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“The first time I was able to complete a project on my own, from my own work, my

Reid (right) with Rich Gannon '83, two of the three Prep football players who have had their numbers retired.

own knowledge, was so fulfilling.” —Enrique Feliciano ’17

Feliciano sees the obvious connections between the other STEM fields and Computer Science. “Math is very much involved in Comp Sci, especially with binary codes, etc.,” he says. He also mentioned the intersection of engineering in things like robots and science in experimenting and problem solving. In fact, he wants to be a computer engineer, a mix of knowledge and hands on work.

Constructing the robot for competition in the specially designed Robotics room, complete with a competition ring.

John Reid ’15 Penn State University COMPUTATIONAL DATA SCIENCE When people think of Reid, they most likely know of his athletic talent. His play on the football field helped Reid land a spot as one of just three names on a banner of retired numbers hanging on the wall of Kelly Fieldhouse. But for many teachers at the school, his intellect, hard work and love of computers stand equal to his excellence on the field. “Whether it was researching the latest tech gadgets, tweaking his own selfbuilt computer or practicing writing code, it was clear John was bound for Computer Science in college,” says Mrs. Hoffman. “He has an undeniable passion for all things technology, which was contagious among his peers." “I remember taking computer science classes at the Prep, first with Mr. (Kevin) Dietzler and then with Mrs. (Teresa) Hoffman. They were my favorite classes,” Reid remembers. Reid is a Computational Data Science major at Penn State University as well as a defensive back on their Big 10 Championship football team. Though not exactly an academic road favored by many high-level college athletes, for Reid it combines his love of computer science with statistics and he hopes it will lead to work with machines, networks and software.

“Actually, comp sci reminds me a lot of football,” he notes. “With both, if you put the time in and work hard, you can be good at it. And both are complex so that you can keep learning no matter how much you know.” Hard work is something on which he thrives. When he went to visit Penn State as a senior, the Lions’ coaches were amazed that he chose to spend time with them watching film rather than joining other recruits at social events. “Football is not necessarily a game where you are instantly good, you have to work at it,” Reid says. “Computers and software are the same way.” Two years into college, Reid is grateful for the classes that he took at the Prep. “Being exposed to comp sci as a junior in high school definitely helped me a lot,” he says. “The learning curve at Penn State wasn’t nearly as steep as it could have been.” Some inkling of his future career path may have been there as a high school sophomore when he built his own computer. Even then, it was his competitiveness that helped him accomplish that task. “I was really into video games and the better the computer, the better you can do at the games,” he says with a laugh. “My dad and my uncle have always worked to keep up on the latest technology so they helped me out and I guess they passed it down to me. There are a lot of tutorials out there. You can pretty much google anything.”

Academics Overview  

Learn about academics at the Prep.

Academics Overview  

Learn about academics at the Prep.