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health/wellness

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because of the amount of inflammation in the body, “therefore we may switch to acupuncture to help with the pain, inflammation, swelling and nerve discomfort.” Good candidates for acupuncture, a “drug free option,” include those with migrane headaches, back or neck pain, sciatica, arthritis, disc issues, rotator cuff injuries, insomnia, depression, anxiety, infertility, hormone issues and digestive issues. Johnson’s practice is more than chiropractic and acupuncture — nutritional counseling and supplements are emphasized. In studying acupuncture, “one of the first things we were taught is to treat the whole body, and that includes nutritionally,” she said. “We do know the necessary supplements to support this system. It speeds up the healing and repair time when we combine the two.” Similar situations are addressed through chiropractic. “Many musculoskeletal issue can be resolved with simple supplementation,” she said. “Our job is to listen to the patient and lead them in the right direction to support their body with the necessary foods for healing.” Johnson also explained the difference between Dry Needling and acupuncture. “Dry Needling is done by most physical therapists,” she said. Dry Needling is focused more on loosening up bound or tight muscle tissue through placing a needle in the muscle tissue that is tight and then moving the needle up and down to loosen the tight tissue. “Kind of like having a knot in a piece of yarn and using your needle to unwind or loosen the knot,” she said. Acupuncture “is dealing with different meridian/energy points to balance the body and help bring energy to or away from the biological systems of the body,” she said. “Acupuncture works more with energy/Chi, which in turn can affect muscles, nerves, inflammation, organs, joints. Our treatments last 15 minutes.”

Beyond the surface at Escape Day Spa by Lee J. Green Every day, Escape Day Spa in Homewood strives to be more than a day spa, according to owner Carrie Holley. They focus on a holistic approach to a total healthy lifestyle for their clients. “We love not just providing wellness services and all-natural products to help people feel good, but also letting them know why we do it and education about the things that have helped us live healthy lifestyles,” said Holley. Escape plans to launch some healthy lifestyle educational classes, demonstrations and open houses soon. “We want to take that hands-on approach to wellness,” she added. Holley said they make all their salt scrubs and muds in-house. Those are 100 percent natural/organic and hypo-allergenic, as are the essential oils and massage creams. Some, if pertinent, are vegan and some are gluten-free. “Our skin is so absorbent and there are a lot of things in our environment that can damage it,” she said. “It’s not just about what we put into our bodies that is so important, but also what we put on our bodies.” Escape Day Spa’s experienced massage therapists, including Holley, take continuing education at least once every two years as a part of maintaining their licenses. “I have been doing massage therapy for 18 years and there are a lot of new things out there just in the past few years,” she said. “Everyone knows how relaxing a massage is and how it can help sore muscles to heal. But many people don’t realize how much it benefits our circulation. It gets toxins out of the body and can clear up allergies; get rid of headaches as well as improve metabolism,” said Holley. Escape Day Spa also does pedicures. Holley said those, along with the facials and massages, have health benefits that extend beyond just feeling or looking good. “We are all about going beyond the surface,” she said. 36 Southern Jewish Life • July 2018

SJL New Orleans, July 2018  

July 2018 New Orleans edition of Southern Jewish Life, the official Jewish news magazine of the Greater New Orleans Jewish community.

SJL New Orleans, July 2018  

July 2018 New Orleans edition of Southern Jewish Life, the official Jewish news magazine of the Greater New Orleans Jewish community.

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