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JUNE 2018 | VOLUME 14 | ISSUE 3

Celebrate the role of Native Prairie PAGE 9

Clubroot surveillance in 2018 |

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Summer management strategies for livestock | Building public trust in agriculture |

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Minister’s Message Lyle Stewart

Welcome to the June Edition of Agriview. The 2018-19 Provincial Budget was introduced in the Saskatchewan Legislature in April by the Honourable Donna Harpauer, Minister of Finance. The budget is focused on keeping our province on track with our plan to meet fiscal challenges while continuing to invest in the services, programs and infrastructure that Saskatchewan people value. The Ministry of Agriculture’s budget is $378.6 million, including $258.2 million to fully fund the business risk management programs of Crop Insurance, AgriStability, AgriInvest and Western Livestock Price Insurance. These programs give producers confidence to make investments in their operation that improve the overall profitability and long-term sustainability of our industry. Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation worked with industry to bring forward enhancements to this year’s Crop Insurance program, including adding fire insurance as a coverage feature for pasture land. The savings in this year’s budget are a result of lower forecast AgriStability costs and decreased Crown land sale incentive costs, due to the conclusion of the 2015 program that provided a purchasing opportunity for farmers and ranchers leasing the land.

These programs give producers confidence to make investments in their operation that improve the overall profitability and sustainability.

The 2018-19 agriculture budget includes $71.2 million for strategic initiatives under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP), the same amount provided in the previous federal-provincial agreement, Growing Forward 2. This year’s budget includes $31.8 million for agricultural research, an increase of $5 million from last year, to support research institutions, project funding through the Agriculture Development Fund and to increase our focus on demonstration and technology transfer. The budget also contains $3 million to support rehabilitation of irrigation assets in five irrigation districts and irrigation asset transfer, $4.4 million in industry grants to support events and organizations such as Canada’s Farm Progress Show and Agriculture in the Classroom, and $800,000 in annual funding to Animal Protection Services of Saskatchewan to support that organization’s work in enforcing The Animal Protection Act. I am confident this budget will support the continued success of our industry.


Table of Contents

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JUNE 2018 | VOLUME 14 | ISSUE 3

Keep it Clean benefits your bottom line and Canada’s brand .

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Consider in-crop fertilizer when weather and crop conditions change Beneficial insects: do you scout before you spray? . Clubroot surveillance in 2018.

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International irrigation conference coming to Saskatchewan .

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Post-application checks on herbicide performance for herbicide-resistance management

RESEARCH Can group-housing lead to lower energy costs due to reduced barn temperatures? Celebrate the role of Native Prairie

PROGRAMS & SERVICES

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Clubroot surveillance in 2018 |

Beef producers improve facilities and help the environment

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Summer management strategies for livestock | Building public trust in agriculture |

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Celebrate the role of native prairie in sustainable growth

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LIVESTOCK

Cover: Native Prairie Appreciation Week is June 17-23. It’s a time to celebrate the values of native prairie – discover how on page 9.

Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef

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Updated livestock and forage strategy unveiled

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Summer management strategies for livestock producers to consider. AGRIVIEW is published by the Communications Branch of Saskatchewan Agriculture for Saskatchewan farmers, ranchers and farm and food organizations. For more information, call 306-787-5160 or email agriview@gov.sk.ca. To view this publication online, visit www.saskatchewan.ca/agriview.

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Bovine tuberculosis investigation over but the industry can’t be complacent Take steps to avoid blue-green algae in your dugouts

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Pasture management will result in more uniform grazing .

PROGRAMS & SERVICES Seeding isn’t complete until you’ve filed the seeded acreage report

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Illegally dumping waste hurts the environment and can result in fines . Volunteers needed to survey wildlife

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Expanding value-added processing in Saskatchewan .

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Building public trust with Blair’s family of companies

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EVENTS CALENDAR Calendar .

PROGRAMS & SERVICES Be FireSmart on the farm: fire pits, burn barrels and windrows.

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IF YOU’RE EXPERIENCING ANY SYMPTOMS OF STRESS, THE FARM STRESS LINE IS THERE FOR YOU 24/7 AT

1-800-667-4442.

Saskatchewan.ca

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Keep it Clean benefits your bottom line and Canada’s brand mycotoxin. DON levels are strictly regulated around the world, so protecting your crop from fusarium and DON will not only improve your bottom line but improve the marketability of the rest of Canadian exports.

Brenna Mahoney Director of Communications and Stakeholder Relations Cereals Canada

Some of the things that farmers can do today to limit the potential for fusarium damage are:

As an individual farmer, you can’t control everything that goes into Canada’s reputation of providing quality, consistent and clean grain. You do, however, have control over some of the most important factors. Adherence to the guidelines in the Keep it Clean program is an excellent way to ensure you are reducing risk on your farm, as well as protecting the Canadian brand.

• Scout fields regularly for disease

symptoms to determine the effectiveness of your management plan; • Apply fungicide when there is an elevated

risk of FHB (e.g. wet conditions during flowering and head emergence); and • Control grassy weeds and straw residue

that may harbour FHB between cereal crop years.

Importers are increasingly on the lookout for unwanted material in grain shipments. They always test arriving vessels to ensure that contract specifications are being met, and testing levels are becoming increasingly minute, often calculated in parts per billion or even parts per trillion (a part per trillion is the equivalent of one second in 32,000 years).

The industry must work as a single value-chain in order to protect and enhance Canada’s reputation for quality and safety. This is why the Canola Council of Canada, Cereals Canada, the Barley Council of Canada, the Prairie Oat Growers Association and Pulse Canada are making the Keep it Clean program 2018 PRODUCTS OF CONCERN directly related to enhancing your crop Shipments that contain things like pesticide residues above the importer’s CANOLA: Be Informed – Treated crop could create marketing concerns: protection management plan. Following the Keep it Clean guidelines will (e.g. Accord, Clever, Facet and Masterline Quinclorac) – consult grain buyer before using. maximum residue limits or mycotoxins such as ochratoxin (OTA) and Quinclorac Metconazole (e.g. Quash) – consult grain buyer before using. enhance your business by reducing risk, while also helping the entire deoxynivalenol (DON) can derail exports and damage Canada’s reputation. CEREALS: Special Considerations: Wheat: Glyphosate (e.g. Roundup) industry – only use pre-harvest if greenest part of the cropon is <30%its moisture. deliver commitments. Countries can turn shipments away if we don’t meet their regulations, Unacceptable residues can sink a shipment – know the 2018 products of concern before application.

Oats: Glyphosate – may not be accepted by grain buyers if treated pre-harvest. Malt Barley: Glyphosate, Saflufenacil (e.g. Kixor) – will not be accepted by grain buyers if treated pre-harvest.

causing millions of dollars in losses and placing future business atPULSES: risk.Up-to-date information is now available at keepingitclean.ca.

A focus for farmers this time of year is fusarium. Every farmer knows the Visit www.keepingitclean.ca; or FOR Three important steps to avoid unacceptable residues and protect Canada’s reputation as a quality supplier: MORE potential yield and quality losses that come from fusarium damage, but Call Cereals Canada at 204-942-2166. Use only registered products. Always follow the label for rate, Confirm market requirements INFO losses in the field are not the only issue. The fungus produces thetiming DON and pre-harvest interval. with your grain buyer. For more information on how your application decisions can impact market access for all, visit keepingitclean.ca AD_KeepItClean_ProductsofConcern_April2018_7.125x9.875_REVISED_FOR_CEREALS_April26.indd 1

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Consider in-crop fertilizer when weather and crop conditions change Daphne Cruise, PAg Crops Extension Specialist Agriculture Knowledge Centre

The ideal time for the majority of fertilizer, both economically and from a plant development perspective, is at seeding. Applying nutrients at seeding saves an extra pass over the field and allows the crop to access nutrients early. However, there are situations when an in-crop fertilizer application makes sense. If conditions are too dry or too wet at seeding, reducing fertilizer applications at seeding time can be done in response to predictions of a decreased yield. This can then be followed up with an in-crop application. Also, if the seeding implement does not allow for effective and efficient placement of all the fertilizer at the time of seeding, then an in-crop application can allow for the remainder of the fertilizer to be applied. The proper time for in-crop nitrogen application ranges from the fourto six-leaf stage for canola and up to the five- to six-leaf stage for cereals. The best time for an application is just before a rainfall, as rain is required to move the fertilizer into the soil where roots can access it and limit volatilization losses. Nitrogen efficiency products, such as Agrotain,

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can also be added to fertilizer to stabilize nutrients for a short time if rain is not in the immediate forecast. In-crop sulphur application can happen a little later in crop development and still be beneficial. Leaf burn could be an issue when doing an in-crop fertilizer application. If broadcasting granular fertilizer, do so when leaves are dry so the prills will roll to the ground and reduce leaf burn. If using a liquid, make the application when leaves are wet from an early dew or light rain so it runs off the plant, and perhaps consider adding extra water and increasing pressure. Use dribble nozzles specific to fertilizer application to reduce contact with leaves and crop residue, as pesticide nozzles are designed to increase leaf coverage and could cause plant damage due to fertilizer burn. Keep in mind that urea ammonium nitrate applied into heavy trash cover can be tied up by crop residue. Therefore, a fertilizer band works better than a full ground cover system. In-crop fertilizer applications are a good risk management tool that producers can use to respond to the constantly changing weather patterns that are often experienced in the short time frame between seeding and the early stages of crop development. FOR MORE INFO

Call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.


CROPS

Beneficial insects: do you scout before you spray? Victoria Nameth, AAg Crops Extension Specialist, Tisdale Regional Services Branch

As the growing season progresses into the month of June, insects and whether or not to apply an insecticide may be at the forefront of our minds. While it is important to control the harmful insects that can damage the crop, it is also important to consider the beneficial insects that can be harmed in the process. Beneficial insects provide a valuable service to the crop through predation or pollination. These insects are grouped into three categories: predators, parasitoids and pollinators. Predators such as lacewings or ladybird beetles prey on other insects. Parasitoids such as parasitic wasps or flies lay their eggs inside the harmful insect host, which eventually kills the host. Pollinators like honey bees or leafcutter bees collect pollen and nectar from flowers and, as a result, our crops get pollinated. Predator and parasitoid insects play an important role in an integrated pest management system. Working as a biological control, these beneficial insects are able to keep harmful pest populations below economic threshold levels. For example, beneficial lacewings prey on

harmful diamondback moth eggs, larvae and cocoons, and developing lacewing larvae can consume 100 to 600 aphids. Similarly, the thirteenspotted lady beetle is an aggressive predator that can consume 100 to 160 aphids in a 24-hour period. This not only prevents damage to crops, but also provides an economic benefit in that application of an insecticide may not be necessary. Recent studies have shown that canola pollinated by insects can see a yield increase of 10 to 15 per cent. Therefore, to keep beneficial insect population healthy, it is important to only spray an insecticide when the economic threshold is exceeded. With the goal to increase awareness of these beneficial insects, a campaign called Field Heroes was launched this past summer. This campaign encourages producers to scout for beneficial insects before applying an insecticide. Visiting the campaign’s website or following @ FieldHeroes on Twitter will provide information on beneficial insects and how to identify and scout for them. The next time you go out to scout your fields for insects, remember the Field Heroes’ slogan: “Not all heroes wear capes: think beneficials before you spray.” FOR MORE INFO

Visit the Field Heroes’ website at www.fieldheroes.ca.

Clubroot surveillance in 2018 Barbara Ziesman, PhD, AAg Provincial Specialist, Plant Disease Crops and Irrigation Branch

To raise awareness of the distribution and severity of clubroot in Saskatchewan and to encourage informed and proactive clubroot management, a clubroot distribution map will be generated showing the general location (at the RM level) of clubroot-infested fields.

Clubroot is an important soil-borne disease of canola and other brassicas that can cause yield losses of 50 per cent or more under extreme conditions. In 2017, clubroot was confirmed in a limited number of canola fields in Saskatchewan crop districts 9A and 9B. Currently, the distribution of clubroot in Saskatchewan appears to be limited, putting the province in a good position to get ahead of the disease and take precautions to minimize the spread and severity of clubroot. The first step towards this goal is to increase our understanding of the distribution of clubroot in Saskatchewan. To address this knowledge gap, Saskatchewan Agriculture is planning to conduct an extensive clubroot survey in the high-risk regions of Saskatchewan (the blue area in the map). This survey will take place in the fall, starting in mid-August. One field in each township throughout the survey area will be randomly surveyed. In each field, plants will be pulled to look for clubroot galls on the roots. Soil samples will also be collected at the field entrance for DNA testing to detect the clubroot pathogen at low levels. When positive fields are found, the landowner and/or producer will be contacted and informed of the finding. Since clubroot is a regulated pest in Saskatchewan, the location of all fields with clubroot will be reported to the rural municipality. Saskatchewan Agriculture is working towards a consistent approach to clubroot regulation in Saskatchewan and is recommending that rural municipalities manage clubroot through a farmer-driven approach. This approach enables the landowner and/or producer to lead on how clubroot will be managed on the farm. Landowners/producers will have the opportunity to work with a professional agrologist to develop a clubroot management plan for the infested fields. If the clubroot management plan meets a minimum set of science-based standards related to canola variety selection, crop rotation and sanitation practices, it will become the formal agreement between the landowner and/or producer and the municipal pest control officer.

FOR MORE INFO

Contact Barb Ziesman, Provincial Specialist, Plant Disease, at 306-529-4403 or barbara.ziesman@gov.sk.ca.

AGRIVIEW | JUNE 2018

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International irrigation conference coming to Saskatchewan Kelly Farden Manager, Agronomy Services Crops and Irrigation Branch

This summer, Saskatchewan will host the 69th International Executive Council Meeting and Conference of the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (ICID). The event takes place August 12 to 17, and will be located at the Teachers Credit Union Place in downtown Saskatoon. It is expected that there will be between 350 to 500 leading experts on irrigation and drainage from across the world in attendance throughout the week. More than 80 countries are members of the ICID, which has a mandate dedicated to sustainable irrigated production and food security. Canada is a member of the ICID through its association with the Canadian Water Resources Association (CWRA) and the Canadian Committee for Irrigation and Drainage (CANCID). Through its network of professionals spread across the world, the ICID has facilitated the sharing of experiences and transfer of water management technology for more than 60 years. Due to the global nature of the organization, ICID is dedicated to addressing agricultural water management issues across a broad spectrum, ranging from rain-fed agriculture and drainage to full-scale intensive irrigation.

The theme for this conference will be “Innovative and Sustainable Agri-water Management: Adapting to a Variable and Changing Climate.” The technical portion of the conference will consist of three sub-themes: 1) Competing Water Demands, 2) Resilient Agriculture—Adapting Agriculture to Climate Change, and 3) Irrigation and Drainage in Perspective. Water resource specialists from around the world will present recent findings at these sessions. In addition to the scientific seminars, the conference will also include a trade show, working group sessions, tours and other special events. The conference tours will travel through some of Saskatchewan’s irrigation districts to highlight innovative and adaptive irrigation and drainage management from the Canadian Prairie perspective. Although, at 250,000 acres, Saskatchewan’s irrigation sector is relatively small, this conference presents a great opportunity to showcase the province’s potential to an international audience. Having this conference in our backyard is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Saskatchewan irrigators and industry stakeholders to learn from and network with world-renowned exerts in the fields of irrigation and water management.

FOR MORE INFO

Visit the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage’s website at www.icid2018.org.

Post-application checks on herbicide performance for herbicide-resistance management Clark Brenzil, PAg Provincial Specialist, Weed Control Crops and Irrigation Branch

The prevalence of herbicide resistance continues to rise in Saskatchewan. Weeds resistant to either Group 1 or Group 2 herbicides were found on 57 per cent of crop fields surveyed in Saskatchewan during 2014 and 2015. Herbicide resistance can be managed effectively if addressed early in its development; therefore, post-herbicide scouting can help to catch emerging problems quickly. Herbicide resistance develops slowly at first, multiplying from a single plant to millions over several years, but the rate of increase is fastest as the transformation of the field to full-blown herbicide resistance nears completion. That is why it is important to monitor fields for weed survivors and eliminate these individuals before they build up to overtake large portions of the field. Single weed plants surviving a herbicide application are difficult to see on casual observation and, when seen, are often chalked up to other

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potential problems with the spray process (rain-wash, shadowing, boom-sway, etc.) and dismissed without further investigation. This is why it is important to scout fields after the in-crop herbicide has been applied. Scouting a field after herbicide application will allow the producer to catch any potential resistance at an early stage of development. The key distinction to look for is a single weed escaping. It is highly unlikely that more than one weed will develop resistance at any one moment in time, so if there are several weed types (species) surviving in a patch, it is likely a result of a herbicide miss, rather than resistance. If a single weed species is found to survive a herbicide application, testing can be conducted at the Saskatchewan Crop Protection Lab to confirm resistance. If multiple species have survived, it is more likely a result of an application miss.

FOR MORE INFO

Contact a Regional Crops Extension Specialist at a nearby Saskatchewan Agriculture Regional Office; Call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377; or Visit saskatchewan.ca and search for ‘herbicide resistance.’


RESEARCH

Can group-housing lead to lower energy costs due to reduced barn temperatures? Changes to the Canadian Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Pigs have the hog industry shifting from stalls to group housing system for sows, and all sow farms are expected to have fully transitioned to the new system by 2024. The advantage of group housing systems is that sows can interact with each other and exhibit more ‘natural’ animal behaviour. In addition to improved animal welfare, one significant economic benefit to producers is the potential to lower their production costs by reducing barn temperatures. Sows housed in groups can huddle together for warmth and maintain a comfortable environment even when the temperature in the barn is lowered. The current temperature setting in typical barns (16.5 C) is slightly above the lower critical temperature of 15 C, the temperature at which the sow will require additional feed to maintain its body condition and weight gain over the gestation period. It is assumed that sows housed in groups may have lower critical temperature values significantly lower than 15 C, thanks to their ability to thermo-regulate their environment. Thus, if group-housed sows can maintain body condition and weight gain at temperatures lower than currently maintained in sow barns without the need for additional feed, the potential exists to significantly reduce energy costs for heating and ventilation.a However, some issues anticipated with group-housed sows include higher activity levels and increased aggression among sows. These problems are exacerbated when sows are put on a restricted feeding regime, which is a common practice to maintain optimal body condition in gestating sows. The sensation of feeling “full” is improved with high-fibre diets; these diets are also known to reduce the urge to feed continuously, as well as overall activity and repetitive behaviour in sows. Moreover, dietary fibre increases heat production in sows without increasing digestible energy. As such, adding fibre to the diet can be a means of reducing activity and limiting aggression in group-housed sows under reduced barn temperature. With the financial support of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Development Fund (ADF) and the Saskatchewan Pork Development Board, Dr. Bernardo Predicala and his team from the Prairie Swine Centre set out to determine the temperature requirements of group-housed sows fed a high-fibre (high heat-increment) diet to reduce energy costs. The specific objectives were to: • Track metabolic rate, body temperature and thermoregulatory

behaviour to determine the environmental temperature preferred by sows fed high-fibre diets; • Assess the energy savings from reduced ventilation and heat requirements when sows are housed in groups at lower environmental temperatures; and • Evaluate the impact on general activity, aggression, body condition and weight gain of sows fed high-fibre diet and housed in groups at their preferred environmental temperature. Ultimately, the researchers wanted to establish management practices that would allow pig producers to benefit economically from the new rules regarding group housing. Dr. Predicala and his team split the project into three phases. In Phase 1, they developed the instruments and training protocols to teach the sows to control their environmental temperature and then tracked the physiological effects of high-fibre diet on sow metabolism and thermoregulatory behaviour. Phase 2 involved actual room-scale experiments in which the preferred environmental temperature of sows was determined and energy

savings at reduced temperatures were assessed. Phase 3 was a feasibility study to determine costs and requirements for proper implementation of this technology in a typical swine production facility. Two fully instrumented, controlled-environment chambers at the PSC barn facility in Saskatoon were used in Phase 1 of this study. In one chamber, the temperature was pre-set; in the other, it was controlled by the sows using an operant mechanism, which included a heater installed in the fresh air supply duct to warm the air when activated. By flicking a switch, a sow could turn on the supplementary heating system, warming the room for three minutes, after which the switch was deactivated for five minutes. A small radiant heater was installed immediately above the heat switch, giving the animal an immediate reward and making the connection in its mind between the switch and warmth. A ‘dummy’ switch that did not operate a radiant heater (i.e., unrewarded activity) was also installed close to the real switch to distinguish between deliberate behaviour by the sows to control the room temperature and random interaction with the mechanism. Subsequent trials in actual gestation rooms allowing the sows to control their own environmental temperature resulted in approximately a 75-per-cent reduction in natural gas consumption and an 11-per-cent reduction in electricity consumption for heating and ventilation compared to a conventional room with the temperature pre-set at 16.5 C. The sows allowed their own environmental temperature to fall as low as 7 C, when the supplemental heater kicked in automatically. In total, this translated into a saving of about $4.78 per sow, which readily offset the cost of the high-fibre diet—composed mainly of barley, beet pulp, canola meal, pea fibre and wheat—and the equipment. As well, carbon dioxide levels were lower in the sow-controlled room, resulting in relatively better air quality than in the pre-set room. Growth performance and physiology were unaffected by the exposure to colder temperatures. No significant behavioral differences were observed between the sow-controlled room and the pre-set room, which implies that sow welfare is not a concern. This project confirmed that feeding group-housed sows a high-fibre/ heat-increment diet and allowing them to express natural thermoregulatory behaviour (i.e., huddling), allowed them to tolerate temperatures significantly lower than the current industry set-point temperature without compromising their welfare or productivity. This translates into a significant reduction in winter energy use, thereby contributing to the overall sustainability of the operation. Ultimately, the findings demonstrate the additional benefits that can be realized from group-housing and facilitate the conversion of the industry to the new system. The Agriculture Development Fund provides funding to institutions, companies and industry organizations to help them carry out research, development and value-added activities in the agriculture and agri-food sector. The results produce new knowledge, information and choices in technologies, techniques and varieties for farmers, ranchers, processors and input suppliers, to improve the competitiveness of Saskatchewan’s agricultural sector. In 2018, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada committed $17.3 million in new funding for 55 ADF research projects through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincialterritorial initiative. FOR MORE INFO

Visit Saskatchewan.ca and search for ADF; then enter the report number 20130263 into the search function.

Radiant heater Operant switch Dummy switch

A

B

Figure 1. Circuitry of the developed operant controller system (A) and associated components (B) including the operant activation and dummy switches, the radiant heater, and the main room supplemental gas heater (not shown).

Figure 2. Sow activation of the operant switch, which triggered the operation of the infrared heat lamp above the switch as immediate feedback reward as well as the main room supplemental gas heater until the air temperature in the room was increased by 1 deg C above the current temperature at the time the switch was activated. AGRIVIEW | JUNE 2018

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Beef producers improve facilities and help the environment Bryce Sundbo, PEng Regional Engineer, Saskatoon Livestock Branch

Tim and Chris McDougall run a beef cow/calf operation in the Rural Municipality of Wilton, on land homesteaded by Tim’s grandfather in 1918. The family will be celebrating the farm’s centennial this year. For a number of years, the McDougalls had wanted to relocate the corrals to a better, more convenient location, but cost was an issue. They were able to access funding under the Growing Forward 2 federal-provincialterritorial initiative, and that allowed them to achieve their relocation goal. The funding process was smooth and problem-free, according to Tim. The couple did most of the work themselves to keep costs down.

The old site decommissioned.

The old site will be leveled and seeded back to native grass.

The New Site

Aerial photo of the McDougall’s farm.

The McDougalls had a number of reasons for wanting to relocate the corrals. 1. They were concerned about the environmental impact of the old facilities on the adjacent creek. They knew there was runoff from the pens that would enter the creek and possibly have a negative impact on the creek or downstream users.

Tim chose a site that slopes to the southwest/west with good drainage, which meant that he did not have to do any earthwork at the new site. He consulted with Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Agricultural Operations staff and decided to build more than 300 metres from the creek so he would not have to apply for an approval under The Agricultural Operations Act while still ensuring that he did not negatively impact the creek. Tim bought steel paneling and welded T-posts on to make free-standing and continuous fencing. The fencing is not dug into the ground so it can be easily moved. Tim chose this design so that, if he wanted, he could change his pens easily. He has always had an interest in sustainable power, and the cost of running power to the new site was going to be high, so the new well is powered by solar and wind energy. Tim estimated that he spent about 300 hours, or six weeks, building the new location. The majority of this work was completed with the use of a front end loader and a welder.

2. Drainage at the old site was poor. The pens would get very muddy in the spring due to the location. 3. The old site was difficult to access. The road to the site was steep and would get icy in the winter.

Decommissioning Three buildings were moved from the old to the new site: a small barn, a pump house and a feed house containing the grain-rolling equipment. Tim estimated that he spent about 200 hours, or over a month, working on decommissioning the old site which was a requirement for accessing the GF2 funding. All the pen fencing was removed and Tim hired a backhoe to dig out the old well casing and decommission the old well. The new site

Tim and Chris McDougall are proud of their relocation project because they can see the environmental benefit. Relocating the livestock out of a sensitive area and away from the creek helps to protect water resources. This has also allowed Tim and Chris to improve the cattle pen environment by locating it on higher ground with better site drainage. The new cattle facility site has significantly better all-season access and supports the sustainability of the livestock industry. Growing Forward 2 has ended but new programming has been established under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) to continue this important work. 

The old site

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FOR MORE INFO

Call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.


PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Celebrate the role of native prairie in sustainable growth •  R AISE AWARENESS: Share your experiences with native rangelands on

Nadia Mori, PAg, MSc Range Management Extension Specialist Regional Services Branch

social media with #NPAW20. Visit the Prairie Conservation Action Plan (PCAP) website for events taking place during this week of celebrating native rangelands.

Temperate grasslands, which include our Canadian Prairies, are considered one of the most endangered ecosystems in the world. In Saskatchewan, it is estimated that approximately 20 per cent of native prairie remains intact. Our remaining native prairie is a valuable resource that touches many lives and interest groups. Ranchers rely on the sustainable use of prairie for their livelihoods. For others, native prairie may be of cultural, spiritual or recreational importance. Many landowners, government and non-government agencies play a role in the stewardship and protection of native prairie. In recognition of the importance of native rangelands to sustainable growth in our province, Saskatchewan’s ministries of agriculture and environment declared the third week of June as Native Prairie Appreciation Week (NPAW). The purpose of the week is to raise awareness and appreciation of native prairie ecosystems and their importance to Saskatchewan’s people as well as to the environmental and agricultural sectors. Native rangelands play many important roles. Some are visible, like providing forage for livestock, habitat for wildlife and recreational areas for everybody to enjoy. Others may be invisible at first glance, such as regulating water flow, cycling nutrients and preserving biodiversity.

•  PASS IT ON: Contact a friend or two who have never spent time on a

rangeland pasture and offer to take them out on a walk. Teach them on the importance of these unique ecosystems and how sustainable grazing management maintains the function of these landscapes.

Some fun things to do in June to celebrate native rangelands: •  IDENTIFY IT: Search for needle-and-thread, our provincial grass. You can

identify it through its distinctive twisted awn and big pointed ligule.

•  TREASURE IT: Find a slope in a pasture that has good litter cover and

“race” water down the hill. Notice how quickly the water infiltrates into the soil. Now race water down a slope with little or no litter and observe how the water travels much faster and farther. Litter is an important part of keeping moisture in the soil and supporting forage growth during dry spells.

As well, join us June 21 and 22 in Beechy for one of the main events held during the 20th NPAW: “The Missouri Coteau: 10,000 Years in the Making”, a tour organized by the Prairie Parkland Chapter of the Society for Range Management and the PCAP. The event will kick off with a social event and surprise keynote presentation on Thursday evening. Friday will feature a full day of touring and hands-on learning on native prairie of the Matador area. The deadline for registration is June 14 and people are encouraged to register early to secure a spot. There will be lots of other activities planned across the province during Native Prairie Appreciation Week. Follow them on social media, #NPAW20, or visit the Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan website.

FOR MORE INFO

Visit www.pcap-sk.org/NPAW , or contact srm.prairieparkland@gmail.com.

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LIVESTOCK

Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef Grant Zalinko, PAg Executive Director Livestock Branch

On April 10 and 11, 2018, the Canadian livestock industry met in Regina for the semi-annual meeting of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB). The CRSB is a national, multi-stakeholder initiative established in 2014 to advance sustainability efforts in the beef industry. The CRSB leads a national forum that connects local, regional and national leaders and stakeholders in the beef industry who are interested in and committed to beef sustainability. The CRSB is a collaborative effort. CRSB members are asked to remove their personal interests and focus on the goal of establishing sustainability initiatives as the pre-competitive advantage for the entire beef industry. The activities of the CRSB are divided into three committees: Communications and Marketing; Certified Sustainable Beef Framework and Scientific Advisory. Committee activities are overseen by the CRSB council, which is selected from member representatives. A significant portion of the meeting focused on the advancement of the Certified Sustainable Beef Framework. The framework has been in development since 2015 and was officially launched at the CRSB annual meeting in December 2017. The mission of the framework is to drive the advancement and recognition of beef sustainability in Canada through a world-class operation-level certification program. Some of the purposes of the framework include:

Minister Stewart listens to Cherie Copithorne-Barnes, Chair of CSRB at their semi-annual AGM in April. • Enabling consumers to purchase sustainably sourced product.

Consumers want to know more about where their food comes from. Assurance programs have been developed to maintain public trust by helping value chains market products that meet certain criteria. Marty Seymour, Director, Industry and Stakeholder Relations, at Farm Credit Canada, spoke about “Chasing Public Trust” during the dinner keynote. Mr. Seymour highlighted the importance of the consumer when marketing agricultural products to the world. It is important to deliver simple, clear messages that focus on branding products in ways that appeal to customers. This means that the message needs to resonate with the customers and their families and not rely solely on facts and science to sell the product. Beef industry stakeholders are encouraged to check out the framework at www.crsbcertifiedsustainablebeef.ca.

• Recognizing leadership and best practice within the beef industry; • Ensuring that a consistent, robust and meaningful definition of

sustainable production in Canada is available; • Supporting the understanding of sustainable beef production in Canada; and

FOR MORE INFO

Monica Hadarits, CRSB Programs and Certification Director, at hadaritsm@cattle.ca or 306-221-6227.

Updated livestock and forage strategy unveiled Shelley Jones Manager, Agriculture Knowledge Centre Regional Services Branch

Saskatchewan Agriculture recently ‘refreshed’ its Livestock Strategy and broadened its scope to include forage as an input integral to sector growth. With a vision to realize prosperous and sustainable sectors, the mission of the Livestock and Forage Strategy 2.0 is to support competiveness under three broad pillars. Under the Science, Research and Innovation pillar, the Ministry sees our role as a partner with industry in the development and application of technologies and practices. Together, we do this by supporting research, development and commercialization programs. As partners, industry and government build and invest in research capacity and infrastructure through projects like the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence at the University of Saskatchewan. We also team up to enhance technology transfer and adoption through learning events like Feedlot School and, on our own, through extension services delivered through the Ministry’s modernized Regional Services Branch. The outcome we seek is to have the sector adopting innovative practices that improve production and, in turn, profitability. The Market Readiness pillar is focused on ensuring Saskatchewan remains a trusted supplier of high-quality livestock and forage products.

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The Ministry works to enable industry to identify, access and serve both new and existing markets by responding effectively to market demands. Critical to this objective is providing effective business and production risk management tools. Programming to enhance on-farm stewardship and enhancing and maintaining the integrity of the Saskatchewan ‘brand’ will help to build trust that we are ‘doing the right thing’ in both domestic and international markets. Protecting human, animal, environmental and industry health falls under the third pillar, Assurance Systems. Ensuring all stakeholders are confident that livestock and food production systems are safe and sustainable is the goal. Public and industry confidence is built by promoting a robust food safety system and regulating responsibly. It also requires us, as partners, to promote animal codes of practice and biosecurity standards and to lead livestock disease surveillance and response. Improving public understanding of what happens in animal agriculture, and why, is a mutual area of focus for government and industry, and one of high priority. The Ministry believes the sector could grow to $2.5 billion in livestock cash receipts by 2025. The strategy serves as the Ministry’s plan of action to get there and is adjusted as circumstances change or opportunities arise. As always, industry feedback and input to it is encouraged and appreciated.

FOR MORE INFO

Contact Shelley Jones, Manager, Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.


LIVESTOCK

Bovine tuberculosis investigation over but the industry can’t be complacent Betty Althouse, DVM Chief Veterinary Officer Livestock Branch

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced in February that bovine tuberculosis (TB) trace-in testing had been completed and that all associated quarantines had been released. A few final laboratory cultures still need to be completed (because TB is very slow growing), but it looks like no further cases have been found. This is great news. CFIA veterinarians are completing the investigation report to be presented to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and trading partners to support recognition of Canada’s status as free of bovine TB. This maintains market access for meat, hides and offal, and live animals. The investigation started in fall 2016 following the detection of TB lesions in a Canadian cow slaughtered at a United States plant. After an 18-month investigation, bovine TB was confirmed in six cattle, all at one premises. The strain of TB was one previously found in Mexico. Although the infection source has not been identified, the thorough investigation has proven that bovine TB risk in Canada remains extremely low. Surveillance testing has eliminated initial concerns about infection of wild elk in the area. That does not mean the livestock industry can be complacent, however. The road to reach bovine TB freedom was a long and expensive one. When the national bovine TB control program started in the 1920s, prevalence of the disease was estimated at four per cent. TB spread through animal movements and within herds. Occasionally, people were infected through contact with live cattle or by consumption of infected milk or meat. Through the control program, herds were tested and individual positive animals (reactors) were removed. In 1961, when the first complete general test of the national herd was completed, prevalence was down to

0.1 per cent. TB eradication areas were established throughout the 1970s and, in the early 1980s, slaughter surveillance replaced on-going herd testing. In order to achieve eradication, all animals in contact with or exposed to TB reactor cattle had to be destroyed. TB can lie dormant in animals as a latent infection, and evade detection through testing. Eradication cannot be ensured without destruction of all exposed animals. We can expect a new bovine TB case to be detected every three to five years in Canada. Continued diligence in slaughter detection, traceability and disease response, including destruction of all exposed cattle, will help assure our TB-free status.

TB investigation 2016-17 by the numbers: •

11,500 ANIMALS ordered destroyed, with $39 MILLION paid in compensation.

 17 MILLION in additional support for unplanned feed costs $ and cleaning and disinfection.

15,000 ANIMALS that had moved from infected or presumed infected herds (trace outs) and 15,000 animals that had moved into the infected herd (trace-ins) were traced in an attempt to identify the source of the infection.

79 CONTACT and TRACE-OUT herds were tested.

• 71 TRACE-IN

FOR MORE INFO

herds were tested.

Visit the CFIA website at www.inspection.gc.ca and search for ‘tuberculosis.’

Take steps to avoid blue-green algae in your dugouts Leah Clark, MSc, PAg Livestock and Feed Extension Specialist Regional Services Branch

Contrary to what the name blue-green algae suggests, it is not actually algae, it is a bacterium whose scientific name is Cyanobacteria. The combination of summer heat, nutrients and sitting water is the perfect recipe for algae growth in dugouts. This may be a concern, as blue-green algae/ cyanobacteria produce toxins that have the potential to cause sickness and, in some cases, death when consumed by livestock. Toxins are produced in small amounts throughout the lifespan of the cyanobacteria but are released at high concentrations when they die. Therefore, it is recommended to limit livestock’s access to a dugout when the cyanobacteria are dying off, either naturally or due to the addition of algaecides. Cyanobacteria tend to grow in still water with nutrients present. Sources of nutrients include animal feces and urine or decaying organic matter in the water. Cyanobacteria need sunlight and, therefore, they are found floating near or on the surface of water. To prevent the establishment of cyanobacteria in a dugout, the issue of dugout nutrient loading has to be addressed. Nutrient loading leads to

increased bacteria and algae growth. The best way to limit nutrient addition to dugouts is to restrict livestock’s access to the dugout. This not only extends the life of the dugout by reducing damage to the banks, it allows forage growth which, in turn, helps to trap nutrient run-off and keep feces and urine out of the water. There are other ways to decrease nutrients in dugouts. A group of chemicals called coagulants can be used in the fall to clear water of organic matter that could decay in the water over the winter. Algae can also be easily prevented with the addition of an aeration system or with the use of a registered copper sulphate treatment. Growth of algae occurs as water warms, so prevention entails an initial dose, followed by a visual inspection, followed by a second treatment if algae growth is observed. It is important to note that correct doses should be used as copper sulphate is toxic to animals in sufficient amounts. After dugout treatment for cyaobacteria, livestock access should be restricted for 10 to 14 days.

FOR MORE INFO

Visit: Saskatchewan.ca/agriculture; or Call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.

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Summer management strategies for livestock producers to consider Jenifer Heyden, MSc, PAg Livestock and Feed Extension Specialist, North Battleford Regional Services Branch

As summer approaches and cattle head out to pasture, there are a number of management strategies to consider. Check water sources regularly to ensure adequate clean water. Watch for high concentrations of total dissolved solids and sulphate, especially in areas affected by low moisture. Be watchful for blue-green algae in dugouts and other water sources. All animals are at risk of poisoning from blue-green algae, but sheep are more likely to be affected than cattle, as they tend to drink from the shoreline, while cattle often wade in further. Make sure livestock have access to trees and/or other forms of shade. Monitor bulls/rams for breeding activity, mobility, and injury. Cows/ewes should be evaluated for body condition, lameness and udder problems, and keep records of potential culls. Catch and treat sick calves/lambs as soon as possible, and record all treatment protocols and any death losses. Work with your veterinarian to develop branding vaccination protocols for your calves and administer vaccines at appropriate times. The herd/flock should have access to adequate salt and vitamin and mineral supplements to ensure reproductive success. If you keep back replacement heifers/ewes, revisit your heifer/ewe lamb selection, take the

time to watch them out on pasture, and make some notes on heifers/ewe lambs you may want to keep. Monitor herd/flock health, watch for signs of footrot and pink eye so you can catch them early and treat accordingly. Review the different fly control options available, decide what is best for your operation and apply the control as necessary. Many producers implement insecticide ear tags and use cattle back-rubbers, dusters and oilers. Others use mineral products with garlic additives. Some companies are offering products with feed-through fly control products in them such as ALTOSIDÂŽ. Consider internal parasite load and control methods for different classes of livestock. Consult with your veterinarian or industry professional to determine the proper product, application and timing. Vaccinate cattle against anthrax if the disease has been a historical or current concern in your area. Sheep are not particularly susceptible to anthrax, but it can be devastating if flocks are infected. Consult with your veterinarian as to your farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s particular risk factors and make an informed decision. Finally, monitor pasture growth and condition; keep an eye out for problem weeds and poisonous plants; and watch for bloat in pastures with alfalfa, especially alfalfa in the pre-bud and bud stage. FOR MORE INFO

Contact your local Saskatchewan Agriculture Regional Office; or Call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.

Pasture management will result in more uniform grazing Lorne Klein, PAg Range Management Extension Specialist, Weyburn Regional Services Branch

When livestock are given a choice, they normally seek and graze the most lush and actively growing plants. In relatively large fields where animals are grazing for months or the whole season, preferred plants are often grazed repeatedly, while other less-desirable plants may be left un-grazed. Repeated grazing of the same plants is more likely to occur during May and June. Normally, plentiful moisture and nutrients and long daylight hours combine to produce rapid initial growth and rapid regrowth after grazing. Regrowth from July to the end of the grazing season is usually much slower. When done properly, management-intensive grazing systems enable desirable forage plants to survive and produce to their potential; however, intensive management comes with a cost in time, water system development and more fences. For producers who wish to get started, focus initially on the fields where livestock will be grazing during the months of May and June. The more rapid the plant growth, the more often livestock should be moved to reduce repeated grazing of plants. Also, about 40 to 50 per cent of the plant material should be left untouched to collect sunlight and initiate re-growth as quickly as possible. There is considerable debate about the number of days livestock should remain on a given paddock. A one-month rotation is better than seasonlong grazing. During periods of rapid growth, a weekly rotation is better than a monthly one, and a three-day rotation is better than a weekly one. On the high end of intensive management, some producers move their livestock daily.

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As an initial target, size paddocks during May and June to achieve uniform grazing in two weeks, leaving behind approximately 40 to 50 per cent of the plant material. If you are achieving this, consider yourself a very good grazing manager. Plan your fence and water system infrastructure so further subdivisions can be easily added, if desired. Size paddocks during July to October for a month of grazing. Smaller paddocks offer advantages, but they are less necessary during this period since re-growth is slow and there is less opportunity for plants to be grazed twice over the month-long period. Management-intensive grazing is a trade-off between the added cost of time and resources necessary to achieve increased forage production and grazing harvest efficiency.

FOR MORE INFO

Contact a Range Management Extension Specialist at a nearby Saskatchewan Agriculture Regional Office; or Call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.


PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Seeding isn’t complete until you’ve filed the seeded acreage report Filing a seeded acreage report is the final step to complete the seeding season. Without it, a producer’s crop insurance coverage is not complete. The Seeded Acreage Report enables SCIC to verify the number of acres seeded, seeding dates and the type of land seeded—such as stubble, summerfallow or irrigation—and determines the coverage and premium. The stored grain declaration is where producers record all the production from the previous crop year still stored on their farms. If this production is not declared on the seeded acreage report form, it will be considered new production. This can be problematic if the producer is ever in a claim situation. Assessing loss becomes challenging when old grain is mixed with new grain, so take a moment to complete both forms carefully in order to reduce errors in premium coverage and calculations. The deadline to submit the Seeded Acreage Report and Stored Grain Declaration is June 25. Producers have until July 5 to report seeded greenfeed acres.

insurable crops. The map provides dates based on townships and rural municipalities, using first frost dates. It is important to note that some crops have absolute final seeding dates that are earlier than June 20. The Ministry of Agriculture’s Varieties of Grain Crops 2018 contains maturity ranges by crop, variety and first fall frost. Customers who require more information should contact their local Customer Service Office for assistance in determining the final seeding date. Crops seeded too late to be reasonably expected to mature may have coverage reduced or denied.

Establishment Benefit The Establishment Benefit is available for crops that suffer significant damage or fail to adequately establish before June 20, due to insurable causes of loss.

Unseeded Acreage

A producer who believes it necessary to reseed or work down a portion of insured crop prior to June 20 should contact SCIC immediately. An adjuster must inspect those acres prior to them being reseeded or destroyed. To qualify for an Establishment Benefit claim, the land area must be five acres or more in one parcel (not scattered) per legal land description. A producer must have the lesser of 10 acres or 10 per cent of the affected crop seeded before a claim is paid.

Enrolment in Crop Insurance automatically includes coverage for land that is too wet to seed due to excessive spring moisture under the Unseeded Acreage feature. However, land that is prone to flooding is not eligible for coverage under the Unseeded Acreage feature. This includes sloughs in the field that are traditionally wet or remain underwater in a year of normal moisture.

If a customer chooses to reseed the acres, insurance may be purchased on the reseeded acres even if the crop was not previously selected for insurance coverage. If the reseeded crop was previously selected for insurance, those acres will continue to be insured. To be eligible for insurance, the reseeded crop must be planted by the seeding deadline.

A step-by-step instruction guide is available and will be mailed to producers to assist in completing the Seeded Acreage Report and Stored Grain Declaration. Both the Seeded Acreage Report and Stored Grain Declaration can be completed through CropConnect.

Newly drained land can be eligible for unseeded acreage coverage. To be eligible, the producer would have had to prepare the seed bed and get the land to a seedable condition. Producers’ experience discount/surcharges are affected by their unseeded acreage claims. Any claim and subsequent payment from the Unseeded Acreage feature will now affect the experience discount/surcharge. The deadline for reporting unseeded acres is June 25. Please note the completion of a Seeded Acreage Report does not guarantee a claim has been filed. To ensure a claim is registered, use CropConnect or contact a Customer Service Office and request an inspection on acres so claim payments are timely. Claims received after the June 25 deadline will be subject to a 25-per-cent reduction to a maximum of $1,000. Claims received after July 2 are not eligible for compensation.

Seeding Deadlines Crop Insurance customers are reminded SCIC will not provide coverage on crops seeded after June 20. Although this is the general final date for seeding across the province, most crops need to be seeded earlier, depending on crop, variety and area of the province.

CropConnect Producers who appreciate the convenience and ease of online banking will enjoy CropConnect. CropConnect makes it easy to complete and submit Crop Insurance forms at a producer’s own pace, from wherever they want, whenever they want. Not registered? No problem. Enrol by calling an SCIC representative at 1-888-935-0000. Customer service can help producers log in, provide an authorization number and walk them through using the tool. It is a fast and efficient way to conduct Crop Insurance business. Once signed up, producers can report seeded acres and stored grain, file claims, complete declarations, view accounting information, choose endorsements, calculate premiums and view all past information and transactions conducted with SCIC. For customers using their smart phones, CropConnect comes in a mobile application. With CropConnect completing Crop Insurance information can be easily conducted from the field or home. FOR MORE INFO

Visit a local Saskatchewan Crop Insurance office; Call SCIC toll-free at 1-888-935-0000; or Go to saskcropinsurance.com.

The Seeding Date Tool available on the SCIC website will help producers determine the final date on which full liability will be accepted on

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Illegally dumping waste hurts the environment and can result in fines Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment

Saskatchewan is well known for its majestic scenery and landscapes. All residents and visitors play a role in preserving this natural beauty. Most people properly dispose of waste, recycle and make good use of municipal garbage containers or local landfills. However, some choose to haul their garbage out to the country and leave it near roads, farms and private property. Some common items illegally discarded include appliances, electronics, demolition waste and household trash. These materials can pose serious environmental risks by polluting water supplies and contaminating soil, which can potentially cause health issues for humans and wildlife. Even innocuous items, such as bags of branches and leaves, can become fire hazards. Discarded litter poses the threat of unintentionally or deliberately set fires, an illegal practice that carries with it potential threats to humans and the environment.

abandoned waste is often recyclable at no charge or returnable for cash. There are options to illegal dumping and all residents should be aware of proper waste disposal techniques and the importance of the three Rs of waste management—reduce, reuse and recycle. Over the last number of years, Saskatchewan has made significant strides in reducing waste, with industry-led programs for used tires, oil, paint and electronics. The Saskatchewan Waste Reduction Council’s website (saskwastereduction.ca) can help you locate the recycling resources available in your community. Disregarding those opportunities and illegally dumping garbage or other waste can also land someone in a pile of trouble. Every year, Government of Saskatchewan conservation officers investigate incidents of illegal dumping and those caught can face harsh penalties, including hefty fines. The minimum fine for littering is $500 and, in more severe cases, a court appearance may be necessary. If you witness someone dumping garbage or other waste, contact Saskatchewan Environment through the TIP line at 1-800-667-7561, or online at saskatchewan.ca/tip.

The disposal of waste by illegal dumping and littering is a serious issue, and, while it occurs far too often, it is easily preventable. A lot of this

Volunteers needed to survey wildlife • ELK – September 1 to February 28;

Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment

Do you enjoy spending time on native prairie in the spring and summer? Have you noticed any sharp-tailed grouse in your travels? Are you interested in contributing to wildlife management in Saskatchewan? If so, the Saskatchewan Co-operative Wildlife Management Survey (CWMS) is for you! The CWMS is a volunteer-based survey that asks participants to provide wildlife observations across Saskatchewan. Formerly the Co-operative Deer Management Survey, this survey has expanded beyond deer to include moose, elk, sharp-tailed grouse and wild turkey. Observations of these species provide the government with important population assessment information. Observations can be collected throughout the year, but there are key periods for each species when it is particularly important to record observations: • SHARPTAILED GROUSE – March 1 to July 15; • WHITETAILED DEER AND MULE DEER – September 1 to November 30; • MOOSE – September 1 to December 31;

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• WILD TURKEY – December 1 to March 1.

A key period for sharp-tailed grouse is in spring, when active lek (or dancing ground) locations can be documented. Sharp-tailed grouse leks are most active during the first few hours of daylight during the spring months. Congregations of sharp-tailed grouse in the fall may also be indicative of an active lek in the area and observers are encouraged to revisit the area the following spring, if possible. Observation of sharp-tailed grouse chicks in summer can provide an indication of annual productivity. Key observation periods for big game species occur during fall and winter, which are opportune times to record and evaluate herd structure. Similarly, wild turkeys are often congregated and easier to count in winter. All observations can be recorded by downloading the SK CWMS mobile application to your Apple or Android device. Once you have downloaded the app, call 1-800-567-4224 or email centre.inquiry@gov.sk.ca for your participant number and activation code.

FOR MORE INFO

Visit saskatchewan.ca/residents/parks-recreation-heritage-and-arts/ hunting-trapping-and-angling/wildlife-population-surveys.


PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Expanding value-added processing in Saskatchewan Robert Brodner Manager, Program Delivery Programs Branch

One of the main Growing Forward 2 (GF2) rebate programs that will continue under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) framework is the Saskatchewan Lean Improvements in Manufacturing program or SLIM. The aim of the SLIM program is to give Saskatchewan value-added companies an incentive to adopt best practices, state-of-the-art technologies or processes that will result in significant improvements in productivity and efficiency. The program is targeted at companies that take one or more of our raw Saskatchewan agricultural commodities and physically transform it into an enhanced product. This could be anything from making honey out of nectar, making distilled products out of grain or transforming livestock into food products. During GF2, there were 52 companies that undertook an efficiency analysis on how they could process more product, process their product faster or simply have less waste in their current processes. This resulted in more than 40 infrastructure projects that invested more than $34 million dollars into Saskatchewan’s value-added sector. The goal of the SLIM program for the next five years remains the same. It will continue to support agricultural value-added companies’ efforts to become more efficient and to process more of the province’s raw commodities here in Saskatchewan. One of the first programs being rolled out under the CAP framework is the new SLIM program. The new program has also become more efficient. There is a simplified application process, and a ministry specialist will work with applicants to ensure they are aware of all of the other programs and options for improvement that are open to them. The streamlined application and review processes are more responsive to SLIM clients.

Blair’s Lanigan food farm planting with Grade 3 students, May 2017.

Saskatchewan value-added companies are able to receive 50 per cent of the cost of their efficiency analysis and infrastructure project, up to $500,000, under the SLIM program. Saskatchewan agri-businesses looking to expand or become more efficient and facing a project cost of $200,000 or more should contact program administrators to see if they qualify for SLIM. Application forms for SLIM can be found online on the Government of Saskatchewan website.

FOR MORE INFO

Visit www.saskatchewan.ca/business and search for ‘Saskatchewan Lean Improvements in Manufacturing.’

Building public trust with Blair’s Family of Companies Shayla Hertz, BSA, AAg Provincial Agriculture Awareness Specialist Regional Services Branch

Everyone in agriculture has a role to play in building public trust, and Blair’s Family of Companies, an agri-business headquartered in Drake, has embraced the opportunity to become an industry leader in agvocacy. This agvocacy focus resulted from regular conversations with farmers, during which employees of Blair’s noticed the recurring discussion around public pushback against modern food and farming practices. Blair’s began determining its role in building public trust, deciding that its duties began with working alongside customers in holding each other accountable for “doing the right things” in farming. Blair’s became a participant in the Land O’ Lakes SUSTAIN program, a partnership between farmers and companies that aligns on-farm conservation agronomy and company-led sustainability targets to maximize the efficiency of crop inputs and farm practices while gaining a positive environmental outcome for communities and farmers. Blair’s also developed a short film, entitled “I Am Your Farmer,” in response to feedback from producers enrolled in the SUSTAIN program who wanted help telling their farm stories. The film highlighted how the technology,

practices and products that Saskatchewan farmers use help to sustainably and responsibly grow food. Blair’s is also involved in educating youth on the importance and diversity of agriculture. In 2017, Blair’s hosted two Food Farms, which are interactive, curriculum-linked educational experiences that help children develop a connection to their food. Students plant and harvest the crops, and learn about livestock that contribute to some of their favorite meals. Employees of Blair’s have also actively participated in Agriculture in the Classroom’s Canadian Agriculture Literacy Month for the past two years. Along with helping to deliver agricultural education, Blair’s encourages its staff to get public trust training. The company has also hosted events for its customers to learn about the vital role they can play in building public trust and how they can engage others in their community to join them. Blair’s Family of Companies is helping to pave the way for others in the agricultural industry to become agvocates, to find their roles in building public trust, to speak up for the food producers of Saskatchewan and to share their love for agriculture with the people of Saskatchewan. FOR MORE INFO

Contact Shayla Hertz, Provincial Agriculture Awareness Specialist, at 306-787-9298 or shayla.hertz@gov.sk.ca; or Contact Kayla Hordos, Talent Development and Marketing Specialist, Blair’s Family of Companies, at 306-746-7766 or kayla@blairs.ag.

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EVENTS | PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Events calendar Date

Event

Location

Phone

Internet

June 10-12, 2018

Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association (SSGA) 105th AGM

Kinetic Park, Swift Current

306-569-8799

www.skstockgrowers.com/event

June 19, 2018

Western Beef Development Centre (WBDC) 2018 Summer Field Day Termuende Research Ranch near Lanigan, SK

306-365-3366

www.wbdc.sk.ca/producer_events

June 20, 2018

Under the Forage Establishment Benefit Option, this is the deadline to seed forage acres. Deadline to submit Establishment Benefit claims. SCIC will not accept yield-loss liability for spring crops seeded after this date. Deadline to submit a gopher claim on crops that fail to establish due to gopher damage

Saskatchewan

1-888-935-0000

www.saskcropinsurance.com

June 20-22, 2018

Canada's Farm Progress Show

Evraz Place, Regina, SK

306-781-9200

www.myfarmshow.com

June 21, 2018

Saskatchewan Outstanding Young Farmers (SK OYF) regional event and luncheon

Queensbury Centre, Regina, SK

306-239-4263

elainepruim@live.com

June 25, 2018

Deadline to submit Seeded Acreage Reports on all crops (excluding greenfeed). Deadline to submit Unseeded Acreage claims. Deadline to report stored grain. Deadline to submit Hive Reporting form. Deadline to submit Stored Honey Report. Deadline to endorse overwintering insurance for the Bee Mortaility Insurance Pilot Program.

Saskatchewan

1-888-935-0000

www.saskcropinsurance.com

June 30, 2018

Deadline to seed greenfeed crops insured as forage. Establishment and gopher damage clains on greenfeed must be submitted by this date.

Saskatchewan

1-888-935-0000

www.saskcropinsurance.com

Be FireSmart on the farm: fire pits, burn barrels and windrows Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment

When used appropriately, fire can be both a useful tool and the centrepiece of many relaxing summer evenings. Whatever part fire plays in daily life on your farm, keep these tips in mind to stay safe. If you have, or plan to build or use, an outdoor fireplace, burning barrel or fire pit, ensure that it is located on mineral soil or a cement foundation with at least a one-metre clearance from any combustible material. No flammable buildings, branches or other debris should be within 15 metres of your burning site. To prevent embers escaping, use heavy-gauge screening with a mesh size between eight and 16 millimetres. Burn only clean, woody debris and yard waste, such as leaves and branches. Burning other materials, including plastic, cardboard, garbage and painted or treated wood, will give off toxic smoke that can have serious health effects.

When burning in spring or summer—whether an entire field or a small smudge—clear or cultivate down to mineral soil around the area to be burned to help prevent your fire from escaping. If you’re burning brush piles or windrows, make sure they’re tightly packed, dry and free of dirt. If you can, place windrows at right angles to prevailing winds, so they’ll burn more efficiently and with less smoke. Keep windrows less than 60 metres long, with at least eight metres between the ends of windrows and at least 15 metres between windrows. Be mindful of the smoke that will result from your burning. Choose days when wind speed and direction take smoke away from highways and neighbours. When the burn is finished, check to ensure your burn sites are out. Make sure you can control your fire. Have a supply of water and basic firefighting tools, such as shovels and rakes, and the required assistance available—just in case. Check the weather forecast and do not burn during high hazard conditions. The time you spend preparing and having these things ready can make all the difference.

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AGRIVIEW | JUNE 2018

Visit www.saskatchewan.ca/firesmart.

Agriview june 2018  

In this issue: - Celebrate Native Prairie - Round table on sustainable beef - Building public trust and more!

Agriview june 2018  

In this issue: - Celebrate Native Prairie - Round table on sustainable beef - Building public trust and more!