Page 1

Making Best Use of Podcasts, Blogs, Wikis, and Other Cutting-Edge Technology Tools to Strengthen Classroom Content Learning (Grades 6-12)

by Stephanie Krajicek


Contact Me Do you have a question that wasn’t answered at the seminar? Please feel free to email me and I’ll get back to you. Stephanie Krajicek krajiceks@gmail.com For listing of the URLs in this seminar and handbook, visit my website: http://eyeonetransformation.blogspot.com/

The material in this book not specifically identified as being reprinted from another source is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/; or, (b) send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 2nd Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.

You may make copies, distribute, adapt and use any of the materials that I have created so long as you are not making a profit and share your creations in turn. If you want to use any of this material for commercial use, please contact me.


TABLE O F CO NT E NTS Media Literacy ............................................................................................................................................................................................... Digital Citizenship........................................................................................................................................................................................ Characteristics of Good Technology Projects........................................................................................................................... Guidelines for Developing Technology Projects...................................................................................................................... Evaluating Technology for Your Classroom................................................................................................................................ On-line Safety Resources ....................................................................................................................................................................... Avatar Maker Tools ................................................................................................................................................................................... Password Generator / Manager Tools...........................................................................................................................................

1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

BLO G GI NG Blogging & Critical Thinking................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Blogging & Writing...................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 That was Then... This is Now .............................................................................................................................................................. 11 Guidelines for Using Blogs ..................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Blogging Expectations / Behavior Contracts ............................................................................................................................... 13 Parent Consent Form............................................................................................................................................................................... 15 School-Wide Internet Publishing Contract ................................................................................................................................ 18 DIY Blogs Checklist.................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 What Blog Service Should I Use? ...................................................................................................................................................... 21 Blog Comparison Chart .......................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Blog Tools & Widgets .............................................................................................................................................................................. 23 Writing Successful Blogs.......................................................................................................................................................................... 27 Blog Evaluation.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 28 Blogs to Check Out................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 Technology Integration: 35+ Ways to Use Blogs in a Classroom ................................................................................ 31 Assessment Traits for Blogs.................................................................................................................................................................. 34 Rubrics On-line............................................................................................................................................................................................. 36 RSS Feed Readers....................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 Technology Integration: Ways to Integrate RSS Feed Readers into Your Class .................................................. 38 DIY: How to Set Up a Class Blog Using Blogger™ ............................................................................................................... 39 POD C AST I NG Podcasting & Critical Thinking ............................................................................................................................................................. 42 Podcasting & Writing ................................................................................................................................................................................ 42 That was Then... This is Now .............................................................................................................................................................. 43 Podcast Expectations / Behavior Contracts ................................................................................................................................ 44 DIY Podcast Checklist .............................................................................................................................................................................. 47 Podcasting Tools Audio Editors......................................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Podcatchers & Media Players....................................................................................................................................................... 50 Hosting Services................................................................................................................................................................................... 51 Miscellaneous......................................................................................................................................................................................... 52 Creating successful podcasts ................................................................................................................................................................ 53 Podcast Evaluation...................................................................................................................................................................................... 55 Additional Podcast Resources............................................................................................................................................................. 58 Technology Integration: 40+ Ways to Use Podcasts in a Classroom ........................................................................ 61 Pre-Production: Podcast Planning & Scripts................................................................................................................................ 64 Production (Recording, Adding Music, Exporting MP3 files)............................................................................................ 67


Assessment Traits for Podcasts .......................................................................................................................................................... 69 Rubrics On-line............................................................................................................................................................................................. 72 WI KIS Wikis & Critical Thinking......................................................................................................................................................................... 73 Wikis & Writing............................................................................................................................................................................................ 73 That was Then... This is Now .............................................................................................................................................................. 74 Wiki Expectations / Behavior Contracts ....................................................................................................................................... 75 DIY Wiki Checklist ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 76 Free Wiki Hosts / Wiki Farms............................................................................................................................................................. 78 Tips for Using Wikis .................................................................................................................................................................................. 80 Wikis to Check Out .................................................................................................................................................................................. 80 Wiki Resources............................................................................................................................................................................................. 82 Technology Integration: 25+ Ways to Use Wikis in a Classroom ............................................................................... 83 Assessment Traits for Wikis ................................................................................................................................................................. 85 Rubrics On-line............................................................................................................................................................................................. 89 SO CIA L BO OKM ARKI NG & NET W ORKI NG Social Bookmarks ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 90 Social Networking....................................................................................................................................................................................... 92 Backchannels .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 96 GA MI NG Gaming in Education ................................................................................................................................................................................. 97 Gaming & Critical Thinking.................................................................................................................................................................... 97 Gaming & Digital Citizenship / Literacy & Writing.................................................................................................................. 97 Technology Integration: Ways to Integrate Serious Games into Your Class ......................................................... 99 MIS CE LLA NEO U S Other Cutting-Edge Technology Tools ......................................................................................................................................... 100 Strategies for Classes with Limited Access to Computers ................................................................................................ 106 Essential Reading.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Letter Home .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 109 Copyright, Fair Use, & Creative Commons ............................................................................................................................... 110 Student Resources.............................................................................................................................................................................. 112 Teacher Resources............................................................................................................................................................................. 113 Glossary of Terms....................................................................................................................................................................................... 114


Media Literacy in the Every Day Classroom The definition of literacy is evolving to accommodate the way we make sense of the world. So what makes a student literate in the 21st century? Our students need to be able to "read" the media (i.e., the Internet, television, radio, video games, etc.) that surrounds them. They need to be media literate. What is media literacy? The Center for Media Literacy (CML) defines it as: ... a 21st century approach to education. It provides a framework to access, analyze, evaluate, create and participate using messages in a variety of forms – from print to video to the Internet. Media literacy builds an understanding of the role of media in society as well as essential skills of inquiry and self-expression necessary for citizens of a democracy. (Jolls, 2008, p. 42) The CML has outlined core concepts for media literacy that can guide how teachers integrate media literacy into their classrooms: 1. All media messages are constructed. 2. Media messages are constructed using a creative language with its own rules. 3. Different people experience the same media message differently. 4. Media have embedded values and points of view. 5. Most media messages are organized to gain profit and / or power. (p. 23) They also propose a set of questions that students can use to help critically evaluate media: 1. Who created this message? 2. What creative techniques are used to attract my attention? 3. How might different people understand this message differently? 4. What values, lifestyles and points of view are represented in, or omitted from, this message? 5. What is this message being sent? (p. 24) How can you incorporate media literacy into what you are already doing? One way to encourage students to practice media literacy is to use popular media forms that are not usually studied in schools. Consider examining video games, music videos, lyrics, social networks, blogs, comic books, or manga. Willett (2005) argues that incorporating popular culture does more than just engage students “whose experiences and competencies may not fit with the traditional literary canon and school skills” (p.142). She contends that incorporating popular culture into the classroom …allow[s] children to tap into sources that are meaningful and important, ones that children can feel confident to discuss. More importantly, however, popular culture contains the new literacies that surround children in the twenty-first century, and it is those literacies that children draw on to make sense of their world and to become confident learners. (p. 150) After studying the election process, ask students to evaluate online election games such as Miniclip’s Campaign Game. Check out more online games at Campaign: General Election Edition. Sources: Baker, F. (2004). Celebrating national literacy month: Media literacy. School Library Media Activities Monthly, 21(1), 50-52. Hobbs, R. & Frost, R. (2003). Measuring the acquisition of media-literacy skills. Reading Research Quarterly, 38 (3), 330-355. Jolls, T. (2008). Literacy for the 21st century: An overview & orientation guide to media literacy education (2nd ed.) Retrieved from http://www.medialit.org/reading_room/article540.html Ostrow, J. (2003). A letter to a niece: Critical media literacy, one child at a time. Voices from the Middle, 10 (3), 23-27. Willett, R. (2005). ‘Baddies’ in the classroom: Media education and narrative writing. Literacy 39 (3), 142-148.

1


Krajicek, Stephanie. “Media Literacy in the Every Day Classroom.” Write Connections 4:1 (2008). Available on-line <http://thewritingsite.org/articles/vol4num1c.asp>. Reprinted with permission

Media Literacy Res ou rces Center for Media Literacy http://www.medialit.org/ Find guides, articles, and a wealth of resources for classrooms ready to study media literacy. Common Sense Media http://www.commonsensemedia.org/ A non-partisan, not-for-profit organization, Common Sense Media is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology. Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educators http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/eval.html Critical Evaluation Information – Find links to surveys, guides, and lessons on media literacy. Media Education Lab http://mediaeducationlab.com/ “The Media Education Lab at Temple University is one of a small handful of research university programs that focuses specifically on the intersections of media studies, communication and education.” Find teaching resources and research about media literacy. Media Literacy Clearinghouse http://www.frankwbaker.com/ A web site designed for K-12 educators who want to learn more about media literacy, integrate it into classroom instruction, help students read the media, and help students become more media aware. Find links to resources, lesson plans, articles, and more. Media Literacy & Information Literacy @ Web English Teacher http://www.webenglishteacher.com/media.html Find links to teacher and student resources about media literacy. Media Literacy http://www.medialiteracy.com/ Find resources for K-12 educators including, but not limited to links to articles, classroom lessons, free downloads, and more. The Media Spot http://themediaspot.org/ “The media spot integrates media literacy education through digital media production in schools, classrooms, afterschool programs, and other educational settings.” Find links to media literacy organizations, reading lists, films, and standards. National Association for Media Literacy Education http://www.amlainfo.org/home Find articles, teacher resources, and links to media literacy information. PBS Teachers: Media Literacy http://www.pbs.org/teachers/media_lit/getting_started.html 2


A list of ideas for incorporating media literacy into classroom study. Project New Media Literacies http://newmedialiteracies.org/ “New Media Literacies (NML), a research initiative based within USC's Annenberg School for Communication, explores how we might best equip young people with the social skills and cultural competencies required to become full participants in an emergent media landscape and raise public understanding about what it means to be literate in a globally interconnected, multicultural world.” Find teacher resources and research about media literacy.

21 st Century Information Literacy http://21cif.com/ Find teacher resources, tutorials, podcasts, webcasts, links, games, and assessment tools and articles concerning 21st information literacy.

Digital Citizens hip Resources

Teaching Digital Citizenship http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/ Find resources for learning and teaching about digital citizenship. Flat Classroom Ning http://flatclassrooms.ning.com/ Flat Classroom™ Projects http://www.flatclassroomproject.org/ Digiteen Wiki http://digiteen.wikispaces.com/ A digital citizenship project for teens. *This is now an archive. Digiteen Ning http://digiteen.ning.com The new home of the Digiteen digital citizenship project. Protecting Reputations Online in Plain English http://www.commoncraft.com/protecting-reputations-video Web users, this video explains the long term risks of sharing inappropriate information online. Digital Nation http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/digitalnation/ PBS program and resources for understanding and learning about technology and its use by younger generations.

3


Digital Citizenship and Creative Content: A Teacher’s Guide http://digitalcitizenshiped.com/Default.aspx “The Digital Citizenship and Creative Content program is a free, turnkey instructional program. The goal is to create an awareness of the rights connected with creative content. Because only through education can students gain an understanding of the relevance of and a personal respect for creative rights and grow to become good digital citizens.” Designed for grades 8-10, but can be modified for grades 6-12. Digital Citizen Acceptable Use Agreement @ Educational Origami http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Digital+Citizen+AUA

Cha racteris tics of Good Tech nology Proj ects

1. Projects and technology use are focused on core concepts, content standards, and curriculum. 2. Academic and technology skills are integrated. 3. Collaboration is encouraged. 4. Problems solving skills and writing are applied to authentic problems. 5. Technology skills are contextualized. 6. Expectations are clearly outlined.

See this article to help guide you: Downes, Stephen. “Nine Rules for Good Technology.” Stephen’s Web. 6 Mar 2000. 21 Nov. 2008. <http://www.downes.ca/post/196>.

Res ou rces for Techn ol ogy Review T.H.E . Jou rnal

http://www.thejournal.com/ A newsletter for K-12 educators. “Each issue contains news, trends, and “how-to” features for K-12 technology decision-makers. Featured topics include networking, security, policy and advocacy, telecom, hardware/software, the smart classroom, mobile computing and wireless, eLearning, technology funding, professional development, technology support--all the important issues for administration and teaching. Each month, T.H.E. Journal also contains product reviews, best practices, peer-written articles, and “inthe-trenches” reporting.”

4


The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative's (ELI's) 7 Things You Should Know About... http://www.educause.edu/7ThingsYouShouldKnowAboutSeries/7495 This series of technology briefs “…provides concise information on emerging learning technologies and related practices. Each brief focuses on a single technology or practice and describes what it is, how it works, where it is going, why it matters to teaching and learning.” Stephen’s Web http://www.downes.ca/ Stephen’s Web is “…a digital research laboratory for innovation in the use of online media in education. More than just a site about online learning, it is intended to demonstrate new directions in the field for practitioners and enthusiasts.”

Guidelin es for Devel oping Tech nol ogy Proj ects

1. Determine educational objectives. What do you want students to know or accomplish at the end of the project? 2. Evaluate current technologies. How does the technology match the educational objectives? Consider features, skills supported, standards met. 3. Evaluate literature and research. Who is doing what? Is it working? What are the obstacles? What technologies are students using for personal or academic tools? Do they support educational objectives? 4. Evaluate technology resources and infrastructure available to you. Make a list of pros / cons for technologies you consider. 5. Evaluate student familiarity with technology. What technology skills are needed to be successful? What skills need to be taught? 6. Evaluate teacher familiarity with technology. What technology skills are needed? What skills need to be learned? 7. Identify resources. Who should be involved? Tech coordinator? Dept. head? Colleagues? Others? Are there professional development opportunities available? Grants? Tutorials? 8. Determine project assessment. How will you assess student learning? How will you assess mastery of technology 9. Determine project timeline & scaffolding activities. How long will you spend on the project? What skills (both content and technology) will students need to be successful?

5


Evaluating Techn olog y for Us e i n Your Clas sroom Technology: __________________________________________________________________________ Description: __________________________________________________________________________ Features: _____________________________________________________________________________ Academic Skills Supported:_______________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Standards met: ________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Name of individual/organization using Classroom application: How is it being used in the technology in question. classroom?

What are the benefits and drawbacks of using this technology? Pros

Cons

6


On-Lin e Safety Res ou rces

CyberSmart http://cybersmartcurriculum.org/ Free student curriculum about on-line citizenship and safety.

ConnectSafely http://connectsafely.org/ “ConnectSafely is for parents, teens, educators, advocates - everyone engaged in and interested in the impact of the social Web. The user-driven, all-media, multi-platform phase of the Web has begun, we all have much to learn about it, and this is the central space – linked to from social networks across the Web - for learning about safety on Web 2.0 together. Our forum is also designed to give teens and parents a voice in the public discussion about youth online safety begun back in the '90s.” SafeKids http://www.safekids.com Links to articles concerning teens and on-line safety.

Wired Safety http://www.wiredsafety.org/ WiredSafety, is “...the largest online safety, education and help group in the world...”.

OnGuard Online http://www.onguardonline.gov/ OnGuard Online provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help you be on guard against Internet fraud, secure your computer, and protect your personal information Consequences: Assembly for 11-16 year olds http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK5OeGeudBM&feature=PlayList&p=D215A23C4BE75955 A video from the “Think You Know” series created by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (http://www.ceop.gov.uk/) about online manipulation and exploitation. NetSmartz http://www.netsmart.org “NetSmartz Workshop is an interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline. The program is designed for children ages 5-17, parents and guardians, educators, and law enforcement. With resources such as videos, games, activity cards, and presentations, NetSmartz entertains while it educates.”

7


Avata r Mak er Tools Help students protect their identities by creating an avatar and screen name for on-line publishing. I a m b or ed av atar mak er h ttp: //ww w.i-a mbor ed.co m/b or ed _l ink.cf m?l in k_id =9 96 2 Very easy to use. Make selections, then take a screenshot to save avatar for use later.

Portrait Avatar Maker http://avatarmaker.abistation.com/index_en.shtml Click on the trait boxes at the top of the screen to edit your avatar. To save, right click and choose Save Picture As… This website only requests that users link back to their site using this language and including a hyperlink • made by AbiRing • Powered by Portrait Avatar Maker Meez http://www.meez.com/ A more advanced avatar maker. Meez avatars are 3dimensional. Users may create an avatar for free, but must create an account to export to a blog, social networking site, or website. Children under the age of 13 may not use Meez.com. Mess Dudes http://www.messdudes.com/ A very easy avatar creator. Make selections and click the download button. Directions for downloading to specific applications are provided on the download page. Doppel Me http://www.doppleme.com/ Sign in, create an avatar and right click to “Save Target As…” Users may also get code to embed in websites. Voki www.voki.com or http://www.voki.com/Voki_for_education.php Create a talking avatar. Use phone or upload previously recorded comments. Embeddable to most sites.

Blabberize http://blabberize.com/ Use your own images and create a talking head...

8


Pass word Genera tor / Ma nager Tools Password Bird http://passwordbird.com/ “Password Bird generates random passwords from the information you provide, the result is a hard-toguess word that is familiar and easy for you to remember.” Password Bird does not store any result or information you provide. PassPlex http://www.passplex.com/ “Passplex is a quick tool to generate random passwords. Generate strong passwords with a few mouse clicks. Ensure the strength of password using the integrated strength meter. Use features like email and save so that you will not forget the password you just created - make sure you delete them after memorizing.” Random.org http://www.random.org/ or http://www.random.org/passwords/ “RANDOM.ORG offers true random numbers to anyone on the Internet. The randomness comes from atmospheric noise, which for many purposes is better than the pseudo-random number algorithms typically used in computer programs.” Free services include lists, strings, calendar dates, integers, drawings, and passwords. New Password Generator http://www.newpasswordgenerator.com/ “For purposes of security on the internet we developed community available password generator, which generates totally random passwords. We do not have a base of passwords neither do we save IP addresses and already generated passwords so you can feel totally safe on our site.” KeePass http://keepass.info/ “KeePass is a free open source password manager, which helps you to manage your passwords in a secure way. You can put all your passwords in one database, which is locked with one master key or a key file. So you only have to remember one single master password or select the key file to unlock the whole database. The databases are encrypted using the best and most secure encryption algorithms currently known...”

9


Blogging & Critical Thinking 

Apply ing exis tin g kn owl ed ge to g en era te n ew i deas

Identify tr ends

Inter act, co lla bor ate an d p ubl ish wi th p eers, exper ts or o th ers

C o mmun ica te infor ma ti on and i deas eff ectiv ely to mul ti pl e aud ience

Loca te, org aniz e, an alyz e, eval ua te, syn th esiz e i nfor ma tion

Identify a nd def in e au th en tic pr obl ems

Transf er cur rent k now l edg e to l earn in g of n ew tech no lo gi es

Blogging & Writing

“Rea l wor ld” wri ti ng

Wr iting Acr oss the Curr icul u m ( W A C)

Va li da tes th e w ri tin g proc ess

Teach wr itin g el emen ts: v oic e, s tyl e, dic ti on, a udi enc e

10


That was then ... This is now Journals Course packets & supplemental reading materials Pen pals Research journals, Self-reflection essays Newsletters Bulletin boards Assignment notebooks

Personal blogs RSS feed aggregators / readers Blog exchanges Research blogs Self-reflection essays Class / school blogs Classroom FAQ pages Live assignment logs

Old things in old ways...

Old things in NEW ways & NEW things in NEW ways...

How can blogs help us take our students one step further? How can they help us do new things in new ways?

11


Guidelines for Using Blogs •

No personal information should be included anywhere in a school-related blog. This includes, but is not limited to, last names, contact information, email addresses, school names, and pictures1. This guideline should parallel the school district's policy regarding these matters.

Information and ideas on a school-related blog should be on school-related topics. The rule of thumb is only post what you want the world to know and what you’d be comfortable saying to someone face-to-face. Do not link to personal blogs / journals from school blogs. Doing so may reveal information that you don't want made public or associated with the school blog.

Be respectful at all times. Do not flame or attack another person, organization or idea. You may state your opinion and offer counterpoints, but do so with respect. All writing should be schoolappropriate, respectful, and free from harmful, hateful, or offensive language.

Make sure things you write about are factual; be prepared to support your posts with evidence. If you are writing an opinion piece, be sure to make that clear.

Always make sure you check over your post for spelling, grammar and usage errors.

Be aware of your blogging service's rules or "terms of service."

Be aware of your school district’s policy on blogging and appropriate usage.

1

Get permission from both your administration and your students’ parents / guardians if you will be posting photos or videos of students. 12


Expecta tions / B ehavi or Con tracts Blogger’s Contract Blogging is a legitimate and authentic form of journalistic publication; therefore, student and teacher bloggers must adhere to essential principles of ethics. I acknowledge that blogs are public and will use my online content as an extension of the classroom. In doing so, I will •

use language appropriate for school.

be mindful of spelling, grammar and usage rules.

take all online content creation seriously, posting only things that are meaningful.

post only those pieces that I am comfortable sharing with everyone; other pieces I will keep as drafts.

express my ideas so long as I do not over generalize or make derogatory / inflammatory remarks.

use constructive/productive/purposeful criticism, supporting any idea, comment, or critique I have with evidence.

only post comments on posts that I have fully read, rather than just skimmed.

I take full responsibility for the information that I produce and publish. I will be able to defend my and my actions on-line •

I will not plagiarize; instead I will expand on others' ideas and give credit where it is due.

I will only post photos that are school appropriate and either in the creative commons or correctly cited.

I will not use my public writing (blog posts, comments, discussion topics, wiki edits) as a chat room; instead, I will save IM language for private conversations.

I will not insult my fellow students or their writing.

I will not bully others in my blog posts or in my comments.

I will not provoke other students in my blog posts or comments.

I will not spam (including, but not limited to meaningless messages, mass messages, and repetitive messages).

I will not write about other people without permission.

13


I will respect the public nature of online information, and in doing so, I will keep any information (full name, compromising stories, etc.) about the subjects of posts private.

Any posts or edits on controversial issues must either be submitted to [teacher/s name] prior to posting or be a part of a classroom project/question which addresses controversial issues. Blogger’s Rights Bloggers have the right to express their ideas so long as they do not over generalize or make derogatory or inflammatory remarks. Bloggers have the right to delete any comments posted on their blogs, manage comment settings to block comments or blacklist individuals who persist in posting inflammatory comments. Consequences for Infractions Infractions of these rules will lead to the following consequences in order of severity and number of offense 1. Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole blogging community), warning by teacher, and editing or deletion of offending post/comment. 2. Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole blogging community), temporary loss of blogging privileges (duration of quarter), editing or deletion of offending post/comment. 3. Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole blogging community), permanent loss of blogging privileges (duration of school year), editing or deletion of offending post/comment. The process by which blog posts violating rules concerning offensive language, IM language or posts of a controversial nature may be used 1. Students present the idea/draft for [teacher’s name] consideration. 2. [Teacher’s name] will either accept or reject the writing based upon its merit on a case-by-case basis. 3. The student will post the piece of writing with this warning "This piece of writing is authentic in its use of controversial language/topics." 4. [Teacher’s name] will post a heading "This blog post was accepted by [teacher’s name] for use on [name of class blog] despite its controversial nature." Adapted from: “Discovery Blogging Rules.” Discovery 0607 Wiki. 23 Nov. 2008 <http://discovery0607.wikispaces.com/Discovery+Blogging+Rules>. Warlick, David. “Blogger’s Contract.” Available online 23 Nov. 2008 <www.classblogmeister.com/bloggers_contract.doc>.

14


Paren t Con sen t Form for B loggi ng Dear Parent(s), As part of the 21st Century Literacy initiative in the high school, your child is required to practice a new form of writing called connective reading and writing. What is Connective Reading? Connective reading involves finding writers on-line who specialize in a subject (or subjects)chosen by each student, and subscribing to those writers via RSS (Real Simple Syndication), and regularly reading those self-chosen writers’ new articles in the students’ RSS reader.1 What is Connective Writing? Connective writing involves students writing, on their weblogs (”blogs”), about the writers and ideas they read in their RSS readers. When writing about these writers’ articles, students will make hyperlinks (basic web links) to the articles they are writing about. And here’s where the power of 21st century writing comes in the writers your child links to will quickly discover that they have been written about (through a site called Technorati), and in most cases, will visit your son’s or daughter’s weblog to read what they wrote. Why is this powerful? Because if your child’s writing succeeds, the writers they’re writing about will comment on your child’s ideas and writings; and in the best cases, some of these real-world writers will take an interest in your child - after all, your child shares an interest with them - and will become mentors, guides, and supporters of your child’s learning through regular visits and “conversations” on your child’s weblog. How Do Students Benefit by Connective Reading and Writing? Self-directed Learning, and Networking. In short, it’s a way for your child to read more about subjects they have a genuine interest in; to learn more about that subject through reading about it; to write more - and better - in order to attract readers in the world who share their interest; and to develop a real-world network of adults with expertise in the subject your child wants to learn about. Choose Your Child’s Level of Privacy By school policy, your child will not be allowed to reveal personal information such as address, birthday, phone number, or email address. However, opinions differ about the use of a student’s full name, and about images of students in photos and videos - so we are offering you choice in these areas. Please read the brief “for and against” summaries about names and images below, and check the option you prefer a. The student’s full name is used; his or her weblog will show up in Google and other search engines. Pro For talented writers with maturity and good judgment, this can be a benefit, as a sort of “online portfolio” of the student’s work. Con For students with less maturity, skill, and/or judgment, showing up on search engines may not be desirable. A “first name only” might be a better choice. 15


CHOOSE ONE OPTION ONLY ___ MY CHILD MAY USE HIS/HER FULL NAME ___ MY CHILD MAY USE ONLY HIS/HER GIVEN NAME, NOT THE FAMILY NAME. b. Image (photo or video) Pro Like sharing your name, sharing photos and videos of yourself - an “author” photo, a “greeting to readers” video, for example - can be helpful in establishing connections with readers. We like being able to connect a face to a writer, to see and hear the writer on occasional video or audio clips. Con Similar to use of full name, students with less maturity or poor judgment should perhaps not publish images or videos of themselves. CHOOSE ONE OPTION ONLY ___ MY CHILD MAY USE HIS/HER IMAGE AND VOICE IN PHOTOS AND VIDEOS ___ MY CHILD MAY NOT USE HIS/HER IMAGE IN PHOTOS AND VIDEOS, BUT MAY SHARE HIS/HER VOICE IN AUDIO CLIPS ___ MY CHILD MAY NOT USE HIS/HER IMAGE OR VOICE c. Screening (”moderating”) reader comments in connective writing, reader comments are the way learning networks are formed. While rude or inappropriate comments from the world are extremely rare, they are still possible. One option is for teachers to moderate (”screen”) all comments on a student’s weblog articles before he/she sees them. A second option is to allow students to moderate their own comments. A third option is to simply not moderate comments at all, and let them be published as soon as readers leave them. Student Moderation Pro encourages responsibility, ownership, and maturity; Con sensitive students might be unable to deal with inappropriate comments (remember, these are extremely rare). No Moderation Pro Readers like to see their comments immediately after they submit them, which encourages more commenting; Con rude or inappropriate comments (e.g., “spam” or uncivil remarks) might appear without the student’s immediate knowledge. Teacher Moderation Pro shelters students from the possibility of a rude or inappropriate comment; Con treats students like children instead of mature young adults. CHOOSE ONE OPTION ONLY ___ MY CHILD MAY MODERATE HIS/HER OWN COMMENTS ___ I WANT TEACHERS TO MODERATE MY CHILD’S COMMENTS FOR THEM ___ MODERATION OF COMMENTS IS NOT NECESSARY

16


If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at [ EMAIL ADDRESS OR PHONE NUMBER HERE]. Please print your name, signature, and date in the spaces below. And thank you for your cooperation. [SIGNATURE BLOCKS HERE] 1 Want to know more about RSS readers? Ask your child to show you his/her Bloglines account. You might decide it’s a powerful tool for staying abreast of the latest information about your own interests many professionals around the world now use RSS readers in their daily professional life to remain competitive and up-to-date. * This project was designed for high school seniors. Burrell, Clay. “Blogging Parent Letter Choose Your Privacy Levels.” Weblog entry. Beyond School. November 9 2007. 2 November 2008 <http://beyond-school.org/2007/11/09/blogging-parent-letter-choose-your-privacy-levels/>. Reprinted with permission

17


Sch ool-Wide Internet Publi shing Contra ct Sample Public School Stude nt I nternet Publishing

Statement of Purpose Sample Public School and the NSW Department of Education and Training are pleased to offer our students access to the World Wide Web and other electronic networks. The advantages afforded by the rich, digital resources available today through the Internet outweigh any disadvantage. However, it is important to remember that access is a privilege, not a right, and carries with it responsibilities for all involved. Internet safety is also an important concern. Wit h eac h e nrolme nt i nt o a NSW Pu blic Scho ol, pa re n tal pe rmi ssi on is req ui red to allo w st ude nt s t o acces s t he Inte rne t at scho ol fol lo win g the gu ideli nes of t he NSW Depa rtm ent of Educa tio n & T rain ing’s U ser Access P olicy . In recent times, Internet-based resources have become more interactive, allowing students to publish work, visible to a wider, often global audience through resources such as a classroom blog. Online communication is critical to our students’ learning of 21st Century Skills and tools such as blogging, podcasting and video production offer an authentic, real-world vehicle for student expression. Publishing student pictures and work on websites promotes learning, collaboration and provides an opportunity to share the achievements of students. Images and products of students would only be included on school websites without identifying captions or names. Again, as educators, our primary responsibility to students is their safety. Hence, expectations for classroom blog, student protected e-mail, podcast projects or other Web interactive use must follow all established Internet safety guidelines.

Internet Safety • • • •

Paren ts a n d Use rs. Despite the best efforts of supervision and Internet filtering, all users and their parents/guardians are advised that access to the electronic network may include the potential for access to materials inappropriate for school-aged students. Every user must take responsibility for his or her use of the network and Internet and avoid these sites. Perso nal Safety. In using the network and Internet, users should not reveal personal information such as home address or telephone number. Users should never arrange a face-to-face meeting with someone “met” on the Internet without a parent’s permission. Con fiden tiality o f Stu den t Infor ma tion. Personally identifiable information concerning students may not be disclosed or used in any way on the Internet without the permission of a parent or guardian. Users should never give out private or confidential information about themselves or others on the Internet. Ac tive Restric tion Measu res. The NSW Department of Education and Training utilizes filtering software and other technologies to prevent students from accessing websites that are (1) obscene, (2) pornographic, (3) harmful to minors and; (4) Anti-social, or promote illegal activity. The use of anonymous proxies to bypass content filters is strictly prohibited and will be considered a violation of the acceptable use policy. The school also monitors the online activities of students, through direct observation and/or technological means.

Student Use of New Web Tools Blogging/Podcasting Terms and Conditions • • • • •

The use of blogs, podcasts or other web 2.0 tools is considered an extension of the classroom. Therefore, any speech that is considered inappropriate in the classroom is also inappropriate in all uses of blogs, podcasts, or other web 2.0 tools. This includes but is not limited to profanity; racist, sexist or discriminatory remarks. Students contributing to the class blogs, podcasts or other web tools are expected to act safely by keeping ALL personal information out of their content. A student should NEVER post personal information on the web (including, but not limited to, last names, personal details including address or phone numbers). Comments made on class blogs must be moderated by the teacher and - if deemed inappropriate – deleted. Links to external web sites from the class blog or from a blog comment are to be checked to verify they are appropriate for a school setting. Students who do not abide by these terms and conditions may lose their opportunity to take part in the class blog project and lose Internet access privileges as specified in the School Discipline Policy.

`   

Will provide developmentally appropriate guidance to students as they make use of telecommunications and electronic information resources to conduct research and other studies related to the school curriculum. Use of networked resources will be in support of educational goals. Treat student infractions of the Acceptable Use Policy according to the school discipline policy.

18


Provide alternate activities for students who do not have permission to use the Internet.

Sample Public School

Student Internet Publishing – Parent/Guardian Consent Form Under the supervision and guidance of _____________________________, Class ________ will be developing a class blog which will include student images and work consisting of artworks, stories, reports, podcasts and videos that relate directly to our normal classwork. The class blog will be hosted on the Internet making the work visible by parents/guardians and relatives at home as well as to other Internet users around the world.

As a parent or legal guardian of __________________________ , I have read and understand the Student Internet Publishing Guidelines and I agree to the following (Please tick where appropriate – leave boxes blank if NO consent is granted)

As a parent or legal guardian or the student named above, I grant permission for my child’s photo without identifying name or caption to appear on any school website As a parent or legal guardian or the student named above, I grant permission for child’s school work to be published without identifying name or caption to appear on any school website

Childs Name (Please Print) _________________________________________________ Parent (Guardian) Signature

_________________________________________________

Date

_____ /______ /_________

Please complete and return this form by “Parent Consent Form for Student Internet Publishing.” Weblog post. Podcast Lane. <http://podcastlane.wordpress.com/2008/04/20/students-blogging-in-class/>. Reprinted with permission.

19


DIY Blogs Checklist Policy & Procedure 

Know your school’s policy on blogging. Will your students be able to access their blogs? If you school blocks all blogs, are exceptions made? Compile a list of blogs you want to share, as well as potential hosts, and talk to your technology coordinator.

Make sure that all students have signed the corporation’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP). Keep copies for your file.

Review your corporation’s AUP.

Establish classroom expectations & consequences for unacceptable behavior. Do you have a plan for teaching appropriate on-line behavior? blogging behavior (i.e., do not use full names, no flaming, etc.)

Share your expectations with your administration to ensure that it will support these rules.

Consider inviting your principal to participate.

Draft a letter to parents explaining your project, its scope, and goals, including expectations and consequences for breaking rules, and obtain permission for students to participate. Have alternative plans available for students who are not granted permission.

Eval ua te R es ourc es 

Decide how often students will post to their blogs. Base your decision on access. Do your students have access to computers daily? Weekly? Will you expect them to blog from home?

Choose a blogging service that will best meet your needs. Be prepared to teach students how to post, comment, manage posts and comments, as well as navigate.

Man ag emen t & S ettings 

Set up student accounts – do they need email addresses? Will students need individual blogs or will they be posting to a class blog?

Determine if blogs will be public or private? Who will be able to write posts? Who will be able to see posts? Will parents be allowed to participate?

C ontent & Ass ess men t 

Determine what kind of blog your students will be creating.

Review NETS-S and NETS-T.

Determine what you will evaluate

20


What Blog Service Should I Use? https //w ww.b lo gg er.co m/s tar t2 A free, blogging tool offered by Google. Users must have a Google account. Free on-line tutorials: http://www.google.com/support/blogger/ http://kidblog.org/home.php “Kidblog.org is built by teachers, for teachers, so students can get the most out of the blogging process. Kidblog meets the need for a safe and simple blogging platform suitable for elementary and middle school students. Most importantly, Kidblog allows teachers to monitor and control all publishing activity within the classroom blogging community.” http://w ordp ress.c o m/ A free, popular blog publishing tool. Users must sign up for an account.

http://w ww.tu mb lr.co m/ “To make a simple analogy If blogs are journals, tumblelogs are scrapbooks. You can also look at tumblelogs as slightly more structured blogs that make it easier, faster, and more fun to post and share stuff you find or create.” http://edu bl ogs. org / Edublogs hosts free blogs for teachers, students, researchers, professors, librarians, administrators and anyone and everyone else involved in education. Edublogs are adfree, come with 100MB of upload space and are easy to use. Great on-line tutorials: http://theedublogger.edublogs.org/about/getting-started-withedublogs/ http://w ww. 21c lass es.c o m/ A free blogportal tool that creates class homepages and student blogs; teachers manage student accounts. http://p os terou s.co m/ a free blog publishing tool that allows users to post photos, text, audio files, links, and videos using e-mail. Tutorial: http://esdev.net/post-images-videos-and-more-to-wordpress-by-email/ http://cl assb lo gs.us / a free blogging platform that includes the ability to create and manage class blogs and virtual classrooms, an online gradebook, and host podcasts.

21


http://w ww.w ordfa ir e.co m/ a live blog that's easy to write and actually updates in real-time

 

 

134

  

 

13      

13      

13

    

     

   

5

6

3 GB

Yes8

2 GB

1 GB

9  10 

   

7 30 MB   

8  

   

20 MB    12

2

21 Classes

18  

3

Kid Blog

  Not yet 13      

Tumlblr

 

13      

Storage space Custom domains Podcast ready Upload video Need email account

2

Posterous

Edublogs

 

Class Blogs

LiveJournal

 

TypePad

WordPress

Web-Hosted Free Premium service available Minimum age User Stats Customizable Pages Themes Locks/ members Mobile Widgets / third party apps Ads

Blogger

Blog Comparison

 

 

 

   

1 MB * 8  11

8

Users under 13 must have parent permission to use this service. Users under 13 must have parent permission to use this service. 4 Users under 13 must use an account created by a KidBlog member over 13 who is responsible for obtaining parent permission. 5 You may monetize a Blogger blog with ads. 6 WorPress sometimes includes ads on the tags page. You may purchase ad-free upgrades. 7 Youn may monetize a TypePad blog if you choose. 8 Depending on level of service... † Unlimited posts 9 With upgrade to premiums service 10 For an extra fee... or you can embed the code from an external site like TeacherTube or Vimeo. 11 Using Vimeo 12 See Edublogger’s tutorial for a work-around 3

22


Blog Tools & Wi dgets Wufoo http://wufoo.com/ An on-line form creator that can be used to gather data. Users can access templates to speed up the process. Teachers can take advantage of templates, including a gradebook, substitute teacher feedback, and Cornell note taking form. Simply create the form, then copy and paste the code into your blog. Add This http://addthis.com/ Add a button to your blog that allows readers to easily bookmark and share your website. Having this button will allow parents and other teachers easier access to your site. Buttonator http://www.buttonator.com/ Create customizable buttons for blog. Choose the style, font, color, and more. http://www.dropmocks.com/ Create slideshows by dragging and dropping images onto the screen. FeedBurner http://feedburner.google.com/ Use this tool to publicize your blogs (or podcasts). Feedburner formats feeds so that readers and listeners anywhere can subscribe to your content. http://www.kwiksurveys.com/ Design surveys, forms, polls and feedback forms. http://www.snacktools.com/ “SnackTools is a suite of web applications designed to simplify the way you create and publish rich media widgets. All the SnackTools apps are licensed for free with the option to pay for a few premium publishing options mainly intended for professional use.” Includes: • Online polls • Flip books • Banners • Custom video and audio players • Slideshows

23


https://api.dropbox.com/ Dropbox is a great service for storing files in the "Cloud." The free Dropbox account comes with 2GB of space that you can use for as long as you like. http://dropitto.me/ Together with Dropbox you can setup an unique upload address wit password protection. DROPitTOme is your one stop solution when an email is just not enough. http://www.aschool.us/random/ To use this flash application simply enter a list of your students names or items that you want to randomly select, one per line. Then click the next button to let the computer start picking names. http://www.toasted-cheese.com/webcal/webcal.cgi Toasted Cheese is ... a place where writers can get honest feedback on their work and honest information about issues important to writers.

http://afterthedeadline.com/ Find writing errors. Wordpress users can use the plugin; After the Deadline is also available as a Firefox add-on or Google Chrome extension http://www.linkwithin.com/learn “LinkWithin is a blog widget that appears under each post, linking to related stories from your blog archive. The widget links to stories that are relevant and interesting to readers of a particular post, keeping them engaged with your blog, and increasing your traffic.” http://pollmo.com/ Create a poll. Ask your question, list your choices, choose the skin. http://beepdf.com/ Share your PDF files on the Web as a unique link (URL) to send via email, or embed them in your blogs or websites. http://simplebooklet.com/index.php Create an interactive booklet that can be embedded in your blog or website. http://www.youblisher.com/ “Make your pdf documents flippable and quickly loading. It is like touching a real document.” 24


http://bookletcreator.com/ “BookletCreator is a simple tool that allows you to create a booklet from a PDF document. It reorders pages so that after printing and folding the pages, a small book is created.”

http://www.yudu.com/ YuDu allows users to upload their PDFs to create search engine friendly pageturning publications that can be emailed or added websites.

https://filestork.net/ “FileStork enables Dropbox users to request or allow individuals to upload files into their Dropbox account. FileStork enables you to allow other people to upload files into your Dropbox without the hassle and risk of sharing a folder. FileStork provides a secure medium that bridges the gap between users and non-users of Dropbox.” Google Reader http://reader.google.com Create a customized online journal of all the sites and blogs that you read. *Users can mark feeds a public and share their reading materials. https://minigroup.com/ Minigroup lets you create private web-based group pages for sharing anything you want. Post messages; upload or embed photos, video and music; and share any kind of file. Or schedule events for the group to attend. ClustrMaps http://clustrmaps.com/ Log your visitors’ geographical locations and see how you’re impacting the world with your blog. Make Beliefs Comix http://www.makebeliefscomix.com/ Create a comic strip and embed it in your blog for a change of pace. TagCrowd http://tagcrowd.com/ Create a visual representation of your blog’s content. Many Eyes http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/ Explore and create visualizations of data. See also Many Eyes Wikified (http://wikified.researchlabs.ibm.com/main/Main Page.) WidgetBox http://www.widgetbox.com/ Thousands of widgets for your blog, profile, or web page. 25


Apture http://www.apture.com/ Easily embed multimedia in blogs or wikis. LabPixies http://www.labpixies.com/ LabPixies is a free online directory for web gadgets (also known as "Widgets"). Add cool and useful gadgets to your home page, or embed them to enrich your blog or website. Simply click the "add to" button of your favorite gadget and start personalizing your online experience! http://zoom.it/ “Zoom.it is a free service for viewing and sharing high-resolution imagery. You give us the link to any image on the web, and we give you a beautiful new way to experience it — along with a nice short URL.”

http://tal.ki/ Create an embeddable forum.

26


Wri ting Su ccessful Bl ogs Focus content. Have a topic that is engaging and something your audience will want to read about. Content is very important! Be mindful of style, voice, and tone. Blogging is a conversation. Beginners should start by reading other blogs to learn what works and what doesn’t. Avoid jargon and clichés and don't overuse the thesaurus. Find your own voice try to write the way you speak. Take your posts for a test drive before publishing by speaking your entry aloud. If you struggle to read it, or are speaking unnaturally, you need to edit. Use descriptive headlines. They are going to be what RSS readers show. Try to be creative. Interesting or puzzling headlines can grab readers’ attention. Make your posts easy to scan by including lists, appropriate images, indented quotes, and subheadings. You might also consider using the inverted pyramid style used by journalists. Edit your posts. Make sure that your writing is clear, correct, and concise. Just because you can write a lot, doesn’t mean that you should. Some errors are bound to happen, but remember that you are striving to share your ideas, and grammar, usage, and spelling errors only get in the way. Also, you never know who might be reading your posts… best put your best foot forward! Establish a schedule for your posts Do you know how often you will post? Your readers will appreciate a reliable schedule. Link to other sites Share your discoveries and build the blogosphere. Consider finding something else to share if loads of people have already linked to it… The first link is the one most people click on, so it should also be the main link for your article. Avoid including too many links that are too close to each other. Credit your sources with a blurb and link. This builds credibility and reciprocity. Use comments to continue conversations. Invite your audience to comment; but be sure to manage the comments. If someone has legitimate criticism of something you’ve produced, pay attention — it’s worth considering. On the other hand, criticism that is petty or nasty should just be ignored.

27


Blog Evalua ti on Basic Information ______________________________________________________________________ Blog URL ____________________________________________________________________________ Title of blog __________________________________________________________________________ Author’s name ________________________________________________________________________

I. Design Readability Do the blog elements enhance the purpose and content? Is font size, choice, or color an issue? Sidebars Is the information in the sidebars dynamic? Consistent across pages? Relevant to the page’s content? Real Estate Is the blog easily scanned? Does the author use white space, boldface and italics, short paragraphs and lists to break up the content? Archive/Search/Tags/Categories Can you easily find previous posts? Is a search function available? Are tags used? Categories? Color scheme Does the color scheme enhance or detract from the blog’s purpose and posts? Advertising Is advertising present? Is it obtrusive and distracting? Effective Use of Pages Are there multiple pages? Are they used effectively? Graphics Are images used judiciously to enhance content?

28

Yes

No


II. Content Purpose Is the blog’s purpose stated?

Yes

Authorship Can you find more information about the author? Titles Does the title provide any information about the nature of the blog? Do titles of posts catch the reader’s attention? Do they accurately portray the blog’s content? Content material (interest, accuracy) Is the content focused? Is the content accurate? Can you find links to other posts on similar topics? Does the author link to other blogs / blog posts to give credit? Writing (Style, Voice, Tone) Does the writing appeal to you? Is the tone appropriate for the blog’s purpose and audience? Can you hear the individual blogging? Mechanics (Clarity, Usage, Grammar, Spelling) Does the blogger struggle to make his / her point? Are errors egregious enough to be distracting? Interesting / Engaging Is the blog interesting? Comments Are comments moderated? Bias Is the content biased? Does the blog’s blogroll indicate anything about the content? Credibility Can you determine what makes the author credible? Based on comments, do other bloggers respect the author’s content? Do other bloggers link to this blog?

29

No


Blogs to Check Out Free Technology for Teachers http://www.freetech4teachers.com Classroom teacher and Google Certified teacher writes this blog to “share information about free resources that teachers can use in their classrooms.” Educational Origami http://edorigami.edublogs.org/ “Educational Origami is a blog , and a wiki, about the integration of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) into the classroom, this is one of the largest challenges that [...] we as teachers face. This wiki is about 21st Century Learning and 21st Century Teaching” The Edublogger http://theedublogger.edublogs.org/ A blog “…dedicated to helping educational bloggers with emerging technologies in education, share their own experiences and promote the blogging medium. Its purpose is to share tips, tricks, ideas and provide help to the educational blogging community.” AcademHack Tech: Tools for Academics http://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/ This site is to serve as a resource for academics trying to navigate the world of computing and technology. Edutopia Blogs http://www.edutopia.org/blogs “Original, creative, practical and sometimes unusual advice and ideas to get you started – or keep you going!” Using Blogs in Science Education http://blogging4biology.edublogs.org/ Stacy Baker, a science educator, created this educators-only blog to talk with other science educators who use blogs in their classrooms or who are interested in doing so. Middle School Blogs http://www.middleweb.com/mw/aaDiaries.html A list of blogs about teaching middle school / by teachers. The Teaching Palette http://theteachingpalette.com/ A blog authored by art educators for art educators. Michael Smith’s The Principal’s Page http://www.principalspage.com/theblog/ The School Principal Blog http://www.schoolprincipalblog.com/

30


Techn ol ogy Integ rati on : 35 Ways to Us e Bl ogs in a Cla ss room 1. Study genre. Post mentor texts, student texts, commentary about, and critiques of texts. Have students read and write about mentor texts; try their hand at writing in a genre; get feedback about their writing 2. Study character. Post examples of characterization, have students find and post examples; ask students to post in persona (i.e., Students can write from Mercutioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective during a unit on Romeo and Juliet or from Antoine LaVoisierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective when studying conservation of mass) 3. Create discovery logs. Students and teachers can post readings, sites, podcasts, videos, and artwork related to units of study (history, math, science, art, etc.) to encourage further study. 4. Let students voice their opinions about current affairs. Use the comments to discuss topics with peers. 5. Digitalize reflection journals. Posts are based on class study or discussion topics given by the teacher. 6. Digitalize research journals. Students document the research process, including their findings, stumbling blocks, solutions and sources. Use comments to get feedback from the teacher and peers. 7. Search for applications of principles studied in class. Find and post real world examples or applications of math concepts and science principles. Include photos, links to articles, and questions. 8. Post class business including homework / class assignments, study guides, extra credit, lunch menus, field trips, class expectations, parent permission forms, dress code policies, progress reports, school announcements, calendars, supply lists, notes, etc. designate a classroom "scribe" who is responsible for posting lessons/materials covered. 9. Digitalize weekly / daily writing prompts. 10. Create an ongoing weekly review / unit review blog. Ask students to be responsible for posting summaries, links, and study guides. 11. Build a story: post a story starter and ask students to post the first part of the story on their own blogs. Students will visit each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blogs and use the comments to continue adding to the stories. 12. Create a blog to communicate with a sister school or sister community somewhere else. 13. Study design principles. Learn about elements of web design, photography, color theory, etc. Have students use a feed reader to follow diverse blogs. They should post about what they think 31


is successful. Posts may also include student work as a result of tutorials and direct instruction on cropping, image editing, color theory, etc. 14. Encourage collaboration. Use blogs to publish class newsletters and document projects. 15. Create tutor blogs. Teachers can post texts and practice for students; use comments to customize lessons and answer questions. Students can post questions and answers based on classroom discussion. 16. Start a language exchange blog. Students practice writing in target language, post photographs, audio clips, video clips and links to information about different cultures and societies, and practice digital citizenship. 17. Manage all aspects of PBL using a blog. 18. Create “Biography of a Thing” blogs. Students should chose any manmade object and trace its journey to where they encountered it. Include images, audio and video clips, and be creative! (Thanks to Dan Sargent, The State of Higher Education http://higheredchat.blogspot.com/) 19. Practice journalism. Post links to news stories for students to read and reflect upon. Students should post their reflections and critiques. Students can also practice writing their own stories using posted examples as mentor texts. 20. Showcase individual art projects throughout the year. 21. Document student growth and monitor goal achievement using student blogs. 22. List class hypotheses before each class science experiment. When experiment is done, results can be posted and compared to initial hypotheses. 23. Blog about family traditions, or holiday memories. 24. Create literature circles review books, post discussion questions, host book talks. 25. Learn about fact and opinion list various statements that are facts and others that are opinion. Students can leave comments explaining why each is either a fact or opinion. 26. Learn about persuasion link to blogs or MSM websites that use persuasive techniques. Ask students to read and then post about the message, techniques they observed and effectiveness. Later ask students to post about current events using the techniques they have studied. 27. Create a global community by inviting students from other schools and other countries to participate in a blog exchange. Post could describe a typical day at school, how students perceive the role of education, how they spend their free time, or what their goals are. Invite epals to post on the same topics. Let students ask questions and leave comments to gain cultural awareness. 28. Reflect on your professional growth: begin with your technology integration projects or list your goals for the year and follow your own progress. Reflect on lessons, analyze strategies and techniques that worked (or didn’t), research and link to alternatives and resources. 32


29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blog it Forward.â&#x20AC;? Find and report acts of "good" in your school or community. 30. Post about math concepts learned throughout the year. Provide examples and solutions of math problems and concepts being studied. 31. Post literary terms and have students find and document examples in popular culture. 32. Examine everyday items and how mathematical concepts are used in their design. 33. Incorporate service learning. Use a blog as a starting point for a class-wide, service project. Students should post about what they think is important, then use comments to begin a discussion to choose the project. Once the project is decided upon, the blogs can be used to document studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; personal growth, observations, and accomplishments. 34. Create a blog for clubs / extracurricular activities. Post minutes, photos, and other important information. Allow members to take turns blogging about activities. 35. Examine the intersection of popular culture and technology. Have students post about technology uses, pros and cons of technology, their opinions of specific tools and services, and anything else that comes up.

33


Assess men t Trai ts for Bl ogs Pick and choose from the following traits to when designing an assessment tool for use with student blogs.

Academic Achievement Content Understanding

Demonstration of academic standards

Content Accuracy

Facts are accurate, meets assignment requirements

Writing (style, voice, tone)

Engaging style, author's voice is evident, tone is appropriate -- no flames, rants, etc.

Writing (clarity, usage, grammar, spelling)

Message is easy to understand, no errors in usage, grammar, or spelling

Audience

Posts are appropriate for stated audience

Economy

Do posts overindulge in digressions and unnecessary details? Are links and images used to enhance posts?

Citations & Permissions

Credit given to borrowed work/ideas? Permission sought and granted when necessary? Correct citation format used.

Copyright / Fair Use

Fair use guidelines are followed with clear, easy to locate and accurate citation for all borrowed material. Links are provided for blogs / posts mentioned in blog. Statement of copyright included, if appropriate.

Blog Design Readability Sidebars Headlines / Titles Use of Media

Does the blog make use of white space, headings and sub-headings, short paragraphs, font size and color to divide space effectively? Is the information included in sidebars useful? Is the content dynamic? Interesting? Relevant to page? Provides information about blog and content? Purpose stated? Interesting? Was the use of media appropriate, supportive of the content, balanced and well considered?

34


Archiving / Navigation Color Scheme

Can audience find popular posts? Is the blog easily searchable? Color choices for background, font, visited/unvisited links are easy on the eye and do not detract from content. They are consistent across pages.

Font

Consistent, easy to read, appropriate size, italics, boldface, underlining are used consistently

Load Time

How quickly does blog load? (Small graphics, good compression of sounds/graphics, appropriate division of material)

Comments Section

Is the audience encouraged to comment? Are comments managed?

Pages Used Effectively

Includes information about authorship, disclaimers, archives, comment policy, links; organization makes sense.

Authorship

Statement of authorship is available.

Links

Links are live, appropriate to posts/blog, and establish credibility. A blogroll is available.

Economy

Does the student over use media / effects, links?

Graphics

Appropriate to content, used to enhance reader interest / understanding

Mastery of Blog Genre / On-line Publishing Drafts / Self Editing

Use draft function to edit content, manage blog content, maintain privacy

Interaction with Audience

Student actively manages the comments in his / her blog. Moderate conversations maturely. Participates in comment conversations by writing thoughtful comments. Does not flame, troll, spam, etc. Stays on topic.

Netiquette

Does not flame, troll, spam, etc. Refrains from shouting, ranting. Is respectful of opinions that differ from his/her own.

35


Technology Skills / N ETS- S Graphics / Audio/ Video

Graphics. Audio clips and videos are cropped, compressed or edited to minimize load time and maximize memory.

Mastery of Technology

Demonstrates a clear understanding of technology can create and navigate with ease, answer questions about how tool influences / affects content and readership.

Media Development

Development / gathering of images, audio, video resources by students

Media Literacy

Image use, choice, quality Music choice, role Audio pacing, mixing Editing transitions and choices

Digital Craftsmanship

Command of media (visual and audio) as evidenced by creative application of tools.

Project Management Project Planning

Drafts, storyboards, conferences, scripts, etc.

Assignment Criteria

Met due dates, length requirements, number of photos, etc.

Reflection / Rationale

Student thoughtfully explained how and why he or she chose to create his or her story. His or her answers to the questions are thorough, organized and creative.

Collaboration

Contributions, quality of work, time-management, problem-solving, attitude, focus on task, preparedness, pride, group dynamic.

Ru bri cs O n-li ne â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rubrics to Evaluate Classroom Bloggingâ&#x20AC;? Enhancing Teaching & Learning @ BGSU http://facultydevelopmentbgsu.blogspot.com/2005/11/rubrics-to-evaluate-classroom-blogging.html Blog Reflection Rubric http://edweb.sdsu.edu/courses/edtec296/assignments/blog_rubric.html 21st Century Information Fluency Blog Evaluation Assessment http://21cif.imsa.edu/rkitp/assessment/v1n5/blog_evaluation_assessment_v1n5.html

36


RSS Feed Rea ders RSS Feed Readers allow users to gather content from many websites in one place. Think of it as a personalized newspaper. Personalized start pages take the homepage one step further: a homepage is customized to include email, social network updates, news, and anything else one might want to see... Google Reader http://www.google.com/reader

Bloglines http://www.bloglines.com/ “Bloglines is a FREE online service for searching, subscribing, creating and sharing news feeds, blogs and rich web content.”

Netvibes www.netv ib es.com/ “Netvibes is a free web service that brings together your favorite media sources and online services” in a personalized startpage.

Pageflakes http://www.pageflakes.com/ “At www.Pageflakes.com, you can easily customize the Internet and make it yours using ‘”Flakes” – small, movable versions of all of your web favorites that you can arrange on your personal homepage.”

RSSOwl http://www.rssowl.org/ Download software: http://www.rssowl.org/download Feedreader http://www.feedreader.com/ “Feedreader is a FREE RSS news aggregation solution that provides robust, state-of-the-art features in an intuitive, userfriendly environment.”

37


My Yahoo! http://my.yahoo.com/ LiveBinders http://livebinders.com/ LiveBinders is your 3-ring binder for the Web * Collect your resources * Organize them neatly and easily * Present them with pride

Ways to In teg ra te RSS Feed Rea ders in to You r Class 1. Create customized website lists for students to access. 2. Gather reading material for your students outside of textbooks, free of charge. 3. Allow ELL students to continue developing their native language. 4. Create groups and assign a topic of research. Use a reader to guide research. 5. Have students create feeds for their blogs. Use a reader to keep track of all blogs and posts. Ask students to subscribe to one anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blog to create a blogging community and to allow students to learn how to comment. 6. Keep up to date in your field or the world. 7. Read professional peersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; blogs.

38


DIY: Ho w to Set Up a Class Blog Using Blogger ™

To cr eate a s in gl e c lass bl og tha t has mu ltipl e stud en t au th ors: 1. Sign up for a Google Account if you don’t already have one. 2. Log in to Blogger using your Google account information. 3. Create a blog. You may create more than one blog and use one per class, if you’d like. 4. Have students create Google accounts.13 5. Go to your blog’s dashboard to manage the blog settings14. 6. Settings > Permissions > Blog Authors Click Add Authors button. Enter your students’ email addresses (i.e., Google account username @gmail.com) separated by commas. Students will receive an email confirmation. Once they accept the invitation in the confirmation email, they will be listed as blog authors. 7. Settings > Permissions > Blog Readers You might choose to invite administrators or parents to be readers of your class blog. You can do this without making the blog public by adding email addresses of only people you desire to have access to the blog.

13

Consider asking parents to do this step so that they have access to their children’s accounts. See the Letter to Parents on page 134. 14 Decide if your class blog is public or private, if comments are allowed and / or moderated, if readership is limited, choose themes, add widgets, etc. 39


8. Settings > Email/Mobile > Email Notifications > Blogsend Address You (or an administrator or parent) can receive email notifications each time a blog post is published by entering email addresses here.

To cr eate ind iv idu al student b lo gs f or whic h y ou ar e an ad mini str ator: 1. Have students sign up for a Google account if they don’t already have one. 2. Have students sign in to Blogger and create a blog. Be sure to guide them through the settings so that their blog are aligned with your school’s policies and your intent. 3. Settings > Permissions > Add Author Have students add you as an author and give you administrative control once you’ve accepted the invitation. You will be able to change the blog’s settings, templates, as well as any post that is published.

4. Settings > Site Feed > Allow Blog Feeds Set to short. Click on Advanced Mode to set the comment feeds if you want to be notified of comments that are posted to students’ blogs. 5. Sign in to Google Reader using your Google account login.

40


6. Subscribe to your studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; blogs by clicking on the Add Subscription button and entering the URL of each blog. Each time your students post to their blogs, you will see a new link in your reader.

NOTES:

41


Podcasts & Critical Thinking C ontent Cr ea te

Media

Radio transcript synthesizing research

Podcast, audio files, MP3 files, blog site

Eval ua te

Choose sources, revise drafts

Choose appropriate tool for material and desired product

Ana lyze

Break down research to find essential points for presentation

Inflection, tone, audience, word choice

Apply Use skills and learning to create content. Create and edit audio / visual files.

Und ers ta nd

Research theories, history, application

Rememb er

Find and read sources

Oral performance expectations, genre expectations

Podcasts & Writing •

Authentic audience

Real need for revision and editing

Workshop: Comments

42


That was then ... This is now Class notes

Lectures available for absent students / review & remediation

Make up work

Asynchronous learning environment

Oral reports Skits

Student performances (podcast / video podcast)

Morning announcements

School news is available for download

Professional Development Days (Teacher In-Service)

Professional Development library for diverse needs and schedules

School assemblies & convocations

Virtual tours, presentations, and speeches

Old things in old ways...

Old things in NEW ways & NEW things in NEW ways...

How can podcasts help us take our students one step further? How can they help us do new things in new ways?

43


Expecta tions / B ehavi or Con tracts Podcas ter’s Con tract Podcasting is a legitimate and authentic form of journalistic publication; therefore, student and teacher podcaster must adhere to essential principles of ethics. I acknowledge that podcasts are public and will use my online content as an extension of the classroom. In doing so, I will: •

use language appropriate for school.

be mindful of word choice, as well as grammar and usage rules.

take all online content creation seriously, posting only things that are meaningful.

post only those pieces that I am comfortable sharing with everyone; other pieces I will keep as drafts.

express my ideas so long as I do not over generalize or make derogatory / inflammatory remarks.

use constructive/productive/purposeful criticism, supporting any idea, comment, or critique I have with evidence.

only post comments on podcasts that I have listened to.

I take full responsibility for the information that I produce and publish. I will be able to defend my and my actions on-line:

I will not plagiarize, instead I will expand on others' ideas and give credit where it is due.

I will only post photos that are school appropriate and either in the creative commons or correctly cited.

I will not insult my fellow students or their podcasts.

I will not bully others during my podcasts or in my comments.

I will not provoke other students during my podcasts or in my comments.

I will not spam (including, but not limited to meaningless messages, mass messages, and repetitive messages).

I will respect the public nature of online information, and in doing so, I will keep any information (full name, compromising stories, etc.) about the subjects of podcasts private.

44


Any podcasts on controversial issues must either be submitted to [teacher/s name] prior to posting or be a part of a classroom project/question which addresses controversial issues.

Podcas ter’s Righ ts Podcasters have the right to express their ideas so long as they do not over generalize or make derogatory or inflammatory remarks. Podcasters have the right to delete any comments associate with their podcasts, manage comment settings to block comments or blacklist individuals who persist in posting inflammatory comments. Consequences for Infractions Infractions of these rules will lead to the following consequences in order of severity and number of offense: 1. Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole podcasting community),warning by teacher, and editing or deletion of offending post/comment. 2. Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction(individual students, one core class, or whole podcasting community),temporary loss of podcasting privileges (duration of quarter), editing or deletion of offending post/comment. 3. Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole podcasting community), permanent loss of podcasting privileges (duration of school year), editing or deletion of offending post/comment. The process by which podcast posts violating rules concerning offensive language or podcasts of a controversial nature may be used: 1. Students present the idea/draft for [teacher’s name] consideration. 2. [Teacher’s name] will either accept or reject the writing based upon its merit on a case-bycase basis. 3. The student will post the piece of writing with this warning: "This podcast is authentic in its use of controversial language/topics." 4. [Teacher’s name] will post a heading: "This script was accepted by [teacher’s name] for use on [name of class podcast site] despite its controversial nature." Adapted from: “Discovery Blogging Rules.” Discovery 0607 Wiki. 23 Nov. 2008 <http://discovery0607.wikispaces.com/Discovery+Blogging+Rules>. Warlick, David. “Blogger’s Contract.” Available online 23 Nov. 2008 <www.classblogmeister.com/bloggers_contract.doc>.

45


Podcas ter’s Con tract 1.

A podcast is in the public eye; therefore, students are expected to put forth their best effort to publish good writing being mindful of usage and grammar; follow fair use guidelines; respect copyright and cc licensing; and represent themselves in a manner befitting members of this classroom and community.

2.

Our podcast is an extension of the classroom; therefore, students will use appropriate language and apply school and classroom policies to all on-line activity.

3.

As a contributing member of the podcast and a digital citizen, you must follow these guidelines a. Follow Podcast Etiquette. Treat others as you want to be treated. Be polite. Be respectful at all times. Express your ideas so long as you do not over generalize or make derogatory / inflammatory remarks. Use constructive/productive/purposeful criticism, supporting any idea, comment, or critique you have with evidence. b. Communicate Use forums, email, IM, SDS, blogs and comments to contribute. Work with your peers to develop the podcast. c. Participate via forums, discussions, blogs, and comments. d. Take responsibility for your actions and deeds on-line and in class. e. Take precautions to guarantee your physical safety and protect your identity. Never post your full name or other personal information on the podcast.

Infractions of these rules will lead to the following consequences in order of severity and number of offense 1.

Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole podcast community), warning by teacher, and editing or deletion of offending post/comment.

2.

Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole podcast community), temporary loss of podcast privileges (duration of quarter), editing or deletion of offending post/comment.

3.

Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole podcast community), permanent loss of podcast privileges (duration of school year), editing or deletion of offending post/comment.

Adapted from: “Discovery Blogging Rules.” Discovery 0607 Wiki. 23 Nov. 2008 <http://discovery0607.wikispaces.com/Discovery+Blogging+Rules>.

46


DIY Podcasts Checklist Policy & Procedure  Know your school’s policy on Internet use. Will your students be able to access blogs or websites where podcasts will be housed? If your school blocks all blogs, are exceptions made? Compile a list of podcasts you want to share, as well as potential hosts, and talk to your technology coordinator.  Make sure that all students have signed the corporation’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP). Keep copies for your file.  Review your corporation’s AUP.  Establish classroom expectations & consequences for unacceptable behavior. Do you have a plan for teaching appropriate on-line behavior (i.e., do not use full names, no flaming, etc.)?  Share your expectations with your administration to ensure that it will support these rules.  Consider inviting your principal to participate.  Draft a letter to parents explaining your project, its scope, and goals, including expectations and consequences for breaking rules, and obtain permission for students to participate. Have alternative plans available for students who are not granted permission. Evaluate Resources  Decide how many podcasts students will create. Base your decision on access: Do your students have access to computers daily? Weekly? Will you expect them to work from home?  Does your school have sufficient bandwidth for your project? Do your school’s computers have soundcards? Are they enabled? What operating system are you running? Microsoft XP? Other? Contact your technology coordinator or specialist for help with these questions.  Do students have storage space on the school’s network? Will they need access to on-line storage?  Choose tools that will best meet your needs. Be prepared to teach students how to record, edit, mix, tag, manage posts and comments, upload, as well as use microphones and recorders.  Do you have all the tools students will need? Microphones? Headphones? Pop filter? MP3 player? Audio editing software? MP3 encoding software? Blog? Management & Settings  Do students have enough file space on the school network or server? Will they need to use thumb drives? 47


 Will students be working in groups or individually? How will groups be assigned?  Determine if podcasts will be public or private. Who will be able to comment on episodes? Who will be able to see comments? Will parents be allowed to participate? Content  What are the academic goals of the assignment? Do they mesh with podcasting? Is there a better medium?  Determine what kind of podcast students will be creating. What are the assignment expectations? (length, audience, topic, format, etc.)  How long will students be given to work on the project?  Will students be working in groups or individually? How will groups be assigned?  Review NETS-S and NETS-T.  What computer / technology skills must be reviewed or taught? Assessment Determine what and how you will evaluate.  Critical thinking skills

 Digital citizenship: Will comments be evaluated? Will students evaluate one another?

 Content  Speaking skills  Writing skills  Participation: Will group work and collaboration be assessed? Effort? Attitude?  Self-evaluation: Will students evaluate their own work and learning? That off their peers?  Design elements (i.e., color, links, graphics, etc.)  Media literacy  Technology use: Will mastery of technology be assessed? What traits will you focus on?

48


Podcas ting Tools: Audio editing software Audacity http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ “Audacity® is free, open source software for recording and editing sounds.” On-line Tutorials & Resources  http://audacity.sourceforge.net/help/  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9_pSLG0LZQ  http://www.how-to-podcast-tutorial.com/17-audacity-tutorial.htm LAME http://lame.sourceforge.net/index.php “LAME is an educational tool to be used for learning about MP3 encoding.” Installation Guide http://audacityteam.org/wiki/index.php?title=Lame_Installation Wavosaur http://www.wavosaur.com/ “Wavosaur is a free sound editor, audio editor, wav editor software for editing, processing and recording sounds, wav and MP3files.” Tutorial http://www.wavosaur.com/tutorial.php Power Sound Editor http://ww w.free-s ou ndedi tor.co m/ind ex.h tml

“Use Power Sound Editor Free to record your own music, voice, or other audio files; edit it; mix it with other audio or musical parts; add effects; and burn it on a CD, post it on the World Wide Web or e-mail it.” mp3DirectCut http://mpesch3.de1.cc/mp3dc.html mp3DirectCut is an “audio editor and recorder for compressed mp3. You can directly cut, copy, paste or change the volume with no need to decompress your files for audio editing. This saves encoding time and preserves the original quality, because nothing will be re-encoded. The built in recorder creates mp3 on the fly from your audio input.” Tutorial http://www.walkernews.net/2008/10/31/how-to-use-mp3directcut-astandalone-mp3-cutter-to-cut-mp3/

49


The Levelator http://www.conversationsnetwork.org/levelator The Levelator is free “software that runs on Windows, OS X (universal binary), or Linux (Ubuntu) that adjusts the audio levels within your podcast or other audio file for variations from one speaker to the next…” Tutorial Podcast  http://www.pixelheadsnetwork.com/2008/01/14/tdmd-daily-tippodcast-36-useful-apps-levelator/  http://oneminutehowto.com/Shows/Shows.asp?How_To_Use_The_L evelator Aviary Myna http://aviary.com/tools/myna Demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3VWMKpQiI&feature=player_embedded http://www.aviary.com/tools/music-creator Aviary's music creator simulates dozens of musical instruments including piano, guitars and drums. Create music loops and patterns for use in Aviary's audio editor (Myna) or as ring tones.

Podcas ting Tools: Podcatchers & Media Players iTunes http://www.apple.com/itunes/ A free desktop application that organizes and plays digital music, videos, podcasts. Search for free podcasts using the iTunes store. Tutorials http://www.apple.com/itunes/tutorials/ Juice http://juicereceiver.sourceforge.net/ A free cross platform receiver that allows users to manage podcasts. It supports multiple media players and offers users a podcast directory. User Guides and Resources http://juicereceiver.sourceforge.net/support/index.php Winamp http://www.winamp.com/ Winamp is a media player that allows users to organize, share, and search for music, videos, audio files. Tutorial http://blog.winamp.com/2008/09/11/winamp-tutorial-getting-started/

50


â&#x2DC;&#x17E;

For a side-by-side comparison of different podcatchers, go to http://www.podcatchermatrix.org/

Podcas ting Tools: Hosting Services OurMedia http://ourmedia.org/ A free hosting service for audio and video files that includes unlimited bandwidth and unlimited disk space. Podcasts are stored at archive.org. Tutorial http://www.how-to-podcast-tutorial.com/25-podcast-uploading.htm PodBean http://www.podbean.com/ PodBean is a free, on-line podcast editor and hosting service. Users can upload, publish, manage and promote podcasts. Accounts include: unmetered bandwidth, customizable site themes complete with widgets, automatic feed generation (RSS2, iTunes and ATOM), feed editing, and iTunes configuration and preview. PodBean podcasts are easily embedded in a variety of medias including emails, blogs, websites and social network sites. Tutorial http://classroomsforthefuture.pbwiki.com/f/How+to+Podbean.pdf BlogTalk Radio http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ BlogTalkRadio is the social radio network that allows users to connect quickly and directly with their audience. Using an ordinary telephone and computer hosts can create free, live, call-in talk shows with unlimited participants that are automatically archived and made available as podcasts.

ď &#x2020; Check out a review of current podcast software at http://podcast-software-review.toptenreviews.com/index.html

51


Podcas ting Tools: Miscellaneous Slogan4U http://slogan4u.com/ Create a slogan for your podcastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tagline. Enter the word or words you wish to create a slogan for and let the generator do the work for you. Write Effective Slogans Resource Page http://slogan4u.com/write_effective_slogans_tutorial.htm Sloganizer http://www.sloganizer.net/en/ Create a slogan for a podcast. Enter the word that you want incorporated. * Not all slogans may be school appropriate. DIY Pop Filters http://www.jakeludington.com/project_studio/20050321_build_your_own_microphone_pop_screen.html DIY Portable Recording Studio http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CV5Rl-IK-eo DIY Blimp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SEux3j8NeA&feature=related

52


Crea ting Su ccessful Podcas ts

Quality content 

Know your audience and niche. Write and present content that appeals to and engages them.

Format is important. Is your podcast instructional? An interview?

Moderate content. Be in control of the content by identifying speakers and guiding interviews.

Strive for accuracy and credibility.

Watch your tone. Listen to other podcasts and decide what you like. Most podcasts are conversational and use animated, informal language.

Quality Sound Production 

Music is appropriate, podsafe, fades in and out as needed, and enhances the podcast.

Volume levels within the podcast are balanced.

Transitions are smooth and do not detract from content.

Host’s and guests’ voices are clear and easy to understand. Speakers enunciate, speak at a normal volume, and speak slowly.

The final product is glitch-free.

Economy 

Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. Use audio effects sparingly and only to enhance the message of your podcast. If effects distract listeners, your podcast isn’t going to be effective.

Podcasts should be 15 minutes or shorter. Longer podcasts should be serialized or broken up into segments.

Editing 

Maintain your focus. Focus on the one thing you want your listeners to remember and that supports your purpose. Limit content to three main points. If there are more than three points, use segments to break up content. 53


Use parallel construction to label segments to help listeners remember content.

Remember that you don’t have to use all quotes in order. You can summarize an interview and use only the best quotes to illustrate your points. Also, you can edit quotes so that, even though the interviewee didn’t stay focused, your podcast can. Group relevant quotes by topic.

Remove dead space, filler words, mistakes, and ambient sounds from audio files.

Links, Tags, and Podcast Notes 

Include links to other podcasts, blogs, websites, or articles that are related to you posts so listeners can learn more.

Include links to material that is used or cited by the podcast.

Take the time to tag your MP3 files (ID3 tags) and podcasts so that potential listeners can find your work.

Include notes that summarize the content of your podcast. List keywords in the summary.

Speaking Ti ps Remember to: • Practice, practice, practice! • Reduce background noise. • Pause recording to take short breaks. • Smile while speaking! Avoid: • Talking too quickly. • Omitting the ends of words. • Trying to sound like someone else – be yourself! • Popping p’s into the microphone. • Getting too close to the microphone. • Touching the microphone or its cord.

54


Podcas t Eval uati on Basic Information: ______________________________________________________________________ Podcast URL:__________________________________________________________________________ Title of podcast:________________________________________________________________________ Author’s name: ________________________________________________________________________ Length: ______________________________________________________________________________

Multimedia Production Sound Production Is the sound quality is good?  no background noise  volume levels are good  transitions are smooth  audio has been edited to remove dead space and other distractions Economy Does the podcast overindulge in digressions and unnecessary details? Do music / audio effects enhance content? Post Production / Publication Is the podcast linked to a blog? Are podcast notes included in the summary? Do the notes contain descriptive key words? ID3 tags have been defined. Can listeners subscribe to the podcast with RSS feeds? Archive/Search/Tags/Categories Can you easily find previous podcasts? Is a search function available? Are tags used? Categories? Advertising Is advertising present? Is it obtrusive and distracting? Graphics Are images used judiciously to enhance content?

55

Yes

No


Content Purpose Is the podcast’s purpose stated?

Yes

Authorship Can you find more information about the author? Segment / Episode Titles Do the title provide any information about the nature of the podcast? About each episode Do titles of posts catch the listener’s attention? Do they accurately portray the podcast’s content? Content material (Interest, Accuracy) Is the content focused? Is the content accurate? Can you find links to other podcasts on similar topics? Does the author link to other blogs / blog posts or podcasts to give credit? Includes quotations from experts to support content. Segments (Introduction) Includes tagline and branding, name of podcast and episode, production date and location. Engages audience. Segments (Conclusion) Summarizes content clearly, succinctly. Writing (Style, Voice, Tone) Is the tone appropriate for the podcast’s purpose and audience? Can you hear the individual behind the podcast? Delivery Is the podcast well-rehearsed? Is the delivery smooth? Easy to listen to and understand? Is the tone appropriate? Does the host enunciate well? Pronounce names and terms correctly? Mechanics (Clarity, Usage, Grammar, Spelling) Does the podcaster struggle to make his / her point? Are errors egregious enough to be distracting? Interesting / Engaging Is the podcast interesting?

56

No


Comments Are comments moderated? Bias Is the content biased? Credibility Can you determine what makes the author credible? Based on comments, do other bloggers and podcasters respect the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s content? Do other bloggers and podcasters link to this blog?

Notes: What aspects of the podcast did you like? What did you not like?

Conclusions: Is this a quality podcast? Why or why not?

57


Addi ti onal Podcas t Resources O’Reilly Digital Media “What is Podcasting” http://digitalmedia.oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/digitalmedia/2005/07/20/Wh atIsPodcasting.html?page=1 Detailed, step-by-step guide to podcasting. Learning in Hand http://learninginhand.com/podcasting/ Website dedicated to teaching educators and students about podcasting. Voices.com Podcasting resources http://www.voices.com/podcasting/mixing-your-podcast.html List of sound editing vocabulary, explanation, and podcasts about creating quality audio for podcasts. Poducate Me http://poducateme.com/ Tutorials, resources and more.

Podcasts to check out… Florida Center for Instructional Technology: Podcasts http://fcit.usf.edu/laptop/podcasts.html Professional development podcasts for educators on a variety of topics, including GarageBand, Audacity, Flickr, and Delicious. KidCast Podcasting in the Classroom http://www.intelligenic.com/blog/ Radio Willow Web http://mps.wes.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=115312 Radio WillowWeb is a podcast for kids and by kids from the students at Willowdale Elementary School in Omaha, Nebraska. Colonial Williamsburg http://www.history.org/media/podcasts.cfm Interviews and photos pertaining to the living museum at Williamsburg. Mabry Online Podcast Central http://mabryonline.org/podcasts/ Podcasts by and about students at Mabry Middle School.

58


Directorie s & Search Engine s Educational Feeds http://www.educational-feeds.com/ A web site that lists educational RSS feeds by categories such as subject area, class podcasts, and grade level. Podcasts for Educators, Schools, and Colleges http://recap.ltd.uk/podcasting/info/educatortips.php A “…directory to locate quality podcasts from over 450 carefully selected podcast channels for educational use - ideal for teaching and learning activities with children, young people and educational professionals.” Learn Out Loud Podcast Directory http://www.learnoutloud.com/Podcast-Directory A “…directory for podcasts you can learn from. We've screened thousands of podcasts to find the ones of the highest quality that you will instruct, inspire, and enlighten you.” Education Podcast Network http://epnweb.org/ Podcasts for and by students K-12 covering a range of subjects. EPN is a part of the Landmark Project. National Geographic http://www.nationalgeographic.com/podcasts/ NPR Podcast Directory http://www.npr.org/rss/podcast/podcast_directory.php ABC News Podcast Directory http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/Podcasting/ NASA Podcasts feed://science.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2010/03/29/21mar_podcast_resources/ podcast.xml Discovery Podcasts http://www.discovery.com/radio/podcasts.html

59


Findi ng Podsafe Musicâ&#x20AC;Ś Internet Archive http://www.archive.org/index.php A nonprofit site that stores audio resources through an Internet library. The Podsafe Music Network http://music.podshow.com/ Music hosting site that allows account holders to download and use music in podcasts for free. Podsafe Audio http://podsafeaudio.com/jamroom/ This site hosts podsafe music MP3 files under the Creative Commons license for Podcasting. Flashkit Loops http://www.flashkit.com/loops/ A collection of royalty free music loops and sound effects in mp3 or wav formats.

60


Techn ology Integ rati on: 40+ W ays to Us e Podcas ts in the Clas sroom 1. Concept of the week: Ask students to create a podcast that summarizes a

concept that was covered in class. Include definitions, explanations, examples and real-life applications 2. Study vocabulary words. Create podcasts that cover definitions, examples in

context, etymology and other interesting facts. 3. Create a podcast of a fieldtrip. Capture the sounds of the ride to the

destination, interview students to learn about their impressions and what they learned, give a summary of what happened, and document any follow up activities that occurred after the trip. 4. Keep your finger on the school’s pulse. Have students poll their peers and

interpret data. Podcasts should include the context, question(s), methodology, and interpretation. 5. Make a DIY file. Create podcasts to teach your audience how to do something

-- balance an equation, use the INSpire Database, make a podcast, etc. 6. Create a “Quote of the Day” podcast that discusses student interpretations and

extrapolations. 7. Create scavenger hunts. Use podcasts to give students necessary background

information and clues to aid them on their search for educational treasure. (Think: The DaVinci Code) 8. Imitate existing radio shows / podcast. Create your own Moment of Science®,

Writer’s Almanac®, This I Believe®, StoryCorps®, Car Talk™ or Grammar Girl™ podcasts. 9. Create radio shows for historical events, to cover themes studied in literature,

to learn about cultures, etc.

10. Give advice to incoming students. Ask students to give advice for success to

incoming students. 11. Create a gallery walk. Have students describe their art work, as well as what

inspired and influenced them. 12. Make podio tours: Creating audio guides for local museum exhibitions, local

landmarks, neighborhoods, campuses, etc. Include descriptions, history, and fun facts. 13. Review movies. Create a catalogue of popular movies or movies that relate to a

theme. 61


14. Showcase musical compositions. Record weekly music recitals. 15. Encourage creativity. Ask students to create thematic podcasts on colors,

seasons, months, food, family, hot topics, etc. 16. Memorialize a day in the life of… Create a podcast that chronicles a day in the

life of different people from your community. Students can interview or shadow a fellow student, a scientist, or an immigrant. Consider also ‘following’ a character from a novel or a historic figure. 17. Preserve history. Interview community members. Research historical moments.

Re-enact events.

18. Record oral histories. Interview family members about pivotal moments in their

lives. 19. Create “This just in…”podcasts based on important events (past, present or

future). 20. Make time capsules using podcasts to document current events, family life,

trends, etc.

21. Document Generation Next. Create podcasts that explore what it means to be

a member of Gen Next. 22. Create a living museum. Research and create podcasts that introduce each

character. Extend the museum by writing about character interaction and motivation. Include birth notices, disputes, eulogies, etc. 23. Collect field notes and data for science, history or geography. 24. Create a digital periodic table. Create podcasts that cover each element. Be

creative: create radio personalities that parallel the nature of each element. Include properties, class, atomic number, and other pertinent information. 25. Review books. Create a collection of student reviews. Include discussion

questions in podcast notes. 26. Create round robin podcasts using students’ writing. 27. Create and publish a digital book. Create an ongoing adventure. Ask students to

write chapters for a “Choose Your Own Ending” book. Use cliffhangers to prompt writing. 28. Study literary elements. Use podcasts to demonstrate understanding. Have

students trace character development, theme, or symbolism in a novel, play, poetry, or short stories.

62


29. Focus on oral language. Create podcasts of oral interpretation / storytelling

centered around a theme (i.e., The Hero’s Journey) or storytelling elements (i.e., kennings, alliteration, repetition, etc.) 30. Encourage language learning: Create podcasts that explore different topics

pertaining to language acquisition (i.e., proverbs, similes, vocabulary, idioms, etc.) 31. Create a classroom exchange: Create podcasts to share with classrooms in

different cities, states, or countries. 32. Practice speaking and listening. Create podcasts that allow students to practice

speaking and listening in foreign languages.

33. Create podcasts for ELL students. Offer tutorials on language topics, practice

reading, and provide audio supplements to classroom texts and assignments. 34. Use podcasts to deliver professional development for teachers. Include links to

pertinent materials and PDF documents. 35. Share professional resources with colleagues. Create podcasts to share

information learned during professional development seminars, workshops, conferences, or from the trenches.

36. Share morning announcements: Podcast school/classroom announcements. 37. Manage classroom business. Use podcasts to record assignments, lessons, and

lectures for students to access if they are absent or if they want to review. 38. Create a digital library of classroom texts for use by students. 39. Broadcast school sporting events 40. Career research: Assign students different career fields. Podcasts should include

education requirements, salary ranges, lists of jobs and descriptions of each, and interviews. 41. Digitalize the school's newspaper. Create podcasts to complement traditional

formats. Episodes could feature a “roving reporter” or editorial format. 42. Venture into video podcasts. 43. Digitalize the school yearbook. Create podcasts to document school events,

trends, club activities, and student profiles.

63


Pre-Producti on: Podcas t Plan nin g & Scripts Tagline: What is the tagline for your podcast? *** Tips ***

_________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________

Practice saying your tag lines out loud.

Try using humor, rhyming words, or alliteration.

Make it memorable.

• Background music: _______________________ • Theme music: ______________________ Introduction (Write this last!) Include the following information:        

Title of podcast (i.e., Grammar Girl: Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing) Date Organization Introduce all segments of the podcast (i.e., Comma Splice) Bumper music Name of host Tagline Summarize / preview what you’re going to discuss

____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ • Music: Fade in / fade out _______________________________________________________ • Sound effects _______________________________________________________________

64


Segments  Write an interesting introduction to each segment.  Be sure each introduction includes the writer’s name and segment title and topic if segments are by different authors.  Decide what order segments will be performed. Segment Name: _____________________________________________________ Segment Writer: _____________________________________________________ Introduction: ________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Segment content: Write down what you will tell the audience during your segment. __________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ • Music: Fade in / fade out _______________________________________________________ • Sound effects _______________________________________________________________

65


Artwork If artwork is used, make sure that it is:  Relevant to the speaker  Matches what is being said in the podcast  Copyright free or has been assigned creative commons rights  Compressed to reduce file size  Edited / cropped to make it easy to see File names / brief description: _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Links Include links to:  Artwork  Websites that are relevant to topic  Websites or resources that are mentioned in the podcast URL/ name of website or source _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

66


Producti on (Recording, A ddi ng Music, E xporti ng MP3 files ) I. Record audio for each segment. Make a note of file names.  Intro____________________

*** 

Maintain a consistent distance from the microphone while recording -- this will ensure the recording volume is consistent

Use voice inflections to show emotion and to emphasize points and opinions. Be yourself!

EDIT! Remove any recording defects or errors like long pauses, sounds in the background, filler words. Remove any long pauses or sound artifacts that might occur during the recording.

Before recording, record a test clip to make sure sound quality is good, volume levels are acceptable, and background noise is minimal.

Record longer shows in short segments.

Be prepared: have scripts and interview questions with you. Make sure you know how to pronounce names and terms.

 Segment 1_______________  Segment 2_______________  Segment 3_______________  Segment 4_______________  Segment 5_______________  Outro___________________ II. Mix in sound effects or music clips.  Intro  Segment 1

Tips for Quality Recording ***

 Segment 2  Segment 3  Segment 4  Segment 5  Outro

*** R eme mb er F air Use Gui deli ne s ** * 

Use up to 10% of a copyrighted musical composition, but no more than 30 seconds

Use up to 10% of a body of sound recording, but no more than 30 seconds

Any alterations cannot change the basic melody or the fundamental character of the work

67


III. Add ID3 Tags (Enter this information using iTunes after the podcast is published.) Info: Name / Title of Episode __________________________________________________________ Artist (Author) _________________________________________________________________ Album (Name of Podcast) ________________________________________________________ Year _________________________________________________________________________ Track number (same as episode number)_____________________________________________ Genre: podcast Video: Description (Write a short blurb about the podcast. Include topics and guest speakers.)_________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Sorting: Name (same as in info)___________________________________________________________ Artwork: Podcast logo IV. Name your file: (tip on naming)__________________________________________________ V. Export as MP3 file. ***   

Ti ps fo r N am ing Po dca st File s *** Be consistent Include date (YYYYMMDD) or episode # Keep it short

Ex. TT Pickle Podcast Name

68

001 Episode #


Assess men t Trai ts for Podca sts Pick and choose from the following traits to when designing an assessment tool for use with podcasts.

Academic Achievement Content Understanding

Demonstration of academic standards

Content (Accuracy)

Facts are accurate, meets assignment requirements

Content (Style, voice, tone)

Engaging style, author's voice is evident, tone is appropriate

Content (Clarity, Usage, Grammar, Word Choice)

Message is easy to understand, no errors in usage, grammar, or spelling

Audience

Content is appropriate for stated audience and purpose of podcast.

Economy

Content is focused; Does not overindulge in digressions and unnecessary details? Music / audio effects enhance content

Citations & Permissions

Credit given to borrowed work/ideas? Permission sought and granted when necessary? Citations are included in podcast notes. Statement of copyright included, if appropriate.

Copyright / Fair Use

Fair use guidelines are followed. Citations are clear, easy to locate and accurate.

References

Includes information that is appropriate, well researched and informative from a variety of sources. Includes quotations from experts to support content. Quotes and sources of information are cited correctly.

69


Mastery of Podcast Genre / O n-line Publishi ng Segments (Introduction)

Includes tagline and branding, name of podcast and episode, production date and location. Engages audience.

Segments (Conclusion)

Summarizes content clearly, succinctly.

Segments (Transitions)

Segment is identified.

Graphics / Music

Enhance and clarify content. Sets mood of podcast. Used effectively to create transitions and tie together segments.

Production (Sound)

sound quality is good â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no background noise, volume levels are good, transitions are smooth, audio has been edited to remove dead space, and other distractions,

Production (Publication)

Podcast is linked to blog / uploaded to podcast host. Podcast notes include summary, descriptive key words. ID3 tags have been defined. Feeds have been established.

Delivery

Well rehearsed Smooth Appropriate tone, conversational Clear, easy to understand Enunciation and diction contribute to overall quality of podcast

70


Technology Skills / N ETS- S Graphics / Audio/ Video

Graphics, audio clips and videos are cropped, compressed or edited to minimize load time and maximize memory.

Mastery of Technology

Demonstrates a clear understanding of technology can create and navigate with ease, answer questions about how tool influences / affects content and readership.

Media Development

Development/ gathering of images, audio, video resources by students Image use, choice, quality

Media Literacy

Music choice, role Audio pacing, mixing Editing transitions and choices

Digital Craftsmanship

Command of media (visual and audio) as evidenced by creative application of tools. Students follow etiquette established for interaction on the Internet and on-line publications. Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comments and editing are appropriate and contribute to the overall goal of the podcast. Students demonstrate technology use to support their academic goals.

Digital Citizenship

Students participate in electronic communities. All students have access to technology. Students take responsibility for and hold peers accountable for their actions. Students include a statement of copyright / cc license on the wiki; Students do not violate the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AUP. Student back their work up, refrain from downloading information that may create security issues for the school network, keep personal information confidential.

71


Project Management Project Planning/ Time Management

All work is completed. Due dates have been met. Revisions, peer conferencing, teacher conferencing completed.

Collaboration

Contributions, quality of work, time-management, problem-solving, attitude, focus on task, preparedness, pride, group dynamic. Group dynamic: Used problem-solving skills and interpersonal skills to mitigate hurdles, communicated frequently, work load equally shared. Individual: contributes to group, completes work assigned by group, turns in quality work, uses time well, is prepared for class, self-directed

Reflection / Rationale

Student thoughtfully explained how and why he or she chose to create his or her story. His or her answers to the questions are thorough, organized and creative.

Ru bri cs O n-li ne Bendigo Education Apple Users Team http://www.beaut.org.au/tips.html A+ Rubric for Podcasting, by Ann Bell http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/podcastrubric.html Kathy Schrockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rubrics for Podcasts http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/assess.html

72


Wikis & Cri tical Thi nking •

Creation of new material

Evaluation of existing material for quality and need

Analysis of content / research prior to contributing

Application of writing skills, interpersonal skills

Digital Citizens hip & Media Literacy: Wikis •

Collaboration with an online community

Evaluating appropriateness of interaction and disclosure

Use of links and citations to promote ethical transfer of information

73


That was then ... This is now Group work

Real-time & asynchronous collaboration

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Professionallyâ&#x20AC;? designed websites

Student / Teacher designed wikis

Filing cabinets

Online resources

Poster presentations, research papers

Interactive, multi-media creations

Old things in old ways...

Old things in NEW ways & NEW things in NEW ways...

How can wikis help us take our students one step further? How can the help us do new things in new ways?

74


Wiki Con tract 1.

A wiki is in the public eye; therefore, students are expected to put forth their best effort to publish good writing being mindful of spelling and grammar; follow fair use guidelines; respect copyright and cc licensing; and represent themselves in a manner befitting members of this classroom and community.

2.

Our wiki is an extension of the classroom; therefore, students will use appropriate language and apply school and classroom policies to all on-line activity.

3.

As a contributing member of the wiki and a digital citizen, you must follow these guidelines a. Follow Wiki Etiquette. Treat others as you want to be treated. Be polite. Sign and date posts to forums / discussions. Work towards agreement. Argue facts, not personalities. Do not ignore questions. Recognize your own biases and keep them in check. Do not knowingly add content that is incorrect or write in a way that implies that something is other than it is. b. Communicate Use forums, email, IM, SDS, blogs and comments to contribute. Work with your peers to develop the wiki. Be respectful at all times. c. Participate via forums, discussions, blogs, and comments. d. Take responsibility for your actions and deeds on-line and in class. e. Take precautions to guarantee your physical safety and protect your identity. Never post your full name or other personal information on the wiki.

Infractions of these rules will lead to the following consequences in order of severity and number of offense 1.

Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole wiki community), warning by teacher, and editing or deletion of offending post/comment.

2.

Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole wiki community), temporary loss of wiki privileges (duration of quarter), editing or deletion of offending post/comment.

3.

Letter of apology to those offended by the infraction (individual students, one core class, or whole wiki community), permanent loss of wiki privileges (duration of school year), editing or deletion of offending post/comment.

Adapted from: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discovery Blogging Rules.â&#x20AC;? Discovery 0607 Wiki. 23 Nov. 2008 <http://discovery0607.wikispaces.com/Discovery+Blogging+Rules>.

75


DIY Wiki Checklist Policy & Procedure  Know your school’s policy on wikis and wiki use. Will your students be able to access the wiki? If you school blocks all wikis, are exceptions made? Compile a list of wikis you want to share, as well as potential hosts, and talk to your technology coordinator.  Make sure that all students have signed the corporation’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP). Keep copies for your file.  Review your corporation’s AUP.  Establish classroom expectations & consequences for unacceptable behavior. Do you have a plan for teaching appropriate on-line behavior? On-line publishing behavior (i.e., do not plagiarize, etc.) Clearly outline what constitutes acceptable participation and behavior in the site. Allow students to contribute to this Agreement. If any of their behavior comes into question, you can then refer back to the Agreement for reinforcement.  Share your expectations with your administration to ensure that it will support these rules.  Consider inviting your principal to participate.  Draft a letter to parents explaining your project, its scope, and goals, including expectations and consequences for breaking rules, and obtain permission for students to participate. Have alternative plans available for students who are not granted permission. Evaluate Resources  Decide how often students will work on the wiki. Base your decision on access: Do your students have access to computers daily? Weekly? Will you expect them to work from home?  Choose a wiki hosting service that will best meet your needs. Be prepared to teach students how to edit, create pages, create links, as well as set up and receive feeds. Management & Settings  Set up student accounts – do they need email addresses?  Determine if the wiki will be public or private. Who will be able to contribute content? Who will be able to see content? Will parents be allowed to participate?

76


Content & Assessment  Determine what kind of wiki you and your students will be creating.  What are the academic goals of the assignment? Do they mesh with wikis? Is there a better medium?  Determine what kind of wiki students will be creating. What are the assignment expectations (contributions, editing, audience, topic, format, etc.)?  How long will students be given to work on the project?  Will students be working in groups or individually? How will groups be assigned?  Review NETS-S and NETS-T.  What computer / technology skills must be reviewed or taught? Determine what you will evaluate:  Critical thinking skills

 Design elements (i.e., links, graphics, etc.)

 Content

 Media literacy

 Speaking skills

 Technology use: Will mastery of technology be assessed? What traits will you focus on?

 Writing skills  Participation: Will group work and collaboration be assessed? Effort? Attitude?

 Digital citizenship: Will comments be evaluated? Will students evaluate one another?

 Self-evaluation: Will students evaluate their own work and learning? That off their peers?

77


Free Wiki Hosts / Wik i Fa rms Wiki Matrix http://www.wikimatrix.org/ Compare and contrast wiki software. PBworks http://pbwiki.com/academic.wiki Create simple wikis, embed audio and video, use tags, and use RSS to publicize changes. PBwiki keeps a complete audit trail of every change made to your wiki. Classroom accounts are available for students without email addresses. Additionally, PBworks uses a WYSIWYG pointand-click editor, has customizable templates, and allows users to embed widgets in wikis. Tutorial http://socialconstructionism.pbwiki.com/PBWiki+Tutorial Wikidot http://www.wikidot.com/ Ad-free, free wiki hosting, widgets, RSS, tags, supports audio and video. Wikidot will be creating an new account level for educators. Tutorials  http://www.wikidot.com/forum/t-89241/wikidot-video-tutorial  http://www.wikidot.com/doc:video TiddlyWiki http://www.tiddlywiki.com/ TiddlyWiki is a single html file that has all the characteristics of a wiki including all of the content, the functionality (including editing, saving, tagging and searching) and the style sheet. Because it's a single file, it's very portable - you can email it, put it on a web server or share it via a USB stick. * Must be downloaded. Tutorial  http://www.blogjones.com/TiddlyWikiTutorial.html  http://www.giffmex.org/twfortherestofus.html Google Sites http://sites.google.com/ Wiki building tool by Google. WYSIWG editor, not HTML needed. Each account comes with 10 MB storage and limits file uploads to 10MB. Education editions get an additional 500MB per account. Google Sites is integrated with other Google products (Maps, Docs, Video) so content is easily embeddable Tutorial: http://sites.google.com/ 78


Wikispaces http://www.wikispaces.com/site/for/teachers Free wikis for educators that includes unlimited users and pages, 2 GB file storage, 20mb file upload limit. Education pages are ad-free Tutorials http://www.slideshare.net/cliotech/wikispaces-tutorial-306220/ Wet Paint http://www.wetpaintcentral.com/ Free wiki hosting service. Includes WYSIWYG editing, photo and video integration, photo galleries, page level discussion threads, RSS and email notification and 80 MB file storage 2MB per file upload). Tutorial / Overview http://www.commoncraft.com/wetpaint @wiki http://atwiki.com/ @Wiki wiki hosting service is completely free and includes the following features:  WYSIWYG entry composer supported  selectable edit-mode (WikiText, WYSIWYG, or text)  password protected posts  file uploads and easy importing  instant publishing and multiple authors  archive  full user customization and administration  RSS feeds Wikia http://www.wikia.com/wiki/Wikia “Wikia is a community destination supporting the creation and development of wiki communities on any topic people are passionate about.”

To compare wiki hosts and features, go to http://www.wikimatrix.org/

79


Tips for Using Wikis 1. Establish clear expectations for behavior (and consequences for misbehavior) in advance. 2. Let students get used to using the wiki before assigning major projects. 3. Keep in mind the nature of wikis when designing projects and assessments: 

Anyone can change anything.

A wiki’s structure is dictated by its content and users.

Organization is often guided by topic links and tags.

A wiki that is used as a web page is not the same as a wiki used for collaboration.

4. Be flexible enough to allow for changes in structure, process and pedagogy, but make sure that academic goals and objectives aren’t lost along the way. 5. Collaborate with students to create a Style Guide for writing / publishing on the wiki. 6. Create an index page so you can always find your work. 7. Decide how you will record student’s individual contributions. Some teachers ask students to sign the page(s) they author or contribute to.

Wikis to Ch eck O ut Alternate History Wiki http://althistory.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page This wiki is dedicated to exploring what might have been if things had turned out differently. Debatepedia http://wiki.idebate.org/index.php/Welcome_to_Debatepedia! Debatepedia is “…a wiki encyclopedia of debates, arguments, and supporting quotations. Its mission is to become "the Wikipedia of debates". It is a place where we can all work together as editors, via the same wiki technology driving Wikipedia, to frame the arguments in public debates that we all need to think through.” Evolution Education Wiki http://evolutionwiki.org/wiki/Main_Page This wiki is “…about evolution and the creationism controversy. Our editorial philosophy extends no further than being 'pro-evolution' (or rather, pro-science), and our many writers come from a wide range of cultural and philosophical backgrounds… The Evolution Education Wiki features 80


essays, book reviews and a comprehensive encyclopedia of evolution, creationism and related topics.” FHS Wolves Den Wiki http://fhswolvesden.wikispaces.com A classroom wiki. Galaxiki: http://www.galaxiki.org/ Galaxiki is the science fiction & fantasy galaxy that anyone can edit. Join the community, get your own solar system & help to build a new online world. A fantastic place for science fiction and fantasy lovers. Green Wikia http://green.wikia.com/wiki/Wikia_Green “Green Wikia strives to become a trusted central place to share our growing and evolving body of knowledge about environmental topics and issues with people who want to inform themselves and live in a more sustainable way.” High School Online Collaborative Writing http://schools.wikia.com/wiki/High_School_Online_Collaborative_Writing A collaborative writing space for teachers and students. *No longer active. Jennifer Barnett’s Technology Integration Wiki http://jenniferbarnett.wikispaces.com/ Memory Archive http://www.memoryarchive.org/en/MemoryArchive A wiki that archives individuals’ memories. There is a teacher section that includes teaching ideas. Mythology Wiki http://mythology.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page A wiki dedicated to exploring mythology, legends, fables, fairy-tales, and folklore. Seventh Grade Math: http://7math.wikispaces.com A teacher resource wiki designed by a math teacher in Alabama. Simple English Wikipedia http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Simple English Wikipedia is a version of the Wikipedia encyclopedia, written in Simple English Wikibooks: Wikijunior http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior “The aim of this project is to produce age-appropriate non-fiction books for children from birth to age 12. These books are richly illustrated with photographs, diagrams, sketches, and original drawings. Wikijunior books are produced by a worldwide community of writers, teachers, students and young people all working together. The books present factual information that is verifiable. You are invited to join in and write, edit and rewrite each module and book to improve its content. Our books are distributed free of charge under the terms of the Gnu Free Documentation License.” Wikibooks http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Main_Page “…a Wikimedia community for creating a free library of educational textbooks that anyone can edit.” 81


Wikibooks: Simple English http://simple.wikibooks.org/wiki/Main_Page Wikibooks editors are working to write textbooks in simple English WikiHistory http://www.wikihistory.org/ WikiHistory is a history book that aims to “weave culture, religion, politics, weather, astronomical occurrences, geologic occurrences, wars and anything else that has gone on into fabric that helps people understand what life was truly like in the past… WikiHistory will strive to see the World as a whole and not dwell on European history, or American History.” Wikihowto http://howto.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page “Wikihowto is a place to find out how to do something, whether it is repairing your computer or learning how to knit. Wikihowto is also an open place for anyone with any skill to share their knowledge.” Wikispecies http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page “Wikispecies is an open, free directory of species. It covers Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Bacteria, Archaea, Protista and all other forms of life. So far we have 161,851 taxonomic entries.”

Wiki Res ou rces Educational Wikis http://educationalwikis.wikispaces.com/Articles+and+Resources A list of resources for wikis in education. Includes links to tutorials, guides, articles, interviews, podcasts, and forums. Teachers First Wiki Walk-Through http://www2.teachersfirst.com/content/wiki/wikiideas1.cfm A guided discussion about wikis in education. Twiki Issues http://www2.teachersfirst.com/content/wiki/issues.cfm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wikis: List of wikis in wikipedia.

82


Techn ol ogy Integ rati on : 25+ Ways to Us e Wikis i n Class rooms 1. Host a mini conference. Ask students to post papers over a topic in a wiki. Students post drafts of their papers, create profile pages, review, edit, critique their colleaguesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; papers. Links to sources and references can be included. 2. Host student portfolios. Assign portfolio pages to each of your students, and allow them to display and discuss their work. 3. Create writing workshops. Assign sessions to different pages. Each session should include mini lessons, practice, prompts, style tips, grammar tips and / or links to texts or inspiration pieces. 4. Study vocabulary. Post vocabulary lists. Ask students to contribute definitions, sentences using the words in contexts, links to examples of different usages. 5. Get feedback. Ask students to post comments about class, texts, movies, or other events on wiki pages. 6. Share notes: Let your students share their collective information so that everyone gets a better understanding of the subject. Ask students to post notes, review questions and other helpful pieces of information on your classroomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wiki. By creating entries and their ancillary links and materials, students will be reviewing for unit / final exams. 7. Brainstorm. Allow group members to post their ideas in a wiki. Ask students to distill the ideas categories and lists. Add pages to discuss or compare and contrast ideas. 8. Start fan clubs. Ask students to research figures from history. Include quotes, photographs, bibliographies, works, links to relevant pages, etc. 9. Track projects. Create to do lists so it is easy for students to see what is finished and what remains to be done. 10. Host a debate: Ask students to research opposing sides of an argument. Have students prepare for and have. Post video and notes. 11. Write round-robin style. Start a creative writing unit, and ask your students to write a short story together, each writing a small amount of the story. 12. Share reviews. Write and post articles reviewing books, movies, TV shows or websites. Include links to related materials. 13. Host a book club. Ask students to post discussion questions, comments, and observations. Each student takes a turn moderating or hosting the final page which should summarize the book, list themes, symbols and other pertinent elements, and synthesize the classâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discussion into a review.

83


14. Create a Classroom FAQ. Collaborate with your students to document the ins and outs of life in your class. Share this FAQ with parents and new students. 15. Document a year in your classroom. Create a classroom scrapbook that looks at enrollment, big ideas, projects, photos, goals, and achievements. Encourage your students to keep track of their personal goals by creating a profile page that uses graphs and other 16. Maintain a classroom / school newspaper: Create your own news outlet on a wiki. 17. Host a hall of fame. Create categories and awards to highlight your students’ achievements both in and out of the classroom. Students and faculty can nominate recipients. You may want to create profile pages for showcased students, pages detailing awards and distinctions, acceptance speeches, and nomination forms. 18. Create a wiki tour of your school or a significant place. School tour: Get your class Take photos and post on the wiki. Annotate each spot with a description, directions, and links to pertinent information. 19. Create a class cookbook. Try combining cooking with narrative writing. Ask students to bring in their favorite recipes from home and write about a memory that is tied to the recipe. They may want to include photographs of the dish or of their family. (*Get permission to post family photos!) 20. Create a classroom exchange. Use the wiki to document your classroom, your community, your customs, and other interesting information. 21. Create a wiki museum for your community. Photograph buildings, landmarks, local events and anything else you want to document. Interview community members, research the community’s origins, etc. 22. Create a nature guide. Study and photograph specimens. Focus on wildflowers, trees, or wildlife. 23. Use your wiki as a hub. Link student work to a class wiki to make it available to the class. 24. Collaborate with your colleagues. Use wikis to create cross-curricular units, share resources, discuss professional development. 25. Write a book. Show students how to write a wikibook. 26. Create a think tank. Post problems for students to solve together.

WetPaint publishes a list of wikis in education: http://wikisineducation.wetpaint.com/page/How+we+use+wikis+in+class?t=anon

84


Assess men t Trai ts for Wikis Pick and choose from these traits when designing a rubric for evaluating a wiki.

Academic Achievement Demonstration of academic standards related to the assignment. Content Understanding

Content demonstrates analysis and synthesis of research materials. Includes information that is balanced, appropriate, well-researched, and informative from a variety of sources. Includes quotations from experts to support content and cultivate credibility.

Content (accuracy)

Facts are accurate. Content draws from a variety of sources. Content represent multiple facets of the topic.

Content (style, voice, tone, word choice)

Tone is appropriate for project and audience Style is consistent â&#x20AC;&#x201C; editing for continuity and cohesiveness is evident. Voice (register, original perspective) is appropriate for the purposes of the assignment. (i.e., NPOV is adhered to).

Content (clarity, usage, mechanics, spelling)

Message is easy to understand.

Audience

Content is appropriate for stated audience and purpose of wiki.

Economy

Content is focused and does not overindulge in digressions and unnecessary details.

No errors in usage, mechanics, or spelling.

Music / audio effects enhance content

85


Quotes and sources of information are cited correctly. References, Sources & Links

Bibliographic citations are listed for each page / article as necessary. Format is correct. Links to sources are available and represent a variety of reliable sources. Links are not broken.

Fair use guidelines are followed. Copyright / Fair Use

Citations are clear, easy to locate and accurate.

Wiki Design Readability

Does the wiki design make use of white space, headings and subheadings, short paragraphs, font size and color to divide space effectively?

Headlines / Titles

Provides information about wiki and content? Purpose stated? Interesting?

Use of Media

Was the use of media appropriate, supportive of the content, balanced and well considered?

Archiving / Navigation

Can audience find popular pages? Is the wiki easily navigable? Is there an index page? Color choices for background, font, visited/unvisited links are easy on the eye and do not detract from content. They are consistent across pages.

Color scheme Font

Consistent, easy to read, appropriate size, italics, boldface, underlining are used consistently

Load Time

How quickly does the wiki load? (Small graphics, good compression of sounds/graphics, appropriate division of material)

Comments Section

Is the audience encouraged to contribute? Are contributions managed?

Pages Used Effectively

Includes information about the wiki, wikiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals, style guide, disclaimers, archives, comment / contribution policy, and links; organization makes sense.

Authorship

Statement of authorship is available. Profile pages of contributors available. 86


Links

Links are live, appropriate to pages, and establish credibility.

Economy

Media and effects, links are used judiciously to enhance content. Not distracting.

Graphics

Appropriate to content, used to enhance reader interest / understanding Enhance and clarify content. Sets mood of wiki.

Mastery of Wiki Genre / On-li ne Publication Drafts / Self Editing

Evidence of editing and negotiation of content. Use of signatures to document edits as necessary and directed.

Interaction With Audience

Students actively manage contributions to the wiki; moderate conversations and discussions maturely; participate in conversations by writing thoughtful comments; and edit appropriately to augment and enhance wiki content rather than promote individual contributions.

Wikiquette

Does not abuse other contributors. Refrains from ranting. Is respectful of opinions that differ from his/her own. Is able to justify edits.

Technology Skills / N ETS- S Graphics / Audio/ Video Mastery of Technology

Graphics, audio clips, and videos are cropped, compressed or edited to minimize load time and maximize memory. Media is properly embedded. Demonstrates a clear understanding of technology can create and navigate with ease, answer questions about how tool influences / affects content and readership.

Media Development

Development / gathering of images, audio, video resources by students

Media Literacy

Image use, choice, quality Music choice, role Audio pacing, mixing Editing transitions and choices

Digital Craftsmanship

Command of media (visual and audio) as evidenced by creative application of tools. 87


Students follow etiquette established for interaction on the Internet and on-line publications. Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comments and editing are appropriate and contribute to the overall goal of the wiki. Students demonstrate technology use to support their academic goals.

Digital Citizenship

Students participate in electronic communities. All students have access to technology. Students take responsibility for and hold peers accountable for their actions. Students include a statement of copyright / cc license on the wiki; Students do not violate the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AUP. Student back their work up, refrain from downloading information that may create security issues for the school network, keep personal information confidential.

Project Management Project Planning

Drafts, storyboards, conferences, scripts, etc.

Assignment Criteria

Met due dates, length requirements, number of photos, etc.

Reflection / Rationale

Student thoughtfully explained how and why he or she chose to create his or her story. His or her answers to the questions are thorough, organized and creative. Contributions, quality of work, time-management, problem-solving, attitude, focus on task, preparedness, pride, group dynamic.

Collaboration

Group dynamic: Used problem-solving skills and interpersonal skills to mitigate hurdles, communicated frequently, work load equally shared. Individual: contributes to group, completes work assigned by group, posts represent quality work, uses time well, is prepared for class, selfdirected

88


Ru bri cs O n-li ne Rubric Assessment: Flat Classroom Project 2007 http://flatclassroomproject.wikispaces.com/Rubrics This wiki provides a “…tool for assessing student contribution and engagement with the wiki editing process.” Cool Cat Teacher, Wiki Grading Rubric http://k12online.wm.edu/WikiGradingRubric.pdf Victoria Davis, author of Cool Cat Teacher Blog provides a rubric for evaluating student wikis. Read, Write, Think: Wiki Rubric www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson979/wikirubric.pdf ENG 463 Wiki Assignment Grading Rubric http://wikis.lib.ncsu.edu/index.php/ENG_463_Wiki_Assignment_Grading_Rubric A rubric designed for a specific English course

89


Social Book marks Social Bookmarking in Plain English: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x66lV7GOcNU Teaching Hacks: Social Bookmarking Tools http://www.teachinghacks.com/wiki/index.php?title=Social_bookmarking_tools * This site hasn’t been updated in a while, however, the educators using bookmarking sites section is still relevant as many of those teachers are still using delicious tags. http://digg.com/ “Digg is a social news website made for people to discover and share content from anywhere on the Internet, by submitting links and stories, and voting and commenting on submitted links and stories. Voting stories up and down is the site's cornerstone function, respectively called digging and burying. Many stories get submitted every day, but only the most Dugg stories appear on the front page. Digg's popularity has prompted the creation of other social networking sites with story submission and voting systems.”1 Tutorials: http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/beginners-guide-to-digg.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9kaFk3vHVA http://www.stumbleupon.com/ “StumbleUpon is an Internet community that allows its users to discover and rate Web pages, photos, and videos. It is a personalized recommendation engine which uses peer and social-networking principles.2” Tutorial http://socialconstructionism.pbworks.com/Stumbleupon-Tutorial

1

2

Digg. (2009, March 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:23, March 23, 2009, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Digg&oldid=277683591 StumbleUpon. (2009, March 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:25, March 23, 2009, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=StumbleUpon&oldid=276118120

90


http://www.diigo.com/ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diigo is a Social bookmarking website which allows signed-up users to bookmark and tag web-pages. Additionally, it allows users to highlight any part of a webpage and attach sticky notes to specific highlights or to a whole page. These annotations can be kept private, shared with a group within Diigo or a special link forwarded to someone else. The name "Diigo" is an abbreviation for "Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff3". Tutorial: http://tiny.cc/o41bY Three Uses of Diigo in the History and Language Arts Classroom http://beyond-school.org/2008/03/31/three-uses-of-diigo-in-the-historyand-language-arts-classroom/ * Diigo in education accounts are available for teachers and students! http://www.citeulike.org/ a free service for managing and discovering scholarly references Tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZG_inLfz9U

http://www.squrl.com/ Collect and organize videos. http://vodpod.com/ Collect and organize video bookmarks. http://vodspot.com/ Use in tandem with a vodpod account to collect and manage a customized video bookmark portal. http://vidque.com/ Save and tag videos, follow video postings of websites, RSS feeds, Twitter accountsor blogs. http://stickr.com/ Create sticky notes on any webpage. http://sqworl.com/ Create visual bookmarks.

3

Diigo. (2009, March 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:27, March 23, 2009, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Diigo&oldid=278176286

91


Social Networking Kinds of Social Networks Services (SNS) Profile based • MySpace • Facebook • LinkedIn Content based • Flickr • Amazon Presence updates • Twitter • Plurk White label • Ning Social Networks in Plain English: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6a_KF7TYKVc Digizen http://www.digizen.org/ Learn about social networks and cyberbullying, evaluation of social networks

Profile Bas ed Social Network http://www.myspace.com/ All About MySpace: Tutorials http://personalweb.about.com/od/myspacecom/All_About_MySpace_ MySpace_Templates_MySpace_Tutorials_and_More.htm http://www.facebook.com/ Tutorials: http://www.allfacebook.com/facebook-tutorials/ http://www.everloop.com/ A social network for kids under 13. http://www.linkedin.com/ “Over 35 million professionals use LinkedIn to:  Exchange information, ideas and opportunities  Stay informed about [their] contacts and industry  Find the people & knowledge [they] need to achieve your goals 92


 Control [their] professional identity[ies] online” Tutorial: http://www.stanford.edu/group/idk2ceo2007/tutorial.html

* https://saywire.com/ Closed network, free trial available. https://www.yammer.com/ Private, secure social network.

Content Based Social Networks http://www.flickr.com An online photo management and sharing application.

http://www.youtube.com “YouTube allows people to easily upload and share video clips on www.YouTube.com and across the Internet through websites, mobile devices, blogs, and email.” http://www.teachertube.com/ “...[A]n online community for sharing instructional videos. • Upload, tag and share videos worldwide. • Upload support files to attach your educational actvities, assessments, lesson plans, notes, and other file formats to your video. • Browse hundreds of videos uploaded by community members. • Find, join and create video groups to connect with people who have similar interests. • Customize the experience by subscribing to member videos, saving favorites, and creating playlists. • Integrate TeacherTube videos on websites using video embeds or APIs. • Make videos public or private - users can elect to 93


broadcast their videos publicly or share them privately with those they invite.” http://www.vimeo.com/ Video sharing and network Tutorial: http://tiny.cc/wn2GA http://blip.tv/ Hosting for videobloggers, podcasts, and other original content, allowing users to crosspost content. *Students under the age of 17 cannot upload their own content.

Mobile Social Networks/Presence Updates http://twitter.com/ “Twitter is a service for friends, family, and co–workers to communicate and stay connected through the exchange of quick, frequent answers to one simple question: What are you doing?” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddO9idmax0o Resources: Twitter4Teachers Wiki http://twitter4teachers.pbworks.com/

100 Tips, Apps, and Resources for Teac hers on Twitter http://onlinecollegedegree.org/2009/03/19/100-tips-apps-andresources-for-teachers-on-twitter/ Twitter Apps http://www.squidoo.com/twitterapps 99 Essential Twitter Tools And Applications http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/03/17/99-essentialtwitter-tools-and-applications/

94


http://www.plurk.com/ Plurk allows users to send messages (140 characters, max) to their networks using SMS technology. Features threaded discussions and timeline views. Comparison of Twitter and Plurk http://www.techipedia.com/2008/twitter-vs-plurk/ Review of Plurk http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/plurk_unique_ or_just_another_t.php

DIY: White Label Social Networks A white label social network is one that can be branded or changed as needed. http://twingr.com/ Create your own “Twitter” http://www.mixxt.net/ Create your own “Facebook” http://www.toonti.com/main?sid=66851 Create a social network, similar to Ning. http://frid.ge/ “Fridge is simple groups for personal and private sharing of media, events, and conversation. Anyone can easily create a group, invite friends, and have one place for specific conversations and shared photos, videos, events and more.”

Social Networks in School http://www.edmodo.com/ Share ideas, files, Internet content, and assignments in real-time. http://yaptime.com/ YapTime groups are private gathering places where users can share photos, calendars and more.

95


Harnessing the Backchannel The backchannel is everything going on in the classroom that isn’t coming from you or “sanctioned” activities. It’s the note passing, whispered questions and side conversations, Internet surfing, text messaging and sum of all idea exchanges related (and unrelated) to the topic at hand. http://todaysmeet.com/ Create a room for the backchannel so you can monitor it. Rooms can be active for as little as 2 hours and as long as a year. http://www.chatzy.com/ Create a private chat room with password protection.

http://backchan.nl/ A tool for “involving audiences in presentations by letting them suggest questions and vote on each other's questions.”

Fun with Facebook Derrick Waddell’s Fake Facebook Template: https://docs.google.com/previewtemplate?id=1nCxDCLcEAuge4wac5I5F_83GH9QNZpXpKCGMRl2utk&mode=public WWII Facebook Wall: http://www.makeuseof.com/tech-fun/world-war-ii-facebook-version/ http://www.myfakewall.com/ Create fake profile pages just for literary or historical figures. http://thewallmachine.com/ A WYSISYG tool for creating fake Facebook walls. Embeddable.

96


Ga ming in Ed uca tio n Serious games are intended to create challenges requiring critical thinking skills and apply knowledge to new situations. Serious games = learning through play Role of play in learning: • Freedom to fail • Freedom to experiment • Freedom to fashion identities • Freedom of effort • Freedom of interpretation

Ga ming & Critical Thinking Gamers can: • Process information quickly • Evaluate information to determine what is relevant the them • Process information from a range of sources and media simultaneously

Ga ming & Digital Citiz ens hip / Literacy & Writing • Games require users to make sense of a range of media both as a producer and a participant •

Gamers participate in online communities

Gamers often post hints and solutions to FAQs, forums, and discussion boards

For information about gaming in education: GamesParentsTeachers.com http://www.gamesparentsteachers.com/ The companion website for the book, Don’t Bother Me Mom – I’m Learning”

97


Brain Meld Teacher Guides http://www.brainmeld.org/BM-Classroom-TeachingGuides.htm “Most [teacher guides] were written by professional educators in the Education Technology program at National University's graduate School of Education in California. Some are more detailed than others, but all are designed to let teachers quickly and easily incorporate mainstream video games into their standards-based curriculum in order to excite, engage and motivate their students.” Tools for Building Learning Games http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/TOOLS_FOR_GAMES.html Games for Change http://gamesforchange.org/ “Games for Change seeks to harness the extraordinary power of video games to address the most pressing issues of our day, including poverty, human rights, global conflict and climate change” (G4C: About). Play games, find resources about gaming in education and grant opportunities. G4C Toolkit http://gamesforchange.org/toolkit “[G4C] has created a toolkit to guide nonprofit organizations and others through the process of making a social issue digital game... The Toolkit is not a technical manual for making a game but provides an overview of the game-making process and guides you through key areas—what questions you need to ask, what decisions you need to make.” The Education Arcade http://www.educationarcade.org/ “The Education Arcade explores games that promote learning through authentic and engaging play. TEA’s research and development projects focus both on the learning that naturally occurs in popular commercial games, and on the design of games that more vigorously address the educational needs of players. [Their] mission is to demonstrate the social, cultural, and educational potentials of videogames by initiating new game development projects, coordinating interdisciplinary research efforts, and informing public conversations about the broader and sometimes unexpected uses of this emerging art form in education.” Interesting Games PeaceMaker http://www.peacemakergame.com/ NPR Story: Former Israeli Army Officer Designs 'Peace' Game http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12056286 Darfur is Dying http://www.darfurisdying.com/

98


Techno logy Integra tio n: Ways to Integra te S erio us Ga mes into Yo ur Class

1. Use Office™ Tools to make learning games

Office Templates to create games for your students: http://people.uncw.edu/ertzbergerj/msgames.htm 2. Ask your students to create their own games that (1) prove that they comprehend the

content and (2) are based on class material. 3. Play simulation games like The Sims™, Peacemaker™, or Spore™. 4. Consider the potential of gaming systems for accessing content, teaching critical thinking

skills, and differentiating content.

5. Explore virtual reality games like Second Life for asynchronous learning and distance

learning. 6. Check out Second Life®. The ALA and ISTE use Second Life for virtual meetings.

99


Oth er Cutting -E dge Techn ol ogy Tool s and Applicati on s

Photo Editing Tool s Flauntr http://www.flauntr.com/ Free, on-line photo editor that integrates with Flickr, blogger, WordPress, MySpace, iGoogle, Facebook, LiveJournal and Picassa. Picassa http://picasa.google.com/ A free “…software download from Google that helps you organize, edit, and share your photos.” Picnik http://www.picnik.com/ Free on-line photo editor. Splashup http://www.splashup.com/ Free photo editor and manager. PhotoShop Express https://www.photoshop.com/ Free, on-line version of PhotoShop. Focuses on organizing, editing, sharing, and community. It's designed to integrate with other services like Facebook, Photobucket, and Picasa. Aviary http://aviary.com/tools A free collection of online tools for image creation and editing.

Screen Ca pture / Image Sharing Camtasia Studio http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia.asp Record onscreen activity. Free trial, download 30-day trial. Jing http://www.jingproject.com/ Capture images, record video, and share it for free. *Must be downloaded. Skitch http://skitch.com/ Download software: http://plasq.com/skitch Skitch.com is a webservice that works hand in hand with the application Skitch to give you 1-click uploading of images for fast and fun image sharing. Capture images and screen captures, annotate them and embed them in blogs, wikis, emails, or web pages for free. *Mac only; must be downloaded. Snagit http://www.techsmith.com/download/snagittrial.asp Screen capture software. Free 30-day trial. *Must be downloaded. Video Tools JumpCut http://www.jumpcut.com/ 100


Video editing through a web browser Vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/ A video sharing network for materials of “family and friend” nature. Pornography, commercial videos, gaming videos and other material not created by the user is not allowed Vodpod http://www.vodpod.com Search for and share videos. Keepvid http://keepvid.com/ Download streaming videos to your hard drive. (Get around school blocks for YouTube!) Animoto http://www.animoto.com “Animoto is a web application that, with the click of a button, produces videos using images and music that a user selects. Using their patent-pending Artificial Intelligence developed to think like an actual editor & director, the resulting video has the emotional impact of a movie trailer and the visual energy of a music video.”

Confere ncing Skype http://www.skype.com/ Make calls from your computer — free to other people on Skype and cheap to landlines and cell phones around the world. Twiddla http://www.twiddla.com/ “Mark up websites, graphics, and photos, or start brainstorming on a blank canvas. Browse the web with your friends or make that conference call more productive than ever. No plug-ins, downloads, or firewall voodoo - it's all here, ready to go when you are. Browser-agnostic, user-friendly.”

Slideshow Tool s AuthorStream www.authorstream.com “authorSTREAM is a platform for sharing PowerPoint presentations on the Internet. authorSTREAM makes it easier to share your PowerPoint slideshows through blogs, websites, on YouTube and even via iPOD. What's best is that it's all FREE! Just sign-up, upload presentations and start sharing.” ImageLoop http://www.imageloop.com/ Create free slideshows to share or embed in blogs or social network profiles. One True Media http://www.onetruemedia.com/ Upload photos or video and create digital montages to share. Picture Trail www.picturetrail.com Slideshows, picture sharing, image hosting, photo editor and photo upload. Prezi http://prezi.com/ Zooming presentation tool. SlideFlickr http://slideflickr.com/ 101


An “…online Flickr slideshow generator that will help you create and embed Flickr slideshows…” SlideRocket www.sliderocket.com SlideRocket allows users to quickly create stunning presentations, store, organize, tag and search assets, collaborate with peers, securely share presentations in person or online and measure the results, all in one integrated environment. SlideShare www.slideshare.com Upload and share presentations. Embed slideshows into your own blog or website. Voice Threads http://voicethread.com Voice Thread is collaborative, multimedia slideshow that allows users to upload images, documents, and video. Groups may comment using voice, text, audio, video or doodles. VUVOX http://www.vuvox.com/ Create slideshows using digital media to embed in other sites.

Timeline Tools OurStory http://www.ourstory.com/ Make a timeline. Collaborate. Share it. xtimeline http://xtimeline.com/ xtimeline is a free web-based timeline. Easily create and share timelines with pictures and videos.

Comic Strip Tools Bubblr http://www.pimpampum.net/bubblr Bubblr is a tool to create comic strips using photos from Flickr. Search for images and add dialogue bubbles to them. Comiqs http://comiqs.com Create a comic strip by uploading photos, adding effects and dialogue. ComicsSketch http://www.mainada.net/comics/ ComicsSketch is a more complex on-line comic creator that allows users to draw using editing tools. Gnomz http://en.gnomz.com Gnomz is a comic tool that allows basic comics from a set of pre-existing characters. Toondoo http://www.toondo.com This is a comic-creating tool that allows users to create their own comic strips with just a few drag and drops and mouse clicks.

Scrapbook Tools Scrapblog http://www.scrapblog.com/ Create, store and share digital scrapbooks. 102


Bookmarking & Organization Tool s Diigo http://www.diigo.com/ This is a virtual highlighter and digital sticky notes. Educators can create accounts for classes. Bubbl.us http://www.bubbl.us/index Bubbl.us is a “…simple and free web application that lets you brainstorm online. Create and share mind maps with peers.” FreeMind http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page Free mind-mapping software. Must be downloaded. Gliffy http://www.gliffy.com Gliffy is a “…free web-based diagram editor.” Create and share flowcharts, diagrams, mind maps… MindMeister http://www.mindmeister.com/ Free, web-based mapping tool. “Users can create, manage and share mind maps online and access them anytime, from anywhere. In brainstorming mode, fellow MindMeisters from around the world (or just in different rooms) can simultaneously work on the same mind map and see each other's changes as they happen.” Mindomo http://www.mindomo.com Create, edit mind maps, and share using this web-based mind-mapping tool, delivering the capabilities of desktop mind mapping software in a Web browser Pegby https://www.pegby.com/home/view An online bulletin board that allows users to create notes and organize them by board, card, column, or stack. About: http://vimeo.com/22584042

Search Tools Search Cube http://search-cube.com/ “[A] visual search engine that presents web search results in a unique, three-dimensional cube interface. It shows previews of up to ninety-six websites, videos and images.” Sweet Search www.sweetsearch.com/ A search engine for students; “it searches only credible Web sites approved by [the company’s] Internet research experts.” Google’s Wonder Wheel http://www.googlewonderwheel.com/ A visual search tool that “... shows related search terms to the current searched query and thus enable you to explore relevant search terms which might be the ones you originally wanted to search for, or simply give you more options to gain more information.” 103


Eyeplorer http://www.eyeplorer.com/ A graphical knowledge engine. ChaCha www.chacha.com/ A live SMS search engine that allows users to ask questions using cell phones. Mahalo www.mahalo.com/ Mahalo is a human-powered search engine dedicated to help people easily find information and resources they can trust. Users SMS to send questions and receive answers.

Other Tool s Buzzword http://www.adobe.com/acom/buzzword/ “Adobe® Buzzword® is an ... online word processor — perfect for writing reports, proposals, and anything else you need to access online or work on with others. Everyone can access the latest version of a document, share feedback, and respond to one another's comments from any computer.” Today’s Meet http://todaysmeet.com/ TodaysMeet helps you embrace the backchannel and connect with your audience in realtime. Google Docs http://docs.google.com/ Create, store and share documents and spreadsheets on the web Zoho http://www.zoho.com Zoho is a free, on-line suite of applications similar to Microsoft Office. Includes a mail editor, word processor, spreadsheet, presentation tool, wiki, chat and database applications. PollDaddy http://www.polldaddy.com/ Free on-line application that allows users to create surveys and polls for websites, blogs, and social network profiles. Quizlet www.quizlet.com Browse and use millions of flashcards created by other students and teachers, or create your own. Students can create their own flashcards, study with classmates, and track their progress.

Publishi ng

Issuu http://issuu.com/ Create embeddable magazines Lulu® http://www.lulu.com/ Upload and publish books online Blurb http://www.blurb.com/ Upload and publish books online Tutorials: http://www.blurb.com/help/tutorials Educator Resources: http://www.blurb.com/educators/ 104


Glogster http://www.glogster.com/ Create interactive posters Education Resources: http://edu.glogster.com/ Story Bird http://storybird.com/ Storybirds are short, visual stories that you make with family and friends to share and (soon) print. Squidoo http://www.squidoo.com/ A â&#x20AC;&#x153;popular publishing platform and community that makes it easy for you to create "lenses" online...â&#x20AC;? Think of it as a social network and wiki mashup. Weebly http://www.weebly.com/ WYSIWYG webpage builder. Tagul http://tagul.com/ Create word clouds that can be embedded in a webpage or blog. Tagxedo http://www.tagxedo.com/ Create customizable word clouds.

Word It Out http://worditout.com/ Transform text into clouds.

Social Networki ng Social Networks in Education Wiki http://socialnetworksined.wikispaces.com/ A listing of social networks used in educational settings. Thinking Machine http://thinkingmachine.pbwiki.com/Think+Social+Networking+for+Education A list of social networks and related resources.

105


Stra teg ies for Clas ses wi th Limi ted Access to Compu ters Teacher Tap http://eduscapes.com/tap/topic84.htm What's the best way to use the one computer I have in my classroom? What strategies should I use when doing large group activities with my computer? What's the most effective way to organize small group activities with only one computer? Teacher tap offers suggestions and answers… Kathy Schrock: A Review of Internet Literature http://kathyschrock.net/1computer/1computer.htm A list of strategies for classrooms with limited access. How to Thrive – Not Just Survive – in a One-Computer Classroom http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech/tech092.shtml Strategies for turning one computer into a “dynamic, creative teaching tool.” Intel Education: Managing Technology http://educate.intel.com/en/ProjectDesign/InstructionalStrategies/ManagingTechnol ogy/ Strategies and links for managing technology in K-12 classrooms.

106


Essen tial Reading Bogost, I. (2007) Persuasive games: The expressive power of videogames. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. Gee, J. P. (2007). Good video games and good learning: Collected essays on video games, learning, and literacy. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. Grossman, L. (2009, Feb. 23). Grand theft auto’s extreme storytelling. Time Magazine Retrieved on March 29, 2009 from, http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,1879194,00.html Harris, Robert. “Evaluating Internet Research Sources.” Virtual Salt 12 June 2007. 21 Nov 2008 <http://www.virtualsalt.com/evalu8it.htm>. ISTE. (2007). National Educational Technology Standards. Available from http://www.iste.org/standards.aspx Jenkins, H. Fans, bloggers, and gamers: Exploring participatory culture. New York: New York University Press. Jenkins, H. Reality bytes: Eight myths about video games debunked. PBS.org The Video Game Revolution. Impact of Gaming Essays. Available on-line <http://www.pbs.org/kcts/videogamerevolution/impact/myths.html>. Keller, D., Kress, A. & Winkle, S. (2006). Teaching seeing & writing 3. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s. Klopfer, E. , Osterweil, S., & Salen, K. ( 2009). Moving games forward: Obstacles, opportunities & openess. Cambridge, MA: Education Arcade. Available online at http://www.education.mit.edu/papers/MovingLearningGamesForward_EdArcade.pdf Lamb, B. (2004). Wide open spaces: Wikis ready or not. Educause, Sept/Oct, 36-48. Available online < net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM0452.pdf> Palfrey, J. & Gasser, U. (2008). Born digital. New York: Basic Books. Prensky, M. (2006). Don’t bother me mom — I’m learning!: How computer and video games are preparing your kids for twenty-first century success — and how you can help. St. Paul, Minnesota: Paragon House. Salen, K. (Ed.) The ecology of games: Connecting youth, games, and learning. Boston: MIT Press. Selfe, C. L. & Hawisher, G.E. (Eds.) (2007). Gaming lives in the twenty-first century: Literate connections. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Shaffer, D.W. (2006). How computer games help children learn. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

107


Spurlin, Joni E. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Technology and Learning: Defining What You Want to Assess.â&#x20AC;? Whitepaper. EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, 2006. Available on-line <http://connect.educause.edu/Library/ELI/TechnologyandLearningDefi/39339>.

108


Letter Hom e: Goo gle A ccounts Dear parent: This semester we will be addressing writing, digital literacy, and digital citizenship as part of our course work. To this end, we will use blogs, feed readers and cloud computing as tools for inquiry and collaboration. These tools are available to your student for free and will allow him / her to

Work with his / her peers and me

Access information

Organize information and work

Learn to navigate the Internet and the many digital tools that are available

Access programs needed for class assignments

Save work online

Publish his / her own writing for an authentic audience

We will be using Google’s suite of free applications for several projects and assignments. In order to access these tools, your student must sign up for a free Google account. By creating a Google account, your student will have access to Blogger1, Google Reader2, Google Sites3, and Google Docs4. Please sit down with your student and create an account. Make a note of your student’s login and password so that you may see what we are doing at any time. To sign up for a Google account: Go to h ttps://w ww.g o ogl e.c o m/acco un ts/ and create an account. You may also go to mail. go og l e.co m/mail /s ign up and create a Gmail account, which automatically creates a Google account. If you do not want your student to create a Google account, please contact me so that we can discuss your concerns and the technology required to complete this semester’s assignments. If you have any concerns or questions, please feel free to contact me at _________________________. Sincerely,

1 Learn

more about blogs at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN2I1pWXjXI 2 Learn more about Google Reader at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSPZ2Uu_X3Y 3 Learn more about wikis at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dnL00TdmLY 4 Learn more about Google Docs at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRqUE6IHTEA and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7y7NafWXeM 109


Copyrigh t, Fai r-Use, Creativ e Commons License Copyright A work is protected by copyright if it is in a tangible form (i.e., writing, recording). Currently, a work by a single author is protected for the duration of the creator’s life plus 70 years. Work by one or more individuals that is contracted, is copyrighted for 95 years after the first publication or 120 years from creation, whichever comes first.

The Skinny on Fair Use Exceptions to copyright laws exist. To determine if your use is deemed fair use, consider the following criteria Purpose. What is the purpose of your use of the copyrighted work? Education? For profit? The fair use doctrine may not be used for profit. Nature of Work. What is the nature of the copyrighted work? Creative? Factual? Factual works are not copyrighted. Because ideas and concepts cannot be owned, only the creative expression of ideas can be copyrighted. Length of work. How much of the original work are you going to use? Here are some general guidelines offered by the U.S. Copyright Office Text Up to 10% of a copyrighted work or 1000 words, whichever is less Poems • • • •

Entire poem if less than 250 words 250 words or less if longer poem No more than 5 poems (or excerpts) of different poets, from an anthology Only 3 poems (or excerpts) per poet

Motion Media • Up to 10% of a copyrighted work or 3 minutes, whichever is less • Clip cannot be altered in any way Illustrations • A photograph or illustration may be used in its entirety • No more than 5 images of an artist's or photographer's work • When using a collection, no more than 10% or no more than 15 images, whichever is less Music • Up to 10% of a copyrighted musical composition, but no more than 30 seconds • Up to 10% of a body of sound recording, but no more than 30 seconds • Any alterations cannot change the basic melody or the fundamental character of the work 110


Impact on revenue. Will you harm the market for this product by using this material?

Creative Commons Lice nse s “Creative Commons defines the spectrum of possibilities between full copyright — all rights reserved — and the public domain — no rights reserved...”5 Creative Commons refers to a new set of licenses that are applied in addition to traditional copyright laws. These new licenses allow creators to grant others the right to use their work. There are several licenses that may be applied to a work.

Attribution

Non-commercial

Share alike

No Derivative Works

People may copy, distribute, display, perform, and remix the copyrighted work, as long as they give credit the way the creator requests. All CC licenses contain this property. People may copy, distribute, display, perform, and remix work for non-commercial purposes only. If they want to use a work for commercial purposes, they must contact the creator for permission. People may create remixes and derivative works based on an original creative work, as long as they only distribute them under the same Creative Commons license that the original work was published under. People may copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of a work — not make derivative works based on it. If they want to alter, transform, build upon, or remix the original work, they must contact the creator for permission.6

5 “Spectrum of Rights.” Creative Commons. 9 November 2008.<http://creativecommons.org/about/>. 6 What is Creative Commons? 9 November 2008 available < wiki.creativecommons.org/images/3/35/Creativecommonswhat-is-creative-commons_eng.pdf>

111


Student Resources

Citation Machine http://citationmachine.net/ An on-line tool for creating bibliographic references. Citation Maker http://secondary.oslis.org/resources/cm/mlacitationss An on-line tool for creating MLA formatted bibliographic references. Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright http://www.loc.gov/teachers/copyrightmystery/ Library of Congress interactive tool for teaching about copyright How to Cite Electronic Sources http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/start/cite/index.html The Library of Congressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resource for writing bibliographic citations. Copyright Kids http://www.copyrightkids.org/ A web site to teach school-age children the basics of copyright law. Includes definitions, quiz, parent and teacher resources, and links. Yahoo! Creative Commons Search http://search.yahoo.com/cc Search service finds content across the Web that has a Creative Commons license. Google Advance Search http://www.google.com/advanced_search?hl=en Use Googleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advanced search and indicate the usage rights to filter out content that is not licenses for CC use. Creative Commons Search http://search.creativecommons.org/ Find photos, music, text, books, educational material, and more that is free to share or build upon utilizing Creative Commons enabled search services at Google, Yahoo!, and Flickr. You can also access this tool via the Firefox web browser.

112


Teacher Resources

Copyright Bay http://www.stfrancis.edu/cid/copyrightbay/index.htm An interactive tool for understanding copyright law. Permission Letter Template http://landmark-project.com/permission1.php The Copyright Site http://www.thecopyrightsite.org/ A site dedicated to helping educators understand copyright laws; includes links, FAQ, and teaching ideas. United States Copyright Office FAQ http://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/ The Learning Page http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/start/cpyrt/index.html The Library of Congressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resource on copyright PBS Teachers http://www.pbs.org/teachers/copyright/ A reference guide for educators who use television programming and multimedia Seven things You Should Know About Creative Commons educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7023.pdf Sharing Creative Works http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Sharing_Creative_Works A general introduction to copyright and CC licensing

113


Glos sary of Terms Terms related to blog s, podcasts, wikis, and other cutti ngedge technologies. -A-

aggregators; feed aggregator; feed reader; news reader -- a client software that pulls web content such as news headlines, blogs, podcasts, and vlogs in a single location for easy viewing. Popular aggregators are audioblog – a blog that includes audio clips in MP3, AAC or other audio format with brief text descriptions of their content. If the audioblog is made available in a syndication format such as RSS, it is a podcast.7 audiocast – audio content that is broadcast on the Internet, includes podcasts, streaming audio, and other distribution methods avatar -- an electronic image that represents and is manipulated by a computer user API (Application Programming Interface) -- a set of procedures that allows a programmer/user to create an external software that interacts with a particular program

-B backchannel -- the practice of using networked computers to maintain a real-time online conversation alongside live spoken remarks bandwidth -- the amount of data that can be carried from one point to another in a given time period; how much data can be sent through a network or modem connection bed – music or other audio that is used as a background element blaudience – portmanteau of blog and audience; a blog’s readership bleg / lazyweb -- portmanteau of blog and beg; a blog that solicits donations blog – portmanteau of web log; n. online journal consisting of regular entries, commentary, descriptions, etc.; v. to maintain or add content to a blog blog client – software run on a local machine (desktop) that allows users write posts for their blogs even if they are off-line. Publication is suspended until users connect to the Internet. Weblog Clients may manage blog entries in the same way that Outlook express manages email.

7

CBS Interactive. “ZDNet Definition for: Audioblog.” ZDNet. 2 November 2008 <http://dictionary.zdnet.com/definition/audioblog.html>.

114


blog hopping – moving from one blog to another with the intent of reading and leaving comments; this is a strategy for building a blaudience blog site – short for blog website blogger – one who blogs; free blog publishing tool from Google™ Bloggies – award for blogs blogoneer – portmanteau of blog and pioneer; a blogger who does something new blogosphere – collective term that includes blogs and the community created by blogging blogroll – a list of blogs read by a blog’s author, often found in the sidebar blogstorm -- a large and sudden influx of visitors to a blog that is caused by links in other bloggers’ articles back to a particular blog blogstream -- play on mainstream; refers to the alternative news and information network growing created by the blogosphere. board – short for mixing board, a tool for combining multiple audio sources into one recording bot – short for robot; a program or script that makes automated edits independent of human decision-making. bumper music – music used as transition between segments

-Cchannel – a group of podcasts or MP3 files. When listeners subscribe to podcasts, they are really subscribing to channels. collaborative blog – a blog that publishes posts by multiple authors around a theme comment spam – comments that contain automatically posted spam cyberbullying --the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group, that is intended to harm others.8

-Ddark blog – a blog that is not available to the public

8

"Cyber-bullying." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 5 Nov 2008, 18:22 UTC. 10 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cyber-bullying&oldid=249880006>. MHRA style

115


desktop blogging client – a blogging tool that is contained on a computer and is not hosted on-line (ecto, BlogJet, WindowsLive Writer, Moveable Type) Dooced -- v. to be fired from one’s job because of blogging; coined by and because of Heather Armstrong of Dooce

-Eencoding – converting audio files to MP3 format for uploading / publishing. episode – an individual podcast in a series (i.e., “Comma Splices” from Grammar Girl: Quick & Dirty Tips for Better Writing)

-Ffisking – a point-by-point refutation of a blog entry or (especially) news story. A really stylish fisking is witty, logical, sarcastic and ruthlessly factual; flaming or handwaving is considered poor form. Named after Robert Fisk, a British journalist who was a frequent … early target of such treatment 9 flame – to write abusively about someone flash mob – a group of people who organize on the Internet and then quickly assemble in a public place, do something bizarre, and disperse10.

flog – portmanteau of fake and blog; a blog that is written by a ghostwriter

-Hhandwave -- v. To gloss over a complex point; to distract a listener; to support a (possibly actually valid) point with blatantly faulty logic.11 host, hosting – a service that allows individuals and organizations to provide their own website accessible via the World Wide Web without having to own or maintain their own server or network.

-IID3 tag – part of an MP3 file that allows information (i.e., title, track, artist, category, etc.) about the file to be saved

9

Raymond, Eric. “Fisking.” The Jargon File. 2 November 2008 <http://catb.org/jargon/html/F/fisking.html>.

10 “Flashmob.” Dictionary.com. 1 July 2010, 1:48 UTC. <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/flash%20mob>. 11

Raymond, Eric. “Handwave.” The Jargon File. 2 November 2008 < http://catb.org/jargon/html/H/handwave.html>.

116


-Llurk; blurk – to read blogs without leaving comments or participating

-Mmashup – “a web application that combines data from more than one source into a single, integrated tool” (i.e., using Google Maps™ and Flickr® to create a travelog to create a new, distinct service not originally provided by either source.)12 meme – a concept, idea, email, or other “thing” that spreads quickly from one person to another via the Internet. metablog – blogging about blogs moblog – mobile blog; to use SMS technology or text messaging to post a blog (Twitter, Posterous) MP3 -- technology and file format for compressing audio content MSM -- acronym for mainstream media used in the blogosphere to refer to traditional forms of mass media (i.e., television, radio, newspapers)

-Nnarrowcast -- used to refer to programming targeted at a small audience demographic, as opposed to broadcast netiquette -- portmanteau of Internet and etiquette; rules comportment and social expectations associated with use of the internet (i.e., all caps indicates shouting) newbie; noob; noobie – one who is new to blogging

-Oopen thread – refers to a discussion that is undefined; related to threaded discussions outro – opposite of “intro,” refers to the music or audio clip at the end of a podcast

-Ppermalink – portmanteau of permanent link; “a URL that points to a specific blog or forum entry after it has passed from the front page to the archives”13

12

"Mashup (web application hybrid)." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 31 Oct 2008, 01:31 UTC. 4 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mashup_(web_application_hybrid)&oldid=248736732>. 13 "Permalink." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 23 Oct 2008, 10:05 UTC. 4 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Permalink&oldid=247140201>.

117


phlog – portmanteau of photo blog; compilation of photography and commentary ping – A utility to determine whether a specific IP address is accessible that works by sending a packet to the specified address and waiting for a reply14. pingback – the reply that is sent by a specific IP address that indicates it is working (see ping). podcast – an audio file published on the Internet podcatcher -- software that automatically checks podcast feeds for and downloads new podcasts podsafe (music) – license that allows music to be used, shared, and distributed by podcasts post – to write an article; a blog entry

-RRSS – acronym for Really Simple Syndication; “a family of Web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works – such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video – in a standardized format”15 RSS Feed – “The file containing a blog’s latest posts. It is read by an RSS aggregator/reader and shows at once when a blog has been updated. It may contain only the title of the post, the title plus the first few lines of a post, or the entire post.”16 RSS Aggregator -- see aggregator

-Ssegment – the divisions within a podcast episode skin – the template or “look” chosen by a user for a blog SMS – acronym for Short Message Service; protocol that allows short messages to be sent between mobile phones. Text messaging uses SMS. stub – a page in a wiki that is too short, unfinished, or used a place holder during planning and development swarming – phenomenon of bloggers banding together to effect a change based on a perception of egregious behavior 14

Jupitermedia Corporation. “Ping.” Webopedia. 2 November 2008 <http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/PING.html>. 15

"RSS." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 3 Nov 2008, 12:06 UTC. 4 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=RSS&oldid=249387729>. 16

"Glossary of blogging." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 4 Nov 2008, 02:01 UTC. 4 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Glossary_of_blogging&oldid=249551462>.

118


-Ttag – v. a way of indexing posts, videos, photos, or websites based on user-defined keywords that is not related to definitions, but on user associations; n. a keyword associated with web content (Delicious, Flickr®, YouTube™ all use tags to organize content.) tag cloud – a visual representation of tags associated with a particular item. “Tags are usually single words and are typically listed alphabetically, and the importance of a tag is shown with font size or color.”17 tagline – witty statement used to “brand” a podcast template – the coding that determines how the information in a blog looks; blog design thread – a discussion; all posts related to a particular discussion trackback – “A system that allows a blogger to see who has seen the original post and has written another entry concerning it.”18 troll – someone who intentionally disrupts discussion for no reason except to be a pest. Posts are generally controversial, inflammatory or irrelevant or off-topic. “The well-constructed troll is a post that induces lots of newbies and flamers to make themselves look even more clueless than they already do, while subtly conveying to the more savvy and experienced that it is in fact a deliberate troll. If you don't fall for the joke, you get to be in on it.” 19

-Vvlog – portmanteau of video and blog; refers to a blog that features commentary in video form vodcast – portmanteau of video podcast; refers to the publication of video files rather than MP3 files for RSS syndication. vorage – portmanteau of video and forage; v. to search for videos

-WWeb 2.0 – the shift from software-centered technology (i.e., word processing) to user-defined technology focused on collaboration and creativity as embodied by blogging and social networking

17

"Tag cloud." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 15 Oct 2008, 21:11 UTC. 4 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tag_cloud&oldid=245525787>. 18

"Glossary of blogging." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 4 Nov 2008, 02:01 UTC. 4 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Glossary_of_blogging&oldid=249551462>. 19

Raymond, Eric. “Troll.” The Jargon File. 2 November 2008. < http://catb.org/jargon/html/T/troll.html>.

119


widget – a “add-on” piece of code that allows users to customize and enhance their web page ; syn.: badge, flake, gadget, application, plug-in wiki – a webpage(s) that allows users to easily create and edit content using their Web browser. It is a collaborative tool. wiki farm – “…a server or an array of servers that provides hosting for multiple wikis. Wiki farms are also known as "hosted wiki service providers.”20 wikiLove -- a general spirit of collegiality and mutual understanding among wiki users. Includes this advice to: • Follow Wikiquette–respect other contributors. • Love newcomers even more. • Follow Wikipedia policies. • Aim for a neutral point of view; write articles that people from all sides can read and agree with. • Stay cool–don't react hastily in anger. • Forgive and forget. • Remember that everyone likes to feel appreciated. When making a comment, it's often good to start with a thank you or something positive when there is a reason for it, and maybe end with a thank you if making a request.21 wikiCrime -- an act that deliberately and seriously hurts the objective of creating quality articles. It should be noted that the intention is important in this case. Normally good faith is assumed. Wikicrime includes: • deliberately, knowingly removing relevant, documented facts from an article. • deliberately inserting information that the contributor knows or believes to be untrue, especially if stated as if it were factual. • deliberately, knowingly inserting contents that have a very strong point of view, or are advertisements, or propaganda while the context suggests the inserted contents are neutral point of view. • committing vandalism.22 wikiHate -- a counterproductive attitude that takes away time from many Wikipedians23 wikipedian – someone who participates in the various Wikipedia-related projects to any extent 20

"Comparison of wiki farms." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 15 Nov 2008, 17:26 UTC. 17 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Comparison_of_wiki_farms&oldid=251987626>. 21

"Wikilove." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 21 Oct 2008, 11:29 UTC. 17 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikilove&oldid=246700597>. 22

“Wikicrime.: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 20 Sept 2008, 04:12 UTC. 17 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:WikiCrime&oldid=239725932>.

23

“Wikihate.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 18 Apr 2008 07:33 UTC. 17 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:WikiCrime&oldid=239725932>.

120


wikiquette – wiki principles of behavior for users and contributors as outlined by Wikipedia. Wikipedia -- free, multilingual encyclopedia project supported by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Its name is a portmanteau of the words wiki (a technology for creating collaborative websites) and encyclopedia. Wikipedia's 10 million articles have been written collaboratively by volunteers around the world, and almost all of its articles can be edited by anyone who can access the Wikipedia website. Launched in 2001 by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger, it is currently the largest and most popular general reference work on the Internet.24 wikiViolence -- when an editor of Wikipedia intentionally acts disrespectfully toward another editor. Wikiviolence can be in the form of a personal attack, edit war, or disrespectful remarks on an editor's talk page.25 wikipedian – a contributing editor to any of the wikipedia projects WYSIWYG – Acronym for “What you see is what you get;” refers to point-and-click editing

24

"Wikipedia." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 17 Nov 2008, 00:56 UTC. 17 Nov 2008 <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia&oldid=252264435>. 25

“Wikiviolence.” WIkipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 21 Feb 2008 08:15 UTC. 17 Nov 2008 < http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:WikiViolence&oldid=192995221>.

121

Handbook 2011-2012  

Seminar Handbook

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you