Page 51

St. Joseph’s Awards $250K in Community Grants St. Joseph’s Medical Center has awarded over $250,000 in grant funding to five local community benefit organizations in partnership with other local agencies seeking to build healthier communities by improving health and living conditions. The Asian Pacific Self-development & Residential Association (APSARA) in partnership with Catholic Charities and Community Partnership for Families was awarded $70,892 for the Community Health Connectors project. The presence of Community Health Connectors (CHC’s) will provide access to resources, increase opportunities for health education and provide case management for those with multiple chronic health conditions. The Emergency Food Bank in partnership with Family Resource & Referral Center, First 5 of San Joaquin & University of California, Cal Fresh Nutrition Education received $50,000 for Child Care Mobile Farmer’s Market project. This project will deliver fresh fruits and vegetables free of charge to 15 child care facilities within Stockton to be used for meals and snacks. Read to Me, Stockton in partnership with Books for Babes, Stockton Unified School District & S. J. County Office of Education received a grant for $20,000 for the Early Infant Literacy Project. Working with partners they will enroll 800 newborns and toddlers to age three in Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, providing approximately 10,000 books to children for one year with the goal of introducing them and their parents to early literacy activities. Reinvent South Stockton California in partnership with Reinvent South Stockton Coalition, San Joaquin County Public Health, and Trustbuilder Organization received a grant for $90,000 for the Families Connect Project. Local residents will be hired to help connect with residents in South Stockton and Midtown Magnolia neighborhoods. They will plan events, engage in community outreach, and refer families to case management services in order to reduce stresses and trauma, allow for attendance and success at work and school and to feel connected to their community and have a support system of care. San Joaquin County Child Abuse Prevention Council in partnership with San Joaquin Public Health & San Joaquin General Hospital received a grant for $22,424 for the ACEing Parenting Program. The ACEing Parenting Program is intended to gauge the efficacy of a strategy where physicians engage the parents of their minor patients in a discussion about Adverse Childhood Experiences, with the goal of mitigating the circle of abuse.

SPRING 2019

The Community Grants Program was established in 1990 to provide funding to community-based organizations that provide services to individuals in need. Since its inception, the program has distributed over $3.4 million in grant funding to deserving nonprofit community benefit organizations with an interest in building healthier communities by improving health and living conditions. St. Joseph’s Medical Center annually sets aside revenues from operations to fund the community grant awards. St. Joseph’s Expands Graduate Medical Education Program A new generation of doctors are being ushered into the Central Valley, thanks to the Graduate Medical Education Program at St. Joseph’s Medical Center. The first two residency programs, emergency medicine and family medicine, welcomed 15 residents last summer, with additional residents training in internal medicine and obstetrics-gynecology, slated to begin in July 2019. Altogether, St. Joseph’s has plans to launch 12 residency programs over the next five to seven years, training physicians in the following fields: anesthesiology, emergency medicine, family medicine, general surgery, internal medicine, interventional radiology, obstetrics-gynecology, orthopedic surgery, psychiatry, thoracic surgery, transitional year (required to qualify for many specialties), and urology. When the program is fully implemented, a total of 184 new doctors will train at St. Joseph’s yearly, making it one of the largest and most complex graduate medical education programs in Northern California. In addition to training new physicians, residency programs greatly benefit local communities. Studies show that as many as half of all residents go on to practice within 50 miles of where they trained. That staying power is crucial for the Central Valley, where both primary care physicians and specialists are in chronically short supply. Along with retaining doctors at the start of their careers, residency programs attract already established physicians, who are eager to train residents in the latest technologies and treatments. Research also shows that teaching hospitals have significantly better patient outcomes. CB Merchant Services Awards Grants to Local Nonprofits C B Merchant Services (CBMS) is pleased to announce grants totaling $108,000 were made to 38 nonprofit organizations

SAN JOAQUIN PHYSICIAN

51

Profile for San Joaquin Medical Society

Spring 2019  

San Joaquin Physician Spring 2019

Spring 2019  

San Joaquin Physician Spring 2019

Profile for sjms