rd

Halls Bayou

Tidwell Rd

d

20

ch R

ABOVE: Bayou and Drainage Map BELOW: Bretshire Detention Basin

Hirs

I-69

d Toll R

Jensen Dr

Hardy

Crosstimbers St


The Eastex | Jensen neighborhood is very well-served by parks. There are nine parks inside the neighborhood’s boundaries: Mary Withers, Shady Lane, Dodson, Warren, Veterans Memorial, Croyden, Reed (Harry), Milton and Curry Street Parks. Each park has different amenities, which are highlighted in the table below.

Dodson Park Parker Rd

Moody Neighborhood Library

Warren Park

Tidwell Rd

Hirs d

ch R

I-69

Jensen Dr

Dixon Library Crosstimbers St

Veterans Memorial Park Croyden Park Harry W. Reed Park Milton Park

Parks

Parking

Grass

Picnic Tables

Drinking Fountain

Shade

Trees

Public Restrooms

Walking Trails

Water Features

Curry Street Park

Sports Fields

ABOVE, Right: Park Map (1/2-mile radius) BELOW: Shady Lane Park BELOW, Right: Park Amenities Chart

Shady Lane Park

d Toll R

In addition to these parks, Eastex Jensen has over two miles of Halls Bayou Hike and Bike trails running through the northeast corner of the neighborhood. The trails connect to Keith-Weiss Park to the north and Tidwell Park to the east.

Pinewood Village/Mary Withers Park

Hardy

Combined the parks encompass an area of 89 acres. Based on the recommended standards for park space developed in the City of Houston’s 2015 Parks Master Plan, the neighborhood has an abundance of parks, with an additional acre of park land for every 1,000 residents above the recommendations.

Little York Rd

P

Mary Withers and Pinewood Village Shady Lane Dodson Warren Vetrans Memorial Croyden Harry W. Reed Milton Curry Street 21


22


Parker Rd

06

Tidwell Transit Center 45 80

45

To Northline Transit Center

29

d

To Northline Transit Center

ch R

06

To Kashmere Transit Center Hirs

I-69 29

To University of Houston

52

06

Drove Alone

Carpooled

Public Transit

5%

5%

4%

4%

12%

14%

To Downtown

76% Houston

BELOW, Left: Transportation to Work, 2016 Eastex | Jensen Houston OPPOSITE PAGE: Photo of Jensen Square Source: ACS 2016

83

Jensen Dr

ABOVE, Left: Transportation Map Tidwell Transit Center Bus Route, 15-30 Min. Frequency Bus Route, 30-60 Min. Frequency

Little York Rd

d Toll R

The Eastex | Jensen area is poorly served by bicycle infrastructure. Currently, the neighborhood does not have any on-street bike routes or lanes. In addition, the recently adopted Houston Bike Plan does not identify a single short-term or key project in this area. The Halls Bayou Greenway between Little York Road and Jensen Drive is complete, and provides the only high comfort bike trail in the area.

To Greenspoint Transit Center

Hardy

In 2016, 75% of Eastex | Jensen workers over the age of 16 drove alone to work, 1% less than Houston overall. In the same year, 4% of Eastex | Jensen workers used public transit, while 5% walked, the same percent as in the city overall.

83 To Eastex Park and Ride

75% Eastex Jensen

Eastex | Jensen is served by six METRO bus routes, four are midfrequency routes running every 15-30 minutes and connect to downtown and other major shopping destinations. The four routes are 80 MLK/ Lockwood; 45 Tidwell; 29 Cullen/Hirsch; and 52 Hardy. There are two additional bus routes that run every 30-60 minutes, the 83 Lee Road / JFK, and 06 Jensen/Greens. The Tidwell Transit Center, located on Epsom Drive, serves three of the area bus routes, the Jensen, Lee Road/JFK and MLK/Lockwood. The Transit Center is very isolated and not well-used.

Walked/Other

23


+

Little York Rd

Tidwell Rd

10.0% 5.0% 0.0%

36% Without Health Insurance

25% Without Health Insurance Houston

15.0%

Eastex Jensen

20.0%

+

Crosstimbers St

25.0%

ABOVE: Percent of Residents Without Health EJ 2016 COH Insurance, Source: ACS 2016

24

d

30.0%

ch R

35%

Hirs

Rd

+

I-69

Jensen Dr

y Toll

40%

Hard

No Insurance

++

+ + +


The Eastex | Jensen area has many small convenience stores, two neighborhood markets selling a selection of groceries, La Michoacana Meat Market and Jensen Supermarket, and one full-service grocery store, Fiesta. A Mi Tienda grocery store is located just outside of the neighborhood boundaries, at I-69 and Little York Road.

Tidwell Rd

d

ch R

Hirs

I-69

Jensen Dr

y Toll Rd

In addition, the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood is well served by medical clinics and pharmacies. However, more than one-third of residents do not have health insurance. People without health insurance are more vulnerable to health emergencies that can have a critical financial impact.

Fiesta Mart

Hard

According to the USDA’s Food Desert Atlas, 214 households in the neighborhood are without a vehicle and more than a half-mile from a grocery store, only 3% of all households.

La Michoacana Meat Market Mi Tienda

Little York Rd

Crosstimbers St

Jensen Supermarket

Access to quality healthcare and fresh food are important aspects that impact the capacity of a neighborhood to prepare for and recover from a disaster.

ABOVE, Right: Map of Grocery Stores Grocery Stores Neighborhood Markets Convenience Stores BELOW, Left to Right: Neighborhood Grocers, Photos by Pooja Shetty OPPOSITE PAGE, Top: Map of Health Clinics and Pharmacies Health Clinics Pharmacies OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: UT Physicians

+

25


2000

Eastex | Jensen 2010

2016

2000

27,703

Race/Ethnicity White Black or African American Asian Other Hispanic or Latino

26,990 -3%

26,081 -3%

10% 22% 0% 1% 66%

5% 21% 1% 1% 72%

Age 17 Years or Younger 18 - 64 Years Old 65 Years or Older

34% 58% 9%

Place of Birth Foreign Born Residents

Houston 2010

2016

1,953,631

2,068,026 6%

2,240,582 8%

5% 19% 0% 1% 75%

31% 25% 5% 2% 37%

26% 23% 6% 2% 44%

26% 23% 6% 1% 44%

33% 59% 8%

35% 61% 8%

28% 64% 8%

26% 65% 9%

25% 65% 10%

30%

28%

28%

26%

28%

29%

Means of Transportation to Work Drove Alone Carpooled Public Transportation Other (Walk, Bicycle, Work at Home, etc.)

61% 26% 6% 7%

66% 23% 5% 6%

75% 14% 4% 7%

72% 16% 6% 5%

75% 13% 5% 7%

73% 12% 4% 8%

Educational Attainment 25 Years + Less Than High School High School Graduate (includes equivalency) Some college Bachelor's degree Master's degree Professional school degree Doctorate degree

61% 24% 12% 2% 0% 0% 0%

53% 28% 14% 4% 1% 0% 0%

51% 27% 19% 3% 0% 0% 0%

30% 20% 23% 17% 6% 3% 1%

26% 22% 24% 17% 7% 2% 2%

23% 23% 24% 19% 8% 2% 2%

25,177 $ 69%

28,164 $ 76%

36,616 $

44,124 $

27%

29%

34%

19%

18%

19%

8,404 92% 8%

8,809 85% 15%

8,968 83% 17%

782,009 92% 8%

889,489 86% 14%

937,245 89% 11%

Tenure Percent Owners Percent Renters

56% 44%

60% 40%

55% 45%

46% 54%

45% 55%

43% 57%

Households without access to a vehicle

16%

11%

12%

12%

10%

9%

3.6

3.6

3.5

2.7

2.7

2.7

Total Population

Median Household Income Percent of Houston's Median Percent of Population Below Poverty Housing Units Occupied Vacant Housing Units

Persons per Household *Sources: Census 2000, Census 2010, ACS 2016

26

$

30,550 70%

$

47,010


Demographics The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood is 7.5 square miles in area and was home to 26,081 people in 2016. The population density was approximately 3,500 people per square mile, only slightly lower than the Houston average density of 3,737 people per square mile. Between 2000 and 2016 the neighborhood population declined by over 3%, from 27,703 to 26,081. In the same time period the city of Houston’s population grew by over 8%.

2220

25%

Houston

Under 18 Years

Eastex | Jensen

Under 18 Years

2211

31%

2305

2209

2207

In 2016, Eastex | Jensen had a young population, with 31% of residents under the age of 18, significantly more than Houston overall where 25% of residents were under 18 years of age. Between 2000 and 2016, all age groups declined in population, yet the greatest decrease was in the number of residents under the age of 18 years.

2210

2208

2201

ABOVE: Eastex | Jensen Census Tract Map BELOW: Population by Age, 2000-2016 Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016

Eastex|Jensen Population in 2016

26,081

16,070

9,277

2,356

2000

18-64 Years

15,854

15,792

Under 18 Years

8,876

Over 65 Years

2,260

2,199

2010

2016

8,090

27


84%

6%

1%

86%

10%

84%

10%

75%

10% 6% 3%

21% 90%

9%

1%

76% 18%

56%

42%

6% 2%

46%

Percent Black/African American Population 2016

28

53%

Percent Hispanic Population 2016

1%

Percent White Population 2016


The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood has steadily changed over the last three decades. In 1980, the neighborhood was predominantly Black or African American at 45%. At this time, the percent of White and Hispanic residents was roughly equal at 28% and 27% respectively. Over the next three decades the Hispanic or Latino population increased substantially, and by 2016 was the majority in the neighborhood at 74% of the total population. Over the same time period, the percent of Black or African American residents declined from 45% to 19%, and the White population declined from 28% to 5%. In 2016, 28% of Eastex | Jensen residents were born outside of the United States, a percent that has decreased slightly since 2000. In Houston overall, 29% of residents were born outside of the United States in 2016.

Asian or Other

1%

BELOW: Percent Population by Race and Ethnicity Over Time OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom Left to Right: Greater Jerusalem Baptist Church, New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church Sources: 1980, 1990, 2000 Census, ACS 2010, ACS 2016

1%

1%

2%

1%

72%

74%

21%

19%

5%

5%

2010

2016

27% Hispanic or Latino

50% 66% 45% 31%

Black or African American

23% 28% White 1980

18% 1990

10% 2000

29


Harris County Flood Control District identified approximately $500 million in projects to reduce the risk of flooding in the Halls Bayou Watershed as part of the Harris County bond election. Combined the projects would reduce flooding risks for over 4,000 existing structures and provide the resources to buy out 830 additional properties. Proposed bond election projects include drainage and conveyance improvements, storm water detention basin design and construction and needed drainage repairs after Harvey.

Detail Area

The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood has a history of flooding. In 1985, the Harris County Flood Control District (HCFCD) established a Buyout Program designed to reduce recurring flood damages in areas deep within the floodplain. Over 400 properties in the northern portion of the neighborhood have been bought out through this program. Yet, hundreds of units in the neighborhood remain in the floodway. Stormwater detention basins have been completed and are under construction in the area of bought out properties along Halls Bayou. Completed in 2013, the Bretshire Stormwater Detention Basin near Jensen Drive and I-69 is a 68 acre site and designed to hold 167 million gallons of stormwater. Just east of this basin is the Hall Park Stormwater Detention Basin, which is currently under construction. The Hall Park Basin site is 97 acres and designed to hold 250 million gallons of stormwater.

Structures Before Buyouts

30

Structures After Buyouts

Parcels Owned by HCFCD


In 2016, 55% of Eastex | Jensen households owned their own homes, which was much higher than Houston overall where only 43% were homeowners.

69%

In contradiction to the declining population, the number of housing units in the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood increased by 7% between 2000 and 2016, from 8,404 to 8,968. During the same time period the percent of vacant housing units soared from 8% to 17% of all units. In 2016, over 1,500 housing units in the neighborhood sat vacant. In Census Tract 2208, 29% of all housing is vacant.

65%

53%

63%

59%

51%

ABOVE, Right: Percent Homeowners by Census Tract, 2016 BELOW: Persons per Household, Percent Vacant Housing Units and Total Housing Units Over Time OPPOSITE PAGE, Top Left: Buyout Area Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016

27%

59%

Persons Per Household

3.3

3.1

2.9

15%

17%

8,404

8,809

8,968

2000

2010

2016

Vacant Housing Units

8% Total Housing Units

31


$41k

$33k

27%

$39k

$40k

$24k

$22k

$32k

Median Household Income, 2016

32

32%

14% 42%

30%

$33k

17%

41%

36%

37%

60%

27%

Percent of Families Below Poverty, 2016

24%

36%

45% 49%

25%

Housing Costs > 30% of Income, 2016


In 2016, the median household income in the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood was $30,550, 65% of the Houston median income of $47,010. Since 2000, the Eastex | Jensen median household income has increased by 20%, while the median income in Houston increased by 26%. Many residents are financially vulnerable. In 2016, median household income varied across the neighborhood, ranging from just over $20,000 to $40,000. Overall, 34% of families living in Eastex | Jensen had incomes below the poverty level in 2016, compared to 19% in Houston overall. In a single Census Tract (2208) 60% of families lived below poverty. In 2016, 59% of renters and 21% of homeowners spent more than 30% of their income on housing. Income and poverty impact a family’s ability to prepare for, react to and recover from disasters.

36% without insurance 64% without insurance

ABOVE: Flood Insurance Coverage for Homes Flooded in Harris County, 2017 BELOW: Median Household Income 2000-2016 Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016, Harris County $47,010

$50,000

+ 9% + 17%

$45,000 $40,000 $35,000 $30,000

n

Housto

+ 12%

Eastex Jensen

+ 8% $30,550

$25,000 $20,000 $0

2000

2010

2016

33


The Eastex | Jensen neighborhood is served by four area high schools: Sam Houston, Kashmere, and Northside High Schools are part of the Houston Independent School District, and Macarthur High School is in Aldine ISD. Each of the four high schools are located outside of the boundaries of the Super Neighborhood.

Macarthur High School

Sam Houston High School

The majority of neighborhood students attend either Sam Houston High School west of the neighborhood or Kashmere High School to the southeast. The demographics of the students attending each of these schools is very different, with Sam Houston High School being majority Hispanic or Latino and Kashmere High School majority Black or African American.

ABOVE: Area High School Boundary Maps BELOW, Left to Right: Sam Houston High School Photo, Sam Houston High School Student Demographics 2017, Kashmere High School Student Demographics 2017 Sources: HISD School Profiles 2017

Kashmere High School Northside High School

Sam Houston Popula�on byKashmere Race Student Popula�on by Race 1% Other 9% African American

1% White

1% White

1% American Indian

32% Hispanic

90% Hispanic

Hispanic 34

65% African American

Sam Houston High School: 2,816 Students

African American

White

Kashmere High School: 606 Students

Asian Hispanic Other African American

White

Asian

Othe


Within the boundaries of the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood are six elementary schools and one middle school. Area schools received very low rankings in the 2017 Children At Risk report, with four F grades, three D grades, and a single C-.

Garcia ES Grade F

d

ch R

James Berry ES Grade D-

Hirs

I-69

Eastex | Jensen 2016

Tidwell Rd

Sam Houston HS NA

Jensen Dr

27% High School Graduate

51% Less than High School

Mendel ES Grade F

Rd

19% Some College

Coop ES Grade D

y Toll

ABOVE: Map of Area Schools BELOW: Educational Attainment (25 Years +), 2016 Sources: ACS 2016, Children At Risk 2017 3% Bachelor’s Degree

Patrick Henry MS Grade F

Hard

In 2016, 51% of Eastex | Jensen residents over the age of 25 did not have a high school diploma or equivalent. In Houston, 23% did not complete high school in 2016. Furthermore, while 19% of neighborhood students pursued some college in 2016, only 3% completed a college degree. In Houston, 27% of residents earned a college degree in 2016. Since 2000, educational attainment has improved in the Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood but additional work is required. Ensuring quality educational experiences for young students will provide greater opportunities to succeed.

Scarborough ES Grade C-

Little York Rd

Crosstimbers St

Roderick Paige ES Grade D-

8% Graduate or Higher 19% Bachelor’s or Higher

24% Some College

Kashmere HS Grade F

23% Less than High School

23% High School Graduate

Houston 2016

35


Little York Rd

Parker Rd

I 69

Tidwell Rd

ad

h Rd

il Ro

Hirs

y Ra

Hard

“Bookshop” Proposed Library and Wood and Metal Shop

Proposed Public Gym

“Car Shop” Proposed Co-Operative Auto Repair Training Shop

Loo

ABOVE: Architecture Proposals Developed for Jensen Drive in Fall 2017 by Alex Bishop, Joey Khong and Stephanie Lau

36

p 61

0

Jensen Dr

Crosstimbers St


Opportunities At the time of publication it has been nearly a year since Hurricane Harvey began dumping rain at unprecedented rates and flooding much of Houston. City leaders report that over 150,000 homes were damaged by flood waters across the city. Lives, routines and resources were disrupted.

It is critical to identify opportunities, across scales, that have the potential to reduce future risks, assist with recovery and lead to greater resiliency over time. By building on the assets of our communities, while understanding the challenges, we can develop strategies that create greater resiliency.

Important questions are being asked about how do we prepare for, react to and recover from disasters of this magnitude, both now and in the future? Furthermore, what can we do collectively to identify the opportunities and challenges in our communities?

The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood is rich with opportunities. Halls Bayou meanders through the northern section of the neighborhood and is lined by trails and parks. Jensen Drive, running north and south, is an important historic corridor and the central

The opportunities identified here build on the prominence of Jensen Drive and the civic strength of the neighborhood. The opportunities seek to expand economic opportunity, improve community amenities and transit access, while looking forward to more resilient housing and cooperative neighborhood models.

BLOCK SCALE

BUILDING SCALE

NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE

spine of the neighborhood. Small subdivisions and neighborhoods of homes, schools, and parks fill in the gaps. The neighborhood is easily accessible to freeways, the Hardy Toll Road defines the western boundary and I-69 runs north and south through the neighborhood.

37


Little York Rd

Unio n

ad | U il Ro y Ra Hard

3 3

Pac ific

nion

Parker Rd

Rail

Pacifi

Line

I 69

il Lin

c Ra

1

e Sam Houston High School

Tidwell Rd

h Rd

Hirs

Jensen Dr

2 2 Moody Neighborhood Library

Dixon Library

2

1

Crosstimbers St

BNSF Rail Line

Loo

p 61

3 38

0


Bridging Barriers: Freeways and Rail

The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood is bounded by railroad lines and highways. The Hardy Toll Road and parallel Union Pacific Rail Line bound the western edge of the neighborhood, the North Loop and a BNSF Rail Line bound the southern edge, and an additional Union Pacific Rail Line bounds the eastern side of the neighborhood. I-69 runs north and south through the eastern portion of the neighborhood. Seven local streets cross both I-69 and the Union Pacific Line on the eastern edge; while only five local streets cross the Hardy

BELOW: I-69 at Jensen Drive OPPOSITE PAGE, Right: Infrastructure and Street Map Highways Rail Lines Through Streets OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Focus Areas

Toll Road on the western boundary. In the over four mile length of the neighborhood, only four local streets are continuous across the eastern and western boundaries: Little York Road, Parker Road, Tidwell Road and Crosstimbers Street. Developing design strategies to bridge the barriers in the neighborhood will lead to greater connectivity, particularly to the resources outside of the community such as the two area high schools and libraries. Strategies could include public art, lighting and pedestrian bridges.

Bridge

Bridge?

39


Little York Rd

Little York Rd

1 Parker Rd

I-69

Hard y Ra

Tidwell Rd

ad

il Ro

Halls Bayou Site

Berry Rd

Berry Road Site

Loo

p 61

40

0

h Rd

Crosstimbers St

Hirs

Jensen Dr

l Rd

y Tol

Hard

2


Bridging Barriers: Dead Ends

The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood has a high number of dead end streets. Many of the dead end streets have become sites for illegal dumping and other nuisances. The dead end streets can also create safety challenges for area residents because of the lack of activity.

ll Tidwe

3

Rd

l Rd

y Tol

Hard

Exploring the potential to create, at minimum, pedestrian linkages to area amenities could mitigate both dumping and safety concerns in these areas. Three specific sites have been identified to explore how connections can be made where dead end streets currently exist. The links would utilize the Halls Bayou Trails, a utility easement, and vacant land. Each site is adjacent to area parks, schools and residential developments that create opportunities for greater connectivity.

Veterans Memorial Park Site

OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Map of Dead End Streets Dead End Streets Parks Schools OPPOSITE PAGE, Far Left, Top to Bottom: Site 1: Halls Bayou and Site 2: Berry Road ABOVE, Right: Site 3: Veterans Memorial Park Site and Dumping Photo (Dead End Design Concept and Photo by Nicholas Seckfort)

41


WHAT IT IS

Jensen Drive Today

VACANT BUILDING PARKING

WHAT IT COULD BE

Jensen Drive in the Future

URBAN FARMING

SIDEWALKS and BIKE LANE FAMILY EVENTS

42

ART

SHADE FOOD TRUCKS

GROCERY

LIBRARY


To bring back Jensen Drive a comprehensive strategy needs to be developed for both short and longterm interventions. The interventions should focus on infrastructure, community and family amenities, economic development, activation, historic preservation and art. Infrastructure needs include sidewalks, shade and transit amenities, such as benches and shelters. Needed community amenities include a library, grocery store, and other services. Important historic buildings, such as the Granada Theater, should be reused and re-purposed and public art and community events can work to activate vacant sites along the street. Jensen Drive is the heart of the neighborhood, and innovative programming and adaptive re-use strategies could create greater social cohesion and community resiliency.

ns en D

INFRASTRUCTURE Sidewalks, Shade, Protected Bike Routes, Transit Amenities

Je

Jensen Drive is the primary spine of the Eastex | Jensen neighborhood. Yet, decades of disinvestment have resulted in vacant storefronts, vast empty parking lots, deteriorating historic buildings such as the Granada Theater, and a lack of services and amenities that once lined this great street.

r

Re-Activating Jensen

Tidwell Rd FAMILIES Library, Grocery Store, Family Activities and Spaces

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Jobs, Urban Farming and New Businesses

ACTIVATION Temporary Re-Use of Parking Lots and Other Vacant Spaces with Events, Food Trucks, and Other Community Gatherings

PRESERVATION Re-purposing Historic Buildings

ART Public Art to Activate Vacant Spaces

ABOVE, Right: Jensen Drive Map ABOVE, Left: Proposed Programs and Strategies OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Jensen Drive Collage, Present and Future (Collage Concept by Gabriela Espinoza)

43


Dr en ns Je

Edell St

Tidwell Rd

44

I-69

Tidwell Transit Center


Transit Connections

Eastex | Jensen is served by six METRO bus routes. The Tidwell Transit Center, located on Epsom Drive just north of Tidwell Road, serves three of the area’s bus routes: 06 Jensen; 83 Lee Road/JFK; and 80 MLK/Lockwood. The 45 Tidwell does not enter the Transit Center. In 2016, 75% of Eastex Jensen workers over the age of 16 drove alone to work and 4% used public transit. In the same year, 12% of area households were without a vehicle.

transit ridership. In addition, this intersection, which is already bustling with bus riders and pedestrians, is served by four bus routes instead of the three serving the Transit Center. The Transit Center property could be redeveloped into housing or other needed amenities. Improving access to transit and encouraging ridership could lead to greater resiliency in the neighborhood over the long-term.

Re-locating the Transit Center to the intersection of Jensen Drive and Tidwell Road could create greater visibility and encourage more

Jen s

en

Dr

Supporting and enhancing transit ridership in the neighborhood could provide residents with a viable

alternative to the private automobile. One of the first steps is to re-think the Tidwell Transit Center. The Transit Center is very isolated, particularly for people walking, and not well-used. For example, the road leading to the Transit Center from Jensen Drive is fenced on both sides, creating a very uncomfortable condition for pedestrians. In addition, while the investment was made to connect the Transit Center to the HOV/HOT Lane on I-69 there is not a park and ride bus serving this location.

?

Tidwell Rd

New Transit Center Entry to Tidwell Transit Center from Jensen Drive

Intersection of Tidwell Road and Jensen Drive

45


Urban Farm

Vacant Lot Co-op Grocer

Local Restaurant

Employees Religious Institutions

Community

Food Pantry

46

Volunteer


Co-op Strategies

The Eastex | Jensen Super Neighborhood has 77 faith-based institutions and nearly 1,000 acres of vacant land. Over 2,000 people need gainful employment, while over 4,000 people are food insecure. Developing networks of organizations and resources could facilitate cooperative economic growth in the neighborhood that would create jobs, spark business growth and provide needed food security.

Vendors Farmers Employer

The Board

Professional Staff

A proposed model for creating a cooperative economy is provided to the right and left. The models focus on urban farming as an economic engine for both individuals and the cooperative, and includes the development of urban farms, local restaurants, a co-operative grocery and food pantry. The overall goal is for the Eastex | Jensen neighborhood to become more resilient and selfsufficient.

RIGHT: Co-op Model BELOW: Employment and Food Security Data OPPOSITE PAGE: Co-op Urban Farming Concept (Concept and Graphics Developed by Tran Le)

8%

Consumers

8%

Stores

Guests

2046 PEOPLE NEED JOBS

Member-Owners

1 IN 6 TEXANS FACES UNCERTAINTY ABOUT HAVING ENOUGH TO EAT (FOOD INSECURITY DATA 2015)

2046 PEOPLE NEED JOBS

1 IN 6 TEXANS FACES UNCERTAINTY ABOUT HAVING ENOUGH TO EAT (FOOD INSECURITY DATA 2015)

4261 PEOPLE NEED FOOD

4261 PEOPLE NEED FOOD

47


?

ABOVE: Jensen Drive Vacant Land Vacant Land ABOVE, Top: Eastex | Jensen Resilient Housing Concepts ABOVE, Right: Concept Site OPPOSITE PAGE, Middle: Buyout Section Diagram OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Halls Bayou (Halls Bayou Section Concept by Caroline Smith, Kaihan Chen, Peter Eccles, Vilma Umanzor, Yan Lu)

48


Resilient Housing

The Eastex | Jensen neighborhood has had a series of property buyouts since 1985 when the Harris County Flood Control District developed the program. In total, over 400 properties have been purchased and demolished to make way for additional stormwater detention projects to reduce the future risks of flooding. The impact of these buyouts has been substantial, and has saved hundreds of homeowners from recurring flood damage.

As the flood risks in the neighborhood have been mitigated, there is increased interest in developing affordable housing that is combined with additional amenities and resources, such as urban farming, to create a more resilient and sustainable neighborhood. This idea was tested on a vacant site on Jensen Drive (see drawings to the left), additional vacant sites were also identified to explore future housing typologies.

C

A B

500 Year Floodplain

100 Year Floodplain

New Park and Detention

49


50


Participants and Sponsors Participants

Community Design Workshop University of Houston College of Architecture + Design Student Team, Spring 2017 Afreen Ali Abhilasha Bisht Filza Khan Angelica Lastra Tran Le Jose Mario Lopez Nicholas Seckfort Pooja Shetty Architecture Design Studio University of Houston College of Architecture + Design Student Team, Fall 2017 Alex Bishop Doumit Doumit Gabriela Espinosa Saraa Hussein Joey Khong Stephanie Lau Matthew Nguyen Stephanie Oropeza Kelvin Rodriguez Michael Zepeda *This document includes research and concepts developed by students in Spring 2017 and Fall 2017

Community Design Resource Center Susan Rogers, Director Adelle Main, Assistant Director Angelica Lastra, Design Strategist Jose Mario Lopez, Design Strategist Gabriela Degetau, Research Assistant Constanza PeĂąa, Research Assistant Honored Guests and Critics Kinder Baumgardner Antoine Bryant Margaret Wallace Brown Amanda Burden Robert Burrow Alan Cisneros Council Member Karla Cisneros Tanya Debose Keith Downey Dineta Frazier Niel Golightly Secunda Joseph Hiroko Kobayashi Kimberly Hatter Brandi Holmes Alex Lahti Elaine Morales Lauren Racusin Jeff Reichman Patricia Oliver Jasleen Sarai Preetal Shah Pastor David Smith

Linda Hicks Smith Juan Antonio Sorto Christof Spieler Amanda Timm Anibeth Turcios Jenifer Wagley Kenneth Williams Huey Wilson

Special Thanks

The Collaborative Community Design Initiative is supported through a generous gift from the Japan Business Association of Houston and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The initiative would not be possible without the generous commitment of time from community leaders and stakeholders and professionals across Houston. We would like to thank all of our partners and supporters.

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Eastex/Jensen Briefing Book  

Briefing Book for the fifth biennial Collaborative Community Design Initiative for the Eastex/Jensen Super Neighborhood

Eastex/Jensen Briefing Book  

Briefing Book for the fifth biennial Collaborative Community Design Initiative for the Eastex/Jensen Super Neighborhood

Profile for skrogers
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