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STEM ENGINEERING On the roof of the school, several Prep students, under the direction of teacher Scott Murphy, stood measuring. They wanted to know how many solar panels could possibly fit in the space and then work with Solar States to help estimate the costs/ savings, etc., of such a project. Later, in partnership with PECO, they would walk through the whole school, trying to gauge the Prep’s electricity usage and recommend ways to upgrade the electrical infrastructure for better efficiency. The students, who called themselves “Crimson and Green,” presented their findings to Prep President Rev. John W. Swope ’72 SJ, and the Board of Trustees, prompting changes. These upgrades are the results of the Intro to Engineering course. The course touches on all areas of engineering, often surprising students by its breadth. “Engineering solves problems that affect all people, companies and schools,” says Murphy. The course touches on all types of engineering: mechanical, civil, electrical, chemistry, bio-medical and environmental, among others. It also works with real companies to give students insight into how the collaboration might work. According to Murphy, often this introduction plays a vital role for students who don’t always understand what engineering is. “I sometimes hear students say that they want to study engineering in college, but what

does that mean,” he asks. “This course is designed to give them exposure to all of the different fields to see what might catch their interest. I think it also gives them a leg up in college, compared to students who have not taken an Engineering class. It helps our guys get a better understanding of the field." In the Class of 2016, 33 students declared a choice to major in engineering, a number that the Prep college counselors see rising. Seeing numbers like this makes it vital that students have the chance to explore the field while still deciding.

The overview provided in the Intro course, plus some alumni advice, helped Dean Domingo ’17 find some clarity for his career path. When he entered high school, Domingo saw himself on a pre-med path but learned that his interest in math and science might be better suited to engineering. On Career Day, he attended a session led by Tim Reilly ’05, a civil engineer. “Listening to him talk helped me see that engineering could be something that I would want to do,” says Domingo. “It was an option before but it really became more concrete for me after that.”

Engineering students work on creating radios (above & below)

Academics Overview  

Learn about academics at the Prep.

Academics Overview  

Learn about academics at the Prep.