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Kashmere Gardens Trinity | Houston Gardens Super Neighborhoods 52 and 48

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Briefing Book

Collaborative Community Design Initiative. No. 5 SPECIAL EDITION: HARVEY Community Design Resource Center 2018

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Kashmere Gardens, After Hurricane Harvey Photo by Marcus Yam, Los Angeles Times


Contents Introduction (Harvey)

5

Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens (Harvey)

7

Context

17

Demographics

29

Opportunities

41

Participants and Sponsors

55

Aerial Figure Ground Barriers Land Use Parks and Drainage Transportation

Population and Age Race and Ethnicity Poverty Income Education Health Housing Neighborhood Resiliency Neighborhood Resiliency (Rail Yards) Economic Opportunity Food Security Buyouts to Amenities Resilient Housing


Tropical Storm Allison Track, 2001

Hurricane Ike Track, 2008

2015-2016

AUG 24, 2017

A HISTORY OF FLOODING

HURRICANE HARVEY

Houston suffered two major flood events in the years preceding Harvey, the Memorial Day Flood in 2015 and the Tax Day Flood in 2016.

4

AUG 26, 2017

On Thursday Harvey is upgraded from a tropical storm to a hurricane. 30 inches of rain is forecast in isolated instances. Supermarket shelves empty as residents make preparations.

ABOVE: Harvey Timeline (Based on Analysis and Graphics by Matthew Nguyen, Constanza PeĂąa, Victor Romo, and Cristina Trejo)

Hurricane Harvey Track, 2017

On Saturday Harvey makes a second landfall and weakens to a tropical storm. Rain forecasts for Houston are measured in feet. Several cities implement curfews and roads begin closing. HISD cancels school for the next week.

AUG 25, 2017

On Friday Harvey is upgraded to a Category 4 storm and makes landfall at 10pm near Rockport. Several counties call for voluntary and mandatory evacuations. Tornado and flood warnings are issued. HISD closes schools.

AUG 27, 2017

Heavy rainfall begins Saturday night and by early Sunday morning neighborhoods begin flooding and high water rescues by boat and helicopter are being televised live.


Introduction At the time of this publication, it has been nearly a year since Hurricane Harvey made landfall and slowly circled around the greater Houston area for five days. Harvey left behind over 150,000 flooded homes and a maximum recorded rainfall of 47.4”. It took only one month before the city seemed to be functioning normally. But the tragedy unfolding for thousands of families continues behind the closed doors of flooded homes and temporary hotel rooms. While natural disasters are equal opportunity events, the resources to recover are not. As civic leader Keith Downey notes: “The storm hit many underserved communities long before the hurricane arrived.”

The slow motion flood disaster that inundated Houston is evidence of a new climate normal. In the wake of this new normal we must begin to define and build towards greater resiliency—not just in preparation for the next disaster, but to ensure everyday resiliency. The fifth biennial Collaborative Community Design Initiative, titled “Floods” is a partnership with four Houston neighborhoods that were severely impacted by Harvey: East Houston, Eastex/Jensen, Edgebrook, and Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/ Houston Gardens. This Briefing Book is for the Kashmere Gardens and Trinity / Houston Gardens Super Neighborhoods.

AUG 28, 2017

THE NEXT WEEK

AUG 29, 2017

THE AFTERMATH

In an unprecedented move, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers begins releasing water from reservoirs in west Houston. The release is to avoid a collapse that would inundate downtown Houston. The release floods thousands of homes near the reservoirs.

The rain from Hurricane Harvey begins to taper off, and by late Tuesday most neighborhoods would not see any more rain. The highest recorded rainfall in Harris County is 47.4”. An estimated 30,000 are in Houston shelters.

Professionals, volunteers, and communities begin cleaning up. Donation drives and distribution points are set up across the city. Individuals are prompted to contact insurance companies and apply for FEMA assistance. Some begin returning to work.

SIX MONTHS LATER

Kashmere and Trinity/Houston Gardens Location Map

Some reconstruction efforts begin. Nearly 894,000 FEMA applications are filed by the November deadline. An estimated 150,000 structures flooded in Houston. Houston residents must now consider whether to rebuild or permanently relocate. Many still reside in temporary, sometimes makeshift, homes. FEMA hotel programs extended through June 2018.

Trinity/ Houston Gardens Kashmere Gardens

ONE YEAR LATER

Over $2 billion in Recovery Funding is finally allocated to the City of Houston and Harris County for rebuilding. Codes and policies are being rewritten to mitigate flood risks. Efforts are lagging to ensure residents are more informed and prepared for future disasters.

THE FUTURE

THE MONTH AFTER

Mucking, demolitions, and citywide cleaning continues. Some schools reopen. Displaced families relocated to temporary housing. Insurance and FEMA agents begin property inspections.

5


I-45 Halls Bayou Watershed

Trinity/Houston Gardens

Hunting Bayou Watershed

I-10

I-69

ABOVE: Halls Bayou Watershed, Hunting Bayou Watershed and Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Super Neighborhoods

6

Kashmere Gardens


Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens The Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Super Neighborhoods are located in northeast Houston, on either side of the North Loop. The two Super Neighborhoods have been combined for the purposes of this study, and will be referred to as the “Gardens” neighborhoods from here forward. The majority of the Gardens neighborhoods are located in the Hunting Bayou Watershed, with the northern portions intersecting the Halls Bayou Watershed (see map to the left). The Harris County Flood Control District data indicates that of the 154,170 homes flooded during Harvey 48,850 were within the 100-year floodplain and 34,970 within the 500-year floodplain. While 70,370 flooded homes were not in an identified floodplain hazard area. In the Gardens neighborhoods the FEMA Flood Hazard maps indicate the substantial flood risk along Hunting Bayou, with much of the Kashmere Gardens neighborhood falling in the 100-year flood plain. Flooding along Hunting Bayou has been a persistent hazard for residents, businesses and property owners. During Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, 8,270 homes in the Hunting Bayou watershed flooded. The Bayou level during Harvey was 2.2’ higher than the level recorded during Allison.

Hunting Bayou

ABOVE: Flood Map Floodway 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain BELOW: Kashmere Gardens, North Loop at Hunting Bayou, August 29, 2017 Photo Harris County Flood Control District

Harris County Flood Control District estimates that 36% of flooded homes across the county were covered by flood insurance policies, while 64% were not.

7


6”

Wednesday

Tuesday

5

ABOVE: Inundation Level Tuesday August 29, 2017 1 a.m.

Monday

5.5

ABOVE: Inundation Level Monday August 28, 2017 1 a.m.

Sunday

6

ABOVE: Inundation Level Sunday August 27, 2017 1 a.m. Saturday

4.5

5” 4”

4 3.5

3”

3 2.5

2”

2 1.5

1”

1

8/30/2017 13:00

8/30/2017 1:00

8/29/2017 13:00

8/29/2017 1:00

ABOVE: Hourly Rainfall Totals, Hunting Bayou at Lockwood Drive Harvey Event: August 26, 2017 - August 20, 2017

8/28/2017 13:00

8/28/2017 1:00

8/27/2017 13:00

8/27/2017 1:00

8/26/2017 1:00

0

8/26/2017 13:00

0.5

0

Hunting Bayou @ Lockwood Drive Top of Bank

Stream Elevation

46

44’

44

Top of Bank

42 40 38

8

08.29.2017

8.30.2017

08.26.2017 08.27.2017 ABOVE: Stream Elevation, Hunting Bayou at Lockwood Drive 08.28.2017 Harvey Event: August 26, 2017 - August 30, 2017 Source: Harris County Flood Warning System

8.29.2017

32 30

8.28.2017

34

8.27.2017

36

8.26.2017

ns

6.5

08.30.2017

40’ 36’ 32’


The Harris County Flood Control District has compiled Hurricane Harvey rainfall data for gages across the County. The Kashmere Gardens gage, located at Hunting Bayou and Lockwood Drive, was used to identify maximum rainfall in the Gardens neighborhoods. The total rainfall over the five-day event was 36.2”. The rainfall in the Gardens neighborhoods was moderate compared to the maximum rainfall amounts recorded across the County. Yet, Hunting Bayou topped its bank in the early morning hours of Sunday August 27, 2017 and remained over the top of bank until mid-day on Tuesday August 29, 2017. The maximum stream elevation peaked at 43.6’, three feet over the top of bank. According to data from the Harris County Flood Control District, 7,420 homes were flooded in the Hunting Bayou Watershed, roughly 5% of the 154,700 estimated flooded homes county wide. The City of Houston’s estimates of flood damage are much higher; the City reports that 3,672 homes in Kashmere Gardens and 3,954 in Trinity/Houston Gardens were flooded during Harvey. This estimate is above the overall number of structures flooded in the watershed according to the Harris County Flood Control District. Based on the City of Houston estimates 79% of all homes in the Kashmere Gardens Super Neighborhood and 54% in Trinity/ Houston Gardens flooded during Hurricane Harvey.

4 days

Harris County Maximum Recorded Rainfall Eastex/Jensen Rainfall Kashmere Gardens Rainfall Edgebrook Rainfall East Houston Rainfall

35.2” 36.2” 38.2”

26.7” 28.7”

2 days

29.5” 18.3” 18.8”

1 day

12.6” 14.2” 14.8”

4.0” 5.3” 6.1” 6.8”

1 hour

34.6”

25.6”

2.4” 3.7” 6.0” 3.9”

20.9” 20.1”

17.0” 14.8”

5.9” 7.2”

14.2”

7.9”

2 hour

35.2”

18.9”

7.6” 9.4” 10.7”

3 hour

43.9”

23.2” 20.6”

12 hour

6 hour

47.4”

11.9” 10.5”

TOTAL RAINFALL =

36.2”

ABOVE: Harris County and Neighborhood Maximum Recorded Rainfall Source: Harris County Flood Control District

9


Tract 2308

Tract 2306

Tract 2304

Tract 2303

Tract 2302

Tract 2301

Tract 2109

Tract 2110

Tract 2112

Tract 2117

Socioeconomic Vulnerability

Income and poverty impact a family’s capacity to prepare for, react to and recover from a disaster

Persons below poverty Civilian (age 16+) unemployed Per capita income Persons (age 25+) with no H.S. diploma

Household Vulnerability

Seniors, children and single parents are more vulnerable to a disaster than other population groups

Persons aged 65 and older Persons aged 17 and younger Civilian noninstitutionalized population with a disability Single parent household with children under 18

Minority Status and Language Vulnerability

Access to information can be a challenge for those with language barriers

Minority (all persons except white, non-Hispanic) Persons (age 5+) who speak English “less than well�

Housing and Transportation Vulnerability Housing in structures with 10 or more units

Access to transportation and quality housing that is outside of designated risk zones reduces vulnerability

Mobile homes estimate At household level, more people than rooms Households with no vehicle available Persons in institutionalized group quarters

Overall Social Vulnerability Vulnerability ranking compared to U.S. Census Tracts (75% and over indicates social vulnerability)

ABOVE: Social Vulnerability Index Tracts in the top 10%, or at the 90th percentile (Indicate high vulnerability) Tracts below the 90th percentile Source: Social Vulnerability Index (2014), https://svi.cdc.gov/map.aspx

10

89%

97%

96%

92%

98%

98%

92%

92%

97%

99%


The Garden Neighborhoods have a very high Social Vulnerability Index, as developed by the ATDSR of the Centers for Disease Control utilizing 2014 Census data. Social vulnerability refers to the resilience of communities when confronted by external stresses on human health, including natural or human-caused disasters. The social vulnerability index is the “degree to which a community exhibits certain social conditions, including high poverty, low percentage of vehicle access, or crowded households.” Each of these conditions can impact a community’s ability to recover. The Garden Super Neighborhoods include ten Census tracts: 2109, 2110, 2112, 2117, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2304, 2306 and 2308. An analysis of the specific social vulnerabilities are provided in the table to the left. All Census tracts that comprise the neighborhood are in the highest vulnerability category, averaging 95% compared to tracts across the United States.

Tract 2306

Tract 2303

Tract 2308

Tract 2304 Tract 2302

Tract 2301

Tract 2109

Tract 2110

Tract 2112

Tract 2117

ABOVE: Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Census Tract Map Photo Michael Ciaglo, Houston Chronicle

11


12


History Kashmere Gardens, Trinity Gardens and Houston Gardens are bound together by rich and complex histories. The neighborhoods began developing in the 1930s, in what was then the outskirts of Houston. Houston Gardens was completed in 1937 by the Suburban Resettlement Administration, a program established during the New Deal. The program developed “subsistence homesteads” across the United States during the height of the Great Depression. While the program was designed to help families out of poverty, it also sought to relieve congestion in cities and to provide opportunities for living on the “rurban” fringe, which was consistent with beliefs at this time in the benefits of rural life. The program focused on developing communities that would be self-sufficient, with small farms and agricultural plots as well as schools and community centers. RIGHT: Kashmere Stage Band Photo By Stones Throw Records / Now Again BELOW, Left to Right: Historic Aerials 1944, 1978 and 2006

More than 10,000 people were “resettled” in the 200 communities developed under its tenure. The projects were primarily concentrated in the South, where farm tenancy, sharecropping, and discrimination had a significant impact on opportunity. Houston Gardens, the only subsistence homestead community in the Houston area, was originally platted into 100 lots. The area has a striking street layout—a large oval parceled on its ends into pie-shaped plots. Nearly every lot is more than an acre; parks ring the edges and the center of the community. Even today this unique plan is easy to spot on a Houston map. By the 1940s Kashmere, Trinity and Houston Gardens all had well established schools and other civic institutions. These institutions were, and continue to be, the center of civic and political life. The Kashmere Gardens neighborhood led the Houston fight

Laura Koppe Rd

Kashmere High School, which serves the entire area, opened in 1957. In 1965 hundreds of students boycotted classes to protest against ongoing segregation in Houston schools. In the 1970s the high school rose to fame when the band director, Conrad Johnson, established the Kashmere Stage Band. The legacy of the Stage Band was documented in the film “Thunder Soul” produced by Jamie Foxx and released in 2010. Kashmere Gardens was also home to a number of important political figures, including Mickey Leeland. The political and social activism in the neighborhood continues today.

Laura Koppe Rd

Laura Koppe Rd

1978

Lockwood Dr

Lockwood Dr

Lockwood Dr

1944

for integration of area schools. The first black student to attend an all white school in the city was enrolled at Kashmere Elementary School in 1960, Tyronne Day. In this era the neighborhood changed substantially. In 1950, Census data reports that the area was predominantly white, at 83%. Just ten years later, in 1960, the majority of the neighborhood’s population was black, at 71%.

2006

13


Franklin Roosevelt signs an executive order to establish the Resettlement Administration in 1935.

Kashmere Gardens Elementary School Mickey Leland is born opens in 1949. The in 1944. Leland was school is segregated an anti-poverty activist and all white. In 1950, who later became a whites make up 83% of congressman from the the Kashmere Gardens Texas 18th District. neighborhood population.

In 1957 Kashmere High School opens. In 1968 the high school is relocated to a new campus on Wileyvale Road and the original campus becomes Key Middle School.

1935 1937

In 1937 the New Deal Suburban Resettlement Administration program completes Houston Gardens, a 100-unit subsistence homestead development. This was the only development of its kind in Houston. ABOVE: Timeline (Based on Concept and Research by Rafael Araujo, Reagan Cameron, Salil Kenny, Catalina Morales)

1944

1949

By the late 1940s Kashmere Gardens and Trinity Gardens were largely platted. The Houston Gardens Suburban Resettlement Administration project is complete. Area schools included Houston Gardens School, Kashmere Gardens School and Dudley School.

1957

1960

COLOR BAR BROKEN BY HOUSTON PUPIL: Boy, 6, First Negro Special to The New York Times. New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 9, 1960; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times with Index pg. 34

Kashmere Gardens Elementary School accepts the first Black student in 1960. Black residents comprise the majority of the population by 1960, at 71%. Source: New York Times

14

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction pro


Across the decades the Gardens neighborhoods have illustrated strong civic leadership and political activism. From the early neighborhood development patterns, to the construction of massive rail yards; from the fight for justice, to the disinvestment that accompanied white flight and recurring flooding, the neighborhood continues to stand together and organized.

Mickey Leland Memorial Park is established in 2000 by Harris County Precinct One to commemorate Leland’s life.

August 25, 2017 Hurricane Harvey makes landfall. Leader Keith Downey documents the aftermath.

In 1965, 9,000 black students from five Houston high schools boycott classes, including students from Kashmere High School, to protest delayed integration of schools.

2000 1965

1970s

2010

2017 2018

Thunder Soul is released in 2010. Produced by Jamie Foxx, the movie tells the story of the Kashmere Stage Band. In 1965 Jacqueline McCauley is the first Black female student admitted to Rice University. She graduated from Kashmere Gardens High School. Conrad “Prof” Johnson establishes the Kashmere Stage Band at Kashmere High School.

In 2018, the Gardens neighborhoods continue to recover from Hurricane Harvey.

15


Laura Koppe Rd

I69 /

TRINITY/HOUSTON GARDENS

9

US 5

Ley Rd

Homestead Rd

Lockwood Dr

Hirsch Rd

Jensen Dr

Kelley St North Loop 610

KASHMERE GARDENS

Collingsworth St

Lockwood Dr

I-69 / US 59

16

Cavalcade St


Context The Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Super Neighborhoods (Gardens) are located northeast of Downtown Houston. The combined neighborhood boundaries are approximately I-69 to the west, Tidwell Road to the north, the Settegast Rail Yard to the east, and Collingsworth Street and the Englewood Rail Yard to the south. The neighborhood began developing in the 1930s and continued over the following decades. Two major rail yards define the boundaries of the neighborhood and also act as barriers. Additional rail lines weave throughout the neighborhood. Hunting Bayou runs along the boundary between the Kashmere Gardens Super Neighborhood and Trinity/Houston Gardens, roughly parallel to the North Loop. RIGHT: Figure Ground Map BELOW, Left to Right: North Loop During Tropical Storm Allison, 2001; Kashmere Gardens After Hurricane Harvey, 2017 OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Aerial 2017 (Photos by Keith Downey and Marcus Yam, Los Angeles Times)

17


Laura Koppe Rd Lockwood Dr

Ley Rd Homestead Rd

Hirsch Rd

I-69 / US 59

Settegast Yard

Kelley St

North Loo

p 6 10

Lockwood Dr

Cavalcade St

Collingsworth St I-69 / US 59

18

o

lew

g En

rd Ya d o


The Gardens neighborhoods are segmented by major infrastructure corridors and industrial development. Infrastructure corridors include two major rail yards—the Settegast Yards and the Englewood Yards—that define the eastern and southern boundary of the neighborhoods. A smaller rail yard sits in the center of the neighborhood just west of Homestead Road and north of Kelley Street. In addition two major rail lines traverse the neighborhood, converging near Hirsch Road and Bennington Street. The rail lines act as both barriers and as levies, significantly impacting drainage, particularly along Hunting Bayou.

Homestead Rd

Lockwood Dr

Hirsch Rd

North Loop 610 Hunting Bayou

I-69 / US 59

Finally, industrial land uses occupy areas adjacent to the rail yards in the southeast portion of the neighborhood, further limiting connectivity. The neighborhood of Kashmere Gardens is bounded on both the east and west by industrial land uses. Combined, the boundaries and barriers create a divided community, with many streets that dead end into the infrastructure corridors.

Ley Rd

Jensen Dr

Additionally, the Eastex Freeway, or I-69, bounds the western side of the neighborhood and the North Loop runs east to west in the southern quadrant, bisecting the neighborhood. The freeways are major boundaries in the neighborhood.

Laura Koppe Rd

Cavalcade St

ABOVE, Right: Street Pattern Map RIGHT: Union Pacific Englewood Yard, Southeast of Kashmere Gardens OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Map of Infrastructure Corridors and Industrial Land Uses

19


20


The major commercial corridor in Kashmere Gardens is Lockwood Drive and Kelley Street. In Trinity/ Houston Gardens the major commercial corridors are Homestead Road, Laura Koppe Road and Tidwell Road. The commercial development is sparse compared to the population of the area, and many businesses are small local shops. There is only one major grocery store in the community, Fiesta Mart on Kelley Street near Lockwood Drive. The building is a former Weingarten’s Grocery.

Today a Fiesta Grocery occupies the former Weingarten’s Grocery on Kelley Street

Large swathes of industrial land uses comprise the southeastern portion of the Gardens neighborhood. Industrial land uses include warehousing, railroad yards and other transportation uses. Vacant and undeveloped land is scattered throughout the Gardens neighborhoods. Vacant land can be both an opportunity and a constraint, providing sites for new development but also encouraging nuisances such as illegal dumping.

ABOVE, Right: Commercial and Industrial Land Use Commercial Land Use Industrial Land Use RIGHT: Fiesta Grocery Store at Lockwood Dr and Kelley St OPPOSITE PAGE, Top: Vacant and Undeveloped Land Vacant Land OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Englewood Rail Yard

21


3 Acre Lots

0.4 Acres Lot

0.2 Acre Lots

Houston Gardens Subsistence Homestead Lot

Single Family Lot

Single Family Lot

1

2

3

(50’ X 150’)

Lavender St

Homestead Rd

22

(60’ X 270’)

Weyburn St


The Gardens neighborhoods are characterized by a diversity of housing typologies and development patterns. Vacant lots are scattered throughout most of the residential areas, leaving gaps in the fabric of the community.

3

In 2016, single family homes made up 79% of all housing units, compared to 45% in Houston. Large apartments comprised just 3% of all housing in the neighborhood, compared to 22% in Houston. In the Gardens, small apartment buildings made up 15% of area housing.

1

The median year that housing was constructed ranges from the late 1950s to the late 1960s. Although there is historic housing that dates back to the 1930s. The housing lots are comparatively larger in the Gardens neighborhoods than the typical Houston lot, which measures 50’ by 100’. Houston Gardens’ historic homestead lots are approximately three-acres in size, enough area for large gardens or farming. The large lots provide opportunities to explore accessory dwelling units or other innovative strategies to increase affordable housing and overall resiliency in the neighborhood.

ABOVE, Right: Residential Land Use Map Single Family Multi-Family RIGHT: Housing by Type 2016 The Gardens Super Neighborhoods Houston OPPOSITE PAGE: Residential Lots Scale Source: ACS 2016

2

79%

45% 27% 2% Single Family Detached

5%

Single Family Attached

15% Small Apartments (2 - 19 units)

22% 3% Large Apartments (20 or more units)

0%

1%

Other

23


Halls Bayou Watershed

Lockwood Dr

Hirsch Rd

1 Homestead Stormwater Detention Basin

Over the last two decades $23 million has been spent to reduce flooding along Hunting Bayou. Improvements include channel modifications, bridge replacements and the Homestead Stormwater Detention Basin.

North Loop 610 Hunting Bayou

Hunting Bayou Watershed

Cavalcade St

Homestead Rd

24

1

I-69 / US 59

Project Hunting, a $176 million project, that includes additional improvements in the watershed is expected to be complete in 2023. Once finished, Project Hunting is expected to remove 5,000 residential and commercial structures from the 100-year floodplain.

Ley Rd


2 3

4

6

North Loop 610

7

Ley Rd Homestead Rd

ABOVE, Right: Park Map 1/4 Mile Radius 1/2 Mile Radius RIGHT: Recommended Park Area OPPOSITE PAGE, Top: Map of Bayous and Drainage Easements OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Hunting Bayou Image at Hutcheson Park

Laura Koppe Rd

5

8

9

10

11

Hunting Bayou

I-69 / US 59

Hunting Bayou, which begins just west of Kashmere Gardens, bisects the community and connects south to the Houston Ship Channel. While portions of the neighborhood are in the Halls Bayou Watershed, the majority of the area drains to Hunting Bayou. There are 45 miles of open waterways in the watershed, including Hunting Bayou and its major tributaries, such as Turkey Run and Schramm Gullies. The 75-acre Homestead Stormwater Detention Basin is complete through two of three phases. Upon completion the basin will hold approximately 300 million gallons of stormwater that would otherwise flood houses and businesses along Hunting Bayou.

1

Hirsch Rd

The City of Houston’s 2015 Parks and Recreation Master Plan recommended 2.5 acres of neighborhood, community and pocket parks per 1,000 people. Based on this standard the Gardens neighborhoods has a 33-acre park deficit. Over 25% of area households live more than a 10-minute walk to a park.

Area Parks 1 Tidwell Park 2 Rosewood Park 3 Pelham Park 4 Banyan-Camway Park 5 Busby Park 6 Trinity Gardens Park 7 Houston Gardens Park 8 Darien Park 9 Elbert Park 10 Apache-Elbert Triangle 11 Hutcheson Park 12 M. Leland Memorial Park 13 Tuffly Park 14 Delce Park

Lockwood Dr

The Gardens neighborhoods have 14 public parks. Two area parks are operated by Harris County and the remainder by the City of Houston. While there are a large number of parks, five of the parks are very small, measuring less than one acre.

Cavalcade St

12

14 13

HPARD Recommended Park Area for Neighborhood, Community, and Pocket Parks 2.5 acres/1,000

Existing Park Area 1.25 acres/1,000= 33 acres

Park Area Needed 1.25 acres/1,000= 33 acres

25


17%

45

Households a Vehicle ToWithout Hempstead Hwy

Gardens Neighborhoods 2016

80

Laura Koppe Rd

To Mesa Transit Center

03

7% Households Without a Vehicle

Ley Rd

Lockwood Dr

Hirsch Rd

To Northline Transit Center

52

Homestead Rd

Houston 2016

To Mesa Transit Center

To Greenspoint Transit Center

51

TC

North Loop 610 Hunting Bayou

97 26

06

To Downtown Transit Center

I-69 / US 59

To Memorial City

To Downtown Transit Center

26

Cavalcade St

77

To Mesa Transit Center

29

To Downtown To Fifth Ward/ Denver Harbor Transit Center

To University of Houston and MLK

ABOVE, Left: Percent of Households Without Access to a Vehicle, 2016 ABOVE: Transit Map High Frequency Bus Route (15 mins) Mid-Frequency Bus Route (30 mins) Low Frequency Bus Route (60 mins) Source: ACS 2016


The Gardens neighborhoods are well-served by public transportation. There are ten bus routes serving the community, three are high frequency routes running every 15 minutes, four are mid-frequency routes running every 30 minutes, and three are 60 minute routes. The routes with the highest ridership are the 80 MLK/ Lockwood, 45 Tidwell and 26 Long Point/Calvacade. Each of these routes runs every 15 minutes or less.

Laura Koppe Rd Lockwood Dr

North Loop 610

I-69 / US 59

ABOVE, Right: Existing and Proposed Bike Lanes and Bayou Greenways Existing On-Street Existing Bayou Greenway Proposed Dedicated On-Street Proposed Shared On-Street Future Bayou Greenway Schools RIGHT: Means of Transportation to Work, 2016 and Bus Route Ridership, 2017 Garden Neighborhoods Houston Source: ACS 2016, METRO Ridership 2017

Homestead Rd

Hirsch Rd

In 2016, 72% of the Gardens’ workers over the age of 16 drove alone to work, which is lower than 76% in Houston overall. Furthermore, 8% of the Gardens’ workers used public transportation, which is twice as high Houston. Public transportation is important to residents in the Gardens neighborhoods as 17% of households did not have a vehicle in 2016, compared to 7% in Houston. Two existing bike trails serve the neighborhood, both are located alongside Hunting Bayou at Hutcheson Park and at the Hunting Bayou Hike and Bike Trail. The Houston Bike Plan proposes a series of future bike lanes and routes inside the neighborhood, that once complete will create better connectivity.

Ley Rd

Cavalcade St

72% 76%

80 MLK/Lockwood 4718

Drove Alone

19% 12%

26 Long Point/Calvacade 3936

Carpooled

8% 4%

06 Jensen/Greens 2845

Public Transit

Bicycled/ Walked Other

2% 3% 2% 2%

45 Tidwell 4255

29 Cullen/Hirsch 3444

52 Hardy-Ley 2470 51 Hardy-Ley 959 03 Langley

618

97 Settegast

608

77 Homestead

589

27


Kashmere Gardens Trinity/Houston Gardens

Houston

2000

2010

2016

2000

2010

2016

31,052

27,645 -11%

26,502 -4%

1,953,631

2,068,026 6%

2,240,582 8%

Population Density (per Sq Mile)

3,069

2,722

2,610

3,372

3,449

3,737

Race/Ethnicity White Black or African American Asian Hispanic or Latino Other

1% 80% 0.2% 17% 1%

2% 75% 1% 22% 0%

1% 64% 0% 34% 1%

31% 25% 5% 37% 2%

26% 23% 6% 44% 2

26% 23% 6% 44% 1%

Age 17 Years or Younger 18 - 64 Years Old 65 Years or Older

28% 57% 14%

24% 62% 14%

24% 62% 15%

28% 64% 8%

26% 65% 9%

25% 65% 10%

8%

11%

15%

26%

29%

26%

Means of Transportation to Work Drove Alone Carpooled Public Transportation Bicycled and Walked Other

61% 18% 15% 3% 1%

68% 15% 10% 2% 2%

72% 14% 8% 2% 1%

72% 16% 6% 3% 1%

74% 14% 5% 3% 2%

76% 12% 4% 3% 2%

Educational Attainment 25 Years + Less Than High School High School Graduate (includes equivalent) Some college Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree Other Professional School Degree

46% 31% 17% 3% 2% 1%

36% 39% 19% 5% 2% 1%

32% 35% 25% 6% 2% 0%

30% 20% 23% 17% 6% 4%

26% 23% 23% 18% 7% 4%

23% 23% 24% 19% 8% 4%

$18,651 50%

$25,299 57%

$27,409 58%

$36,616

$44,124

$47,010

31%

27%

25%

19%

18%

19%

12,243 89% 11%

12,183 82% 18%

11,952 82% 18%

782,009 92% 8%

889,489 86% 14%

937,245 89% 11%

54% 46%

57% 42%

51% 49%

46% 54%

45% 55%

43% 57%

Households without access to a vehicle

9%

18%

17%

12%

10%

9%

Persons per Household

2.5

2.3

2.2

2.7

2.7

2.7

Total Population

Place of Birth Foreign Born Residents

Median Household Income Percent of Houston’s Median Percent of Population Below Poverty Housing Units Occupied Vacant Housing Units Tenure Percent Owners Percent Renters

Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016

28


Demographics The Gardens neighborhood, comprised of the Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Super Neighborhoods, encompasses over ten square miles and was home to 26,502 people in 2016. The population density is 2,610 people per square mile, which is considerably lower than the Houston average density of 3,737 people per square mile.

2306

2304 2302 2301

2109 2112

Between 2000 and 2016 the population of the Gardens declined from 31,052 to 26,502 people, a 15% loss. In contrast, the City of Houston grew in population by 14% over the same time period.

8,852

18-64 Years

ABOVE: Gardens Census Tract Map BELOW: Population by Age, 2000-2016 Sources: ACS 2000, 2010, 2016

Gardens Population in 2016 26,502 17,016

2000

16,354

Under 18 Ye

ars

6,661

4,463

2117

2110

Since 2000, the number of residents in every age group, from children, to adults, to seniors has declined. In 2016, the Gardens had a lower percentage of children under the age of 18 than Houston overall, 24% of the total population compared to 25%, and had a higher percent of seniors, 15% compared to 10%.

17,737

2308

2303

Over 65 Years

6,251

3,968

3,897

2010

2016

29


61% 58%

39% 67%

41%

78% 58%

52% 66%

Percent Black/African American Population, 2016

30

31%

56% 82%

78%

34%

20% 19%

14%

38%

48% 34%

Percent Hispanic/Latino Population, 2016


Over the decades the demographics of the Gardens neighborhoods have changed. In 1950, the Kashmere Gardens neighborhood was 83% White. By 1970, the neighborhood was 88% Black or African American. In more recent years, the Hispanic or Latino population has increased in the Gardens neighborhoods, rising from 17% in 2000 to 34% in 2016. The growing Hispanic population is reflected in demographic change across Houston. In 2016, the majority population group in the Gardens was Black or African American, at 64%. In the same year, 15% of the neighborhood’s population was born outside of the United States, much lower than the 29% in Houston overall.

BELOW: Percent Population by Race and Ethnicity, 2000-2016 OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Kashmere Gardens Community Picnic Photo by Keith Downey Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016

80%

Black or African American

75% 64% 34% 22%

17%

Hispanic or Latino

1%

White

2%

1%

1%

Asian / Other Race

1%

1%

2010

2016

2000

31


30%

46% 31%

46%

20%

19% 54%

29%

46%

30%

41%

20%

31%

39%

36%

21%

20%

25% 8% 24%

18-64 Year Olds Living Below Poverty, 2016

Poverty for Population Under 18 Years

24% 22%

22%

Children Living Below Poverty, 2016

48%

19%

24%

13%

68%

26%

18%

27%

Seniors Living Below Poverty, 2016

49%

41%

31%

Poverty for Population Between 18-64 Years

26%

Poverty for Population Ove

29%

r 65 Years

23%

2000 32

2010

28% 22%

2016


In 2016, the median household income in the Gardens neighborhoods was $27,409, compared to $47,010 in Houston. Median household income remains very similar across Census Tracts in the neighborhood. In 2016, 25% of families in the Gardens neighborhoods had incomes below the federal poverty level. The percent of families living below poverty has declined since 2000, when 31% of families lived

$30K

below poverty. However, in 2016 the poverty level was still 6% higher than Houston overall, which had a poverty rate of 19%. Children are the most vulnerable population group in the Gardens neighborhood. Poverty rates for residents under the age of 18 in 2016 was 41%, much higher than Houston overall where 34% of children lived below poverty. Critically, 54% of the children living in Census Tract 2302 in Kashmere Gardens and 68% living in Census Tract 2301 in Trinity/ Houston Gardens were living below the poverty level in 2016.

$31K

$26K $31K $28K $29K $28K $30K

$23K

$26K

BELOW: Median Household Income Over Time, Houston and Gardens Super Neighborhoods OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Poverty Level Over Time by Age Group Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016

Median Household Income, 2016

$47,010 $42,962

$36,616

$18,651

2000

ome

hold Inc

n House

Media Houston

ome

n Household Inc

Gardens Media

$25,299

2010

$27,409

2016 33


Educational attainment in the Gardens neighborhoods has improved substantially since 2000 when 46% of residents over the age of 25 had not completed high school. By 2016, the percent of residents without a high school degree was reduced to 35%, a number still much higher than 23% in Houston overall. In 2016, 25% of Gardens residents over 25 had some college education and 8% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. An important neighborhood education resource, the McCrane-Kashmere Gardens Neighborhood Library, was flood during Harvey. The library has been temporarily housed at the Kashmere Multi-Service Center for nearly a year. RIGHT: Educational Attainment (25 Years +) Gardens Neighborhoods and Houston, 2016 BELOW, Left to Right: St. Francis Assisi Campus Flood (Photo by St. Francis Assisi Houston), Kashmere High School OPPOSITE PAGE, Top: School Map OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Children at Risk Rankings for Area Schools Sources: ACS 2016, Children at Risk

34

Bachelor’s Degree or Higher

8%

Some College 25%

Less than High School 32%

High School Graduate 35%

Gardens 2016

Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 31%

Less than High School 23%

Some College 24%

High School Graduate 23%

Houston 2016


5 Scarborough Elementary School 6 Fleming Middle School 7 Felix Cook Junior Elementary School 8 Forest Brook Middle School 9 Francis Scott Key Middle School 10 Kashmere Gardens Elementary School 11 Kashmere High School 12 McGowen Elementary School 13 Barbara Jordan High School 14 St Francis of Assisi School

7

Ley Rd Homestead Rd

13

11

9

North Loop 610

1

10 4

I-69 / US 59

4 Ross Elementary School

5

12

Students displaced from the nearby Scarborough Elementary School in the Eastex/Jensen Super Neighborhood due to flooding from Harvey are attending classes at the former Terrell Middle School, which was closed by HISD in 2001. 1 Yes Prep Northside 2 Shadydale Elementary School 3 Isaacs Elementary School

Hirsch Rd

In addition, six of the fourteen area schools are located in a 100-year floodplain. St. Francis Assisi Catholic School was significantly damaged by flooding during Hurricane Harvey. The parish and school, which serves a vibrant African-American Catholic community, saw at least four feet of water across the campus. The school has re-opened but suffered losses of materials and equipment.

Scarborough Elementary School students, displaced by flooding from the Eastex/ Jensen Super Neighborhood, are attending the former Terrell Middle School which was closed in 2001.

Laura Koppe Rd Lockwood Dr

The Gardens neighborhoods are served by eleven public schools, one parochial school and one charter schools. According to the 2018 Children at Risk School Rankings, six out of the twelve schools evaluated in the area have a failing grade. All other schools received grades between a C+ and a D.

8

2

St. Francis Assisi School was severely damaged during Hurricane Harvey, taking on four feet of water. The school has re-opened.

14

Cavalcade St

3

McCrane-Kashmere Gardens Neighborhood Library has been temporarily housed at the Multi-Service Center since flooding during Harvey.

D D+ C F CF D F F F F F NA NA

C D+ D F CDF F F F F F NA NA

C+ CCCD D F F F F F F NA NA

2016

2017

2018

6

35


20% 22%

23%

23% 22% 25% 26% 16%

30%

19%

Percent of Residents With a Disability, 2016

Gardens 2016

22%

Total Population With a Disability

Houston 2016

36

10%

Assisted Living Veteran Housing

1%

Hospitals Government Clinics

13%

8%

27%

Disability Under 18 Years

Disability 18-64 Years

Disability Over 65 Years

No Health Insurance

1%

5%

4% 25%


In the Gardens neighborhoods, residents with a disability made up 22% of the population in 2016, more than double the percent in Houston overall, which is 10%. Furthermore, 13% of residents between 18 and 64 years of age had a disability, which is substantially higher than the 5% in Houston. The Gardens neighborhood has numerous assisted living facilities and other services, for both seniors and those who are disabled. The number of residents who are disabled leads to greater vulnerability, particularly during a disaster.

Laura Koppe Rd Lockwood Dr

Ley Rd Homestead Rd

Hirsch Rd

In 2016, 27% of the neighborhoods’ residents did not have health insurance, which is similar to the 25% in Houston overall. North Loop 610

I-69 / US 59

According to the USDA’s Food Desert Atlas, five out of the ten Census tracts in the Gardens neighborhood are classified as food deserts, Census tracts with a low income population and more than one mile from a grocery store. The only major grocery store in the area is Fiesta, located at the intersection of Lockwood Drive and Kelley Street. There are nine Houston Foodbank pantries inside the neighborhood. Pantries reduce food insecurity in vulnerable neighborhoods.

Cavalcade St

ABOVE: Food Stores and Food Deserts Food Desert (USDA) Grocery Stores Small Markets Convenience Stores Food Pantries RIGHT: Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom Left: Residents with Disabilities by Age and Health Insurance, 2016 Sources: USDA Food Desert Atlas, Houston Foodbank, ACS 2016

37


The City of Houston estimates that 7,726 homes flooded in the Gardens neighborhoods during Harvey, 64% of all homes.

38


Between 2000 and 2016, the number of housing units in the Gardens neighborhood declined by 2%, dropping from 12,243 in 2000 to 11,952 in 2016. Over the same time period, the percent of vacant units in the neighborhood increased from 11% in 2000 to 18% in 2016.

vacant housing units, high poverty rates for children, and a large number of disabled residents, is a community that was vulnerable even before a disaster. Yet, the Gardens neighborhood was one of the hardest hit by flooding and damages from Hurricane Harvey.

In 2016, 35% of households in the Gardens were occupied by a single person. Furthermore, 14% of households were seniors, over the age of 65 years, living alone. The combined impact of seniors living alone, a large number of

The City of Houston estimates that 7,726 homes, or 64% of all homes, in the Gardens neighborhood were damaged by flooding due to Hurricane Harvey. Harris County Flood Control District has purchased 94 properties along Hunting Bayou

RIGHT: Percent Home Owners, Persons Per Household, Percent Vacant Units, and Total Housing Units Over Time BELOW: Tenure, 2016 OPPOSITE PAGE, Left: Inundation Map Legend HCFCD Estimated Inundation Housing Parcel Building Footprint Sources: Census 2000, ACS 2010, ACS 2016, Harris County Flood Control District Inundation Map, HCAD

Home Owners 51%

54%

57%

51%

2.3

2.2

18%

18%

Persons per Household 2.5 Percent Vacant Housing Units

Total Housing Units 12,243

Renters 43%

A primary challenge for homeowners in the Gardens neighborhood is the value of housing. The median value of homes in ZIP Code 77026, which includes Kashmere Gardens, was $85,200 in 2018 according to Zillow. While the median value of a home in Houston is $178,300. Homeowners would find it difficult to find an affordable home to purchase in Houston.

Percent Owners

11% Home Owners 57%

for flood mitigation projects and to prevent recurring damages. Additional properties are targeted for buyouts in the future.

12,183

Renters 49%

11,952 HOUSTON

GARDENS

2000

2010

2016 39


Tidwell Rd

Laura Koppe Rd

Homestead Rd

Lockwood Dr

Houston Gardens

Settegast Yard

Hunting Bayou

Homestead Rd

Calvacade Rd

Hirsch Rd

40

US 59 Service Rd

ABOVE: Opportunity Map OPPOSITE PAGE: Neighborhood Photos and Opportunities (Target Hunger, Goffney Community Garden Photo by Greenwood King)

w

gle

En

d oo

rd Ya


Opportunities At the time of publication it has been nearly a year since Hurricane Harvey began dumping rain at unprecedented rates and flooding much of Houston. City leaders report that over 150,000 homes were damaged by flood waters across the city. Lives, routines and resources were disrupted.

It is critical to identify opportunities, across scales, that have the potential to reduce future risks, assist with recovery and lead to greater resiliency over time. By building on the assets of our communities, while understanding the challenges, we can develop strategies that create greater resiliency.

Important questions are being asked about how do we prepare for, react to and recover from disasters of this magnitude, both now and in the future? Furthermore, what can we do collectively to identify the opportunities and challenges in our communities?

The Gardens Super Neighborhoods, are bounded on the west and south by two expansive railroad yards— the Settegast Yard and Englewood Yard—and bisected by Hunting Bayou. Much of the Kashmere Gardens neighborhood is in the

Low income family

NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE

Flood

Family is displaced

BLOCK SCALE

100-year flood plain. Project Hunting, a Harris County Flood Control District mitigation project, could have transformative effects, removing 5,000 structures from the floodplain. The opportunities identified here seek to mitigate flooding risks, expand economic opportunity, and improve community amenities, all while looking forward to more resilient housing and neighborhood models. The opportunities build on the civic strength of the historic African American neighborhoods, platted with large lots and well connected by transit.

Emergency home unit is quickly built, and family can return to their neighborhood BUILDING SCALE

41


Halls Bayou

Hunting Bayou

45 ft

Elevation

Lockwood Dr

Hirsch Rd

I-69 Service Rd

New Storm Water Flow?

40 ft 35 ft Downtown Hunting Bayou Joins Buffalo Bayou

Buffalo Bayou

Galena Park

42


Neighborhood Resiliency

In the Gardens neighborhoods the main flooding during Hurricane Harvey occurred along Hunting Bayou, west of both the Settegast and Englewood rail yards. Currently, storm water flows southeast along Hunting Bayou until its confluence with the Houston Ship Channel and Buffalo Bayou just east of Galena Park. Buffalo Bayou did not have significant flooding between Downtown and Galena Park.

Hunting Bayou

ns u

yo

Ba

Buffa

lo Ba

There are major thoroughfares that have the width to support more drainage infrastructure, including Lockwood Drive, Hirsch Road, and the Eastex Freeway Service Road. Re-routing storm water flow could help alleviate the flooding along Hunting Bayou and increase long term resiliency for the neighborhood.

TOP, Right: Hunting Bayou, July 4,2018 Photo by Keith Downey RIGHT: Potential Street Drainage Section OPPOSITE PAGE: Potential Drainage Flow and Inundation Map (August 28 at 1am) (Drainage Concept By Rafael Araujo, Reagan Cameron, Salil Keny and Catalina Morales)

ee

Hunting Bayou

Gr

There is an opportunity to connect the Kashmere Gardens section of Hunting Bayou to Buffalo Bayou through channels or underground storm drains. The elevation of Kashmere Gardens is 45 feet, but declines moving south, reaching 35 feet just north of Buffalo Bayou.

you

Current Storm Water Flow

? 43


1

Settegast Yard

Existing Detention 75 acres

Kelley St

2

Lockwood Dr

Cavalcade St

3

wo

le ng

E

rd Ya d o

Flood Water

44

Flood Water


Neighborhood Resiliency: Rail Yards

The Settegast and Englewood rail yards define the eastern and southern boundaries of the Gardens neighborhood. The massive infrastructure of the rail yards act as levies, damming the flow of storm water across their boundaries. This obstruction of drainage is clearly visible in the sharp boundary of the floodplain between the east and west, and north and south (see floodplain map to the left).

Over the last two decades $23 million has been spent on channel modifications, bridge replacements and the Homestead Stormwater Detention Basin to reduce flooding along Hunting Bayou. An additional $176 million is being requested through the Harris County bond election for future improvements. The proposed improvements are expected to remove 5,000 residential and commercial structures from the 100-year floodplain.

Exploring how the rail yards could assist in mitigating flooding, instead of adding to this hazard, could create greater neighborhood resiliency. This could include alleviating the levy quality of the rail yards while also exploring the sites as additional detention. BELOW: Diagrammatic Section of Rail Yard MIDDLE: Aerial Photos OPPOSITE PAGE: Floodplain Map and Proposed Rail Yard Stormwater Detention Floodway 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain

75 acres

1

2

3

Settegast Rail Yard Condition

Homestead Stormwater Detention Basin

Englewood Rail Yard Condition

Storm Drainage?

Hunting Bayou

Kashmere Gardens Trinity/ Houston Gardens

Street Adjacent to Rail Yard

Detention?

Settegast Rail Yard Englewood Rail Yard

45


Re ta il

Gro c

nk? Ba

er y

ubator?

?

C

? Inc op o

Homestead Rd LEFT: Aerial Image of Homestead Road Between Tidwell and Laura Koppe Road BELOW: Map of Existing Commercial and Vacant Land Conditions Along Major Streets Commercial Vacant Other

Homestead Rd

To Northeast MSC and Tidwell Park

Laura Koppe Rd

Tidwell Rd

Vacant lots could also be used for health fairs, community bulletin boards, farmers markets or other events and activities. (Photos Houston Health Fest, Newark Community Bulletin Board and Palm Center Farmers Market Houston)

Lockwood Dr

46


Economic Opportunity

Commercial activity and economic development in the Gardens neighborhoods is extremely limited and scattered throughout the area. Nonetheless, the primary commercial corridors are Lockwood Drive and Homestead Road, followed by Tidwell Road, Laura Koppe Road and Calvacade Street. In the Trinity/Houston Gardens area the segment of Homestead Road between Tidwell Road and Laura

Koppe Road, has the potential to become a primary commercial zone. In this location, there is a balance between existing commercial land uses and vacant land, as well as two civic gathering spaces, the Northeast Multi-Service Center and Tidwell Park. Inside the boundaries of the Kashmere Gardens neighborhood, Lockwood Drive is the major commercial corridor for the neighborhood. The Kashmere Multi-

Service Center, located between Hunting Bayou and Calvacade Street, is a major destination in the area, as well as other civic sites and schools. Despite the scarcity of commercial zones, the Gardens neighborhoods have an abundance of vacant lots that could be utilized as zones for local incubator programs, grocery stores, retail shops, restaurants, banks or other uses. Economic opportunity is a key element to greater resiliency.

Re ta il

nk? Ba

Hunting Bayou

Calvacade St

Gro c

ubator?

?

C

? Inc op oCalvacade St

er y

Homestead Rd

Lockwood Rd

Kashmere Multi-Service Center Lockwood Dr

Fiesta Mart

North

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E Crosstimbers St

Landor St

Finch St

Finch St

Kittridge St

Kirkpatrick Blvd

Elbert St

Darien St

Homestead Rd

Camway St

Banyan St

2+ Acre Lots 2 Apache St

Jay St

Jay St

Peyton St St. Louis St Howton St Miley St

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Food Security

ABOVE: Grocery Store, Food Desert and Community Gardens and Farms Map Food Desert Grocery Stores Supermarkets Convenience Stores RIGHT: Community Gardens and Farms OPPOSITE PAGE: Historic Houston Gardens (NuWaters Photo by Salvador Sosa Jr)

M 1 2

1

Cavalcade St

Kashmere St

There are currently two community gardens in the neighborhood and one grocer. The .75-acre Goffney Community Garden, sponsored by Target Hunger, is located on Cavalcade Street near the intersection with Kashmere Street. In addition, NuWaters is establishing a training farm in Houston Gardens. The NuWaters farm builds on the history and potential of the original purpose of Houston Gardens as a subsistence homestead community. If the NuWaters farm is a success, urban agriculture could again become an important part of the neighborhood. The potential overall impact could be to eliminate food insecurity and build alternative economic opportunity in the neighborhood. Combined, this would create a more resilient community.

ile

Houston Gardens, a historic subsistence homestead community, was completed in 1937 by the Suburban Resettlement Association. The only such development in Houston, the site was originally divided into one hundred lots, ranging in size from one to three acres. The distinct site is an elongated oval, divided into pie shape pieces on the ends, and rectangular lots in the center. The unusual street pattern is still evident today.

1

2

Goffney Community Garden in Kashmere Gardens

NuWaters Training Farm in Houston Gardens

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? Hutcheson Park

Hike and Bike Trail

Hunting Bayou

Wayne St

?

610

Hirsch Rd

N Loop

“Bench”

? ?

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Buyouts to Amenities

The Harris County Flood Control District has purchased 94 properties adjacent to Hunting Bayou to make room for Project Hunting, a $176 million flood damage reduction project. According to the Harris County Flood Control District “When this project is complete, most neighborhoods near the bayou will see water surface elevation reductions of 3-4 feet for the 1 percent (100-year) flooding event. The number of homes and businesses subject to the 1 percent

(100-year) flooding event would drop from 5,100 to 650, and all homes and businesses will benefit from the reduced frequency and depth of flooding.” As a result of Project Hunting, and the work of other partners such as the Houston Parks Board, there are green “benches” that range in size from 30 to 300 feet, and hike and bike trails along segments of Hunting Bayou just south of the North Loop. When complete, the hike and bike trails will extend from

Cavalcade Street to Lockwood Drive. In the future, the trail will extend south and east to Herman Brown Park. Additional buyouts and flood improvement projects have the potential to transform this area into a ribbon of green infrastructure, creating a sustainable and resilient community. BELOW: HCFCD Buyouts, Hunting Bayou Parcel Owned by HCFCD Bought Out Structure BELOW: Opportunity “Benches” Along Hunting Bayou

Buyouts and Property Owned by HCFCD

Lockwood Dr

Wipprecht St

Hutcheson Párk

?

?

51


Tidwell Rd

Laura Koppe Rd

Homestead Rd

Lockwood Dr

Hirsch Rd North Loop

I-69

Calvacade Rd

Flooded Home Recovery Strategies

Living in garage of flooded home

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Living on the second story of flooded home

Repairing flooded home

Elevating flooded home

Flooded home buyouts


Resilient Housing

The City of Houston estimates that 7,726 homes, or 64% of all homes, in the Gardens neighborhoods were damaged by flooding due to Hurricane Harvey. Despite Hunting Bayou watershed experiencing flooding regularly, new housing development continues to occur. Today, there are over twenty new plats in the community. To combat the risk of flooding and encourage resilient building, the City of Houston recently amended the floodplain ordinance, Chapter 19. The new code requires structures in the 100- and 500-year floodplains to be elevated two feet above the 500-year flood elevation. Developing resiliency strategies for new housing, including elevating, on-site rainwater collection and detention, and other mitigation strategies could work to ensure that future flood risks are minimized, and that no negative impacts are

Low-Income Family

FLOOD EVENT

created through new construction. In addition, evaluating the appropriate flood mitigation strategies for existing housing would protect residents. These strategies could include elevating, flood proofing, on-site detention and block level drainage ditch maintenance. Combined these strategies could help to secure the investment of families’ in their homes, particularly those that are already at risk. Ensuring greater resiliency of area housing will help to protect the wealth and stability of area families.

RIGHT: Flooded Apartments in Kashmere Gardens BELOW: Resilient Housing Strategy OPPOSITE PAGE, Top: Gardens Aerial with New Plats (white) OPPOSITE PAGE, Bottom: Strategies for Home Recovery Sources: City of Houston Plat Tracker, Harrel Park Photos by Keith Downey (Resilient Housing Strategy by Constanza PeĂąa; Strategies for Home Recovery by Rocio Alonso, Canston Fitzwater, Shoaib Nizami, John Taylor)

Family is Displaced

Emergency home unit is quickly built, and family can return to their neighborhood

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Hunting Bayou, August 29, 2017 Photo by Harris County Flood Control District

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Participants and Sponsors Participants

Community Design Workshop University of Houston College of Architecture + Design Student Team, Spring 2018 Rafael Araujo Reagan Cameron Salil Kenny Catalina Morales *This document includes research prepared by students in Spring 2018

Community Design Resource Center Susan Rogers, Director Adelle Main, Assistant Director Angelica Lastra, Design Strategist Jose Mario Lopez, Design Strategist Gabriela Degetau, Research Assistant Constanza PeĂąa, Research Assistant Honored Guests and Critics Kinder Baumgardner Antoine Bryant Margaret Wallace Brown Amanda Burden Robert Burrow Alan Cisneros Keith Downey Dineta Frazier Niel Golightly Secunda Joseph Hiroko Kobayashi Kimberly Hatter Brandi Holmes

Alex Lahti Elaine Morales Lauren Racusin Jeff Reichman Patricia Oliver Jasleen Sarai Preetal Shah Juan Antonio Sorto Christof Spieler Amanda Timm Jenifer Wagley Kenneth Williams Huey Wilson

Special Thanks

The Collaborative Community Design Initiative is supported through a generous gift from the Japan Business Association of Houston and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The initiative would not be possible without the generous commitment of time from community leaders and stakeholders and professionals across Houston. We would like to thank all of our partners and supporters. We would like to send a special thanks to Amanda Burden and Lauren Racusin of Bloomberg Associates and to Keith Downey for sharing his photographs of Harvey’s impact on Kashmere Gardens.

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Profile for SKRogers

Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Briefing Book  

Briefing Book for the fifth biennial Collaborative Community Design Initiative for the Super Neighborhoods of Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/H...

Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/Houston Gardens Briefing Book  

Briefing Book for the fifth biennial Collaborative Community Design Initiative for the Super Neighborhoods of Kashmere Gardens and Trinity/H...

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