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Project’s name:

Festival of the Mind - 50 ideas for better Sheffield

50 ideas for better Sheffield Every year, the University of Sheffield’s School of Architecture and Department of Landscape carry out projects in the city, working with communities to explore new approaches to urban development. 50 Ideas for Better Sheffield aims to bring together in one place some highlights of those projects from the past ten years. The ideas presented in the exhibition are collected from Sheffield-based architecture (majority), landscape and urban design student projects from the last ten years to find most interesting ones, still relevant today. The projects were found on internal servers, on various CDs, in booklets and from the actual students who, in many cases, have left Sheffield University years ago. From over a hundred projects unearthed we have selected 50 ideas which are not just interesting but also relevant to development of the city and its communities today - be those prototypes to be used by community groups or aspirational ideas to make people think about development of the city. Many of the ideas presented have been forgotten and many are even more relevant now than at the time they were conceived. By curating this exhibition we hope to engage non-professionals in discussions about architecture and the urban environment and to make the concept of regeneration more people-focused.

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This project is a collaboration between SKINN (Shalesmoor Kelham Island and Neepsend Network) a community-led regeneration agency and Dr. Cristina Cerulli, a lecturer and researcher at the University of Sheffield’s School of Architecture.


Year:

Location:

2012

Sheffield wide

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Cristina Cerulli

University of Sheffield Festival of the MInd

Project’s members:

Ivan Rabodzeenko, Jekaterina Porohina

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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ood There is a- Frange of Architecture Centres around the UK that operate to encourage public involvement in architectural discourse, ranging from issues around housing to the quality of public space. There are various models for what the centres exactly provide and how they operate.

At the moment however there is no such centre in Sheffield, but there are plenty of issues in the built environment that have to be resolved and plenty new built work happening in the city: new housing developments, area action plans and retage - Heristrategies, generation parks, etc. There is no doubt that these old and new projects are longing for public attention and engagement. But how could an architecture centre facilitate it?

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The project aimed to engage school children, but also the wider community, introducing the subject of architecture not only through subjects of art and design, but also through citizenship and wider learning. Its activities got people talking about architectural issues, demonstrating that there is the capacity of creative interest in the city to sustain a potential, more permanent, centre. The project was a SSoA collaboration (through a Live Project) with Sheffield Civic Trust which aimed at establishing the identity for the new centre. The Live Project was also the springboard to Sheffield Now! a CIC that temporarily carried out the functions of the architecture centre as explored by the Live Project.

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Location:

2007

Sheffield

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Rosie Parnell, Lisa Procter

Sheffield Civic Trust

Project’s members: Abigail Thomas, Hayley Anderson, Hugh Miller, Kyle Reid, Luke Richardson, Richard Holland, Tom Vigar

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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South Yorkshire National Park - Live project

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South Yorkshire was once the industrial centre of Britain, with a thriving economy based on mining and manufacture. In recent times the industry has reduced and South Yorkshire has been left behind while other regions and cities throughout the country have been regenerated and developed. e & Ed oAurtrc& Cultuureca-tio is-c n D -

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is Following theon -recent designation of the New Forest Nation-D al Park and the proposal for the South Downs National Park, adding to the eight existing National Parks in England – four of which are in the very North of England, (Northumberland, Lakes, Dales and Moors) – and the nearby highly popular Peaks District National Park in Derbyshire, South Yorkshire might add to the Middle England region and become a further location for a new designation/creation of a National Park created for and of the 21st Century.

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Imagine planting a kind of “forest” across the whole of South Yorkshire beyond and between existing urban and rural settlement patterns and from that dense and continuous field create a series of settings/places in which intervention can take place on varying scales. This could be South Yorkshire ‘offer in Europe’ … place the region high on the national and international map for sustainable community development through the renaissance of its towns, cities, and their hinterlands, bringing urban and rural needs and agendas together into a single renaissance purpose … and, if planned and delivered with creativity and boldness, could lead to a long term economic and social well-being of the area and its communities.

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Location:

2005

South Yorkshire

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles, John Nordon, Jeremy Till

Alan Simpson

Project’s members:

Paul Bower, Ross Brearley, Peter Buist, Dan Burn, Laura Donaldson, Daniel Downs, Zhi Jian Fann, Yvonne Pang, Matt Plummer, Lisa Procter, Carolina Scott, Kenji Shermer, Joe Tenner, Lizzy Wilson, Kim Winston

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Kelham Island Stones - Live Project

Reuse of heritage in a way that encourages understanding of industrial process

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This Live Project was intended to make a record of stonework held at the Kelham Island Industrial Museum in Sheffield. The stones came from demolished buildings around Sheffield and were of ornamental nature. The project included creation of a web catalogue that provided details concerning the size, ood - the relative history of each stone, but also incondition- Fand cluded the work on ideas for re-using the stones, playing on the fact that the stones have been discarded and are no longer required for what they were intended, to give them new life in a new context.

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This project proposed reusing the stones in a way that would make them an attraction in their own right. One of the strategies was to display stones as part of garden and make an attraction for kids. But rather than proposing a simple touch/seat setting, the group aimed for interactive outcome. This meant making the project more fun and also providing the educational benefits. Firstly, through the act of moving the stones an understanding of weights, materials, forces would emerge, secondly, the project could become a historical reminder of how many of the stones would have been used originally.

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Location:

2003

Kelham Island

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Russel Light

Kelham Island Museum

Project’s members: Hugh Conway-Morris, Lucy Taylor, Tom Burbridge, Richard Palmer, Marcus Offinger, Prashat Solanky, Nazrina Noor, Jamie Fewings, Tony Burke

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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How can we build when no-one is building?

Housing on top of the supermarkets

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With developers not building due to downturn in the economy, Sheffield City Council should look at a strategy for big business to help them provide the homes they needed. Sheffield Council would set out new legislation on large sites that had been land-banked in the region. This would mean telling Tesco they needed to provide 150 affordable family homes on the five hectare site if they were to get planning permission, or they must sell the land.

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“the country’s most powerful retailer, Tesco, is also among Britain’s most powerful real estate companies; its portfolio is conservatively valued at £14.2bn...”

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The UK is currently facing a deficit of 160,000 houses. The idea explores how affordable housing could be delivered in ‘Credit Crunch’ times when it is not economically viable for normative developers to build. Looking to create opportunities in land rather than housing the idea is to explore how to unlock Tesco’s estimated 185 massive land banked sites across the country lying vacant. The project explores a sustainable solution to provide affordable family housing and a commercially viable warehouse for online shopping for Tesco, thus, creating a mutually beneficial relationship for both.


By analyzing the Tesco Strategy published in their annual report, the project proposed a new type of warehouse for online shopping that Tesco could design, based solely on efficiency and improving profits. To do this the store would have to be more sustainable to reduce costs. The store would act as a distribution centre for Sheffield for online orders people order from their homes. On top of the warehouse the houses would be built, in what would be virtually free ‘land’; the symbiosis of warehouse and housing in this new hybrid building type would also be exploited in energy terms by, for instance, using heat generated by refrigerators and cooling systems to heat the homes. Rising fuel costs with the consequent increase in internet shopping could make this building type more and more plausible.

Year: 2009

Location:

Attercliffe

Project mentor(s): Cristina Cerulli, Tatjana Schneider

Project’s member(s): Adam Dainow

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Project’s name:

The City Embodied

Development of studio and community space clusters to resist gentrification of an area

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Arguably,- Htop-down city planning is ounsustainable. This is beousing - H using egeneration R cause it frequently fails to promote a city’s identity using the terms of its existing residents. Instead it gives prominence to the needs of prospective private sector businesses and investors. With this idea as a starting point, this project explored planning with a bottom-up approach. For areas such as the Devonshire Quarter, gentrification can have deeply negative effects. Although& Eapartments and shops may- Fbe - Food ood -built, rents in the area duca e o ur c tio scgo i also up. In the case of the Devonshire Quarter, this is very n -D bad news for the many businesses that populate the area and make it unique. It can be argued that higher rents push out craftspeople and destroy the character of the area. One project from 2011 proposed an alternative to traditional top-down development plans. The idea is that through the development of a creative community and the provision of community space in the area, gentrification can be halted. By providingRepeople spaces to meet,- Hpeople can discuss what is eritage - rHceersitage with sou happening to their area, and push for developments and improvements that will help them, instead of driving them out.

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Project proposed redevelopment of Eye Witness works to create studio and creative workspaces along with spaces for community.

Year: 2012

Location:

Devonshire Quarter

Project mentor(s):

Carolyn Butterworth

Project’s member(s): Kirti Durelle

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Fugitive House - Live project

Art projects to generate discussion about city development egte&neCrualttiuorne--RAr

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echno gn & TThe logdeHouse 24620 was built in Detroit during the 1920s. esi y -D velopers have already demolished many other houses like it. However, this one was rescued from destruction by American artist-cum-architect Kyong Park. He dismantled it and took it to Europe as part of a multi-media art installation called ‘24620’, a reference to the house’s number.

It is a ‘fugitive’ house, running from the city of Detroit, where more than two hundred thousand homes were destroyed or rt & Culture -A burned in the last fifty years. The 24620 was touring around different urban locations in France, Germany and Netherlands and has temporarily found a home in Sheffield, outside the Hubs, in 2003.

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Contrasting with the surrounding futuristic steel structure of the Hubs and sleek art deco look of the Workstation the worn and weather-weary wooden Detroit house was calling for discussion about ongoing regeneration projects in Sheffield, bringing up issues like longevity, urgent in 2003 development - Leisure schemes like Heart of the City and West One, questioning what will still be standing in 20 years time.

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In formal terms the house worked as a backdrop for organised public discussion between Sheffield City Council, historians and staff and students from Sheffield School of Architecture. The public had to make up their own decision about the meaning of this visit from Detroit. For the artist the ‘24620” replicates the condition of a dysfunctional city. Wherever it may go, the house takes the ideals and failures of modernism with it, creating discourses on the cultural state and destiny of each community.

Year:

Location:

2003

Cultural Industries Quarter

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Carolyn Butterworth, Jeremy Till

Project’s members:

Kyong Park

Mark Broom, Stuart Curran, Jonathan Drage, Vanessa Pearce, Kay Robson, Neil Sansom, Ruth Sienkiewic, Vicky Stoddard, Jon Wallis, Simon Watkins

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Sheffield City rt & Culture -A Centre

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Home - a feminist responce to homelessness in Sheffield

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Self-built cooperative housing as a way to empower homeless people - Leisure -

The overall ambitionignof a one neration & Tethis chno project was not to egeprovide lo -R es -D off solution for a small groupgyof homeless families in Sheffield, but, rather, to develop a case study for a new approach to homelessness. The project tried to examine the issue from the position of self-empowering processes rather than charity.

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When dealing with vulnerable individuals as a user group, these principles become all the more significant. For these reasons, a small scale co-operative living environment presents itself as the most appropriate reaction. The ideology of co-operative living lends itself to an increased sense of community and with this comes responsibility and worth. Teaming sources - provides Leisure these ideas with the-empowering notion of self-build - Re a logical framework for homeless communities to re-engage with a sense of home.

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The provision of a sense of home for homeless families demands a more complex and holistic approach than the mere provision of housing. The criteria for developing physical shelCulture e & Educa considter into social and -emotional home requires cin urcdepth Ar t & tio s o n Di eration of the sense of identity, community, family, ritual, belonging and territory.

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Co-operative self build housing has a number of attributes that would suggest the legitimacy of a model for growth. Firstly, co-operative housing, although less common in the UK, is a tried and tested model. In Canada, a quarter of a million people live in housing co-operatives. Secondly, the principles of cooperative living lend itself to sharing of skills. The self-build construction process is essential in providing an emotional and physical investment into the sense of home. It lends itself to easily accessible and manageable construction techniques. However, it is also essential that the homes have a sense of permanency and robustness, in an attempt to create a sense of long-term home.

Year: 2009

Location:

Burngreave

Project mentor(s): Florian Kossak

Project’s member(s): Sarah Considine

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Re-imagining public space for the media age sources - Heritage - Re OCTV Sheffield

City-wide television network to record and broadcast actions and opinions of the people of Sheffield

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By reinforcing the connection between the virtual and the ration - Housing egenethe physical -intention is to utilise the virtual’s potential for the -R mediation of power, and to hand it back to the citizens of Sheffield.

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‘OCTV Sheffield’ is a theoretical response to the perceived decline in the role and function of ‘public space’ within the city. It is an exploration into the changing mediation of power, and, at its core, is the notion that physical public space is no longer being used an ‘arena of conflict’; instead this role is increasingly being transferred to the virtual world.

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‘OCTV Sheffield’ is a city-wide television network, spatially manifested through a series of hybrid public spaces, with the central ‘forum’ space being the focus of the design investigation. It seeks to broadcast activity which occurs in the public domain across the city – once again giving the public the power to comment on the behaviour of others. The project combines notions of spaces for appropriation and temporary ownership with facilities for the recording and broadcasting of everyday city events and activity. The central forum effectively becomes a hybrid public space/ broadcast centre and acts as a giant outdoor TV studio to record and broadcast the actions and opinions of the people of Sheffield. Through combining ‘public space’ with the generation of visual media ‘OCTV Sheffield’ reverses the concept of closed circuit television. Public visibility becomes a tool of personal and collective empowerment, rather than a weapon of ‘top down’ control.

Year: 2009

Location:

Matilda Street, Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s): Florian Kossak

Project’s member(s): Anna Muray

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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School of life

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The predicted mass shift amongst Britons towards domestic holidays fuelled by recession and the weak value of the pound, has in some ways become a reality. But the financial crisis masks some of the larger, more long-term problems with- the Leisureaviation industry, particularly the growing environmental concerns regarding air travel.

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The idea explores how the recently abandoned Sheffield City Airport may be reinvented into a holiday destination of sorts.

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The (real) client for this imaginary project is ‘The School of Life’, an unusual travel agency that disputes the notion that holidays are about escaping reality, instead they offer sojourns to the & Comm un vism it y cti neglected corners of everyday life, airports, service stations, A motorways, questioning many of the notion of the package holiday and offering a superficially ‘modest yet philosophically’ considered alternatives. The proposals consists of three main elements: it relocates existing Sheffield Aero Club back to the airport, provides a windpowered electric car service station, but also the whole complex of classy holiday facilities: artificial beach, the cloud room, hotel rooms, subterranean spa.

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Prosaically, the project is a new motorway service station for the M1, which is cross programmed with a base and airstrip for a local flying club. Environmentally, it consists of a wind farm that provides power for the recharging of electric cars using the motorway. Poetically, the project is an exploration of our relationship to the exotic and the notions of virtual travel. The operations of the flying school lend the building the air of the romance of travel, without the need to actually go anywhere. Discreetly concealed within the building is the accommodation of the School of Life, with its hotel rooms, sky space and artificial beaches, all bringing aspects of the exotic into the project in ways that are inspired by Huysman’s Des Esseintes, who furnished his villa in order to satisfy his own fantasies of travel.

Year: 2009

Location:

Sheffield City Airport

Project mentor(s): Russel Light

Project’s member(s): Paul Westwood

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Park Hill flat restoration - Live project

Restoration of one of the Park Hill flats to be used as visitor centre

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This idea was realised in 1999, one year after the building became Grade II listed and much before Urban Splash came in to redevelop it. Sheffield City Council had obtained a five thousand pound grant to restore a flat on Gilbert Row, to its original condition of the early sixties. A Live Project group were asked to carry out the work on a flat that would then operate as a visitor centre. The idea was to recreate the flat to reflect the way it was actually occupied by residents. The project involved research into social and historical context of the flat, physical qualities of the interior, sourcing of authentic fittings and furniture as well as actual repair of the flat. The most unusual part of the project was the process of stripping and cleaning - removal of successive layers of paint and plaster had almost archaeological overtones. When all was left bare, the application of (what were deemed) appropriate finishes began.

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The interior was completed by the end of allotted four weeks, however the rather oppressive anti-vandal shutters, fastened across exterior openings and out of the team’s jurisdiction, still had to be replaced by the City Council. “It is to be hoped that the City Council will attend to these final details so that the flat can be used as intended and made open to the public.” There is no information available whether City Council has completed the task or that the flat became opened to public. But if it was, it would have been a great contribution to our understanding of why Park Hill is so unique.

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1999

Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Jeremy Till

Sheffield City Council

Project’s members: Unknown

Department: School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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The Whirl - Live project

Art to inspire positive sustainable changes

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In 2007 one Live Project team worked with Ruth Nutter on the an art installation called the “Whirl”.

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Whirl in the Woods was designed to offer ways for people to re-imagine their relationship with home and the wider natural world. The idea is a playful, sensory installation on the Whirlow Wheel site (old water mill) in Ecclesall Woods - an artistic expression of low carbon and low waste living and reconnection with nature. The idea of the installation was about creating an experience, enhancing the awareness of nature, while creating a sense of the home, with a welcoming fire and the smell of baking bread in the air. Main themes of the Whirl: low carbon living, reconnecting with nature and low waste living, getting away from the image of sterile and private ‘eco-homes’.

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Ruth Nutter is an arts producer who was awarded a NESTA (National Endowment of Science Technology and the Arts) fellowship to explore ways to inspire and enable people to live more sustainably. people to experience the Whirl installation itagwant e- Her‘I in such a way that it inspires them to look at their own lives and sources - Heritage - Re make positive sustainable changes…’ - Ruth.


The project team worked with Handspring Design at the Sawmill in Ecclesall woods. The structure was pre-fabricated at Ecclesall Sawmill and then assembled on site in two and a half days. The installation was opened to public during one night event. The structure was disassembled that very night and all trace of ‘The Whirl in the Woods’ was removed. All of the timber screens that comprised the Heart have been donated to Handsping Design at Ecclesall Woods Sawmill, who intended to re-use them to screen their exterior workshop. None of the timber used to build this event has been wasted.

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2007

Ecclesall Woods

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles

Ruth Nutter with NESTA

Project’s members: India Aspin, Andrew Breathwick, Daniel Chen, Paul Fielding, Molly Grey, Rachel Harris, Martin Lydon, Heather McGill, Juliet SakyiAnsah, David Sparks

Department: School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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IYO - Live project

Instigation and analysis of past live projects for the better future practice As you may have noticed, a large proportion of ideas in this exhibition came from Live Projects. These type of projects at SSoA run for six weeks at the start of each academic years and are carried out by groups of up to ten students from Y5 and Y6 in the MArch (postgraduate architecture course). Students work with a range of clients including local community groups, charities, health organisations and regional authorities. One of the Live Projects looked at documenting and analyzing Live Projects themselves in order to assess their value and influence their future. In this Live Project set up as IYO, the Inconspicuous Yellow Office, Live Projects themselves were looked at as means to question mainstream architectural practice, asking questions like: er

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Techno gen ation gn & projects? log Why do we do Dlive Why do they- Rehave to be alternaesi y tive? What is an alternative practice? If the majority of students go on to work in commercial practices then shouldn’t the projects reflect this? They could be used as a stepping stone for future jobs, why not?

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Live Projects embody a huge diversity of academic and practical principles. They are neither wholly alternative, nor typical, however the range of clients, users, processes, products and outcomes, provide an invaluable contribution to the students’ education and the services to the communities that students are working with. Building upon the existing project’s archive, the IYO has organized encounters, public debates and small workshops, bringing together Sheffield students and academics, past and present clients, local communities and practitioners with external researchers and activists, in the context of a wider European cultural project, PEPRAV (Plate-forme Européenne de Pratiques et Recherches Alternatives de la Ville). IYO culminated with a publication and ‘Platform’ workshop and conference in Sheffield 23-25 October 2006.

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2006

Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Doina Petrescu, Florian Kossak, Tatjana Schneider, BDR

European Platform for Alternative Research and Action in the City

Project’s members:

James Brown, Pui Yu Zue Lee, Kevin Ryan, Thomas Vigar, Emma Williams, Paul Bower, Peter Buist, Matt Plummer, Julia Udall

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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MAUD_UDP2 Resources -

Sheffield City Centre - Heritage -

Digital notice board as a regeneration tool

The noticeboard is an indispensable part of many communities, found in neighbourhoods, shops, workplaces and now more increasingly online. Usually free of charge they can be used to advertise events, jobs, services or items for sale, etc. Many of these displays are self-sustainable and self-organising. However today the availability of suitable technology leads to a rise in digital notice boards, which have several advantages over traditional ones: allowing multimedia notices, automatic clearing of out of dated content displays, web access, etc.

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One of the ideas from a project looking at regeneration of Upper Don corridor was to design a digital noticeboard for the Neepsend area. The noticeboard in this scenario would enable communication between a variety of different area’s stakeholders, helping to bring people and resources together and to uplift this neglected part of Sheffield


For example, the recycle exchange, which would allow local businesses as well as private persons to exchange waste material which could be used in different way by somebody else (see idea No.14) The skills exchange, a platform to ask the local people and business a way to help each other. This tool gives the community a possibility to search for any kind of help and advice that they are looking for. If personal or professional help is required, the member can be sure that there will be someone in the network who has exactly what they are looking for. Similar to Regather in Sheffield. The noticeboard could also host: Calendar of upcoming events. Street improvements & new planning issues section. The vacant space exchange, where local community can use un-utilised spaces. This sort of network would help tighten already existing links between local residents and businesses and help to develop an even more resilient network of local and international relations.

Year: 2011

Location: Neepsend

Project mentor(s): Cristina Cerulli, Florian Kossak

Project’s members:

Adrian Judt, Sowbarnika Sendhil, Xiaodi Duo, Yali Zang, Yeshu Yang

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Space of waste - Live project

Un-used resources to be shared online

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50 Ideas - Festival of the Mind

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Bradford Environmental Action Trust (BEAT) is a charity running various projects across the waste and conservation sectors and have developed and run an online business and construction waste exchange – www.whywaste.org.uk. The purpose of the exchange iseritato find new uses for material otherwise deemed ge -H as waste and therefore condemned to landfill. As part of the awareness-raising campaign for this Yorkshire and Humberwide service, BEAT has commissioned the design and construction of a building made wholly (or as near as possible) from material found through the website. This material available on the website at the time of design (from 1st October 2007) dictated the dynamics and specifics of the process and had a significant influence on the finished building. In addition to materials found on the website, BEAT also provided reclaimed timber from one of its other reuse project. The building was constructed and displayed in Tudor Square, Sheffield and was open to the public from 12th November 2007 for one week.


The purpose of constructing a building was to prove that waste is a rich and untapped resource and that it is possible to make something beautiful from someone else’s rubbish. “One person’s waste is another’s resource.” For the project to have the necessary impact it was essential that members of the press and public be impressed by both the quality of the design and build and the ingenuity and adaptability in the use of materials. Other cities in the region have expressed an interest in exhibiting the building and it was BEAT’s intention to tour it after the Sheffield build. Therefore an element of the brief was that the building be as demountable as possible and relatively easy to transport. The building was formally opened on Monday 12th November to the press and public. There was a small exhibition inside created by whywaste.org. uk about the benefits of reusing waste. At dusk visitors were greeted to a hanging light feature inside. The Why Waste website is still operational.

Year:

Location:

2007

Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Jeremy Till

Bradford Environmental Action Trust

Project’s members:

Sarah Hunt, Peter Sofoluke, James Halsall, Dave Basak, Gordon Ashton, Kevin Ryan, Pete Jennings, Tom Goodall, Rosie Greenwood, Ben Craggs

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Sheffield City Centre

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Abbeydale Broadfield - Live project

Wildlife & Leisure Corridor along River Sheaf - Food -

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The River Sheaf flows from the Peak District through the centre of the valley towards Sheffield city centre. The river is a wildlife corridor, its inaccessible banks often home to a variety of species of woodland trees and plants. Currently many industrial buildings along the river prevent not only access to it but also - Heritage visual connection with it.

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The River Sheaf is a potentially great asset to the area, but is currently under-utilised. It is possible to follow and in fact improve upon the existing models of river walk and cycle development along the River Don and turn it into the main cycle and pedestrian artery to and from the City Centre.

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One of the ideas from a 2004 Live Project looking at the development strategies for Broadfield was the proposal of a continuous riverside pathway to function as the main cycle and pedestrian artery to the City Centre; this would include improvements to the banks of the river, the addition of leisure uses and improvement of existing facilities.

sm & Commun tivi it y Ac


In places the river has been canalised in deep concrete channels in an attempt to reduce problems of flooding - The project suggests that wherever possible the canalised river should be opened up and its banks naturalised. As a general rule, one bank should remain undeveloped and relatively inaccessible, to act as a refuge for wildlife and visual green space, while the other would be developed into a continuous pedestrian and cycle route. These can be cantilevered over the waters edge where space is limited. Provide legible signage, orientation viewpoints, good lighting, and a good choice of possible routes to promote a feeling of safety. Use a unified design style and nodes of interest and activity (such as fishing points and sculpture trails) to make the experience more pleasurable. Link the new River Sheaf route to Sheffield’s wider cycle and pedestrian network. Add leisure uses (restaurants, cafes, bars) to the banks of the river to extend the hours of use of the area and thus make the walk feel safer and more lively.

Year:

Location:

2004

Broadfield

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Aidan Hoggard

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Project’s members:

Ben Costello, Duncan McDougall, Mark Holloway, Mihalis Walsh, Laura Birchenough, Prash Solanky, Richard Palmer

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Castle Market as a space of production, consumption, exchange and distribution In his text Grundrisse, Marx proposes that production equals consumption (and vice versa) and that consumption is in effect the crucial and ultimate part of production as any product can eisurits e - cononly come to its full meaning through the very act- Lof sumption.

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Currently most of goods production process stretch across continents. This project, part of a Design Studio looking at ‘Consumption’, proposed that production and consumption should be brought closer together whilst making the distribution and exchange of goods more visible. Because the process is localised the consumer will have more control over the production and objects can be taken away or bought into the process at & Comm un vism it y cti A various stages in their development. Through the process of mass production the modern consumer has lost all connection with the goods which they consume.

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50 Ideas - Festival of the Mind

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The existing Castle Market is redefined to function as a machine for the production of goods - acting as the distributor, and place for exchange and consumption. The consumer is invited to enter the machine and be exposed to the inner workings – the gears and cogs which make the process happen.


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The idea poses to redefine the architecture of consumption in Castle Market through localising the actions of production, consumption, exchange and distribution all within a single, concentrated locale. This is achieved through creating a site of intense mixed use consisting of small scale production workshops producing on demand goods for the consumer.

Year: 2010

Location:

Castlegate

Project mentor(s): Florian Kossak

Project’s member(s): Nicholas Evans

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas

Market stalls


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Project’s name:

A vision for Parkwood Springs - Live project

Leisure / adventure park at Parkwood Springs - Re

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Parkwood Springs is an extraordinary part of the city. Located just 1 mile from Sheffield City Centre, the area occupies an extensive site of over 300 acres (almost as big as the city centre). The boundaries of the site include the River Don to the west, Rutland Road to the south, the rear property boundaries on Penrith Road, Musgrove Road and Shirecliffe Road to the east and Herries Road to the north. The site is within easy reach of Housing -a large proportion of Sheffield and in particuresidents -from lar the nearby communities of Southey/Owlerton, Burngreave, Hillsborough, Walkley and Netherthorpe. The ideas is to transform a vast, scarred landscape into a special place that local people, the city and the region can be proud of. A place that has both local and European significance - attracting people to enjoy experiences that are both leisurely and breathtaking.

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Popular suggestions for new facilities and development of the existing included (at the time, in 2003): -Motor-cross, Quad-biking, Motor-biking. There is strong demand and support from local communities for a motorcycle area. If provided it would be expected to positively reduce the use of motorbikes on the rest of the Parkwood Springs area. -Canoeing, Water Sports. The River Don at Parkwood Springs is ideal as a teaching and development base, extending activities from other parts of the Don. Existing unused historic buildings could be developed to provide supporting facilities. -Mountain Biking, Cycling. The terrain available at Parkwood Springs will enable substantial provision for occasional riders and recreation riders. -BMX, Skateboarding, Skating. And other urban sports are popular across Europe. Parkwood Springs offers an opportunity to provide competition standard facilities as well as more informal facilities for these sports. -Walking, Nature Trails. The creation of multi-user and sole-user paths should provide sufficient access for the existing users, additional recreational users and urban users. -Jogging, Orienteering, Cross Country Running. New facilities should be well designed routes which meet the needs of different users and give the perception of feeling safe. Other activities proposed included: Adventure Trails, Bird Watching, Fishing, Horse Riding, Climbing and Go Karting - some of which are now implemented

Year:

Location:

2002

Parkwood Springs

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles, Carolyn Butterworth Parkwood Springs Steering Group, South Yorkshire Forestry Project’s members: Unknown

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Sharrad Road Allotments regeneration projectLive project

New outdoor classroom for £135

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This project has shown that it takes only 15 days and 8 students to rebuild an old dilapidated shed into a spacious outdoor classroom with secure storage area, compost bins and wooden flooring. And all can be done for only £135 if the majority of materials have been sourced for free.

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The structure was built for Sharrard Road Allotment to be used by local school - Food -and community. To design the structure students worked with staff of Leisure Gardeners and Leisure Gardeners Federation, allotment holders and actively involved in the design process future users of the space - children from Intake Primary School.

- Heritage -

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The building sequence was as follows - remove the roof and side panels of existing shed, relocate uprights to provide more space for the structure, add new floor and storage area, secure covering to the roof. Two compost bins have been built on the front of the new classroom. These will enable the children to become involved in the process of composting and to actually see it all as it happens, with the compost bins being visible from inside the shed through two old door sections. Two bins were provided as this is intended as a cold composting system, so whilst one bin is being filled the other can be rotting down to form compost and vice versa. Because of the uncontrolled nature of found materials, the reality of working on-site was often very different to the planned construction process. Rather than following set plans precisely the group had to be flexible and adapt designs to found materials materials. This made for a unique final structure: railway sleepers used for entrance steps; old doors & reclaimed PVC signs for cladding, old desktops, pallet planks and boarding for the floor, heavy duty plastic sheets for the windows, and polycarbonate off-cuts to cover the roof. Currently the building is used on a regular basis by the school’s gardening club.

Year:

Location:

2004

Gleadless

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles

Sharrard Road Allotments

Project’s members:

Alex Moody, Becky Haverty, Calah Norris, Emma Tincombe, James Pugh, Joe Salmon, Marianne Heaslip, Tom Burbidge

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Project’s name:

Portland Works - Live project

Documenting skills and techniques of manufacturers

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The students spent time observing the tenants at work. In some cases, the students were allowed to take part in the production process in order to gain a better understanding of the skill, precision and experience required. The workshops also documented the ways in which the tenantFoorganised and used their - od rce & Educat oubased c i space on their working methods, noting in particular the o s i n -D proportion of time spent using various pieces of equipment as well as the sequence of movement between machines and other work stations.

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The documentation has not only helped students to formulate strategies for future development of the building in terms of relocation of tenants, but could potentially be useful for the manufacturers themselves, who can collaborate on various projects, order materials in bulk and share certain machinery or equip- Heritage Resources ment.- Similar strategies can be applied to other manufacturers in the city.

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tion e ge n - 2011 Live Projects, students were doing research As part oferathe -R on the current tenants of the works to create a vision for future development of the building.

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Initially constructed to house companies working solely within the steel industry, Portland Works is now home to a community of diverse and thriving businesses including metalworkers, engravers, artists, wood workers and musicians. Some of industrial and manufacturing businesses have been in the building for tens of year, manufacturing the same products as ten or twenty years before. A lot of these companies manufacture unique products, which are not much known outside of their trade circles.

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Whilst researching information for the materials and product maps, valuable information was acquired about the manufacturing processes of the tenants interviewed. This information was combined to create diagrams which outlined not only the process of manufacture itself, but also the location of the raw materials acquired and the eventual destination of the product with both the nature and location of a representative sample of customers. The diagrams were created to serve several purposes: 1. When considering the potential reconfiguration or relocation of tenancies in Portland Works, the diagrams would inform the designer of the spatial requirements of the tenant for their work. 2. For marketing purposes: these diagrams could be displayed on open days and other events to give visiting potential shareholders a better idea of the entire process of the tenant. 3. For educational purposes: students and other visitors to Portland Works would be able to understand more about the work processes taking place.

Year:

Location:

2011

Sheffield wide

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Cristina Cerulli

Portland Works, Little Sheffield Limited

Project’s members:

Benjamin Baliti, Guy Moulson, Jonathan Orlek, Caroline Gore-Booth, Ewan Tavendale, Bryony Spottiswoode, Mersedeh Gharavifard, Chen Guo, Qi Mingyu, Scaria Njavally, Adrian Judt, Christopher Carthy

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Portland Works

Knowledge Transfer to help community groups - Re

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Not a student project, this idea is about channelling resources within academia, however small, towards supporting community projects in the city. This can take the shape of student projects integrated within the curriculum, extracurricular projects or what the University sometimes calls ‘Knowledge Exchange’ activities. The convergence of academic activities and community needs had the potential to strengthen the signal, itage - Herthe amplifying strenght of resources available and creating real transformation. One example of such convergence is the Portland Works Project/Campaign.

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A campaign was started to save Portland Works, a historically significant industrial complex in Randall Rd, from speculative redevelopment into studio flats. Dr Cristina Cerulli was able to obtain a small ‘Knowledge Transfer’ grant (just under £10K) from the University of Sheffield to explore sustainable futures for the Works.


As part of the Knowledge Transfer Project a number of case studies were developed around projects representing a range of models of management, ownership and funding or with an interesting vision and therefore with a to offer inspiring ideas for Portland Works, with regards, in particular, to the creation of a shared vision for Portland Works and the development of a governance model and business plan. Ten projects were looked at in detail and a draft of the case studies was used as the basis for one of the sessions for the Exploring Futures workshop, held in June 2010. The Knowledge Transfer Workshop, brought together tenants, campaigners and a number of advisors from a diverse backgrounds and organisations. Immediately after the workshop the campaign group felt empowered to take it upon itself to set up an Industrial Provident Society (essentially a coop) for the Benefit of the Community to try to buy and manage the building. A number of Student Projects were also developed to broaden the reach of the research, as an immediate and informal way of taking in new disciplines and perspectives. Projects were undertaken by students from Sheffield University within the School of Architecture, the School of Journalism and the School of English in response to briefs written by the Portland Works Committee, in conversation with academic staff responsible for the courses where the work was situated. Students were given access to ongoing research and resources and taken on tours around Portland Works. Considerable time was invested in building the relationships, but the collaboration with students and staff from various disciplines extended the understanding of how Portland Works is perceived, what its potential might be in the future and created space for reflection on the research carried out to date. The outcomes of these student projects have been used as source material for the development of the website, marketing strategy, business plan and ‘vision’ for the Works. Each project became a strand of investigation that provided opportunities and further developed the network of the campaign. Two years after the Knowledge Transfer grant, Portland Works has now been bought through the first Community Share Issue in Sheffield and is still collaborating with the University to generate relevant research to steer the management of the organisation and the upgrading of the building.

Year:

Location:

2011

Sheffield wide

Project mentors and members: Dr Cristina Cerulli, Julia Udall, students and staff from the University of Sheffield and many others that supported the Save Portland Works Campaign

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Empty shops - Live project

Food growing in underused urban spaces - Heritage -

sources -

Idea of growing food in vacant or under-used urban spaces is not generally new. With an increased awareness and demand for locally sourced food, urban food growing is becoming more popular. egeneration gn & Technolo esi gy -D sm & Commun i v i t it y Ac

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50 Ideas - Festival of the Mind

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While looking - meanwhile initiatives for the area around fu- Housingat ture Sevenstone development, a Live Project group looked at alternative use of Charter Square, a pedestrian underpass and square currently forgotten at the back of the Moor. Students looked at both linking the future developments to the people of Sheffield and how to minimise the disturbance that the current halt to the development has caused. The idea suggested that because of its cutoff location and the lack of short-term redevelopment plans for it, the square could temporarily become - Foodgrowing a small scale area, used by city centre dwellers and workers.

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Year:

Location:

2009

Sheffield City Centre, Charter Square

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Carolyn Butterworth

Sheffield City Council, Rreef

Project’s members: Ioannis Balaskas, Anais Dalez, Catherine Duncalfe, Philip Etchells, Luke Ritchie, Sarah Bryan, Ben Johnson

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Sheffield City Centre

Project’s name:

Empty shops - Live project

Use of carparks for leisure activities isur

- Le inethe This idea deals with an issue of ‘temporary’ car parks city centre that arise from delayed large scale developments put on hold until ‘better’ times. One example can be seen at the site of Rockingham Street fire station, another one at Kelham Island, and another one on Arundel Gate.

Empty after 6 pm these sometimes monstrous-sized fields of tarmac or gravel in the city centre may become a reasonable source of depression for any resident. As an attempt to minimise these disturbances Architecture students looked atmunways sm & Com tivi it y Ac of using car parks for leisure activities.

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What about running regular drive-in cinema events? At the Rockingham Street car park? This would require temporary construction of screen and projector, but it is ok, it could be stored in a shipping container at one of the parking lots. Sound can be transmitted through your car stereos, pretty boys and girls could be selling you pop corn from the lot. Car park could also become a location for Car Boot sales, art and design fairs, food festivals etc. Sheffield has a thriving festival culture and in the past few years has developed an impressive track record of organising temporary events, of which the one with the highest profile is Tramlines. Only three year old the Tramlines is a completely free event that transforms Sheffield City Centre across over 70 venues (with over 160,000 attending). This year a car park by Kelham Island was transformed into an impressive music venue.

Year:

Location:

2009

Sheffield City Centre, Charter Square

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Carolyn Butterworth

Sheffield City Council, Rreef

Project’s members: Ioannis Balaskas, Anais Dalez, Catherine Duncalfe, Philip Etchells, Luke Ritchie, Sarah Bryan, Ben Johnson

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Empty shops - Live project

Public engagement during construction - Housing -

Construction sites are often closed off, offering very little to the city residents in terms of visual enjoyment. Add to this the length of the construction process, and they leave a black hole in the areas where they are located.- Housing generatio -R

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This idea proposes that the construction process should be celebrated and viewing points should be created along the perimeter of construction fence to increase their visual interest. The idea suggests that people would feel more connected with the the development of their city The hoardings should contribute to their surroundings more ood positively. This can be more costly but- Ffunding can be attracted urce & Educati on sc o i from- D the contractor as a part of negotiations around planning ritage - HeThe permission. project could also be done in collaboration with artists, engineers or specialists in green wall technology. Green walls could soften the harshness of traditional hoardings, literally bringing life to the perimeter of a construction site.

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50 Ideas - Festival of the Mind

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What about creating a bird hide-style shelters but for construction sites? These would give a great interactive view of construction process whilst also simultaneously acting as an information point for the building work that is going on. The hide can be designed so it can be secured at night. The entry doors can be locked restricting access when not appropriate. The transparent nature of the design also means that the spaces feel safe as they can be constantly viewed from inside and out. The construction hide can be used as a flexible device which can be moved to a number of different building sites across Sheffield. It can act as a temporary landmark during the period of construction, forming a point of identity for people to recognise an area being developed. Sites could include The Moor or various sites as part of the Sevenstone development.

Year:

Location:

2009

Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Carolyn Butterworth

Sheffield City Council, Rreef

Project’s members: Ioannis Balaskas, Anais Dalez, Catherine Duncalfe, Philip Etchells, Luke Ritchie, Sarah Bryan, Ben Johnson

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Sharrow development framework strategy Live project

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One of its important features is ranson strip that runs along Bramall Lane from Ring Road to the outskirts of Sheffield which is designated as a possible extension to the city’s tram network. As such no buildings post 1970’s have been allowed to be build on this strip of land.

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Considering that Bramall Lane borders Sharrow - one of the most diverse neighbourhoods in terms of ethnicity, housing types, business trade and relative affluence in Sheffield, the project suggested that a regular market could become a good solution for uplifting the area, helping to utilise empty spaces while they are awaiting the tramline.

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sources -H - Re Lane Bramall is a main arterial route into- the city for commut- Heritage ers. At peak times it can get very congested at certain points where secondary routes converge into it. As such it is not the most pedestrian friendly road to walk down and commerce is more geared to passing vehicular trade such as used car-sales, petrol garages and large advertising boards.

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The market could be used by the residents of Sharrow, celebrating the numerous nationalities living there, but also would provide a link to London Road and a public face for the businesses within the area. Sheffield United Football Ground on Bramall Lane provides a bi-weekly audience of thousands for the advertising of the market. And if the tramline was built, the market could relocate to another vacant site. In fact, it could carry on moving. Should it be a huge success it could even occupy a building.

Year:

Location:

2005

Sharrow

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Aidan Hoggard

Colin Harvard, Sharrow Community Forum

Project’s members:

Keith Binnie, Robert Collister, Benjamin Leach, Malcolm Lorimer, Lawrence McCleery, Christopher Preston, Jamie Thompson, Julia Udall

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Better interaction between workspaces in the public realm -

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The idea comes from the project that explored future strategies for the John Street Triangle, a small area within Sharrow that is a home to a large number of businesses and creative groups. It is the only business area in Sharrow and its red brick courtyard buildings house small scale “little mesters”, metal workshops and music recording studios that embody real history of the city. Despite its significance, the area is currently cut-off from the local housing and the vibrancy of London Road by faceless ing - enclosed nature of facadesReof ration student accommodation - Housand genenew business workshops. This lack of visual connections keeps out pedestrian movement beyond area’s borders. The project suggested that by encouraging people to occupy spaces outside of their home and workplace environment it would be possible to make a positive impact on public realm of the John Street Triangle. o isc -D

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There are eleven metal trades buildings in the area, the most significant of these 19th Century industrial are the listed Stag and Portland Works. Around a dozen of small working industries remain in the Stag Works, the building also has over 30 years of music heritage with bands such as Def Leppard and Arctic Monkeys having used it. Portland works is a ‘working industry’ building too with approximately 20 work spaces within the courtyard - occupied by metal workers, furniture makers, carvers, electricians and others. Most of them, however, are hidden from the general passer by. Better access to these spaces for general public, provision of shared facilities in the courtyards, and creation of further workspaces outside of normal studio environment could significantly help the area, enhancing its character and adding visual stimuli to make connections within its borders. As well as intensifying the co-operative nature of the ‘little mesters’ and giving the opportunity for the individual workers to interact with each other

Year:

Location:

2005

Sharrow

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Aidan Hoggard

Colin Harvard, Sharrow Community Forum

Project’s members: Keith Binnie, Robert Collister, Benjamin Leach, Malcolm Lorimer, Lawrence McCleery, Christopher Preston, Jamie Thompson, Julia Udall

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Multi-purpose centre, Sheffield Botanical Gardens

Revealing the back-of-house at Sheffield Botanical Gardens

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Recently, through a three phase restoration programme funded by Heritage Lottery with 25% match funded through the work of a strong group of volunteers (the Friends of the Botanical Gardens, Sheffield – FoBS), the gardens have been returned to their original “gardenesque” look. This project dealt with the fourth stage of the restoration - concerned with the regeneration of the area set out for the garden’s staff and work of FoBS. A Live Projects team was asked to produce a series of designs - Heritage for the building. Going with initial aim of the gardens the project explored the idea of provision of a building that could work as an educational facility with the wish to reveal to people the working area behind the public face of the gardens, which is currently hidden from the view.

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The Sheffield Botanical Gardens were originally developed in order to provide horticultural education to the public and since their founding in the early 19th century, have become a unique resource in the city. In a relatively small area they combine beautiful landscaped gardens with landmark heritage glasshouses, while their location allows them to be easily accessible both as a recreational destination and a green route through the city.

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A new multi-purpose building, to carry on the work of the gardens and housing facilities and equipment for the maintenance and propagation of the gardens was proposed. The building would provide flexible spaces for variety of community facilities that could include lecture theatres, cafe and leisure spaces. Proposed building works as an extension to the gardens, integrated with the landscape of the gardens through the use of accessible roofscapes. The proposals took into account a large amount of research into the physical nature of the site and its geographical and historical context, the requirements of the various groups who would use the centre on a day-to-day basis and also current trends in related European building types.

Year:

Location:

2004

Ecclesall Road

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles

Sheffield Botanical Gardens

Project’s members:

Elen Gest, Anna Holder, Tom James, Chris Preston, Jamie Thompson, Mark Broom, Ruth Sienkiewicz

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Re-thinking Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley Live project

Elevated tree walks in Endcliffe Park Endcliffe - the development of rces - represents a cornerstone souPark - Heritagein - Re Sheffield as a city; its proximity to the Peak District National Park allows the park to be a conduit between the urban fabric of Sheffield and the unspoiled beauty of the Peaks whilst being one of the most popular green spaces used by many groups of people.

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Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Department asked the Live Project Team at the University of Sheffield School of Architecture to look at how Endcliffe Park could be improved. Creative public consultation was carried out to establish where the problems lie and what strategies can be implemented to improve the current condition.

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One of the most popular ideas was creation of elevated tree walks. This would create both attraction in Endcliffe woods and a way to explore the woodland at all levels. At its summit users would get a view of the whole of the Porter Valley and out to the Peak District, showing the parks wider context. Successful examples of similar projects can be seen around the country such as Salcey Forest in Northamptonshire.


The walk would start beyond stepping stones. Two main issues to consider for this proposal were vandalism and user safety as the tree walk could not realistically be ‘manned’ 24 hours a day. Therefore special attention must be paid to the design of the entrance of the walkway. A suggestion was that the first 20 metres of the walkway could be a covered box with spiky or thorny plants around the exterior, to stop climbing and graffiti and to allow the box to be closed by the rangers out of hours. This would also create the impression that the walk is ‘exploding’ out of the ground. Could a tree walk exist successfully in an open park?

Year:

Location:

2007

Endcliffe Park

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles

Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Department

Project’s members:

Adam Dainow, Ryan Hamill, Jordan Lloyd, Phil Miller, Caroline Payne, Patrick Skingley, Luke Brown, Rachael Harris, Chris Patience, Alex Southall

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Re-thinking Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley Live project

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One of the 2007 Live Projects looked at developing an extended programme of events, building on what is there already, for Endcliffe park. This was a response to the lack of unified system or strategy for presenting cycles of events that occur on a regular or irregular basis in Endcliffe Park, with park users resorting to seeing snippets from flyers in or around the park or on the internet. The project also tried to address how the use of the park could be extended beyond the daytime hours. The project set out to improve the current condition by collating existing events in a typical monthly cycle and proposing a range of events that supplemented existing ones. Some of such events were based in the evening, after dusk, in an explicit attempt to extend the hours the park can be used for scope for public activity,rather than being abandoned at night.

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New event ideas: Car Boot Jumble Sale. A well established idea in the UK, the basic premise is that areas of park can be given over once a month to hold such an event. A Little Live Music Never Hurt Anyone. Since the demise of the band stand in 1957, live music in the park has been a little hard to come by. The project proposed a casual relaxed performance that will appeal to all park users, especially on weekends and holidays. Tai Chi/Yoga. During the consultation many residents stated that they would like to see small scale events, such as Yoga and Tai Chi. Many people thought this would help bring the community together and give men and women an alternative approach to exercise. These types of events would be relatively easy to operate and require little organisation and cost. Late Night Football. From consultation, it became apparent that a significant amount of youths ‘hang out’ in the park at night. Rather than erecting a shelter for these people, students decided to take an alternative approach, which focused on providing appropriate late night activities. This event was prototyped during the Live Project with a mini tournament that proved very popular. The success of the late night football event test proves that these types of events are relatively easy to organise and provide supervision for youth. Craft fairs and Workshops. Conversations with residents indicated the enjoyment the park’s users experienced from previous craft fairs. This proposal focuses on providing more craft fairs and workshops. These events would require some organisation, however, the event would give local businesses the opportunity sell their products, as well as promoting their companies.

Year:

Location:

2007

Endcliffe Park

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles

Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Department

Project’s members:

Adam Dainow, Ryan Hamill, Jordan Lloyd, Phil Miller, Caroline Payne, Patrick Skingley, Luke Brown, Rachael Harris, Chris Patience, Alex Southall

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Castlegate - Live project

Two markets for Sheffield - Housing - Castle Market to uncover the ruins of the Castle Plans to demolish and to expose the culverted River Sheaf have been developed back in 2002. Although back then, the idea was to relocate the markets onto the site of current Wilkinson store. After some investigations at the time it seemed too costly to purchase Wilkinson site. At the same time as work was ongoing, Deutsche Bank Property Holdings were looking at their holdings on The Moor. They started discussions with the Council on a Masterplan for The Moor, and, in particular, regarding the possibility of moving - Food the market, from its traditional site, to a site on The Moor.

In 2003 Sheffield City Council engaged one of the Live Project team to provide a fresh view of the potential development opportunities within Castlegate market area, while also researching into the sites history and archaeological remains.

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As much of the potential for area’s redevelopment hinged on the exposure of the castle ruins below the market. The project discussed the idea of transforming the area into a new Cultur- Heritage al and Historic Quarter, but also investigated consequences of market removal from the area, considering latest Sheffield One Masterplan, that proposed consolidation of the city centre away from the Castlegate site.


According to students’ conclusions, the building of a single market on the Moor will not necessarily create the best future for both traders and shoppers. The increase in resident population in the city centre due to the new residential developments along the riverside, the then proposed redevelopment of Park Hill and the continued increase in number of student accommodation could suggest that the city may be able to support more than one universal market. While it seems clear that while the move to the Moor could provide most cost effective solution to the current problem of upgrading the market (in order to bring the meat and fish market up to current standards), there may also be the potential for a more diverse kind of market to provide for the residents of Park Hill, the Riverside and any new homes proposed for the castle area. The success of lifestyle shopping around the Devonshire Green area may provide a model for the redevelopment of shopping around the castle too. In addition, uncovering the castle remains and establishing a museum and visitor facilities could encourage the combination of shopping and tourism. A temporary, semi-open market space might provide a venue for specialist shops as well as a new home for some of the existing traders already on the castle site.

Year:

Location:

2003

Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Sarah Wigglesworth

Sheffield City Council

Project’s members: David Coyle, Kevin Davis, Sally Jones, Rory Martin, Kate Parton, Adam Spall, Zhi Wang, Ed Whiteley, Floria Winkler

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Empty shops - Live project

Emporiums in empty shops

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The regeneration of a large area of the city centre has stalled due to the recession. ‘Sevenstone’, the proposed New Retail Quarter (NRQ) development has been put on hold until the economic situation improves. This problem, coupled with the overall decline in British retail economy, leaves local residents and visitors faced with rows of dilapidated shops and empty streets. One of the 2009 Live Projects proposed a number of innovative and creative interim uses for the shops, buildings and streets - Housing in this ‘Empty Quarter’. One of the ideas was to create Sheffield Emporium in one of the vacant units on Cambridge St. earmarked for demolition.

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The financial viability of the scheme lies in offering city centre retail outlets at competitive prices. The costs of building works, running costs, management costs, business rates, insurance costs will be shared between the occupants throughout two years, which is currently estimated as the minimum lifespan of the project. There is no reason why the idea should not extend beyond that time. Any major internal works on the unit should be avoided and standard materials and forms of construction should be used during fit-out to keep the costs down. The project would have to cater for a number of retail strategies and a variety of possible occupants, with small variations. It is estimated that over the lifespan of the project over 60 businesses could in turn occupy Sheffield Emporium. The retailers should be a mix of well-known local independent brands and incubators for new businesses.

Year:

Location:

2009

Sheffield City Centre, Charter Square

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Carolyn Butterworth

Sheffield City Council, Rreef

Project’s members: Ioannis Balaskas, Anais Dalez, Catherine Duncalfe, Philip Etchells, Luke Ritchie, Sarah Bryan, Ben Johnson

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Green food map for Sheffield

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On average global agri-business consumes over ten calories of petroleum and coal energy to deliver a calorie of food to your dinner plate and most of our meals have traveled about 1,300 miles before they arrive on our table.

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The Sheffield Food Network links sustainable food outlets, producers and restaurants to the people of Sheffield, but aims to extend this relationship by sharing ideas about growing fruit and vegetables, butchery, baking, local recipes, how to forage for wild - Housing neration and much more. efood, Re g In 2008 a Live Project team worked with the organisation to develop an on-line map of sustainable food outlets, producers, restaurants as well as other things connected to sustainable food and drink in Sheffield. The project was the springboard for a follow up project to develop a beta-version of a web-site which would allow Sheffield Food Network to serve the people of Sheffield. A further project looked at developing a more robust - Food and easy toEdmaintain website, to be launched later in 2012. uca rc e & ti c ou -D

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Both the Beta web-site and the latest incarnation of the Sheffield Food Network site are designed to connect people with an interest in food—or simply people with food. The idea is infinitely scaleable, using technologies already familiar to the general public. Management of the database (and therefore the website) is a simple matter of modifying an online spreadsheet; thus popularising a marginal (but increasingly relevant) message on next to no capital costs and minimal management.

Year:

Location:

2008

Sheffield wide

Project mentor(s): Renata Tyszczuk, Jordan J. Lloyd

Client(s): Grow Sheffield

Project’s members: Adam Towle, Beatrice Munby, Ben Johnson, David Rozwadowski, Jordan J. Lloyd, Lukas Barry, Martin Lydon, Pat Skingley, Paul Westwood, Rachael JonesRenata , Tyszczuk, Sarah Green

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Allotment Soup - Live project Sheffield City Centre

Compost toilets for allotments and outdoor events - Food -

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One of 2006 Live Projects looked at designing a composting toilet for the annual Allotment Soup event organised by Grow Sheffield . Allotment Soup is a yearly creative festival celebrating harvest. In 2006 the festival took place at the Leaf allotments in Norwood. Leaf are a community allotment organisation that cultivates an area of six allotments, and, beyond their concerns - Food urce &HEedriutacagtei about were looking to replace their on site portaloo on scothe- festival, i -D with a more environmental and economical alternative.

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The problem of toilet facilities is common on allotment plots, and thus it was decided to develop a modular system of construction, which could be replicated elsewhere.

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Due to the limited budget for the project, the group used wooden pallets, which are widely available in standard sizes. Pallets are easily accessible and easy to transport and are a readily available recyclable material. A clamping joint was developed which maintained the structural integrity of the individual pallets, whilst also allowing for creation of stable walls. The timber used for clamping extends beyond the pallets to support the roof. The system can easily be dismantled and re arranged in a different format. In terms of developing the temporary urinal, the group developed a male and female urinal, which each empty into a compost heap through a hose pipe pierced at various intervals. By distributing the urine around the compost heap, the “goodness” is put back into the system, by reclaiming the nutrients and nitrogen in the urine. This solution proved successful for the Allotment Soup event. The structure which the students have created on the Leaf site is such that it can also house a composting toilet unit which Leaf were planning to purchase for the site, which will have given the structure a greater long term use.

Year:

Location:

2011

Norwood

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Mark Parson

Grow Sheffield, LEAF Sheffield

Project’s members: Edith Humble, Aknur Sengaliyeva, Tom Atkinson, Zanthe Wray, Laura Daniel, Nicola Beer, Xiaoyi Li, Ruoyu Huang, Tajchavit Sibunruang, Matthew Wrigh, Michael Langley, Rosie Evered

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Broadfield as Sheffield’s Eco-quarter An opportunity exists to build on the green projects at Heeley - Housing City Farm and the new Ann’s Grove School, creating Sheffield’s first Eco-Quarter. By tying this in with social and economic factors, Broadfield may also become a model for sustainable development in Britain. The proposal is for a sustainable community strategy; a principle that is sympathetic with the concept of green design.

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For the local residents this would mean reduction in energy bills, more green shared community assets, better pedestrian d- Foospaces, access through the area and a new educational centre.

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Energy. A four-person household in a typical 19th / 20th century terrace house can expect to spend around ÂŁ400 a year on gas and electricity. So how about having wind turbines in Meersbrook park? Each turbine could provide enough electricity for over 1,500 people... Or more smaller local turbines such as the one at Heeley City Farm? The farm profits from selling any excess power that is generated back to the national grid. New housing developments would be provided with Photovoltaic (PV) cells, harnessing solar power. PV cells would be used as sun shades in car parks, simultaneously refuelling electric cars or powering the community centre. South Yorkshire Forest generates tonnes of waste wood in the south of Sheffield each year. It is a managed forest, meaning that new trees are planted regularly. A local Biomass Combined Heat and Power unit would generate electricity by burning the wood and produce heat for domestic hot water systems. The efficiency of the system would mean cheaper bills and less pollution. Waste. Each year Sheffield households produce approximately 240,000 tonnes of waste, of which we recycle less than 10%. This can be improved by: *Recycling collection points for each housing development, making it easy to get rid of recyclable material. *New kitchens equipped with space for recycling bins as standard. *Local businesses encouraged to use less waste packaging and more biodegradable / recyclable materials. *Compost collection points established in Broadfield, in conjunction with Heeley City Farm. The residents would be encouraged to use the compost in allotments and greenspaces - to benefit the community directly.

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Location:

2004

Broadfield

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Aidan Hoggard

The University of Sheffield School of Architecture

Project’s members:

Ben Costello, Duncan McDougall, Mark Holloway, Mihalis Walsh, Laura Birchenough, Prash Solanky, Richard Palmer

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Food for thought

A city centre community growing space to encourage political discourse -A

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The idea is -to create a city centre hub which offers community growing space, a market place and cooking facilities which would encourage debate and wider community engagement in political and social matters. The hub would plug into the local food network, bringing people together to grow, make, exchange and eat local foods whilst creating a platform for informal debate and a political forum. It is proposed that the building will be located on the vacant site between the Cheesegrater source - Heritage - Re at sSt (QPark Paul’s Place/Arundel Gate) and Sheffield City Coun- Food cil ‘First Point’ in Union Street.

Food would be grown on a multi-terraced roof, then cooked and sold in the cafe. The building would have a large kitchen which would be used for cooking classes, with all the bio-waste from the kitchen and the cafe used to make compost for the plants on the roof. The building would also host food markets and seed swaps, and the meeting room could be used by various local community groups. - Heritage -

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Location:

Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s): Leo Care

Project’s member(s): Heather Oakley

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Chamber / classical music space in Nazarene Church

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The idea was to bring facilities for music at Sheffield University to a level comparable with our natural competitors in Manchester, Leeds, York, Huddersfield, Nottingham; to create a valuable asset for the community as currently Sheffield has no dedicated venue for chamber music.

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The project proposed to transform the disused church building - Food dFooVictoria (known as ‘The Church of Nazarene’)-in Street, Sheffield, & E d e uca o ur c tio isc n D into a licensed performance space for music, seating audiences of up to 250. The building backs onto the new SoundHouse building (housing studios, practice rooms, and percussion instruments), close to the renovated Victorian Jessop Building on Leavygreave Road, which now houses the Music Department. It is a Grade II listed building and is owned by the University (currently using it as a storage space). The Music Department engages in a diverse range of performing activities from classical chamber music to opera and contemporary music theatre, - Heritage ritage u r c o including world music performance, music and e s - Heelectro-acoustic s- Re mixed media. The proposed performance space will be central to the day-to-day functioning (rehearsing, performing, teaching) as well as knowledge transfer and community activities of the Music Department. Ensemble in Residence, Ensemble 360, and World Music Performers in Residence would perform there, along with a steady stream of internationally acclaimed visiting performers. The envisioning of this transformation is a key step in the launching of a fund-raising campaign.

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The Church of the Nazarene, situated on Victoria Street, was built c1885 in the Gothic Revival style. Originally a Catholic Apostolic church, it was later adopted as an Evangelical church before finally entering the ownership of the University of Sheffield. The university’s estates department used the building as a storage location for several decades right up until very recently.

Year:

Location:

2009

Sheffiled City Centre

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Bryan Lawson

The University of Sheffield Music Department

Project’s members:

Oliver Cartwright, Victoria Jones, Joanne Langford, Daniel Litten, Jonathan Millard, Alessandro Palladin, Vasileios Polychroniadis, Hoisun Yung

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Love Bytes Sitelines - Live project

Digital tools to interpret and present the city

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Initial aim of the project was to develop something web-based - Food e & Educa o ur c tio forDiscartists coming to the festival to see to get a better undern standing of Sheffield before their visit - venues where the festival would take place, places to eat, etc.

rt & Culture -

As students got into the project, they started seeing the possibilities of developing a completely different and interactive ways to describe the city. The objective became to experiment with a number of methodologies for looking at city and the site, and to present those methodologies for others to use and developourfurther. Heritage c

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SiteLines was an experimental project investigating new ways to look at and describe the city and it was developed for Lovebytes, an organisation set up to support the development of digital art and culture by creating opportunities for the develop- Housing egeneration ment, and consumption of work in new media. The - R production organisation’s main focus is the Lovebytes International Festival of Digital Art, which is held annually in March. The festival brings together artists, musicians, designers and technologists for three days of events that attract an increasingly international audience made up of media professionals, students and artists and a growing general public audience.


On the website, which is still online you can see few examples. If you have a look at the “sound.scape” part you get a grid of sounds nodes - abstract version of West Street. As you hover over nodes you get snippets of the recorded sound at those location. As you start building up points you get a path which maps sounds and flows through the city centre. Only after you have built a complete path through the area you can see information about the places where you have selected (including images and more factual information). It became apparent that the types of sounds gathered at each node were diverse over the whole grid, but very particular for each location, in this way mimicking, and being a representation of, the quality of the fabric and the cultural associations at each point. Each bite of sound can potentially tell viewer a number of things about the life (or lack of) in the area it is taken from. Each sound bite is a bite of contextual information. Another methodology looked at Tudor Square by documenting and presenting every bit of text in the area - from wrappers found on the floor to signs and banners. The text was then plotted onto the map of the square, pointing in the direction where the viewer would look when reading it. After you have selected a selected a number of bits of text, you get a map which shows a spatial route through Tudor square. This and other methods on the website present an interesting and fresh way to look at the city as well as presenting the city to people who have never been here before. As well as presenting some more experimental information, the website also tells visitors about various buildings, streets and the festival itself. Even though the map was develped in 2002, it still stands as a sophisticated piece of work.

Year:

Location:

2002

Cultural Industries Quarter

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Jeremy Till, Jon Harrison

Lovebytes

Project’s members: Ele McCallum, George Legg, James Norton, Kasam Visanji, Matt Jones, Matt Kirk, Phil Smith, Sam Vardy, Steve Clews

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Lansdowne Estate - Live project

Better navigation on Lansdowne estate

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In 2008 a Live Project group looked at developing a number of strategies to improve navigation, sense of ownership, connections, environment, community, security and the long term future of Lansdowne Estate.

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Legibility was one of the major issues throughout the project looking at how the Lansdowne estate is navigated, not only in the sense of how people get around, but also how they identify themselves as part of the estate, and the role of identity in way finding. Students worked on the estate, interviewing a range of local residents before developing a series of design proposals. A brief was developed based on the meetings and interviews with all client bodies (estate management and facilities organisations) and the findings of the first Lost in Lansdowne event, to which the residents were invited. Conversations with the residents centred around prepared activities, drawings and a scale model of the estate, have led the students to developing a number of strategies for the estate, broken up into phases. The first phase proposal included the most basic solutions for the problems of safety and navigation. These could be implemented immediately with little or no funding by an unskilled workforce.

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There were a number of issues with the navigation on the estate: maps, like any other physical appendage on the estate have been vandalised rendering them unreadable. There was a distinct lack of signage to smaller entrances to the estate. Junctions were not signposted. The stair cores, pivotal to navigation around individual flats, were confusing to visitors. Thus it was decided that careful positioning of signage was crucial. It was proposed to employ surface signage for the estate as it was: * Low Cost * Easily Maintained * Adaptable * Invites Involvement * Bold * Provides Identity * Ties in with Colour Coding * Precursor to further artwork * Demonstrates immediate action

Year:

Location:

2008

Highfield

Project mentor(s): Carolyn Butterworth, Florian Kossak

Project’s members:

Client(s): Sheffield Homes with Sharrow Partnership

Ariadna Aston, Leanna Boxill, Rachel Harris, Tom Jackson-Hulme, Heather McGill, David Spark, Naomi Taylor, Yogesh Taylor, Craig Western, Josh Wilcox

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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MAUD_UDP2

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Facilities along river Don for active leisure

The Upper River Don, from the city to the North-West area of echno gn & Ta Hillsborough, is a lost world. Running parallel with major log esi y -D road and close to the Super-tram track it is almost invisible. For a large part it is also inaccessible, cut off by private car-parks, industrial estates and empty sites. This section of river is full of surprises: derelict water wheels, curiously named islands such as Bacon Island and an abandoned graveyard.

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In a three week-long project Urban Design students were asked to propose interventions, programmes and strategies to imrt & Culture -A prove the access and environment and vitality of areas around the specific stretch of the Upper River Don.

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The idea of the project was to transform the river from its historic role of utility to one of amenity. Proposed short term and long-term initiatives included floating walkways, electricity generating water wheels to light those walkways, small interventions such as fishing platforms, picnic spots, children’s playgrounds, planting strategies, reuse of abandoned buildings and empty sites for community activities, art events and fairs - Leisure and much more.

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Students also worked with various organisations and presented their work at a public event, which was the starting point of further ideas about possible uses/activities to reclaim the river. Not Sure which one to go for? Why not take a friend and a rubber boat on a warm summer weekend and have a go at exploring yourself which one could work best? River Commons Projects Report http://issuu.com/skin_network/docs/the_ river_commons_projects

Year: 2011

Location: Upper Don Valley

Project mentor(s): Cristina Cerulli, Florian Kossak

Project’s member(s): All year students

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Project’s name:

An automatic lanscape

Wetland upsteam of Rotherham to reduce flood risk Sheffield City Centre

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The industrial development of the Don Valley has changed the River Don infrastructure greatly. In the 1000 years that the valley has been occupied the river and its tributaries have been constrained, bound and diverted. The original branches, pools - Housing egeneration -R and complex gradations of environment of a water network are largely absent, they have been destroyed, replaced by hard boundaries, straight lines and a narrowing deepening and a speeding of the flow of water from the valley surface to the sea. This allowed the development of the valley and its floodplain, but at the same time has removed wetlands and marshes and the systems that buffered its flow and cleaned the water, exposing nearby residents to the extremes of weather and pollution, including soil erosion and flooding. - Food urce & Educa -D

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The development of the flood plain, ironically, magnified the effects of the 2007 floods and contributed to the damage. To prevent further flooding Rotherham council commissioned a series of intensive and expensive flood alleviating measures - the first phase costed ÂŁ14 million. The proposed systems to combat the flooding are unfortunately continuations of the constraints that have caused the problem. The drainage network is ritage - extended. Increasalready- Retoo to be sustained, let sourcelarge - Healone sing the speed of water through the valley will only worsen the problem.

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Instead this project proposed to integrate with the existing complexity of the river and waterways. The idea is to create a wetland upstream of Rotherham on the floodplain to absorb spikes in the river flow rate caused by extreme rainfall. & Comm un vism it y cti

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One problem with building dams and levees to create wetlands is the quantity of materials needed and the necessary temporary works and maintenance. By using a repeating form that can self-assemble into interlocking barriers, similar to Japanese tetrapod system, less human intervention is required. The system will self-adapt to the different conditions on the site. The component units are called cores. After deployment, the cores disperse into the river and begin to clog, accelerating the oxbow formation at the beginning of the project, or consolidating the wetland at the later stages. The eventual form is dependent on the original landscape and the location and timing of the release of the cores can only take place after careful analysis of the sites topography and ecology. The expected course of the river as these alterations take place is shown to the left. The project is expected to take 80-100 years to complete, with the resulting wetland being a self-sustaining and stable environment. These new technologies make the casting of complex concrete forms (the cores) much simpler and cheaper that before: -advanced casting with fabric moulds and rapid-prototyped moulds. -biodegradable concrete using wood chip aggregates and foamed cellular concrete. These two methods mean that concrete can be cast in a very complex shapes and with controlled densities and decay rates at low cost.

Year: 2010

Location: Lower Don Valley

Project mentor(s): Unknown

Project’s members: Ben Oram

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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‘Recycling’ for majority is only seen as a separate, extra activity that requires more time, more effort or more money on the part of the consumer. ‘Recycling’ is also not very well integrated into the the design of current waste disposal system.

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Currently most flatted council estates employ ‘Recycling as an added-extra’ model: placing big supermarket-style recycling tubs in the grounds of estates. The problem is that it relies upon the motivation (and the storage space in flats) to collect waste, carry it out, and sort it into the bins. It asks for a high price in users’ time. In areas where people are motivated to recycle (notably the better-off parts of the City), it has worked ok, but everywhere else, understandably, it is dramatically underused.

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Rubbish chutes are inadequate to deal with large bags (and pizza boxes). The openable tray is far too small for a typical black bin liner. Therefore it is very common that these access points are frequently littered with discarded bags. This in turn puts strain on the refuse collection workforce and makes the areas themselves unpleasant and unhygienic.

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The group of students understood and presented through their very interesting blogs the complexities of waste disposal and have outlined a number strategies which can help to move towards resolving the issues of waste disposal: 1. Redesign the Default. By moving the point of choice to the point of disposal (say, the kitchen bin) designers can create an environment in which it is just as easy (or hard) to recycle as it is to not recycle. Thus it might be more cost-effective for the council to provide free point-of-disposal sorting bins to every household. 2. Redesign the Infrastructure. Particularly in the case of 1960’s high-rise estates, it would be prohibitively expensive to retrofit existing waste-chutes to handle multiple waste-streams. An alternative system involves ‘timesampling’ the existing chutes - using a button operated input device at the chute-head to control a mechanical sorter at the chute-foot - allowing the single chute to be used for several different types of waste. 3. Redesign Communications. Historically, waste schemes are burdened by their reliance on ‘one size fits all’ solutions. Councils should be looking at means of providing continuous feedback, which would allow pilot schemes to be matched to specific estates with a much finer brush - creating the opportunity to creative virtuous (communal) feedback loops in service provision.

Year:

Location:

2009

Sheffield wide

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Cristina Cerulli

Sheffield Homes

Project’s members: Emma Cockcroft, Sarah Ernst, Becky Glaves, Hannah O’Boyle, Avinash Parmar, Aditi Saxena

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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- HeritageCentre

Neepsend Forum - Live project

Development trust with an asset base to guide area development

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Hidden from the general consciousness of the city Neepsend harbours a series of beautiful, surprising and provoking elements unknown to the majority. Its hidden status is at once a major asset and potential weakness. For years it has enabled the people of Neepsend to develop their spaces and buildings, relatively uninhabited and in tune with their needs. Being close the the City Centre and to rapidly regenerating Kelham Island, Neepsend will soon be host to a number of new large-scale developments- Howhich could threaten the diverse mix of industrial using uses. As well as this the area has a number of other issues, all linked to its current development: -lack of community facilities -lack of coherent strategy and development policy -crime and concerns for public safety.

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- Fooda- Live Project group looked to come up with a Back in 2003 number of strategies for more organic regeneration of the area working with a Kelham Neepsend Forum, a group similar to what today exists as SKINN (Shalesmoor Kelham Island Neepsend Network). Many of their findings are still relevant today since the development of the area has been frozen by a combination of recession and flooding in 2007. One of the main strategies the group proposed was the creation of a development trust that will protect the interest of local community.

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Development trusts are community led enterprise organisations that combine local action with business expertise. They instigate the setting up of sustainable enterprises that contributes to local area. They are not for profit organisations that follow all the administrative systems of a business and the legal requirements of companies but with a vision that engages the community and a commitment to work to improve it.. Students identified that this proposed multi-purpose organisation, the Neepsend Development Trus,t could help the community by: -acting as an advisor to the City Council on Planning decision in the area, preventing developments that would have a negative impact and preventing poorly designed ones being permitted. -providing support services to the prostitutes that operate in the area, through a drop in centre. -acquiring property for development, such as managed workspaces -support service to local businesses, including financial advice and business planning. It would be desirable for such a Trust to form an asset base from which it can earn some of its revenue, as relying on public grant income alone over a long period is problematic. Such assets could include buildings which the Trust acquires through public grants or donations, develops and manages to assist the strategy for the area, in turn creating revenue surpluses and equity which will help sustain the overall operation. SKINN is continuing the work of Kelham Neepsend Forum to reach more organic development of the area, by involving local community in the planning and working with local businesses to preserve the affordability of the area as a hub for creative and start-up businesses.

Year:

Location:

2003

Neepsend

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Russell Light

Neepsend Forum

Project’s members: Gareth Abrahams, Ross Bowman, James Graham, Jeremy Lodge, Nick McLoughlin, Drew Meakin, James Pooley, Andrea Riscold, Tim Wenham

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Sheffield City Centre

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Young people developing their neighbourhood centre

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The project was primarily led by four organisations groups working in Parsons Cross: the Local Authority - Sheffield City Council - the the SOAR (Southey Owlerton Area Regeneration) regeneration charity and charities Chilypep and Sheffield Futures who work directly with local community around employment and inclusion, especially of young people. Together they had been working to secure funding in order to develop a purpose-built young people’s building that would, amongst other things, help raise aspirations and provide a positive resource for young people in the area. The intention was for the building to be used by young people mainly aged between 13 -19 which would include provision for social, leisure and support work.

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A Live Project aimed to assess the need for a physical building and to bring new vision and ideas to the project. In the short term the project group tried to establish trust and hand over an initiative to the young people they worked with/for by raising awareness of existing facilities and promoting the idea of ownership. The hope was that this would initiate future intervention to involve the wider community which may look towards a new building, or alternatively utilise the current youth centres to their full potential. Students designed the ‘Parson X-change’ brand, to bring together all young people’s facilities under one umbrella. The aim was for this brand to be taken on and to eventually be used as a tool to successfully communicate with young people and also obtain future funding for new premises.

Year:

Location:

2009

Parsons Cross

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Rosie Parnell

Sheffield City Council with Sheffield Futures, S.O.A.R and Chilypep

Project’s members:

Amy Brown, Ariadna Aston, Emma Wood, Hellen Siu, Marianne Melling, Yogesh Taylor

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Gateway to Ecclesall Woods - Live Project

More innovative and multi-functional small constructions in the city

Ecclesall Woods is the largest semi-natural ancient woodland in S. Yorkshire with a rich history dating back thousands of years. The woodland forms a nature reserve and is part of the city’s green belt. The Sawmill Site, separate from the surrounding woodland, is considered a working area within woodland’s perimeter boundary is and is home to a cluster of wood related businesses.

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Ecclesall Sawmill hosted a number of live projects, where students would construct “live” structures from the wood produced at the sawmill to be used at the facility: a wood storage canopy, a composting toilet, an outdoor classroom and a bicycle parking station, some of which won architectural awards. The projects are part of a masterplan for the development of the site with the aim to transform the sawmill into a woodland innovation centre; showcasing how a woodland can be sustainably inhabited and managed for work, education, leisure and research purposes.

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The last of these structures at the Sawmill site was built in 2011 when the Live Project team was approached to design and make something that will make people go “wow” and to create a design language for future schemes/ interventions around Ecclesall Woods Sawmill. An old shipping container was standing at the hill cutting, used for storage of materials and tools. It was decided to cover it in more attractive cladding material and built a folly on the top connected with the top of the hill by a path. A variety of different construction techniques were employed with the final project even making it into Architect’s Journal Small Projects Award shortlist. This is one of the prototypes which was designed, sourced and made in Ecclesall woods. There is no reason why similar approach cannot be used in other places in the city.

Year:

Location:

2011

Ecclesall Woods

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Prue Chiles

Ecclesall Woods Sawmill

Project’s members: Rebecca Cunningham, Robin Flindell, Daniel Hall, Tom Harden, Harry Leung, Ding Li, Liwei Liu, Christopher Parrott, James Southern, Jo Daniel Storenge, Dawei Zhai, Yiran Zhou

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Abbeydale Picture House - Live project

Restoration of Abbeydale Picture House Abbeydale Picture House was built in 1920 as a 1,560 seat Culture The cinema, with a billiard hall and ballroom in the basement. Ar t & s- ources - Leisure - Re building operated as a cinema until 1975, when the development of multiplexes drove single screen cinemas to extinction. Friends of the Abbeydale Picture House (FAPH) was formed in 2003, and in 2005 bought the building, with the intention to restore it as a performance venue and cinema. Today it is the best preserved early cinema in the city, and unusual in a national context as it was built with a fly tower, although this has never been put into full use.

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& Com mu - Leisure -in the FAPH has run the Abbey Snooker Club and Bar Abbey vism nit cti y A basement, established the successful Picture House Youth Theatre, and opened the venue to gatherings of craftspeople and artists.

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In 2009 a Live Project group produced and collated information that would enable FAPH to make a strong business case to prospective partners. Demonstrating that the Picture House is viable as a venue, and sustainable as a business, is central to securing the capital investment required. m & Commu n ivis it y

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The students looked at the possible restoration of the main features in the building, and analysis of theatre designs, with the aim of designing a flexible auditorium for the Picture House. Students have produced alternative layouts and designs plus realistics renders to present to funding agencies, have carried out an analysis of decorative mouldings in the building in order to restore them and ascertain the original colouring of auditorium, analysed acoustics of the space, and held a fundraising event in the building to raise awareness of the building and the campaign to save it. Currently most of the Abbeydale Picture House’s internal space is taken up by the vast auditorium. As is, it is not capable of generating enough revenue and usage due to its rigid nature. The proposed scheme is a blend of careful restoration with new insertions to make the building economically viable in the future. Included within the scheme is the restored main auditorium with a capacity of around 550, a new studio theatre with a capacity of around 100 in the old fly tower and new cafes and bars. A modular stage would be installed in the main auditorium that could be stored under the main stage that could be manipulated to house a variety of events and uses. Both a phasing strategy, allowing for work to be conducted in smaller portions, and a strategic approach to heritage were proposed. The phasing capitalises on the scheme’s ability to allow areas of the APH to function separately to others. This means the scheme does not have to be financed in one go, but can be funded incrementally. The heritage strategy makes moves towards clear insertions that are discrete from the original building.

Year:

Location:

2009

Abbeydale Road

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Russell Light

Friends of Abbeydale Picture House

Project’s members: Michael Boyes, Tom Hudson, Moemi Makalun, Ben Asbury, Matthew Jones, Rachael Jones, Ben Oram

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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What we leave behind

Archiving facilities for communities

In our current information age we are constantly generating ine & Educa t & Culture formation about- Arourselves. With all this information o ur c tio we create, isc n D many have yet to protect it. There is major concern amongst archivists and heritage groups that a whole generation of society could be lost through the improper storage of our data. This needs to be rectified, although many don’t trust their information with large multinational companies, and feel there is a need for an ‘off grid’ public repository of digital information for future generations.

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In parallel to this, the rise in community archives over the past inrg -- HLoeuissu sources e- Re five years has seen volunteers in their thousands, driven by the collective need for their community’s heritage to be retained, form such archives. However with the physical form of many of these archives existing in shoe boxes under the bed, or along the shelves of a living room. The need for a tangible home of community archives has been made apparent across local communities, where only in the past five years has their importance begun to circulate in the minds of mainstream archivists.

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Thus it is clear that our legacy is in jeopardy if the importance of our heritage by the everyday citizen is not acknowledged. If local government archives don’t acknowledge the need for the common person to have his or her place in history, then a new type of archive provision is required. Intertwined with volunteers willing to assist is of invaluable benefit to the cultural engagement of our communities. The project proposes a new archive (the commonplace knowledge and observations core) within the site of Sheffield’s former crown court. In addition to the physical and digital experiential archive, a memorial of the common, and a civic hall/auditorium compliments the civic qualities of the site and programme. With in-house dwellings for visiting researchers and permanently based archivists providing a permanent presence on the site. Finally a series of information and observations points will be created as an extension of the archives presence/activity on the street frontage.

Year: 2011

Location: Castlegate

Project mentor(s): Unknown

Project’s member(s):

Jonathan Steven Shaw

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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The southern part of Devonshire Quarter, the area between the e- Leisura Electricity Substation and Fitzwilliam Street was once thriving part of the city, containing small workshops, mesters, and back-to-back housing. In recent years this area and its context has dramatically changed. A number of sites have been demolished and redeveloped for housing and apartments, parks and precincts have been remodelled and once vacant buildings assigned new community and civic functions. Despite all of this investment and change it is a lost and forgotten place, devoid of people, vegetation, and purpose. Economic decline &T nol gn & Ceocmhm and demolition have created a wasteland which evsiismdevelopers unogy it y - cDti A currently have no appetite for. Dual carriageway is a physical barrier to the site, dividing the area from residential areas Broomhall and Ecclasall Road. One of 2012 landscape final-year projects explored how these abandoned bits of land can be brought back to the city through a stronger green strategy, exploring what they can contribute to in the short-term in terms of habitat, ecological contribution rt & Culture and facilities for people who live and work in the- Aarea.

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The idea was to design how a landscape would develop over time. As usages of buildings change, the landscape changes and grows. As residential development comes in to the former industrial areas, landscape would develop with more permanent features, at the same time keeping the areas where most efforts have been spent in the first phases.

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One of the students looked at how landscape initiatives can enhance the everyday of the local community, for users to be able to travel through the site many times and have different experiences. Fast growing vegetation, which can populate the site quickly. Swathes of annual meadow capture each gust of wind in a constant and spectacular transformation. The initiatives do not have to be expensive: quick landforms made from construction debris and brick rubble. Using the land to manipulate, slow down and engage people and elements with the landscape. Flowing swathes will emphasise the passing of seasons. The development of the site can be a gradual, piecemeal one. Care will be needed to ensure that investment in quality materials and vegetation will be made in the permanent areas, whereas cheaper and easily-dismantled materials and features will be used in those proposed for development. This ensures minimum up-front costs and waste, therefore increasing viability and sustainability.

Year: 2012

Location: Devonshire Quarter

Project mentor(s): Andy Clayden

Project’s members: Kirsty Dougall

Department: Landscape

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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For the last two years, first year students from SSoA have been using one of the units on the Moor to work on a construction projects, “Matter-Reality”. The project involved students working in groups to create structures from a single material. The Housing brick, materials- are: stone, timber, bio-materials, metal, glass, concrete and plastics. In 2012 students’ brief was to build a place for conversation.

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The construction process was carried out in the vacant unit which also doubled up as a public information hub for the project. Passers-by were invited to enter the shop and engage with the students, ask questions about the project or just have a look at what was happening. All three storeys of the unit were used. - Food The process generated a lof of interest from shoppers and pedestrians. It is always interesting to see something happening in the space which has been unused for months.

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Currently there are 103 vacant shops in Sheffield City Centre. A lot of these are awaiting future redevelopment and could be - Heritage vacant for months and, in some cases, years. As well as having visible ground floor presence many shops stretch to the other end of the building in addition to having large spaces on upper floors and underground.


After construction, the finished projects were assembled along the Moor, where the public and tutors assessed them. As the unit belonged to a private developer, the process of getting permission for using the units was rather straightforward - University insurance and name was enough without much paperwork. The spaces were given to the students. The argument for the landlord was simple - the proposed activities would liven the place up and create an atmosphere of “something happening�. The project is a great example of what can happen with a little effort from the owner of the property. The property owner still has to pay rates on the vacant property, so why not put some of them to good use? Activities generate attention for the property, thus increasing the possibility of it getting rented on commercial basis and are good publicity for the owner.

Year: 2011, 2012

Location: Sheffield City Centre

Project mentor(s): All year 1 tutors

Project’s members: All year 1 students

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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In 2009 Sheffield Homes looked after 5,947 garages with only 65% of the stock being let and over 1,500 of those garages being unavailable. The garages were unavailable as a result of no demand, poor condition or bad/no marketing.

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One of the Live Project group’s looked at alternative use for using these empty The project looked at several strategies - Hogarages. with proposals for re-use with a range of cost, commitment of resources and timescales.

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One of such proposals, based in the Gleadless Valley, looked at the potential of using empty garage stock as short term homes, by converting some double garages situated under maisonettes into studio accommodation. With a gross internal area of 32 sq/m per studio, this would provide sufficient accommodation ood for up to two- Fpeople. This solution is perhaps best conceived in a situation where affordable households on adjacent developments, need additional accommodation for growing families. For example, if a young adult living at home with their parents is expecting or thinking of starting a family of their own, but are unable to afford a substantial place of their own. This may be the case for residents/families that are already on the waiting list to be put into social/affordable housing. This may be a buffer solution between dependent home living and fully independent first time house buyer/ tenants.


Openings would have to be constructed on the front and rear facade to ensure sufficient natural light and ventilation. The studio would need to be connected to all major services (gas, water, electricity, waste); provisions for these would have to be met. Major construction issues would be implemented on bathroom and kitchen installation. Construction and fit out would have to been kept to a minimum to make it economically viable. Conversion of the garages into studios could, potentially, fit into Sheffield City Council’s strategy to provide more affordable housing. Funds that would be normally used to create additional housing stock could be provided for them. This would provide affordable housing in already developed community groups and provide an economic and environmental solution by repairing and adapting existing building stock that cannot be demolished. Rent from tenants would replenish building and implementation costs.

Year: 2009

Project mentor(s): Cristina Cerulli

Location: Sheffield wide

Client(s): Sheffield Homes

Project’s members: Emma Cockcroft, Sarah Ernst, Becky Glaves, Hannah O’Boyle, Avinash Parmar, Aditi Saxena

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Play, pause, revind - Heritage -

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The former Sheffield–Manchester rail line is now largely disused. The line is an elevated rail structure running to the north of the city centre, and then westwards through Hillsborough and along the Upper Don Valley towards the small town of Stocksbridge. Currently there is a single rail line that is in use once a day, supporting a freight train that carries scrap steel to the steel- Hworks ousing - at Stocksbridge.

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The line runs through brownfield land that is detached from the city centre and currently lacking of places for social interaction/ recreation. Still the line has great potential of becoming something completely different from what it is today. It could become Sheffield High Line, a place where people can gather, socialize, enjoy the nature and learn from it. Visitor would be able learn about the history of the surrounding area and, last but not least, Food -city from higher heights. look over -the -

The idea is to create a park for people and for nature, where culture and the vegetation, side by side, are given plenty of space to blossom. A space to escape from the city...in the city. All five senses will be excited during the visit to the park. The character areas/habitats will offer views, scents, sounds, fruit and berries will offer taste and textures will offer touch. - Leisure -

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The idea is to create a park that will convince people that it’s all about them, that it is made for them, but in fact it will be all about nature as well. The High Line will be a green refuge, a shelterbelt for migrating species coming from outside of the city, as well as for people that are living in the city. To be successful Sheffield High Line needs to encompass a variety of functions. It should have spaces for play, active leisure and outside performances. There should also be sitting opportunities, facing the city and thereby offering an amazing view over it. The park would offer various, dynamic and interesting environments for people to explore, whilst at the same time offering protected habitats for the large number of birds, mammals and insects living in the areas. This could be achieved by different plantations, materials and features. It is Important that the park has a coherent feeling, therefore some materials and features should be repeated throughout the park. Through play of topography it is possible to make a journey through the park more interesting. To reduce rainwater runoff the surfaces in the park will mostly consist of plantations and porous materials, such as wooden decking or gravel. The rain that falls on Wicker arches will be lead down to raingardens running along the arches. The surface runoff from the surrounding urban areas will be used to fill the wetland areas which will reduce the pressure of the local drainage system. The environments should show seasonal change, encourage play and awareness of the nature and the history. The park is not meant to be a shortcut, it is meant to slow people’s pace down, make them stay in the park for a while and experience something different from the ordinary life.

Year: 2011

Location: Great Central Main Line, Neepsend, Wicker

Project mentor(s): Nigel Dunnett

Project’s member(s): Nejra Lagumdzija

Department: Landscape

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas


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Portland Works - Live Project

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The -collective act of building the planters develops relationships with users of the space and is a good team-building exercise. Planting and caring after the plants reinforces this relationship and provides a talking point. Planters can be built from any leftover bits of wood, including pallets, and other discarded materials such as carpet tiles and plastic sheets. The planter shown was built and planted in one afternoon. ood In thisourcase planter also provides- Fseating. ce & Eduthe ca

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Several Live Projects at SSoA have used this device to cement relationships and leave a legacy beyond their project. These include the Broomhall Community Centre, the Cancer Support Center and Portland Works. In all these projects planters were built with and for the clients at the very end of the project as a way to handing-over their work.

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This idea can be replicated in many places around the city providing not only a place to grow plants, but a whole load of other benefits, including: -desirable green addition to urban spaces -respond to the people’s growing interest in gardening and sustainable food -provide a point of conversation and relaxation -potential reduction of standing/running water - when planters are placed on hard surface such as roofs and terraces

Year:

Location:

2011

Sheffield wide

Project mentor(s):

Client(s):

Cristina Cerulli

Portland Works, Little Sheffield Limited

Project’s members:

Benjamin Baliti, Guy Moulson, Jonathan Orlek, Caroline Gore-Booth, Ewan Tavendale, Bryony Spottiswoode, Mersedeh Gharavifard, Chen Guo, Qi Mingyu, Scaria Njavally, Adrian Judt, Christopher Carthy

Department:

School of Architecture

More information:

http://www.skinn.org.uk/50ideas

50 Ideas for Better Sheffield  

Every year, the University of Sheffield’s School of Architecture carries out projects in the city, working with communities to explore new a...

50 Ideas for Better Sheffield  

Every year, the University of Sheffield’s School of Architecture carries out projects in the city, working with communities to explore new a...

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