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A GLOBAL GUIDE TO TRAVEL, SHOPPING AND FUN II WINTER 2015

LOSE YOURSELF IN LIMA Plus GREAT ESCAPES TO MIAMI, MUMBAI, BERLIN and MORE B:10.75”

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Bank before you fy. With new CIBC branches right at Toronto Pearson, you can do your banking before you board. Get foreign cash, purchase travel insurance or tell us about your travel plans, so you can shop abroad hassle-free. Visit one of our new airport branches or look for our multi-currency ATMs. Bon voyage! Another way CIBC makes it easier to bank where, when and how you wantTM.

cibc.com CIBC and related marks are trademarks of CIBC.


WINTER 2015

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1

EXPLORER

Kluane, p32 DETOURS

Berlin, p51

DETOURS

Toronto, p55 EXPLORER

Miami, p44

DETOURS

Mumbai, p54

EXPLORER

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explorer

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY HIX ISLAND HOUSE

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Lima, p24

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Mucho Pisco

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Fresh Tracks

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Just Add Water

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Miami’s New Vice

An all-consuming journey to Lima, Peru, the world’s new culinary capital With its fat snowfalls and thin crowds, the St. Elias Mountains are a winter paradise The best, most beautiful winter-escaping islands (for all budgets) The rise of the Design District, from a derelict downtown ’hood to the chicest hub in Florida

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ON THE COVER II Illustration by Fumio Watanabe, Photograph by Jason Sullivan, Model Claudia Luque WINTER 2015 AWAY 3


INSIDER 9 II On the Ground Thousands of people pass through Richard Serra’s massive sculpture every day 10 II Pearson Person De-icing queen Glynys Jones knows her snow 12 II Anatomy Bombardier’s $70-million private jet 16 II Checking In We’re peoplewatching at the departure lounges

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the list 19 II Air Fare Halal Middle

Eastern cuisine lands at Toronto Pearson 20 II Style and Beauty Sunny accessories for the beach 22 II Gifts Cool aids from the country that does winter best 23 II Et Cetera Five totally satisfying ways to kill time 23 II My Carry-ons Hockey Night in Canada host George Stroumboulopoulos shows us what’s in his bag

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d e to u r s 51 II Berlin A city of pockets, corners and alleys. Your guide: writer R. M. Vaughan 54 II Mumbai A brash megacity with unexpectedly mellow respites. Your guide: architect Rooshad Shroff 55 II Toronto A city of neighbourhoods. Your guide: designer Sarah Richardson

wa y f i n d e r 57 II Maps Navigating Toronto Pearson Terminal 1 and Terminal 3

jet age 62 II 1964 The whirlwind courtship of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton

PHOTOGRAPHS BY (CLOCKWISE) EMMA MCINTYRE, WILKOSZ AND WAY, VICKY LAM

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Winter 2015 Volume 1, Issue 1 CO-PUBLISHERS Deborah Trepanier, Douglas Kelly Account Manager Gayle Matthews EDITORIAL Editorial Director Maryam Sanati Editor Deborah Stokes Senior Editor Conan Tobias ART Creative Director Una Janicijevic Art Director Colleen Nicholson Photo Editor Liz Ikiriko

ALSO AVAILABLE IN A DIGITAL EDITION FOR YOUR DESKTOP, LAPTOP AND TABLET L'ÉDITION FRANÇAISE DU MAGAZINE AWAY EST ÉGALEMENT DISPONIBLE SUR VOTRE ORDINATEUR DE BUREAU, ORDINATEUR PORTABLE ET TABLETTE

CONTRIBUTORS Graciela Cattarossi, Alice Cho, Doublenaut, Watanabe Fumio, Paul Gallant, Jean Grant, Nicola Hamilton, Bronwen Jervis, Vicky Lam, Reynard Li, Alex Mathers, Emma McIntyre, Simone Olivero, Jean François Porchez, Corinna Reeves, Rooshad Shroff, Jason Sullivan, Sarah Treleaven, R. M. Vaughan, Antonia Whyatt, Wilkosz & Way, John Zada PRODUCTION Production Director Maria Mendes Production Manager Jennifer Shute Prepress Co-ordinator Jonathan Gault TORONTO PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT President and CEO Howard Eng Vice-President, Customer and Terminal Services Scott Collier Vice-President, Stakeholder Relations and Communications Hillary Marshall Associate Director, Retail and Food Programs Janine Gervais Associate Director, Advertising and Partnerships Sergio Pulla Manager, Retail Marketing Erin Kennedy ST. JOSEPH MEDIA Chairman Tony Gagliano President Douglas Knight General Manager and Vice-President, Finance Karl Percy Vice-President, Digital Ken Hunt Vice-President, Research Clarence Poirier Vice-President, Marketing and Production Darlene Storey Human Resources Director Catheryn Kendall Controller Dora Brenndorfer Director, Information and Digital Technology Prasad Gokhale CONTACT US Greater Toronto Airports Authority Corporate Affairs and Communications Toronto Pearson International Airport P.O. Box 6031, 3111 Convair Drive Toronto AMF, Ontario L5P 1B2 Canada (416) 776-3000 For editorial, contact: AWAY 111 Queen Street East, Suite 320, Toronto, Ontario M5C 1S2 away@stjosephmedia.com (416) 364-3333

GO TO ACCÉDEZ AU

TORONTOPEARSON.COM

For sales, contact: Gayle Matthews gmatthews@stjosephmedia.com (647) 272-9464 AWAY is published four times per year by St. Joseph Media Inc. on behalf of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA). © 2014. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced in any form without the consent of the GTAA. The GTAA is not responsible for any errors or omissions contained in this publication. Printed in Canada by St. Joseph Printing.


PRESIDENT’S LETTER

WELCOME TO AWAY

Toronto Pearson is a gateway to the world. It’s also a destination waiting to be discovered Dear Toronto Pearson Passenger, As a young child growing up in Alberta, I was fascinated by air travel. I would hound my parents to take me to the airport so I could watch the planes come and go. The excitement of seeing people rush to catch their flights, family members being welcomed home, the sense of wonder (or perhaps trepidation) at the thought of boarding one of the massive metal birds— these memories stayed with me. Today, I have the great privilege of operating Canada’s largest airport: Toronto Pearson. An airport the size of Toronto Pearson serves many roles. Pearson is a catalyst for economic growth, bringing trade, jobs and tourism to the region. It’s also the first entry point for many new Canadians arriving in our country. In fact, some call it Canada’s new Pier 21, in reference to the Halifax gateway where approximately one million immigrants entered Canada for the first time between 1928 and 1971. No matter what reason you are travelling to, from or through Toronto Pearson, we want to provide you with the best possible travel experience. Take a look around our terminals and you’ll find many positive and exciting changes, including this inaugural issue of Away, Toronto Pearson’s magazine covering travel trends and destinations, as well as airport innovations. Away’s maps can lead you through the terminals and show you where to find your favourite cup of coffee or a gift to take home or lead you to our expanded duty-free offerings. (Toronto Pearson is also on Google Indoor Maps.)

We’ve worked with our partners to bring internationally recognized brands like Coach, Burberry, Longchamp and Victoria’s Secret to Toronto Pearson. When you’re ready to relax, you can find several lounges decked out with iPads to keep you entertained or take a moment to enjoy one of our delightful dining options. Toronto Pearson is pleased to present you with a high-quality dining experience, offering everything from local flavours to familiar brands that reflect the foodcentric culture of Toronto and the region. Among the other enhancements at our airport are free baggage carts, improved Wi-Fi service and our new Toronto Pearson International Airport mobile app that gives you updates on flight arrivals and departures. Toronto Pearson is truly like a small city, waiting to be explored and discovered, and there are tens of thousands of us who work here each day, ready to serve you. Think of us as your gateway to the world. Enjoy your journey, and come back to visit us again soon.

Bon voyage, Howard Eng President and CEO WINTER 2015 AWAY 7


INSIDER THE SECRET LIFE OF TORONTO PEARSON

ON THE GROUND

SPACE INVADERS

PHOTOGRAPH BY REYNARD LI

Works of art that go with the flow

In both scale and spirit, Tilted Spheres (above) is a massive work. Richard Serra’s masterful steel sculpture—consisting of four semi-circles leaning into a hollow core—dominates its space at Toronto Pearson’s Terminal 1. Tens of thousands of people move through the piece every day, their steps and voices echoing inside the rounded metal. It’s the most iconic piece in the airport’s varied permanent collection, and a companion to a group of rotating exhibits created in partnership with artists and cultural institutions. The total effect is eclectic and surprising, not to mention an edifying way to pass the time.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE Check out Time Flies: The Airport at 75, an exhibition of archival finds. Through March 29. Malton Airport Gallery, Terminal 1

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INSIDER de-icing. I didn’t know about aircraft types, like the difference between a 737 and a 767. I had to learn all that.

I started as a de-icing inspector and then I was a de-icing officer until I took a role in management.

What are the biggest challenges of the job? The de-icing operation can start as early as 6 a.m. and go to 3 a.m. the next day. When you’re in a storm, you’re there for the whole event, even if you have to go and get some sleep and come back again. When the weather is really bad and most people are staying home, those are the days when we have to go to work.

How did you get into this line of work? When I started here 14 years ago, my niche was the environment. The airport was taking a close look at stormwater, ensuring the water quality and making sure the de-icing fluids weren’t getting into the waterways. I graduated with a degree in environmental studies from the University of Waterloo. I didn’t know anything about

Do you ever get a chance to escape the cold? I like the heat, lying on a beach. But those of us with snow-demanding jobs don’t get to travel in the winter. I was once on a plane on a cold October morning and we had to get a quick frost spray. I had never seen the operation from the inside of a plane before. My face was pressed to the glass the whole time.

PEARSON PERSON

FROZEN ASSET

As a manager of one of the world’s largest de-icing operations, Glynys Jones really knows her snow BY PAUL GALLANT

Toronto may not be the coldest city in the world, but the weather from the Great Lakes makes the snow here especially wet and heavy. So Toronto Pearson’s de-icing team, the largest centralized operation of its kind in the world, has one of the airport’s toughest jobs. Each winter, more than 150 workers remove icy buildup from some 17,000 planes—as many as 400 to 500 a day. Do they call you “the de-icing queen”? I get that a lot. There aren’t many women in de-icing. 10 AWAY WINTER 2015

PHOTOGRAPH BY REYNARD LI

Is there an art to getting the planes ice-free? The operator has to be as close as possible to the surface he's spraying because heat and fluid pressure are removing the contamination. Overnight aircraft are the worst because heavy snow falls and ice builds up on the aircraft's critical surfaces. That crusty, compacted snow can be very difficult to remove. You can also have something called clear ice, where the plane looks clean but there’s actually a thin layer of ice that’s very difficult to see. You have to do what’s called a tactile, where a crew member gets out of his truck and completes a physical inspection of the plane to make sure there isn’t any ice on the aircraft. Tactiles take a lot of time.


INSIDER ANATOMY

RAREFIED AIR

Bombardier’s Global 7000 is the ultimate private jet: ultra-comfortable, ultra-long-range and ultra-expensive BY PAUL GALLANT

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THE SPECS With a range of 13,520 kilometres (7,300 nautical miles), the Global 7000 could fly from Toronto to Dubai without touching down. The cabin features four distinct living areas, including a stateroom and kitchen.

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1 SUPER VISION Bombardier’s “vision system” gives the pilot a digital rendering of the outside environment, overlaid on the cockpit windows. This lets the crew see in the dark—virtually.

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2 HUGE WINDOWS Abundant natural light makes the Global 7000 feel “more like flying in a bubble than in a metal tube,” says Bombardier executive Sean Johnston. 3 PLUSH LOUNGERS Eight people can sleep fully reclined on the jet’s adjustable seats. Not that they won’t fight over the queen-size bed in the stateroom.

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4 CUSTOM FURNISHINGS Bombardier’s team of designers will help you choose from 40,000 sample materials, including silk carpets.

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5 GOURMET KITCHEN The plane is outfitted with fridges, induction cooktops, convection and steam ovens and a microwave. 6 LUXE BATHROOMS There’s enough hot water onboard for a 40-minute shower.

IMAGES PROVIDED COURTESY OF BOMBARDIER INC.

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7 ROOM FOR THE WHOLE GANG The jet’s thin, reinforced frame maximizes interior space to handle as many as 19 passengers. The frame is 15 per cent lighter than in other jets, saving a small fortune in fuel costs. 8 WI-FI CONNECTIVITY You can stream content to any of the cabin’s four TV screens. Plus, the window shades, temperature and lighting can be controlled via mobile apps. 9 FRESH AIR The humidification system, air quality and air pressure make you forget you’re 15,000 metres above Earth. WINTER 2015 AWAY 13


open happiness

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‰/MD Coca-Cola Ltd., used under license.


INSIDER

CHECKING IN

A DAY IN THE LIFE We ask ten world travellers where they’re headed BY JEAN GRANT PHOTOGRAPHS BY EMMA MCINTYRE

Who Carlos Miranda, 40-yearold architect from Montreal Where San José, Costa Rica Why “I’m visiting my family.” How I’m passing the time “A Coach bag caught my eye at a shop in the terminal, but it’s my birthday soon so I’m going to restrain myself.”

➡Who Steven Burgess,

47-year-old engineer from Melbourne, Australia Where New York City Why “We’re stopping in Toronto to meet friends for a surprise engagement.” Carry-on “I always have a book and a spare hat.” How I’m passing the time “I’m going to buy some snacks and a bottle of Grey Goose vodka at duty free.” 16 AWAY WINTER 2015

Who Ivan Trinh, 40-year-old monk Where Back home to Edmonton. “I was in Toronto helping and teaching at my master’s temple.” Carry-on “Clothes, ginseng tea and religious books.”

⬆Who Mayuko Van Den Haas,

44-year-old ground employee at Air Canada, and daughter Rika, from Toronto Where Japan Why “We’re going to see my family. We visit once a year.” Carry-on “Toys and homework in hers and snacks, books and a blanket in mine.”


Who Robert Simpson, 55-yearold PR professional Where Back home to Vancouver. “I travel to Toronto four days every month for work.” Carry-on “I don’t check anything, so I carry an extra sweater, gym shoes, a bathing suit and swim goggles.”

➡Who Gladette Ledingham,

77-year-old retired nurse Where Back home to Vancouver Why “We were visiting our daughters and grandchildren. Thankfully, they all live in Toronto, so we can see everyone in one trip.” Carry-on “My iPad, cosmetics and toothpaste.”

⬆Who Natsumi Kaneko, 27-year-old

office clerk from Japan Where “My husband and I are stopping in Toronto on our way home from Florida. We went to Disney World for our honeymoon.”

⬅Who Ranjit Dhaliwal,

27-year-old law student from Toronto Where Vancouver Why “I’m heading to a family reunion.” How I’m passing the time “I ate breakfast at the Mill Street Brewery. Unfortunately, it was a little early for a beer.”

⬅Who Mackenzie Hamilton, 25-year-old

model living in New York Where Vancouver Why “I’m really excited to be going home to see my family on Vancouver Island. The last time I was there, my trip was cut short because of a job.” Carry-on “I have an iPad, a Nintendo 3DS and a few books.” WINTER 2015 AWAY 17


the list DINING AND SHOPPING AT TORONTO PEARSON

AIR FARE

PIE FOR THE SKY

PHOTOGRAPH BY EMMA McINTYRE

Paramount puts a populist spin on Middle Eastern cuisine Earlier this year, Paramount Fine Foods opened a quick-service outpost at Toronto Pearson (a second will open in the spring), bringing halal Middle Eastern food-stall staples to hungry travellers. The chain is known to its southern Ontario devotees for grilled kebabs, flaky pastries, creamy dips like hummus and moutabal, and the Lebanese answer to pizza: blistery, wood-fired manakeesh (above). Paramount has

come a long way since 2007, the year Lebaneseborn Mohamad Fakih purchased an ailing restaurant in Mississauga, Ontario, and set out on an ambitious plan to revive it. Fakih now employs 800 staff across nine Paramount locations, including a 3,300-square-foot gourmet halal butcher shop. The whole enterprise is simultaneously populist and authentic—just as Mediterranean cuisine should be. WINTER 2015 AWAY 19


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STYLE AND BEAUTY

SHORE THINGS

Play up your tan with these island-inspired beach accessories PHOTOGRAPHS BY VICKY LAM

1 Bamboo rose gold bracelet, $3,040, and earrings, $2,105. Gucci 2 Colour Crush nail polish in mint cream, minty armour and pink cream, $6 each. The Body Shop 3 Narciso perfume by Narciso Rodriguez, $98. The Duty Free Store by Nuance 4 Ray-Ban matte blue aviators, $208. The Duty Free Store by Nuance 5 Coach Bleecker Legacy coin case in fawn, $78. Coach 6 Leather card case in blue, $285. Salvatore Ferragamo 7 Turquoise watch, $300. Michael Kors 8 Jambox Bluetooth speaker by Jawbone in aqua scales, $180. iStore 9 Silk scarves in lagoon and paper, $110 each. Longchamp 10 Leather bracelets, $180 each. Salvatore Ferragamo. (All prices in Canadian dollars.) See Toronto Pearson map on page 58 for retail locations inside Terminal 1 WINTER 2015 AWAY 21


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GIFTS

MADE IN CANADA Take home some cold comfort from the country that does winter best PHOTOGRAPH BY VICKY LAM

1 Prince Rupert butter fudge, $13. Hudson’s Bay Company Trading Post 2 Brown and cream cashmere scarf, $160. Hudson’s Bay Company Trading Post 3 Anat Basanta never-ending necklace, $405. The Duty Free Store by Nuance 4 Handknit wool mittens, $60. Hudson’s Bay Company Trading Post 5 Loyal Loot log bowls in eggplant, $175, and red, $115. The Duty Free Store by Nuance 6 Ecojot Toronto notebook, $10. Watermark 7 Stalk & Barrel single malt whisky, $130. The Duty Free Store by Nuance. (All prices in Canadian dollars.) 22 AWAY WINTER 2015

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See Toronto Pearson map on page 58 for retail locations inside Terminal 1


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MY CARRY-ONS

George Stroumboulopoulos, the new host of Hockey Night in Canada, shows us what’s in his bag 3

“I’m listening to the National, Hayden and a lot of space-rock band Spiritualized.”

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CULTURE BREAK

Five entertaining ways to kill time on the ground or in the clouds

ILLUSTRATION BY ALEX MATHERS

1 BOOK Emma Hooper’s Etta and Otto and Russell and James is 2015’s most anticipated debut. Eighty-three-yearold Etta awakes one morning with an impulse to see the ocean, setting out to walk across Canada, from her Saskatchewan farmhouse to the shores of Halifax. Meanwhile, Otto, the husband she leaves behind, takes an emotional trip as he reminisces about a life filled with friendship, war and missed opportunities. Available January 20. Kindle, iBooks, hardcover 2 ART Spend your layover at Toronto Pearson with Amazon of the North, Eamon Mac Mahon’s photo essay of Canada’s boreal forest, also known as Canada’s Amazon, which stretches from Newfoundland to the Yukon. Until June 2015. Terminal 1

3 MUSIC Cover albums don’t always fly, but there’s no question Zooey Deschanel, the “She” half of She & Him, was born to sing the standards—not to mention more modern favourites— found on Classics, the indie duo’s new collection. iTunes 4 GAME Forget Candy Crush; Crossy Road is your new addictive time-waster. It’s Frogger reimagined for the mobile era, only more difficult and with boxy Lego-like graphics. App Store 5 MOVIE Richard Linklater shot the critically acclaimed Boyhood over a span of 12 years, accomplishing something no other director has done in a single film: capturing the childhood of a fictional boy in real time. iTunes

“My go-to snacks for travelling are pistachios and pretzels. I like the vegan ones from Whole Foods.”

“Currently, I’m hooked on watching episodes of The Killing, so flights have been pretty grim.”

“I’m obviously reading a lot of hockey stuff right now, like Stephen Harper’s A Great Game.”


explorer

Canta Rana in Barranco, Lima’s best neighbourhood for restaurant hopping


MUCHO PISCO

Peruvian cuisine has become the toast of chefs around the world. A journey to the heart of the culinary movement in Lima’s Barranco district BY SARAH TRELEAVEN PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON SULLIVAN


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1 A bartender at boutique Hotel B mixes up a pisco sour, made from Peruvian brandy, simple syrup, bitters and egg 2 A plate of anticuchos, spicy grilled cow-heart kebabs with a pork-like texture 3 A street vendor sells snacks in the Barranco district

CÉSAR, MY GUIDE for the evening, was waiting for me in front of the church, near the Starbucks, in the central square of Barranco in Lima. Barranco isn’t as swanky as Miraflores or San Isidro—the toniest of the 43 districts in the sprawling, patchy capital city of Peru—but it’s much cooler. The one-time beach resort is now home to the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, the Museo Mario Testino (which shows the work of the renowned Peruvian fashion photographer), boutiques selling high-end clothing made of alpaca and a members-only yacht club. It’s also heaven for gourmands, with the

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highest concentration of restaurants in the city. Barranco is one of the few Lima neighbourhoods where you can feasibly restaurant hop. Peruvian food is having a moment. Last year, Lima restaurant in London, run by chef Virgilio Martinez, became the first Peruvian restaurant to receive a coveted Michelin star. Superstar chefs such as Ferran Adrià and Anthony Bourdain have been singing the praises of Peru’s rich scene. And chef Gastón Acurio, of Astrid & Gastón fame, is turning that scene into a global concern. Considered a culinary god in Peru, Acurio has made it his mission to glorify local ingredients and cuisine. He has built an empire of 44 restaurants around the world, including seven in Lima, turning the city into the foodie capital of South America. The international attention is nice, but Limaites aren’t letting it get to their heads. The art, culture and food scenes remain, at heart, faithfully traditional. And so I found myself, one hazy night in October, on a gastronomic adventure through Lima with César, a guide from the tour company Intrepid Travel. The plan was to spend the evening zigzaging across Barranco to taste the big five of Peruvian food and drink: pisco


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sour, anticuchos, ceviche, picarones, and arroz con leche. We started at the new boutique Hotel B, a 17-suite self-described “arts hotel” in a beautifully renovated belle époque mansion dating back to 1914. It’s a chic affair, with cozy spaces for sitting (both inside and outside) and contemporary artwork that clashes nicely with the original architecture. At the bar, I order a pisco sour, a cocktail that consists of pisco—a brandy made in the country’s wine regions, usually from muscat grapes—with lime or lemon juice, simple syrup, egg white and bitters, served on ice. It’s extremely sweet and tart, which makes it hard to stop at just one. Both Chile and Peru claim the pisco sour as their national drink, and Lima has plenty of other menu items of disputed provenance. Peru is home to multiple waves of immigrants, all of whom have added their own flavours and techniques to the culinary melting pot. Chifas, or Chinese-Peruvian restaurants that serve dishes like fried rice with Peruvian corn, have become so absorbed in the culture that they’re now considered local. Japanese, Spanish, French and Italians have also made their mark. Spaghetti is common on Peruvian menus. Our next stop was for anticuchos— grilled cow-heart kebabs—at El Tio Mario (Uncle Mario), a down-home joint with black and white pictures of the old Barranco lining the walls. We took a seat on the terrace, despite the slightly chilly late spring temperature in October. (Summer in Lima runs from November to March.) Our plates arrived loaded with an anticucho skewer, roasted potatoes and boiled corn. Anticucho is marinated overnight in salt, vinegar, cumin and ají panca, a Peruvian red chili pepper that gives deep flavour without a lot of heat. When it’s grilled, the texture is tender and slightly gummy—closer to pork than beef. César and I were getting along swimmingly and talk turned to potatoes. Peruvians win out over even the Irish when it comes to pride in their starches. César told me that

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Peru has 2,800 different types of spuds, including three sweet potatoes. Apparently, there are also 2,000 types of soup. “Even one made of stones,” said César.

AFTER A LONG history of hard times, Peru’s economy is now one of the best-performing in South America. That’s due to a booming export market, as well as a popular centrist government. Decades of guerrilla terrorism by the Shining Path militant group effectively came to an end in the 1990s. Peru’s new prosperity has had a profound impact on basic necessities. Quinoa, the country’s staple crop, has become an international sensation. Demand has driven up the price, and most of it is hoarded for export. Quinoa costs about 22 soles ($8.50) per pound, double the price of chicken. But there are upsides to Peru’s economic reversal of fortune. César told me there are a staggering “300 per cent more restaurants” in Lima than there were just 10 years ago. Next up was ceviche at Picas, a hipster haven blasting Depeche Mode. We sat on the patio and our order soon arrived: small cubes of

USUALLY A LUNCHTIME MEAL, CEVICHE IS THE PERFECT MATE FOR LATE-NIGHT BEER AND SALSA DANCING

4 Plaza Principal, the Barranco district’s central square 5 Digging into tart, salty, spicy ceviche WINTER 2015 AWAY 29


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sea bass cured in lime and topped with diced onions and chili peppers. The combination of tart, salty and spicy lit up my tastebuds. Ceviche is usually a lunchtime meal, eaten when just-caught fish is most fresh. But it’s also a perfect accompaniment to late-night beer and salsa dancing. César and I debated the merits of regional variations on ceviche, popular across Latin America. I’m partial to the Mexican recipe: light and sharp, with high acidity. Ecuadoreans put ketchup in their ceviche, and Costa Ricans use onion juice. César made a face: “I did not like it.” We moved on to Acantilado de

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LIMA A ID EN AV

Eight-hour non-stop flight from Toronto Pearson to Lima

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BARRANCO DISTRICT

PACIFIC OCEAN

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STAY The Arts Boutique Hotel (known as Hotel B) is the hot new property in Lima. The exquisitely renovated building is filled with fascinating art and photography, the airy rooms have high ceilings and charming design details and the food and cocktails are thoughtful and delicious. Rates start at US$350 per night. hotelb.pe

MAP BY NICOLA HAMILTON

FLY Several airlines operate flights from Toronto Pearson to Lima, including Air Canada, LAN, American Airlines, Delta, United and Avianca. From Lima’s Jorge Chávez International Airport, take the official licensed Taxis Verdes (Green Taxis), which post their prices.

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6 Picarones, deep-fried sweet potatoes with the characteristics of both onion rings and doughnuts 7 A vendor dishes out mazamorra, a pudding made from purple corn

Barranco, a cliffside resort above the Pacific Ocean with a view of new, million-dollar seaside apartments, a private marina and the giant lit cross that was erected on a hillside in honour of Pope John Paul II’s visit in 1985. Deep-fried picarones arrived, looking like a combination of doughnuts and chubby onion rings. They’re made with sweet potatoes, pumpkin, flour and sugar and topped with a syrup made of sugar cane, cinnamon and cloves. They are as good as they sound: crispy, soft, surprisingly spicy and delectably greasy. We walked down Jirón de La Unión, a pedestrian promenade lined with restaurants, to our final destination. Near the main square, we stopped at a little stand on wheels, where a woman wearing a white lab coat and matching cap served up mazamorra and arroz con leche. I took a generous spoonful of each. The mazamorra, a pudding made from purple corn and sprinkled with cinnamon, was gooey, like pie filling made with an excessive thickening agent. The arroz con leche was a pleasantly sweet and creamy rice pudding. I was already full and floundered on this finale. César noticed and, scraping the bottom of his own plastic bowl, offered to take mine off my hands. I exhaled, completely spent. “I can’t believe you’re already done,” said César, digging into round two. “I love this stuff.” ✈


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The Catenary Ridge on the north face of Mount Logan

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FRESH T R ACKS

The St. Elias Mountains: an immensely snowy playground no one has heard of STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHN ZADA

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sk any schoolchild to name Canada’s highest mountain range and “the Rockies” will roll off the tongue. That picture-perfect range, towering above pristine forests and alpine lakes, is as iconic as moose, maple syrup and lumberjacks. Are any other mountains loftier? Sure, but you’ve never heard of them. They’re the St. Elias Mountains. Located 1,700 kilometres northwest of the Rockies, they’re not just the highest in Canada but in all of North America. Doused in untrodden snow, they rise up at the borders of the Yukon, B.C. and Alaska. They’re home to Canada’s tallest peak, the behemoth-like Mount Logan—a staggering 5,960 metres high. In fact, the St. Elias Mountains are so gargantuan and formidable that they were the last place on Earth to be reached by European explorers at the turn of the 20th century. To this day, parts of them remain terra incognita. These hills are mostly known to diehard winter-sports enthusiasts—the kind that crave high altitudes and a pure, unadulterated natural environment. Lack of snow is never a problem here; neither are crowds. These peaks are thankfully light on tourists. At St. Elias’s higher elevations, seasoned mountaineers can tackle a number of juggernauts in the sky with names like Lucania, Hubbard and Queen Mary. The climbing is world-class but you don’t need to be an expert

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CANADA

HOW TO GET THERE

with ice picks and crampons to partake in the fun. The Yukon-based travel company Icefield Discovery Tours runs a seasonal glacier camp within sight of Mount Logan. There, you can snowshoe or backcountry ski on a stable chunk of glacier and spend the night roughing it in a Weatherhaven shelter. If sidestepping crevasses isn’t your thing, Icefield also runs guided flyover tours in a small plane. They’ll even land on the glacier so you can spend a few minutes walking around, punching your footprints in the snow. Below the icefields, there’s the wilderness village of Haines Junction (or “the Junction”), gateway to the beautiful boreal landscape of Kluane National Park. Seasoned cross-country skiers and snowshoers flock to Kluane’s trails, including the Auriol and Cottonwood routes, popular for both day treks and longer ski tours. Hikers tromp through the same thoroughfares in the summer. To wind the day down, the Junction has a couple of cafés and hangouts, but you’ll likely end up driving two hours to Whitehorse for a meal of wild elk stroganoff and a glass of shiraz at the hip Klondike Rib and Salmon restaurant. Because even in the blissfully wild north, there’s room for a few newfangled perks. ✈ 1 The Icefield Discovery glacier camp, 40 kilometres from Mount Logan 2 Whitehorse, facing Mount Sima, a twohour drive from the St. Elias Mountains 3 Members of the Yukon chapter of the Alpine Club of Canada rope up at the Icefield Discovery camp before a trek along the glacier

Where to stay in and around Haines Junction: Kluane Bed & Breakfast (from $100 per night), kluanecabins.com; Parkside Inn (from $130 per night), parksidekluaneyukon.com

2 1

KLUANE NATIONAL PARK

HAINES JUNCTION

WHITEHORSE

Direct Air Canada flight to Whitehorse

Equipment rentals and custom trips: Up North Adventures (Whitehorse), upnorthadventures.com

MAP BY NICOLA HAMILTON

3

Two-hour drive to Haines Junction

Glacier camp and flights: Icefield Discovery Tours, icefielddiscovery.com GULF OF ALASKA

Info on winter trails: yukonhiking.ca

WINTER 2015 AWAY 35


explorer

A turbo-charged Helio Courier aircraft takes off after dropping travellers at the Icefield camp

36 AWAY WINTER 2015


THE HILLS ARE SO GARGANTUAN AND FORMIDABLE THAT PARTS OF THEM REMAIN TERRA INCOGNITA

WINTER 2015 AWAY 37


JUST ADD WATER Toronto is a hop, skip and puddle jumper away from some of the world’s most beautiful islands— delightful mini-universes of sand, sun and sea. Here’s a guide to five of the best, for all budgets BY ANTONIA WHYATT

38 AWAY WINTER 2015


explorer

Waikiki beach from the tower of the Royal Hawaiian. Below: the Ty Gurney Surf School

OAHU HAWAII

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOEY CARROLL/TY GURNEY SURF SCHOOL

IT'S THE THIRD-LARGEST HAWAIIAN ISLAND IN SIZE BUT THE BIGGEST IN PERSONALITY

Oahu just got a lot closer thanks to a new direct flight, via Air Canada Rouge, from Toronto Pearson to Honolulu—where even the airport is filled with the scent of leis and the sleep-inducing sound of Polynesian music. Oahu gives you a bit of everything, from brash Honolulu, with its high-rise hotels ringing Waikiki, the island’s tourist centre, to the dramatic North Shore, where surfers come to ride the big waves and the roads are lined with shacks selling tacos, sushi and cheap drinks. BEST FOR Split personalities who want high action for half the day and naps under palm trees for the rest. BUDGET Mid-range. One of the sleekest hotels is the Modern Honolulu (from US$350 per night; themodernhonolulu.com), designed by Ian Schrager. It’s glossy and fun, with four bars, a sceney restaurant and a tropical garden. Each room comes with a ukulele and pareo. Sign up for a lesson at the Ty Gurney Surf School, located in front of the elegant pink 1930s Royal Hawaiian hotel, where surfing as a sport began. DO AS THE LOCALS DO Try the spicy poke bowl at Ono’s Seafood (747 Kapahulu Ave., Honolulu). Poke is chopped tuna mixed with soy, sesame seeds, wasabi, sweet Maui onions and chili flakes. Foodies tour the island trying endless versions on offer. Also, rent a car and head to Kailua Town, where you can grab a kayak or paddleboard and drift out into the warm turquoise waters of Kailua Bay. WINTER 2015 AWAY 39


explorer

IT HAS FOUR DOZEN BEACHES AND ONLY ONE TRAFFIC LIGHT

This islet just off Puerto Rico is so undeveloped that wild horses still roam the hills and 40-plus beaches, yet it’s easily accessible via puddle jumper from San Juan. BEST FOR Beachy purists who want nothing but sand and sky. BUDGET Low end. Canadian architect John Hix helped turned Vieques into a destination with his dramatic, entirely concrete and totally affordable Hix Island House (from US$135 per night; hixislandhouse.com). All rooms are three-sided, with the fourth wall open, allowing the trade winds to blow through. DO AS THE LOCALS DO Mosquito Bay sounds awful, but this bioluminescent bay emits a blue-green glow at night. When you run your hand through the water, it magically glimmers and gleams. 40 AWAY WINTER 2015

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SHUTTERSTOCK AND COURTESY OF HIX ISLAND HOUSE

VIEQUES PUERTO RICO


explorer

THIS SMALL ISLAND JUST OFF PUERTO RICO IS SO UNDEVELOPED THAT WILD HORSES STILL ROAM THE HILLS

Hix Island House interior and exterior (below left). Below: Bridgetown, Barbados

B ARB ADOS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES AND NIK WHEELER/ ALAMY

A PINK-SAND PLAYGROUND WITH A PATRICIAN VIBE

It’s the sand that sets Barbados apart. Pinkish white and soft as a powder puff, it caresses the island in a gentle embrace thanks to unique geology—Barbados is actually a coral reef that was pushed out of the sea by tectonic plates. And then there’s the architecture: colourful gingerbread houses line the roads, while grand estates and Palladian villas look imposingly out to sea. The 400-year-old settlements of Speightstown, Holetown and Bridgetown are steeped in history. BEST FOR Aspirationalists who like highbrow pursuits. Barbados used to be an exclusive winter playground for British aristocrats. Their legacy lingers in practically everything there is to do and see, like polo, sailing and opera. BUDGET High end. The luxe Coral Reef Club in Holetown has been a family-run boutique hotel for the past six decades and offers meticulously appointed cottage rooms (from US$850 per night, minimum seven- to 14-night stay; coralreefbarbados.com). It’s an Old World vibe: classic colonial design and white-glove service. Every Wednesday, you can take a tour of the spectacular grounds with the head gardener. DO AS THE LOCALS DO Try the Friday-night fish fry in the village of Oistins for flying fish and blackened barracuda. Save plenty of time for Crane Beach. Lined by dramatic cliffs topping 21 metres high, the beach is known for its bodysurfable waves. WINTER 2015 AWAY 41


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC THE RISE OF THE PRETTY, UNCLUTTERED NORTH SHORE

42 AWAY WINTER 2015

With a reputation for package holidays, the Dominican is the last place you expect for a history lesson. But it’s where Christopher Columbus landed in 1492, leaving his brother behind to build Santo Domingo, now the oldest continuously inhabited European city in the Americas. Another surprise here is the island’s natural beauty—with 19 national parks, it’s being wonderfully preserved. BEST FOR Caribbean culture and sun seekers who want to do little. Or a lot. BUDGET Everything from low (the pulsating all-inclusive hotels in Punta Cana) to high. The most anticipated opening is the Gansevoort Playa Imbert on the island’s north shore, a world away from the madding crowd. The 48 sleek and contemporary suites start from US$595 per night (gansevoorthotelgroup.com). Guests can explore the area’s vast wilderness reserve or dive among the shipwrecks. Nearby is Cabarete, the adventuresports capital of the Dominican—a mecca for surfers, kite surfers and windsurfers. DO AS THE LOCALS DO A two-hour drive from the Gansevoort is the Samaná Peninsula, a 35-kilometre stretch of curving, nearly empty beaches on the Atlantic. Samaná has long been the getaway for Dominicans and in-the-know Europeans, but Canadians are getting in on the act thanks to direct flights from Toronto. From mid-January to March, humpback whales congregate in the Samaná Bay to nurse their young and mate.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KLEMEN MISIC/ISTOCK

INSIDER


explorer

ST. LUCIA THE MOST DRAMATIC SCENERY IN THE ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY AURORA PHOTOS/ALAMY AND COURTESY SUGAR BEACH, A VICEROY RESORT

Gingerbread houses in Samaná. Below, far right: Gansevoort Playa Imbert. Below: the festival at Anse La Raye, St. Lucia and the Sugar Beach Resort

St. Lucia looks like a slumbering dragon, with its spiky, lush green mountains tumbling dramatically into the sea. At the end of the volcanic chain of the Antilles, it is the Caribbean’s most mountainous island. The black and silvery beaches in the volcanic south of the island reflect its tumultuous geology (beaches in the north are golden). Arguably, the volcanic cones of Petit and Gros Piton rising out of the ocean are the most jaw-dropping sight in the Caribbean. BEST FOR Romantics and adventurers. The island is covered in a thick blanket of emerald rainforest and has plenty of sporty adventure, like zip lining, rainforest eco-tours and hiking up to the top of Gros Piton. BUDGET Mid-range. The guest rooms at the new, contemporarycool Sugar Beach Viceroy hotel, once an 18th-century sugar plantation, start at US$350 (viceroyhotelsandresorts.com). They’re on the same property as the US$1,000-plus bungalows where Gwyneth Paltrow stayed. DO AS THE LOCALS DO On Fridays, the village of Anse La Raye has a street festival, with stalls selling fish cakes, grilled lobster and hot bakes (biscuits). You’re guaranteed to end up dancing. ✈

WITH ITS LUSH GREEN MOUNTAINS, ST. LUCIA LOOKS LIKE A SLUMBERING DRAGON

WINTER 2015 AWAY 43


explorer

MIAMI'S NEW VICE

The city’s hottest scene is far from its famous beach, in the once-derelict downtown Design District BY SARAH TRELEAVEN PHOTOGRAPHS BY GRACIELA CATTAROSSI

44 AWAY WINTER 2015


1

1 Art, like this mural and sculpture garden nestled between luxury boutiques, takes centre stage in the Design District

PRADA MARFA, a replica of a Prada boutique created by Scandinavian artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, is a singular attraction set against the desolation of west Texas. On the side of a lonely highway, it’s a landmark that road trippers drive

out of their way to take selfies with and a symbol of our insatiable desire for status goods. More than 2,000 kilometres away, Miami is building a real version of that statement piece: a strip of some of the world’s most expensive shops plunked WINTER 2015 AWAY 45


THE DISTRICT IS A STUDY IN CONTRASTS: A FASCINATING MIX OF GRIT AND GLAMOUR

2

2 A flag by artist David Hammons from the Craig Robins Collection 3 Prada is just one of the designer brands flocking to the neighbourhood 4 Elastika, a sculpture by Zaha Hadid, in the atrium of the 1920s Moore Building, which started as a furniture showroom

down among empty lots, graffiti and overgrown scrub. It’s all part of the transformation of the Miami Design District from a seedy, downat-the-heels neighbourhood to a chic destination for everything from contemporary art and designer sofas to high fashion and fine dining. The Design District’s turnaround was cemented in 2012, when Louis Vuitton opened a boutique there, its only free-standing shop in the United States outside of New York City. Now, a number of other prominent designers are laying claim to the area. Luxury fashion brands like Givenchy, Tom Ford, Valentino, Fendi, Dolce & Gabbana and Van Cleef & Arpels are opening soon, joining Hermès, Longchamp, Prada,

46 AWAY WINTER 2015

Rick Owens, Céline and Cartier, which have already set up shop. Most tourists keep to Miami Beach, with its spring-break vibe that caters to both high- and low-end consumption. In quite a different way, the Design District, across the Biscayne Bay on the mainland, is a study in contrasts: a fascinating mix of grit and glamour. Bordering Little Haiti, the neighbourhood’s empty lots, bodegas, mural art and tropical vibe are more Caribbean than Floridian. In the midst of all this, N.E. 40th Street emerges as a luxury oasis. The sidewalks are expansive, valet parking booths are plentiful and the trellises are wrapped in pink bougainvillea. Near the Rick Owens boutique, a minimalist tem-


explorer

PHOTOGRAPH BY MORIS MORENO/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX (BOTTOM RIGHT)

3

ple to high-end white sneakers and black leather goods, is Design and Architecture Senior High, a public school and magnet for arts-minded kids. Calypso music blasted from behind its tall fence one afternoon in October. The jumbled vibe felt very far from the beach. Culture is a huge part of the Design District. Craig Robins, a Miami property developer, art collector and philanthropist, is one of the district’s visionaries. Robins also helped bring Art Basel, an international contemporary art show that began in Basel, Switzerland, to Miami in 2002. The Design District is home to many privately owned and nationally significant venues for contemporary art, including the Rubell Family

4 WINTER 2015 AWAY 47


THE DINING SCENE IS BEGINNING TO MATURE, WITH NEW OPEN-AIR RESTAURANTS LANDING NEXT TO ESTABLISHED PIONEERS

5


city to Miami Beach is pretty jarring. It takes you past the exclusive real estate of Star, Palm and Hibiscus islands. On the other side of Biscayne Bay is the Miami of sand, decadence, jet setters and tourists of all kinds. By comparison, the Design District is not just rough and ready but tamer and quieter—a work in progress. You’ll root for it all the same. ✈

5 Michael’s Genuine, by award-winning chef Michael Schwartz, is a hot spot for locavore cuisine 6 Area hallmarks: white buildings, cool graphics and a touch of grit from the rail tracks

AL HW Y

6

N FED ER

Collection, located on N.W. 29th Street, on the Design District’s outskirts, and the 30,000-square-foot De La Cruz Collection Contemporary Art Space, which features a mix of U.S. and international stars. Just as its art venues are in full bloom, the Design District’s dining scene is beginning to mature, with charming outdoor restaurants landing next to established pioneers. Michael’s Genuine, owned by the James Beard Award–winning chef Michael Schwartz, opened in 2007 and brought the first hints of high-end locavore cuisine to the neighbourhood. It’s still a popular hub for house-made fruit jams and wood-fired local fish. In a nice touch, Schwartz sources some of his greens from the nearby Little Haiti Community Garden. Among the newer dining options is Oak Tavern, serving modern American food with a ladies-wholunch-under-giant-oak-trees vibe. It features a fresh-herb garden in the centre of a shaded courtyard. A few blocks away, Mandolin Aegean Bistro is a destination for Greek dishes like grilled octopus and baklava. Its whip-thin, stiletto-clad crowd mostly refuses the fabulous fresh-baked bread. Big plans are underway to turn the Design District into less of a daytrip draw and more of a full-service community. It’s rare to see an urban American neighbourhood rebuilt from scratch but here, cranes for slick new developments are sprouting across the landscape. Much of N.E. 41st Street—just one block from the valets and Valentino—is under construction. Among the new projects are Design41, a boxy steeland-glass office and retail space; Sweetbird South, Chicago-based architect Jeanne Gang’s 14-storey condo in the shape of a honeycomb; and the high-design Museum Garage car park, which comes with a contemplation garden, tube slide and climbing net. There’s also Paseo Ponti, a sprawling new pedestrian shopping promenade that will extend from N.E. 38th to 42nd streets. The journey from this part of the

N MIAMI AVE

MAP BY NICOLA HAMILTON, PHOTOGRAPH BY RICHARD PATERSON COURTESY OF MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT (TOP RIGHT)

explorer

1

NE 42ND ST

BISCAYNE BAY

DESIGN DISTRICT NE 39TH ST 195

NW 36TH ST

TO MIAMI BEACH

1

HOW TO GET THERE

FLY Several airlines operate direct flights from Toronto Pearson to Miami, including Air Canada, WestJet, American Airlines, United, US Airways and Delta.

Three-hour flight from Toronto Pearson to Miami

STAY The only thing the Design District doesn’t have (yet) is a hotel. Most visitors stay at a Miami Beach resort like Canyon Ranch Hotel & Spa, which has a focus on healthy, active living. Rates start at around US$500 and include spa treatments. canyonranch.com/miamibeach

WINTER 2015 AWAY 49


d e tour s CITY GUIDES DESIGNED BY EXPERTS

Hanging out in Mitte, Berlin's cultural core

WINTER 2015 AWAY 51


d e to u r s

BERLIN

Leisurely and introverted, the German city is best explored on foot

YOUR GUIDE R. M. Vaughan is a Canadian writer who divides his time between Toronto and Berlin. His newest book, Bright Eyed: Insomnia and Its Cultures, will be published in May 2015.

52 AWAY WINTER 2015

NEIGHBOURHOOD Mitte, Berlin’s central borough, is home to dozens of smart art galleries, smarter museums and well-manicured, generous parks. HANGOUT The grand, old-fashioned department store KaDeWe opened in 1907. It’s expensive, but you don’t need to buy much—a bit of fancy chocolate, some stationery—to experience the extravagance of the place. There’s an entire section dedicated to offal, another to tobacco and a champagne bar. kadewe.de

COOL STUFF 1. The beautiful memory game 32xBerlin features local photographs by Friederike von Rauch. 2. Made from sugar beets, Held vodka tastes like a hearty alcohol salad. 3. Germans adore gnomes shamelessly, and so should you.

HOTEL Everyone stays at the Adlon— everyone rich, that is. The legendary five-star hotel, located right across from the Brandenburg Gate, is luxury incarnate. It's also where Michael Jackson dangled his baby from a balcony. Starting at $350 per night. hotel-adlon.de

BEST-KEPT SECRET Franken Bar is a rundown, smoky bar in Berlin’s punkanarchist Oranienstrasse district. The place completely epitomizes Berlin’s surly underside. Tip well, or else. franken-bar.de

RESTAURANT Berliners will tell you there’s no such thing as German cuisine. But there’s Austrian cooking, and Austria Restaurant serves savoury semmelknödel (bread dumplings) the size of baseballs. austria-berlin.de

Nine-hour flight from Toronto Pearson

BERLIN

OPPOSITE PAGE: WILKOSZ AND WAY. THIS PAGE (CLOCKWISE): WILKOSZ AND WAY, COURTESY KADEWE, FRIEDERIKE VON RAUCH, SHUTTERSTOCK, FLICKR.COM/BRUCE, GETTYIMAGES, FINN JACKSON BALLARD

Berlin is a city of pockets, corners and alleys. Of course it has a centre, called Mitte, with all the top historical destinations: Berliner Dom, the Brandenburg Gate, the Reichstag. Guided walking tours are a sure bet—try Original Berlin Walks (berlinwalks.de) and ask for Finn, who does Second World War, Cold War, Jewish life and LGBT tours. But after you get your photo taken beside one of the last fragments of the Berlin Wall, another, less haunted version of Germany awaits. A city of nearly 100 Kiez, the local equivalent of a ’hood, Berlin is best explored on foot, with enough time to dig around in a dusty bookstore, people-watch in a noisy café packed with international students or wander through one of the madcap markets. Unlike other international capitals, Berlin is leisurely and a bit introverted. Berliners can’t be bothered with status anxiety.


d e to u r s

MUMBAI

Where to find a few quiet moments in India’s brashest city

YOUR GUIDE Rooshad Shroff is an architect and designer who draws inspiration from traditional Indian craft. He designed the Christian Louboutin stores in Mumbai and Bangkok.

54 AWAY WINTER 2015

NEIGHBOURHOOD On narrow streets in southern Mumbai, Khotachiwadi’s Portuguese-style bungalows are under threat by encroaching development—so see this adorable neighbourhood while you can.

COOL STUFF 1. Spruce up your walls with vintage Bollywood posters from Chor Bazaar, a sprawling flea market. 2. Pick up Tiffin containers, used by dabbawallas to deliver hot lunches, at Crawford Market.

HANGOUT The walkable Kala Ghoda art district in South Mumbai is home to the institutional (the National Gallery of Modern Art) and the independent (Gallery Maskara).

RESTAURANT Neel at Tote on the Turf specializes in upscale Indian food with rich Hyderabadi flavours. The design, by architects Chris Lee and Kapil Gupta, is minimalist chic. thetote.in HOTEL The Taj Mahal Palace looks over the Arabian Sea like a maharaja surveying his kingdom. From $500 per night. tajhotels.com LOCAL SECRET Part of the Walkeshwar Temple complex, the historic Banganga water tank, built in 1127, is tucked away in the affluent Malabar Hill neighbourhood. It’s a holy place for Hindus and was a spring for the Ganges according to local mythology.

20-hour flight from Toronto Pearson

MUMBAI

CLOCKWISE: KIRTI MANIAN, GETTYIMAGES, KETAN KUNDARGI/TOTE ON THE TURF, SHUTTERSTOCK, FRANK HEUER/LAIF/REDUX

With its imposing monuments, chaotic streets and bustling beaches, Mumbai doesn’t conceal its ambitions or its flaws. Among the boldest declarations of Mumbai’s immodesty are a golden-hued 75-storey Trump Tower (now in the planning stages) and the 27-storey private home of Muk esh Ambani. The current building boom has dropped shiny new malls in former industrial zones and planted sleek towers alongside slums. But the city’s older pleasures are enduring, including the excellent restaurants in the historical quarter. In Mumbai you can still turn a busy downtown corner and stumble into a waterfront fishing village. You can survey it all from a rooftop restaurant near Chowpatty beach or in a café in Bandra West. Even the way of doing laundry— brought from all over the city to be washed in Dhobi Ghat— is a spectacle.


TORONTO

CLOCKWISE: COURTESY TORONTO CHRISTMAS MARKET, ISTOCKPHOTO, COURTESY OF CYNTHIA FINDLAY, COURTESY NICHOLAS METIVIER GALLERY, COURTESY THE HAZELTON HOTEL, KJ BUSH / EVERGREEN BRICK WORKS, BRANDON BARRÉ, RENEE SUEN

Even in boom times, the neighbourhood vibe endures

Anyone who hasn’t visited Toronto in a decade would barely recognize its skyline today. The city is shape-shifting rapidly, as neighbourhoods morph, skyscrapers reach higher and the sprawl pushes into the suburbs. Toronto is a city in demand —more than 100,000 people are arriving to live here each year. Amazingly, this hasn't changed the heart of the place—it’s a city of neighbourhoods, most of which have their own distinct architecture, streetscapes and culture. Visitors should spend their time hopping from one enclave to the next. In the west end, there’s Parkdale, College, Ossington and Dundas—full of indie cafés and hot restaurants. In midtown, you'll find Summerhill’s upscale boutiques. In the east, Corktown has the Distillery District and the athletes’ village for the 2015 Pan Am Games. It’s all something of an adventure. YOUR GUIDE Sarah Richardson is a Canadian interior designer. Her projects range from her TV series (Sarah’s House, Design Inc., Sarah 101) to her job as Good Housekeeping’s home design director. Her latest book is Sarah Style.

HANGOUT A 10-minute streetcar ride from the core, the Distillery District in Corktown is one of the city’s most vibrant developments, housing galleries, restaurants, shops and, in keeping with its history, a local brewery. thedistillerydistrict.com

RESTAURANT Chef Grant van Gameren’s Bar Isabel is an inventive Spanish restaurant on College Street. The seafood plates, especially the octopus, are amazing. barisabel.com

COOL STUFF 1. Queen West Antique Centre has amazing midcentury modern furniture. qwac.ca 2. Take home statement earrings from Cynthia Findlay Antiques. cynthia findlay.com 3. The Nicholas Metivier Gallery represents international artists like Edward Burtynsky and Chuck Close. metiviergallery.com

NEIGHBOURHOOD Queen West, along the whole 501 streetcar route, goes through great neighbourhoods, from the Beach to Roncesvalles. LOCAL SECRET The Evergreen Brick Works is an incredible environmental centre tucked in the Don Valley but close to midtown. One if its nicest features in the winter is a sweet (and free) skating rink. evergreen.ca

AIRPORT INFO Toronto Pearson International Airport is 32 kilometres northwest of downtown.

HOTEL The Hazelton is very stylish and close to great shopping and prime peoplewatching. thehazeltonhotel.com

Taxi Rate to the city centre is around $55. It can take about 30 minutes if traffic is good.

Go bus For $5.70, take Go service from the airport to Yorkdale or York Mills subway.

TTC For $3, ride the TTC bus to Kipling, then transfer to the subway for downtown.

WINTER 2015 AWAY 55


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WAY F I N D e r HOW TO NAVIGATE TORONTO PEARSON

409

AIRPORT ROAD

427

TERMINAL 3

INFO

ILLUSTRATION BY ALICE CHO

For online guides to Terminal 1 and Terminal 3, go to torontopearson.com

TERMINAL 1

Terminal Link Train

WINTER 2015 AWAY 57


wa y f i n d e r

D28 TO GATES D1–D12

D12

D11 D9

D10

D26 D5

D8

D24

D7

D3

D22

D1 D6

TERMINAL 1

D4

Canada, USA and international arrivals and departures

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

38 39 40 41 42 43

A&W Caffé di Calabria Caffè Ritazza Camden Food Co. Cibo Express Gourmet Markets Extreme Pita The Great Canadian Bagel Heirloom Bakery Café The Marketplace Purblendz Starbucks Starbucks Starbucks Thai Express Tim Hortons Tim Hortons Tim Hortons Upper Crust

FASHION & ACCESSORIES

Burberry Bvlgari Coach Gucci Longchamp Longines Metalsmiths Sterling Metalsmiths Sterling Metalsmiths Sterling Michael Kors Montblanc Omega Rado Salvatore Ferragamo Swarovski Tissot Tumi Victoria’s Secret Victoria’s Secret

HEALTH & BEAUTY

:10 Minute Manicure :10 Minute Manicure Aveda The Body Shop Jo Malone MAC Cosmetics

58 AWAY WINTER 2015

D20

59

53

9

T1 RETAIL INDEX

CAFÉS & SNACKS

58 85

D31

L2 Bridge Level Nearest Gate

D37 E/F70 E/F81 D33 F61 D45 F89 E75 D45 D45 D45 F62 E75 D45 D51 F66 E74 F57 E75 E76 E75 E76 E75 E76 D40 D20 F60 E76 E76 E76 E76 E76 E76 E76 E77 E75 D20 D37 F67 D20 D37 D20 D20

D33 D35 D37 D39

44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55

56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72

Ink Maclean’s Relay Relay Relay Relay Relay Relay Relay Streetcar Watermark Watermark

RESTAURANTS & BARS

Apropos Asobu Bar:120 Beaches Boardwalk Café Boccone Pronto Boccone Trattoria Fetta Marathi Mill St. Brewery Molson Pub Queen West Bar Red Rocket True Burger Co. True Burger Co. Twist by Roger Mooking Via Della Bici by Casey’s Vinifera

Nearest Gate

D/F51 D22 D42 F83 D/F55 E77 F60 F67 E69 D4 D35 D20 F62,63 E74 D20 D4 F57 D39 E73 E78 D20 F60 F57 D/F51 E74 F64 D36 E73 E73

79 54 87

38, 41 1

61

6, 9-11, 14

RETAIL SERVICES

Plaza Premium Lounge Plaza Premium Lounge Plaza Premium Lounge Travelex Currency Exchange Travelex Currency Exchange Travelex Currency Exchange Walter’s Shoeshine Walter’s Shoeshine Walter’s Shoeshine Walter’s Shoeshine

SOUVENIRS & GIFTS 83 Hudson’s Bay

Company Trading Post

84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93

D38

46

D44

73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82

12

70 90-91, 83 93

25 D40 D41 D42 D43 NEWS & BOOKS

86

4

SPECIALTY STORES

Best Buy Express Best Buy Express Best Buy Express Davids Tea The Duty Free Store by Nuance The Duty Free Store by Nuance iStore Rocky Mtn. Chocolate Factory The Source Sunglass Hut

D45

Nearest Gate

E77 D20 F82 D51 E76 F60 D33 F65 D20 F57 D38

E73 D20 D31 D35 E76 F61 D36 D36 F60 F36

D36


PARKING

L1 Arrivals Level L2 Bridge Level 45 64 26, 37

81

40, 42-43

55

74

PUBLIC AREA 15

47

76 44

D51 F51

D53 F53

D32 F32

7

TO GATES F84–99

48

67

75

D55 F55

60

D57 F57

D34 F34

F61

5

F63

56

GATES

65

50

89

F36

F82

82 66

18

D Canada E International F USA

92

78

F60 F62

27 56

SERVICES

12

Bathroom Nursing Station Info Escalator Elevator Airline Service Lounge TTY Bus Bay Government Services Connection Centre Play Area

F64a/b

F65 SWING GATES

Depending on flight schedules, these gates may not be accessible to all passengers at all times. For more information, call 416-AIRPORT.

E70 F70

80

69 39

51

16

F67

F66a/b

E 68 F68

E69 F69

E71 F 71

E 72 F 72

F84–99

F83

2 71-72 62

E81 F81 E80 F80

52

77

17

13

57,68 19, 21, 84 23, 36

E 73 F 73

35 20, 22, 24, 28-34

88

3 73

49

E 79 F 79

63

E 78 F 78

8

E 77

E 74 E 75

E 76

WINTER 2015 AWAY 59


wa y f i n d e r

TERMINAL 3

A13

Canada, USA and international arrivals and departures

A14 B14

T3 RETAIL INDEX

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9

CAFÉS & SNACKS

Brioche Dorée Corso Freshii Heirloom Bakery Café Starbucks Starbucks Tim Hortons Tim Hortons

FASHION & ACCESSORIES

Metalsmiths Sterling NEWS & BOOKS

10 11 12 13 14 15

Frontpage News Ink Ink Maclean’s Streetcar Watermark

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Acer Caplansky’s Deli The Cork & Well Fionn MacCool’s Meteor Nobel Burger Bar Toast of Queen Street Vinifera

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

RESTAURANTS & BARS

RETAIL SERVICES

Plaza Premium Lounge Plaza Premium Lounge Travelex Currency Exchange Travelex Currency Exchange Travelex Currency Exchange Walter’s Shoeshine Walter’s Shoeshine

60 AWAY WINTER 2015

A15

Nearest Gate

C33 B29 A/B20 C31 A/B19 B39 B22 B26

A17

SWING GATES

B26 B24 B41 A11 A10 C36

B24 C32 B39 C36 A11 B26 A11

5

B17 A18 B18

B27

C36 B39 A/B19 B24 A10 A13 B27 C32

3

B 15

A16 B 16

Depending on flight schedules, these gates may not be accessible to all passengers at all times. For more information, call 416-AIRPORT.

31

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

SOUVENIRS & GIFTS

Discover Canada

SPECIALTY STORES

Best Buy Express Best Buy Express Davids Tea The Duty Free Store by Nuance The Duty Free Store by Nuance The Duty Free Store by Nuance The Duty Free Store by Nuance iStore

Nearest Gate

B41

B28 C34 B27 B27 C36 C30 A11 B26

21

18


A7

A6

A8

PARKING

A9 14

A10

28

A11

20 30

PUBLIC AREA

38

A12 11

13

24 19

7

10

B24

29

B 22

8

B25 A20 B20

39

B26

36

A19 B19

31

22

B 27

12 35

B 41 9

B 28

GATES

A Canada/USA B Canada C USA

B 29

2

B 40

17

32

6

26

B 39

SERVICES

Bathroom Nursing Station Info Escalator Elevator Airline Service Lounge TTY Bus Bay Government Services Connection Centre Play Area

B 38 B37

C30 37

C31

36 4

15 25 1

C32

16

27

C36

23 33

C33

C34

C35


STIRRING UP A STORM The whirlwind courtship of Liz and Dick

For 1964, it was a shocker. Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton arrived at Toronto’s Malton Airport in January, conspicuously intertwined but conspicuously unmarried after both receiving quickie Mexican divorces. Taylor had dumped singer Eddie Fisher for Burton, her co-star in Cleopatra, and Burton was so besotted with her that he brought Taylor to Toronto for his stint as Hamlet at the O’Keefe Centre. For weeks, the couple nested in the King Edward Hotel. Puritanical protesters marched outside, decrying their home-wrecking ways (this being the early ’60s, she got most of the blame). Fans tracked their every move. By the time Burton popped the question in the King Edward’s Sovereign Ballroom and they scooted off to Montreal to get married (the first of two times they’d do so), Liz and Dick had become the most iconic couple in the world.

FROM THE ARCHIVES

1964

62 AWAY WINTER 2015

PHOTOGRAPH BY EDDY ROWORTH / TORONTO STAR / GETTY

jet age


Your journey starts here. Travel from downtown to Pearson Airport in 45 minutes with your TTC fare.*

* The 192 Airport Rocket leaves from Kipling Station. Average travel time is based on a 30-minute subway ride from Bloor-Yonge to Kipling and a 15-minute bus ride to the airport.

Pla n yo ur t rip at

ttc. ca


15% Parking Discount††††

Complimentary Priority Security Lane†

Complimentary Lounge Access††

Discover Complimentary Valet†††

cloud 10. TM

Complimentary Wi-Fi

An eleva ted trave l expe rienc e at

Toron to Pears on Intern ationa l Airpor t. It’s all part of the servic e.

Visit amexcloud10.ca to discover premium travel benefits.* *Only on select cards. Terms and Conditions apply. TM, ®: Used by Amex Bank of Canada under license from American Express. ®*: Aeroplan and AeroplanPlus are registered trademarks of Aimia Canada Inc. ®†, TM†: Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Amex Bank of Canada. †Conditions apply. Select American Express® Cards are eligible for this beneft: The Centurion ® Card from American Express, The Platinum Card® from American Express, The American Express® AeroplanPlus®* Platinum Card, The American Express® AIR MILES®† Reserve Credit Card, The Business Platinum Card® from American Express, The American Express Corporate Platinum Card, and the American Express AeroplanPlus Corporate Platinum Card. ††Air Canada Maple Leaf Lounge Access is a card beneft available to: The Centurion ® Card from American Express, The American Express® AeroplanPlus®* Platinum Card, and The American Express AeroplanPlus Corporate Platinum Card. Plaza Premium Lounge Access is a card beneft available to: The Centurion ® Card from American Express, The Platinum Card® from American Express, The American Express® AIR MILES®† Reserve Credit Card, The Business Platinum Card® from American Express, and The American Express Corporate Platinum Card. †††Select Canadian American Express Cards are eligible for this beneft: The Centurion ® Card from American Express, The Platinum Card® from American Express, The American Express® AeroplanPlus®* Platinum Card, and The Business Platinum Card® from American Express. Toronto Pearson Valet Care Service – Basic and Supplementary Platinum Card members must present a valid, unexpired Platinum Card when picking up vehicle for $25 Valet fee to be waived, provided the associated parking fee is charged to your Platinum Card. Waived fee applies only to Toronto Pearson Airport Valet Services in Terminal 1 and 3. For more information on Valet Service visit torontopearson.com. ††††Select Canadian American Express Cards are eligible for this beneft: The Centurion® card from American Express, the American Express Platinum Card, the American Express AeroplanPlus Platinum Card, and The Business Platinum Card from American Express.

Away - Toronto Pearson  

A Global Guide to Travel, Shopping and Fun - Winter 2015

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