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saint joseph health system spring 2011 • Vol. 4 Issue 2

Traveling on the

outskirts

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Letter from the CEO is published quarterly by the Communications/Public Relations/Marketing department of Saint Joseph Health System for employees and their families.

contact us

SaintJosephCommonThread.org Saint Joseph Hospital Attn: PR & Marketing One Saint Joseph Dr. Lexington, KY 40504 859.313.1845

publisher

Saint Joseph Health System

executive editor

Continuing the Legacy May of 2005 was a very special time for me. My family and I relocated from our nation’s capital to Lexington (after my first-ever visit to Kentucky for an interview), and I began my tenure with Saint Joseph. I had not prepared myself for the impact that Saint Joseph and central/eastern Kentucky would have on my life.

“Together, we have exceeded our own expectations in patient satisfaction and quality, all in the name of the most precious individual, the patient.”

Over the past six years, through thoughtful work and forward-thinking collaboration, we have grown to become the 9-facility Saint Joseph Health System that we are today. But more importantly, we have grown even more as a health care family dedicated to living out the mission established by our collective founding congregations of Sisters. Together, we have exceeded our own expectations in patient satisfaction and quality, all in the name of the most precious individual, the patient.

Certainly the numerous awards have served as outward evidence of the experience and commitment at Saint Joseph (including the recent J.D. Power & Associates inpatient distinction for all seven hospitals), but awards are simply a product of the fabric that makes up this incredible family. Simultaneously, I have been astounded, humbled and filled with pride hundreds of times when I have witnessed the tremendous care that you selflessly offer each and every day. As I prepare to leave Saint Joseph Health System, I take comfort in the fact that you will continue this legacy that was established long before my arrival, and will continue well past my departure. The pioneering work of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Congregation of Divine Providence, and the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati will remain evident in everything you do, even as you enter into Saint Joseph’s next phase with potential partners in Louisville. When I join CHRISTUS Health in a few weeks, I will take with me countless memories of your support, professionalism and compassion. Thank you, and may God continue to bless you, your loved ones, our patients and the communities we serve.

Gene Woods, Saint Joseph Health System CEO

Jeff Murphy

editor

Kara Fitzgerald

art director Liz Sword

graphic designer

Laura Doolittle (Provations Group)

contributing writers Kym Russell Kathie Stamps Amy Taylor

photographers Ben Keeling Alan Olasin Shaun Ring Lee Thomas Tim Webb

marketing staff

Sue Andrews Cindy Clark Angela Florek Neva Francis Katie Heckman Sharon Hershberger Tonya Lewis Cyndi McGraw Stephanie Sarrantonio Kevin Smith

SJHS president’s council

Gene Woods, CEO, SJHS Ed Carthew, CHRO, SJHS Gary Ermers, CFO, SJHS Jackie Kingsolver, Associate Counsel, CHI Jim Parobek, President, Physician Enterprise, SJHS Mark Streety, CIO, SJHS Daniel Varga, MD, CMO, SJHS Ben Wiederholt, Interim VP, Mission Integration, SJHS Virginia Dempsey, President, SJL Greg Gerard, President, SJB Ken Haynes, President, SJH/SJE/SJJ Bruce Klockars, President, FMH/SJMS Kathy Stumbo, President, SJM Saint Joseph Health System is dedicated to protecting and preserving the environment. Common Thread is printed on Forest Stewardship Council™ (FSC®) Certified Paper. The FSC promotes the responsible use of the world’s forests as a renewable and sustainable resource by making sure the forests are managed properly and are not depleted.


Spring 2011

Contents

delivered from

evil

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Gabriel Kuyena shares his story of tragedy and torture in Africa at the hands of rebel soldiers. Escaping to America, he now awaits a reunion with his family.

features 8 Traveling on the Outskirts Jeanie Lawson brings care to families in Appalachia.

12 Saint Joseph Goes Red View photos of American Heart Month events throughout the system.

24 A Lasting Legacy

A family and community remember Larry Ballard.

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Contents

Spring 2011 3 New Threads All seven Saint Joseph Health System hospitals receive J.D. Power award, plus other hot topics.

Departments

6 Quick Thread Allissa Anderson and her son, Jeremiah, break “biggest baby” record.

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22 7 Common View Pat Rutherford’s efforts to raise the bar in health care.

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14 Quick Thread Joni Keith survives home break-in with son Carson in tow. 20 Mission Moments Julia Phillips has made an ongoing commitment to serve in Haiti. 22 Health Care Hero Michael Bowman guards with his heart and offers a ministry of presence. 26 Photo File Employees are captured at various events and celebrations in this photo gallery. 28 Unwind Tiffany Francis unwinds on stage with Big City Groove and the MetroGnomes.

29 Welcome to My World Inez Maggard takes us into her world as a switchboard operator. 30 Mission Moments Jeanie Hogg’s desire for mission work fuels her art of making mittens.

Try your luck at our Reader Reward challenge for a chance to win a Kindle e-book reader! Also, send us your pet photos! See inside back cover for details.

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an

All seven Saint Joseph Health System hospitals have received distinction for service

elite

group

excellence from J.D. Power and Associates. The service excellence distinction was determined by surveying a random sample of discharged patients in 2010 at each hospital on their perceptions of their hospital stay and comparing the results to the national benchmark established by J.D. Power. This recognition acknowledges our strong commitment to provide an outstanding patient experience!

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Save The Dates

Saint Joseph - Mount Sterling Grand Opening Events: n May 26: Staff & Family Open House and Cookout, 3-8 p.m.

n June 1: VIP Dedication and RibbonCutting, 10 a.m.

Community Events:

n June 4: Community Celebration and

n Flaget Baby Fair: April 30,

n June 16: Grand Opening and Patient

Open House, 1-5 p.m. Flaget Memorial Hospital

n Get Healthy Berea: May 14, n n n n

Saint Joseph - Berea Maternity Fair: May 14, The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East maternity fair: May 21, Saint Joseph - London Jessamine Health Fair: June 4, Saint Joseph - Jessamine Go Red for women night: June 24, Lexington Legends

Foundation Golf Tournaments:

Transfer Day

Local Fundraisers: n Heart Walk: April 23, Commonwealth Stadium

n March for Babies: May 15, Coldstream Park, Lexington

n Tour de Cure: May 21, Louisville n Step Out Walk to Fight Diabetes: June 4, Keeneland Race Course

Relay for Life: n Nelson County: May 13, Bardstown

n Saint Joseph - London: June 10, London Country Club n Saint Joseph Hospital: June 13, University Club of Kentucky n Saint Joseph - Mount Sterling: June 23, Old Silo

Excellence through Insight: Saint Joseph Health System earned three national Excellence through Insight awards in 2011 from HealthStream Research. Saint Joseph Hospital was recognized for overall emergency department satisfaction and Saint Joseph East was recognized for overall outpatient satisfaction, as well as overall satisfaction for their outpatient cardiology unit (cath lab) – an honor it has received three years in a row.

High School

n Floyd County: June 3, Big Sandy Community & Technical College

n Laurel County: June 3, Laurel London Optimist Complex

n Fayette County: June 10, Lexington Christian Academy

Bringing Care Closer to Home: Saint Joseph Health System (SJHS) has been awarded a $250,000 grant funded by the federal government’s Social Innovation Fund and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. SJHS will use its grant to establish primarycare clinics in Powell and Wolfe counties. These satellite clinics will be staffed by nurse practitioners and will utilize telemedicine technology to collaborate with physicians and specialists at a central location. The Countdown is On: The new Saint Joseph - Mount Sterling replacement hospital opens June 16, 2011. The 114,000-square-foot hospital sits on 30 acres of land on Falcon Drive, just off Interstate 64. Highlights include: family-friendly environment, healing garden, 40 all-private patient rooms, intensive care unit, operating rooms, maternity center and 14 private emergency treatment rooms.

n Jessamine County: June 10, West

Watch for more details at your facility and at SaintJosephHealthSystem.org!

Jessamine Middle School

n Madison County: June 10, Michael Caudill Middle School

n Montgomery County: June 24, Easy Walker Park

75 years with keeneland: Keeneland’s 2011 spring race meet, April 8-29, is the official start of the Lexington track’s 75th anniversary celebration. Throughout the year, Saint Joseph Health System will sponsor a series of tributes to Keeneland on WLEX-TV. Included will be interesting facts about how the two organizations have partnered together over the past 75 years, such as the launch of the Keeneland Health Education Center inside Saint Joseph Hospital in 1998.

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Saint Joseph Cancer Center: Saint Joseph Cancer Center, located at Saint Joseph East and Saint Joseph Hospital, held an open house March 2 for the new Saint Joseph Cancer Center Resource Services, as well as Saint Joseph Radiation Oncology and Saint Joseph Hematology Oncology, located at 701 Bob-O-Link Dr. in Lexington. Resource Services offers free education and support for cancer patients and families. Visit SaintJosephCancerCenter.com for details. Partnership with Nicholas County Hospital: Saint Joseph Health System (SJHS) is now providing management and oversight services to Nicholas County Hospital in Carlisle, Ky. SJHS is not acquiring the hospital, but will provide management oversight, a facility administrator and a director of nursing to the hospital for the next three years. 


children’s services, home health care and a Center of Excellence in bariatric surgery.

University Medical Center

Statewide partnership update

S

aint Joseph Health System, Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare and University Medical Center, which includes University of Louisville Hospital and the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, are working together on a unique partnership that will address Kentucky’s most serious health challenges, expand access to high-quality care and meet the demands of health care reform. Key Work Threads Planning responsibilities have been organized into seven key tracks, or work “threads”: Due Diligence, Definitive Agreement, Business & Strategic Plan, Mission & Culture, Financial Modeling, Information Technology, and Ethical & Religious Directives. Compatible Missions, Complementary Strengths The three organizations already have experience in collaborating to meet the needs of patients. Catholic Health Initiatives is the parent of Saint Joseph Health System and a partner in Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare, which has a longstanding relationship with the University of Louisville. Jewish Hospital and the University of Louisville have a decades-old relationship that has fostered a number of medical advancements. Together, the organizations have pioneered medical research and innovative new procedures in cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, transplantation, hand and microsurgery, rehabilitation and neurosciences.

In addition, the three organizations share compatible missions that center on providing patients and communities with a continuum of care from the most basic to advanced specialty care. Each also brings specific, complementary strengths to the new partnership: • University Medical Center is known for trauma care and cancer care, its Stroke Center, high-risk obstetrics services, cardiopulmonary care, psychiatric care and programs in robotics and telemedicine. • Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare is a major organ transplant center that also offers cancer, cardiology and neurology services, rehabilitative medicine, psychiatry and home health care. • Saint Joseph Health System has the state’s leading cardiovascular program, as well as cancer and orthopedic care, women and

Respecting Heritage and Tradition While the three organizations represent three distinct health care traditions – academic, Jewish and Catholic – all embrace values and service orientations that respect human life and dignity, provide care and healing to those in need, and promote service to the community. The organizations are committed to respecting each other’s traditions and heritage. For example, the Catholic facilities in the partnership will comply with the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services (ERDs), and the otherthan-Catholic partner entities will not do anything to cause the Catholic facilities to fall out of compliance with the ERDs. Working Toward a New, Shared Future A primary goal of the partnership is to benefit patients in Kentucky by providing ever-improving care, better access to care and lower cost of care. When complete, the partnership will: • Be accessible to more than two million people • Offer the services of more than 3,000 physicians • Provide services at more than 90 locations, including hospitals, clinics, specialty institutions, home health agencies and primary care centers • Reach virtually all of Kentucky’s 120 counties • Combine the strengths of academic medicine, translational research and faith-based care • Provide a consistent level of care and a coordinated continuum of care across the state.

Watch for more details and developments in a new newsletter, Partnership Progress. Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare


thread

Photograph by shaun ring

quick

Breaking Baby Records

Allissa Anderson and her record-setting son, Jeremiah

By Kym Russell The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East celebrated its first anniversary in March. In one year, the facility set many records. More than 2,500 babies were delivered, twice as many as in 2002 when Saint Joseph East first experienced a boom in the baby business. And, last September and November were record-breaking months, with 229 and 228 deliveries, respectively (the largest monthly volumes to date; current average is 203 births a month). In a record-breaking month, one special delivery stands out. Baby Jeremiah was born on November 12 with a record all of his own to claim: biggest baby.

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He weighed in at 12 pounds, 2 ounces when he was delivered by C-section, surprising mom, Allissa Anderson and everyone in the delivery room, too. “We knew he was growing and he was going to be big, but not even the doctor thought he’d be that big,” Anderson said. Baby Jeremiah may hold the record for some time as he was born three pounds heavier than “average” size babies. Anderson, who works at Saint Joseph Jessamine in the admitting and registration department, said her first child was exactly

the perfect size to her. “My family and I enjoy showing his picture off because he is a super-cute baby and people guess his age wrong all the time.” Anderson is back at work after maternity leave. She enjoys telling her son’s birth story at work because he is an official Saint Joseph record-holder. “Jeremiah was perfectly healthy, the doctor and nurses were great and I didn’t have any complications. His size was the only surprise.” The rest is baby record-setting history for The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East.


Common view

The Sky’s the Limit Pat Rutherford’s efforts to raise the bar in health care by Kathie Stamps

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atricia “Pat” Rutherford, MS, RN, co-chairs the quality and process improvement committee for the Saint Joseph Health System (SJHS) board of directors. She is vice president of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) based in Cambridge, Mass., an organization that brings people and institutions together to improve health care. Born in Ohio, Rutherford received her Bachelor of Science in nursing at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. In 1974 she earned a master’s in psychiatric/ community mental health nursing from Boston University and has lived in the Boston area since then. She spent 21 years as a nurse and patient services director at Children’s Hospital before joining IHI in 2000. n Living in Massachusetts, how did you become involved with SJHS? I initially got to know several leaders from SJHS through IHI’s IMPACT Network working on various Quality Improvement (QI) initiatives. Their eagerness to embrace QI strategies stood out among the participants.

I was honored by the invitation to serve on the newly consolidated board of directors for SJHS. I travel to Kentucky five or six times a year and occasionally meet with leaders of SJHS at national health care meetings. n What do you like about the SJHS board of directors? Their mission, their passion, their genuine commitment to QI as a core strategy and carrying out the ministry of the founding Sisters. They’re a dedicated group of leaders and that transcends to the front lines. n What is your church involvement? At the Paulist Center in Boston I serve on strategic planning committees and lector ministry. I chaired an art and environment committee to select new artwork for our renovated chapel, which was quite an undertaking to get a community to agree upon artwork that symbolizes deeply held spiritual beliefs. n What inspires you? When I began my career as a pediatric

Photograph by alan olasin

nurse I would do just about anything to make a child smile or have a little bit of fun. I was motivated to make every child and every family’s day a little bit better, no matter what the circumstances were. A maxim from my nursing days was “Cure sometimes, relieve often, comfort always.” It inspires me to this day to help people, under whatever circumstances. n What are your hobbies? International travel and vacations on Martha’s Vineyard, Cape Cod and Vermont; photography; visiting museums; live theater and concerts. I am single and I live with a couple and their two boys in a two-family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., sharing the joys of everyday life as well as celebrations of important life events. n What motivates you? I believe that like-minded people working together as a team can do anything. When we are aligned around what we’re trying to accomplish and using strategies, the sky’s the limit. That’s being demonstrated at SJHS. Spring 2011 common thread

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Photograph by tim webb

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traveling on the

outskirts Jeanie Lawson brings care to families in Appalachia

By Amy Taylor

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n her travels through eleven counties to find hurting people and help them, Appalachian Outreach Program (AOP) Social Worker Jeanie Lawson has been chased by roosters, bitten by dogs, and has watched snakes slither their way out of mailboxes. “You never know what you’re going to find,” said Lawson, who provides a variety of social work services for people from very poor counties who have been discharged from Saint Joseph Health System hospitals. She gets very attached to her “patients,” like a homebound Jackson County couple in their 90s (pictured here). The husband got choked eating squirrel meat one year, which landed him in Saint Joseph - Berea. The next year he was bitten by a snake. “They had a son who died,” Lawson said. “They never had a daughter. If I don’t visit them at least once every two weeks, they get worried about me.” Lawson works out of her home and her car for the AOP, which is a free program provided by Saint Joseph Health System. The social worker and two others – Registered Dietitian

Barbara Baumgardner and Sister Joan Wilson – visit with former patients to provide social services, pastoral guidance, nutritional counseling, friendship and compassion. Often the social worker refers patients to Baumgardner for nutritional help. “Jeanie goes above and beyond to make sure she finds a way to help everyone she meets,” the dietitian said. “She helps people fill out the paperwork to get free medicines or disability payments. She provides grief counseling. She goes to funerals to console people. There aren’t enough good things to say about her.” The 55-year-old social worker recalls a truck driver who was diagnosed with cancer and was quickly declining. When she went to his home in Leslie County to see him, she found out “he had never even thought of applying for his disability money, and didn’t have a clue as to how to do it.” Lawson educated him on the spot. “He was receiving payments before he died, and he shared with his family members how thankful he was for our outreach. I still stay in contact with his wife and follow up with her in bereavement counseling.”

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The social worker has been aiding a family living in a shack to build a tiny but warm house with donated materials. She is helping a little girl whose mother recently suffered a massive stroke, and whose father is very ill with complications of diabetes. “This family really touched me,” Lawson said. “I was able to help when they ran out of food. Then I was able to get the girl winter clothes when another little girl passed away from cancer. At Christmas, we helped [provide gifts] for this child. The father called me repeatedly to thank me. The girl lives with her grandparents now.” Sometimes a family needs help paying for some basic necessities – or just needs comfort and counseling. In one case, Lawson helped a family cope with a tragic death. She met a man at Saint Joseph Hospital who had been electrocuted trying to save another man’s life. He had terrible burns over most of his body. His sister will never forget the tragedy, or Lawson’s compassion, she said. She and her brother lived next to each other. One dark night an ATV accident hit close to their homes. The brother, a single father of four, and his sister went out to help. He was holding a light for another rescuer when he touched a downed power line and was shot through with electricity.

“The laughter and love and tears and sharing that happen around a kitchen table – there’s nothing like it.” First the horribly burned man was transported to Saint Joseph Hospital to stabilize his heart. From there he went to the burn unit at another local hospital. But he couldn’t survive the awful damage to his body. Lawson visited the man twice at his house. After his death, “I went to the home to offer condolences the day of the visitation in a little Presbyterian church. I ended up staying with five children and waiting for the hearse. Then I went with the family to the church. It was very emotional.” Lawson has maintained close contact with the family, according to the man’s sister. Photographs by tim webb

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“She helped take pictures in the church,” she said. “She helped the kids write poems about their Dad. She listened to the kids and let them say what they needed to. We were weak with grief, and she was such a blessing. It’s like this lady is part of our family.” Helping out in Appalachia is something Lawson had dreamed of since her girlhood in Colorado. “When I graduated from college, my roommate and I came together to Kentucky to the Redbird Mission,” Lawson said. “I met my husband, James, a coal miner, the next year. It started out as a year of mission work, and then

I fell in love and got married, and I fell in love with Kentucky at the same time.” As part of a Redbird Mission program, Lawson drove a bookmobile up the hills and into the “hollers” for five years. “I raised my children on my bookmobile,” she said. “My three-year-old rode with me before he started school. My next baby rode starting when he was two weeks old.” In 1990, Lawson began working as social worker and grief coordinator for Tri-County Hospice, which is part of Saint Joseph London. In 2003 she transferred to the social work position with the AOP.

“I prayed about it, and the Lord sent this job,” she said. “It’s the most rewarding thing I’ve ever done.” Lawson was worried she would miss her hospice co-workers when she took the outreach job. Instead, “if I could have written a job description right out of college, it would have been this job. How many people come home at night from work feeling really good, and they’ve been blessed at the same time? The laughter and love and tears and sharing that happen around a kitchen table – there’s nothing like it.”

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Saint Joseph goes

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honor of American Heart Month and as the central Kentucky sponsor of the Go Red for Women movement, Saint Joseph Health System hosted several events in its communities in February to raise

1 SJH employees and volunteers gathered to celebrate National Wear Red Day Feb. 4 to show their support in the fight against heart disease in women.

awareness for heart disease.

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2 Sara Haynes (left) and Dr. Michelle Morton (right), co-chairs of central Kentucky’s Go Red for Women campaign, along with sponsor SJHS, hosted “An Evening to Warm the Heart” Feb. 22 at Dudley’s in Lexington to raise awareness about heart disease in women.


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3 The Crystal Heart Ball was held Feb. 5 in London, raising more than $17,000 to benefit the SJL heart and healthy communities outreach programs. Pictured are employees Donna Arena (left), dietitian, and Lisa Rutherford (right), mission leader. 4 SJM showed its support for Go Red for Women, a nationwide program that offers guidance and support to help women take charge of their heart health. 5 Stephanie Barnhardt, a registered nurse in the Heart Institute at SJH, helped provide free blood pressure screenings at Macy’s in Fayette Mall Feb. 4.

6 SJMS employees wore shades of red on National Wear Red Day Feb. 4 to support the important message of living heart-healthy.

9 FMH’s ICU/TCU teams held a bake sale on National Wear Red Day Feb. 4 to raise money for Go Red for Women.

7 Saint Joseph Heart Institute staff members at SJH paused on Feb. 4 to capture their passion for the Go Red for Women cause.

10 SJE employees and volunteers celebrated National Wear Red Day Feb. 4 to show their support for Go Red for Women.

8 Saint Joseph Heart Institute clinicians, left to right, Tammy Dail, Mary Pat Owens, Shannon Evans, Margaret Kramer, Stephanie Barnhardt and Stephanie Sarrantonio (marketing) hosted a Go Red for Women event at Macy’s Feb. 4.

11 SJB staff members wore red clothing or a red ribbon to celebrate National Wear Red Day Feb. 4.

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Home Break-In Tests Nurse By Kym Russell The doorbell rang twice. Joni Keith, a critical care float nurse, ignored it. She had been up with baby Carson most of the night. At 11 a.m., she napped when Carson slept. “Then, I heard this huge bang and thump and I could hear footsteps inside my house,” Keith said. “We were on the first floor. My husband wasn’t home. I locked the bedroom door, grabbed the baby and went into the bathroom. I locked that door and I called 911.” The intruder was coming closer. “I could hear him walking around and going through things. I didn’t know if he was after our stuff or us.” Keith gave the 911 responder instructions for police to enter the house through the garage, and the intruder was apprehended. “The police got here in four minutes. The guy either didn’t know anyone was home or didn’t care. It was terrifying. But, at the time I didn’t think about it. My number one thought was to protect this baby.” That focus serves Keith on the job at Saint Joseph Hospital. She also works with the Rapid Response Team to handle critical medical situations each day. “You have to stay calm and do what you can.”

Joni Keith and her son, Carson

Photograph by tim webb

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delivered from

evil

Photograph by shaun ring

Gabriel Kuyena has a story most people couldn’t bear to watch in a movie or read in a novel.

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n Hebrew the name Gabriel means “God is my strength� and it certainly took the power of God to help Kuyena escape tragedy and torture in Africa to live a life of freedom in America. Photographs by shaun ring

God was on

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my side ... I disappeared from death. Today Kuyena’s deep faith, his professional comportment and mellifluous voice, his compassion for his fellow human beings are evident on a daily basis. “I like to smile every day,” he said. “Every day when I wake up I like to believe in God.” In March he celebrated one year of being a floor technician on first shift at Saint Joseph East and The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East. Kuyena is from the Democratic Republic of Congo in central Africa. Formerly known as Zaire, the country lies west of Kenya and Tanzania, north of Angola and Zambia. Several million people have lost their lives in war-torn Congo, including Kuyena’s parents, who were killed by rebel forces before his own eyes in 1999 during an attack in their house. “The same rebels who kill my father planned to kill me,” he said. “By God’s will they didn’t have success.” But he was tortured, with tear gas and chili peppers. Almost a dozen years later, his eyes are still suffering the effects of that event and he goes for weekly treatments on his reddened eyes. After the violence inflicted on his family, Kuyena was jailed for two days and had almost resigned himself to the idea of death. “I like to say God was on my side,” he said. “I disappeared from death.” He escaped on foot and found a good

Samaritan to take him to safety, in Zambia. “I didn’t have any documents,” he said. “No passport or identification, just my face.” Although his benefactor wanted to take him to South Africa, officials wouldn’t allow it and they put Kuyena in a Zambian prison for eight months. He wrote letters to UNICEF, Red Cross and other humanitarian agencies to say, “I didn’t kill anybody, I didn’t steal anything; I just survived from death. Why put me in prison with murderers?” Finally, he was allowed to leave the prison and live as a refugee in a camp in Zambia, out in the bush away from civilization. It was a hard life, but “God was on my side,” he said. “He was just keeping me and giving me life.” Kuyena spent almost 10 years in the refugee camp, thinking each minute of his wife and three small children left behind in Congo. In early 2009 he received a letter from an American agency with an office in Kenya; after 90 days of reviewing his information, they connected him with an agency in Kenya. “They said, ‘Gabriel, we find your story is genuine. We are going to send you to the United States.’ I didn’t know anybody in America. I don’t know how somebody can live in a new place, but I say, OK, fine, I need to be protected.”

The flight lasted 38 hours, from Zambia to Nairobi to London to New York to Cincinnati to Lexington. “I arrived here March 12, 2009, at 10:45 p.m.,” he said. It was the day he first heard about the state called Kentucky. Members of Kentucky Refugee Ministries met him at Blue Grass Airport and provided housing for him. For two months Kuyena attended classes to “learn all the rules in America.” He was hired as an interpreter, as French is his first language and he speaks 17 local African languages. By June 2009 he had a job in housekeeping at another local hospital. In early 2010 he met Rob Tussey at Quest Community Church. Both of them attend First Freewill Baptist Church now. “This one is not my boss, he’s my brother,” Kuyena said of Tussey. “I take him as my real brother.” Tussey, manager of the environmental services department at Saint Joseph East, offered him a job. Kuyena accepted and has been a floor tech since March 2010. One Sunday at church, Tussey introduced his parents, from rural eastern Kentucky, to Kuyena, who said, “If this is your father, this is my father as well.” “I’ll never forget the day he came to my office and said, ‘Mr. Robert I’ve located my wife and daughters. I give God all the Spring 2011 common thread

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Photographs by shaun ring

glory for it,’” said Tussey. “We had a prayer and thanked God for what he had done for him.” Kuyena has acclimated to life in Kentucky. “Everything is good,” he said, although he admitted having problems with the food. He doesn’t eat much meat, except fish and “small chicken” but he enjoys cooking for himself. When he learned to speak English, in school in Africa, it was from people with British accents. Shortly after moving to Kentucky, he could understand maybe 10 or 12 words out of 20. “Now I can’t speak very well but I can understand it,” he said. “Even when people speak slang I can understand.” His daughters, Emeracen, Theresa and Natasha, were born in 1989, 1993 and 1996. He has no idea where his three boys are, but he assumes they are still in Congo. He is focusing his efforts on his wife, Sara Kange Kapepula, and their three daughters, who are living in a refugee camp in Namibia. “I have a bunch of papers inside my case because the United States government has already approved my family to stay with me since October 12,” he said. The family members are able to communicate by phone and computer, but it is going to take time to bring them to Kentucky. “I’m trying my best to put everything in God’s hand,” he said. “I think God will assist one day.” 18

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“This one is not my boss, he’s my brother, I take him as my real brother.” Kuyena is in the process of raising money for their trip to the United States. It will cost about $8,000 to bring his wife and three children here. “It’s not easy to save money in America but I’m trying,” he said. He is so appreciative of all God has done for him, including giving him a good boss in Rob Tussey, and he is grateful that each shift at the hospital starts with opening “the book of life to see what you are supposed to do.” His favorite Bible verse is Jeremiah 33:3, “Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and mighty things, which thou knowest not.” Or, as Kuyena puts it, “Hey, call me and I answer you the thing that you can’t see with your two eyes.” Gabriel Kuyena has much in common with Jeremiah: both endured violence and the threat of death during political unrest; and both were rescued by God and came to embrace thoughts of peace, and not evil.


Gabriel Kuyena Family Fund If you would like to offer a tax-deductible gift to help Gabriel Kuyena bring his family to Kentucky, please call the Foundation office at 859.313.1705. You can donate online at SaintJosephFoundation.org by clicking “Give to Saint Joseph,” then “Make a Donation,” then “Gabriel Kuyena Family Fund.” Or you can make a check payable to Saint Joseph Hospital Foundation, with “Gabriel Kuyena” written in the memo and send to: Saint Joseph Hospital Foundation One Saint Joseph Drive Lexington, KY 40504

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Love for Haiti Julia Phillips’ ongoing commitment to serve By Amy Taylor

A

n earthquake drew Julia Phillips to her first mission trip to Haiti. That was in January of 2010. Since then, she has used all of her vacation time to make three more trips to the troubled third-world country. Phillips, 27, is no stranger to mission work. The registered nurse, who works in Saint Joseph Hospital’s emergency department, grew up in Honduras with missionary parents who are still there serving with Samaritan’s Purse. Her August trip took her to Death Corner in Cite Soleil, “a very dangerous part of Port au Prince where the gangs are, and where the slums are,” the nurse said. “Sometimes the police don’t even want to go there.” Samaritan’s Purse had set up a clinic in Death Corner so residents could receive primary care. “Everything was walled-in” there, Phillips said. “There were bars on the windows and doors. You couldn’t get in unless they let you in. The cholera clinics were just roped off with security guys walking around.” The nurse felt safe there, however, having grown up in Honduras. Then again, Haiti in August didn’t have the stench of diseased corpses being torched in the streets that Haiti had after the quake. Phillips saw about 120 patients a day that summer, working with two doctors, two nurses and a group of volunteers. During the August trip, “in the slum, there were a lot of kids with malnutrition and diarrhea,” Phillips said. “We did a lot of testing for malaria. There was a lot of dehydration and a lot of worms. All the kids were treated for worms, because they have limited access to clean water.” In November, back in the states, Samaritan’s Purse put out a call for nurses to come back to help with a cholera epidemic that was raging through Haiti. Samaritan’s Purse offered to pay Phillips’ airfare if she could get two weeks off.

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Photograph by lee thomas


Mission moments

Jana Congleton (left), a fellow registered nurse, served with Phillips (right) in Haiti last August.

“You just want to love on them in their state of brokenness.” “It was pretty amazing,” the nurse said. “They called on a Saturday asking if I could go. By Monday, I had all my shifts covered – co-workers picked up my hours. Saint Joseph also allowed for a PTO donation for three days I missed. One co-worker, April Skaggs, gave me some of her PTO time, while others donated money for expenses or supplies to take down to Haiti. I think, since they couldn’t be there, that they felt good contributing.” (Phillips would like to thank her co-workers for their support, especially April Skaggs and Rebecca Downs who both donated PTO hours for her past three trips.) During the cholera epidemic, workers in private hospitals in Haiti were fearful of taking in victims of the disease, and health care workers didn’t want to set up clinics in the schools. So “Samaritan’s Purse was able to find plots of land where they could set

up tents and tarps. We had stretchers under tarps for our patients, similar to what we had used for the mobile clinics.” Cholera is caused by bacteria found in unclean water or food. The disease causes “violent rice-water stools and violent vomiting,” Phillips said. The main treatment is rehydration through IV fluids that deliver electrolytes. Antibiotics are also used. Without treatment, death can come quickly. Since there was no clean running water, Samaritan’s Purse brought clean water to the mobile clinics in huge tanks, the nurse said. The health care workers killed bacteria by washing their hands in a bleach and water solution. Phillips admits that when she went in November to help cholera patients, “I was scared” of becoming infected. But fear faded “working in the environment and realizing

that there was a lot of good education there. We had a really good system set up – we had to decontaminate shoes and clothes. We cleaned up carefully before we ate. When we came back to the base, we headed straight for the showers.” When she went back in January of 2011, “the fear of getting cholera didn’t even bother me,” the nurse said. “In November, all the patients were so sick. This past January, I worked in the pediatric wards. We had coloring books and bubbles and games. We were able to make their experience much happier.” Helping in Haiti has only strengthened the young woman’s desire to do mission work. “You see the raw emotion and the hurt,” she said. “You just want to love on them in their state of brokenness.” Jana Congleton, RN, BSN, CEN, and clinical manager of the emergency department at continued on page 32

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Ministry of

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Photograph by shaun ring


Health Care HERO

Michael Bowman guards with his heart

By Amy Taylor

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tanding 6 feet tall and weighing in at 225 solid pounds, Michael Bowman is an imposing security guard at Saint Joseph Jessamine RJ Corman Ambulatory Care Center (SJJ). What is most impressive about Bowman, according to his co-workers, however, is not his size or strength. Instead, it’s his ability to defuse a violent situation with gentleness and compassion – and his habit of treating co-workers and patients alike with tremendous caring. Sherry Schwarz, RN, works third shift in the emergency department with Bowman. She can recall many times when the guard has calmed down an enraged patient with his ministry of presence. “I just love him,” Schwarz said. “I can’t say enough good things about him. We had one patient who was so angry, and Michael just pulled his chair up and sat next to the bed and said, ‘Let’s start over.’” Bowman also recalls that patient. The man had been brought to the hospital after a domestic dispute occurred. He was drunk and giving the emergency staff trouble. “I just started talking with him about where he was from, where he worked, about his hobbies,” the security guard said. “You

get a person calmed down, and they get their mind off the problem. He actually said, ‘Thank you for talking to me. It means a lot to me that you took time to sit down and talk to me like a normal person.’” Bowman has a gift for calming people with kindness, and for giving them his undivided attention, according to Ryan Goble, another registered nurse in the SJJ emergency department. “He always has a positive attitude about his job,” Goble said. “He’s very good with patients. His presence always makes the night feel safer.” Dan Andrews, RN, MBA, CEN, emergency department manager, is also grateful for Bowman’s cheerful, kind nature. “He always goes above and beyond,” Andrews said. “He will step up and do even little things to keep the department flowing and patients moving, like taking out trash and making beds. He’s a consummate professional and an all-around good guy.” Schwarz recalls an elderly woman who came to the SJJ emergency department with her husband. When the husband had to be transferred to Saint Joseph Hospital, the lady was “scared to death” to drive home because there was so much snow on the roads. Bowman discovered that the lady lived in

Garrard County, his home county. So “after work I gave her a ride home,” he said. “She was so thankful that somehow she got my address and sent me a card. But I didn’t want that – I just wanted to help her.” The 43-year-old guard is married with two children: his son, Mason, who is 10, and his daughter, Mackenzie, who is 8. He has coached his children’s ball games, and he and his wife, Melissa, help out at their church, Faith United Community, where they have taught children’s Bible school. Bowman has learned that prayer is a powerful aid to healing, he said. “One lady in the ED (emergency department) had lost a child,” he said. “I asked if she wanted to pray. She said she would, and we prayed together. You get into a moment that is so rough. Prayer always helps.” Before he came to SJJ in 2009, Bowman worked for an armored car company for 16 years. His co-workers are delighted that he chose health care as a second career. He not only warms up their cars and cleans their windshields on stormy nights – he warms their hearts with his giving nature. “I try to get along with everyone,” he said. “I want to represent the hospital the best way I can.”

“I asked if she wanted to pray, and we prayed together.”

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legacy Remembering Larry Ballard By Amy Taylor

doring husband. Devoted father. Doting grandpa. Loving brother. Inspiring coach. Steadfast citizen. Faithful church member. Treasured friend. Larry Ballard was one of those people you could never say enough good things about. That’s why it was a shock to his family and his community when he died less than four weeks after being diagnosed with stomach cancer. It was actually four months before his death when the Bardstown man told his wife, Midge, that something didn’t feel right. “Maybe you’re getting a stomach virus,” Midge recalls telling the man who was once her high school sweetheart, and was still the love of her life. “He said it wasn’t that. It felt different.” At the time, the only medication he was taking was something for heartburn, and a pill to keep his blood pressure under control. During the year, Larry had undergone a colonoscopy and an electrocardiogram. Both revealed nothing wrong. When the 66-year-old spoke of fatigue, his family blamed the uncommonly hot summer. Then one Sunday, when he carried the cross at his church, “it looked so heavy,” Midge said. “It looked like he was straining to hold it up.” Larry, who was retired from BellSouth, walked to his beloved Saint Joseph Church every day for the 6:30 a.m. Mass. On Monday morning after church, he realized that he needed to see a doctor. Due to his extremely low blood count, he was immediately sent to Flaget Memorial Hospital for testing. His surgeon suspected a bleeding ulcer – but an endoscopy revealed stomach cancer.

Larry and Midge Ballard and family. By then Larry had lost a great deal of blood. He would need to rebuild his strength in order to get cancer treatment. This was just days before the new Flaget Cancer Center was set to open in August 2010. After Larry had received treatment that raised the iron level in his blood, Dr. Monte Martin, the medical oncologist who would soon be working in the new cancer center, prescribed an initial dose of chemotherapy in hopes of shrinking the tumor. Larry took the chemo treatment in the medical-surgical unit at Flaget. But it was too late. Less than three weeks after being diagnosed, Larry was admitted to Flaget,

where he spent his last week. Seconds before he passed, “I leaned down and kissed him and said, ‘Larry, you’re going to see the beautiful place,’” his wife said. “He smiled ear to ear.” Larry passed away in Flaget Memorial Hospital on Sunday, July 25, 2010. “His disease was that far along,” Martin said. “The chemo just didn’t have a chance to work.” At Larry’s service, his family was humbled by “the biggest funeral they ever had at Saint Joe’s,” said his son Mike. “That speaks volumes.” Mark, the middle of Larry and Midge’s three children, spoke at the funeral service. continued on page 32

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“I leaned down and kissed him and said, ‘Larry, you’re going to see the beautiful place.’”

Photograph by lee thomas

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Photo

File 1

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Keelin White, a registered nurse in radiology, created a Jeopardy-inspired Joint Commission game that helped staff at SJH prepare for this year’s survey.

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Sisters of Charity of Nazareth who either worked or volunteered at FMH over the past 60 years attended the hospital’s 60th anniversary celebration Jan. 14 in Nazareth, Ky.

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Sister Susan Gatz (left), vice president of SCN, and SJHS CEO Gene Woods (right) visited with Archbishop Joseph Kurtz after a Mass Jan. 14 at St. Vincent de Paul Church in Nazareth, Ky., celebrating FMH’s 60 th anniversary.

SJH Radiography Program students participated in the 1st Annual Research Symposium on Aug. 5, 2010. Front row (left to right): Holly Bacon, Rachel Brannock, Jessi Sewell, Ashley Taylor, Michelle Webb (awarded certificate of excellence) and Ashton Hacker; Back row (left to right): Tara Taylor, C.G. King, Susan West, Danielle Smith, Mary Beth Routt, Amanda Baber and Jessica Schiess.

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The School at Work class of 2011 graduated Feb. 4 at SJH. From left, Brenda Harris (program instructor), Mary Williams, Lanika Jackson, Latosha Bond, Daphne Hopkins, Bailey Kaplan, Tina Stewart, Lesley Young, Erma Napier and Greta Clark. (not pictured: Carmalita Setty, Christa Brock, Vicky Gibson and Kellie Proffitt)

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Bardstown Mayor Bill Sheckles (seated, right) met with President Bruce Klockars (seated, left) and FMH employees as he signed a proclamation declaring Jan. 7-14 “FMH Week� in honor of its 60 th anniversary.

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The Reader Reward challenge winner for the winter issue of Common Thread, Frankie Woodson, took home the limited edition red Nintendo Wii and Wii Fit Plus software.

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8 On Jan. 26 Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates presented the Silver Medal of Honor from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to SJH for increasing organ donations. Holding the award is Tricia Powers, manager of the intensive care unit and the hospital representative for organ and tissue donation.

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A group from SJHS, from left, Marla Saunders, Lana Rose, Patty Sturt, Janet McDaniel, Lesa Kilbourn, Kim Sargent, Jason Stodghill, Kelly Gaffney, Jim Patterson and Sharon Inman attended the Meditech 6.0 training in Denver Dec. 7-9. (not pictured: Lynn Patton)

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unwind Big Bands. Big Fun. By Kym Russell At work, Tiffany Francis keeps electronic communications humming as a physician liaison for information technology services. Off hours, she’s at home on stage with Big City Groove and the MetroGnomes. “My work with Saint Joseph is my career, I love it. Music is my passion. I’m more of a creative type. Working in the IT field I don’t always have an outlet for my creative spark. Music is really where I get to let that out,” she said. Francis and several performers do double-duty performing in both bands. “The MetroGnomes is a 1940s-style big

Tiffany Francis (right) with her band, Big City Groove

band. You’ll hear Latin music, old Sinatrastyle tunes and all kinds of arrangements in a big band format. We’re in Ecton Park Big Band and Jazz Series and Stonebridge Summer Concert Series. Big City Groove has a full horn section. It’s a really big sound. It’s amazing and so much fun,” Francis said. Bigger yet, American Idol? A family emergency kept her from auditioning when the show was in Louisville. “It’s not out of the question. I love what I’m doing on the local scale. As long as I have an outlet for music, I’m happy.” Follow Francis at BigCityGrooveMusic.com and TheMetroGnomes.com.

Photograph by ben keeling

How do you unwind? Tell us at SaintJosephCommonThread.org.

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Welcome to My world

Off the HOOK

Inez Maggard fields constant calls as a switchboard operator

By Kathie Stamps

I

nez Maggard is a switchboard operator at Saint Joseph - London. Originally from Hyden, Ky., she started as a nurses’ assistant when the hospital was known as Marymount Medical Center. Her first day of work was May 27, 1979, her daughter’s birthday. Her bubbly personality has been part of the communications department since the mid-1980s.

What makes you good at your job? I really care. I take my job very seriously. Without the people and the public we don’t have a job. I have a lot to be grateful for and I try to do unto others as I would have them do unto me. I love my job. It’s a very stressful job but I like what I do. The day passes really, really fast.

What do your duties include? I answer all incoming calls. We are responsible for calling all our crews after hours – our heart team, surgical teams, cath teams – if we have an emergency surgery. We’re also responsible for calling all the codes, for a fire or tornado, for example.

We’re known as [providing] 24-hour services since we moved to the new facility. We have new equipment in the building and a state-of-the-art computer phone and headset. We kinda like our computer! We have a mouse and can drag the callers down and put them in this little box and we can see how many calls are coming in and rolling down. There are always two girls on day shift and two on second.

What would people be surprised to know about switchboard operators? How busy we are! We are answering the phone, dealing with the public and with employees and physicians and staff. I think people would be surprised to see how each day is different.

Photograph by Tim Webb

How has your job changed since the new hospital opened?

What do you do away from work? I love spending time with my husband, children and seven grandchildren. At home I have a lot of bird feeders. I like to sit and watch the different types of birds we have. I like being outside and gardening.

What is a typical day for you? I work from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. No two days are ever the same; it’s always changing. We never get two calls that are the same.

What inspires you? Life in general. Every day I get up and thank God. Working here makes you take

stock of yourself and look around and see what you have. Life is very precious and I’m always grateful for that. The Lord got me up this morning and I’m grateful. He gave me a home, a job, good health and a wonderful family. I have awesome co-workers; it’s like a big family in here. I couldn’t have asked for a better place to work or better people to work with or have a better boss.

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Jeanie Hogg’s desire for mission work fuels her art By Kym Russell

L

ast October, Jeanie Hogg and her sister-in-law followed their hearts off the map to two villages in Nicaragua. Both women are nurses. They were part of a medical mission group that trekked deep into the jungle to bring health care to 965 patients over the course of five days. Getting there from Nicaragua’s main airport took an arduous 50-mile, seven-hour bus ride over dirt roads to Puerto Cabezas on the other side of the country. They went even further to reach the Miskito people (who do not have a native word for illness) living in the villages of Waspam and Wafla. “They do not have medical care. A traveling nurse comes every three or four months. We set up. And, at dawn, people were already in line to see us,” said Jeanie Hogg, a registered nurse with Saint Joseph - Berea Family Medicine. On the way home, Hogg said, the exhaustion sets in. “You reflect about what you accomplished. You know you’re not going to cure anything. We offered some comfort, even if it was temporary. Hopefully, we left with them our focus on Jesus. We were there because we love Him and felt compelled to come and share His word and help in any way we can.” Hogg wants to travel to Guatemala with Berea Baptist Church this summer. Five years ago, she went to Belize on a mission trip. She can see that her experiences are changing her in unexpected ways in her personal and professional life. She explains, “We’d wake to the sound of monkeys screeching and the pounding of rice. They get up as soon as it’s light to pound rice for meals that day. They live off the land. That simplicity of life stays in my mind. Seeing these people who have nothing made me question my own values and the things I have at home. We get so self-centered and let so many things get in the way of being faithful to God and helping mankind.

continued on page 32

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mittens on a

Mission


Photographs by tim webb

Mission Moments

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[from page 24] He reflected on how many lives his father had touched. “Several years ago a young man who had played baseball as a child for my dad invited him to dinner at Saint Monica Church because Dad had influenced his life in a positive way,” Mark said. “He told Dad that he was the first adult who ever believed in him. That was just who he was. He led by example in a way that made you want to make him proud.” Construction had been going on in downtown Bardstown for months before Larry’s passing. It had been his habit to walk the streets, pushing his grandchildren in their strollers. During his funeral procession, it was clear that he had made an impression on the construction workers. As his hearse rolled by, “all the men got off their machines, took their hard hats off and put them over their hearts,” Midge said. “That was really special.” Even the mail carrier was amazed at the avalanche of condolence cards sent to the family. “I’ve been here for years, and I’ve never seen such an outpouring of love,” she told Midge. Since Larry’s death, Midge urges people to get cancer check-ups. “Get screened,” she said. “You know your body. If you think you need a test, get the test.” After Larry’s death, his family asked that friends donate to the Flaget Cancer Center in his memory, according to Bill Conway, board chair for the Flaget Foundation, and close friend to the family. Conway wasn’t surprised to see donations flooding in to honor Larry. “He was a gentle man – a gentleman,” said Conway. “He had that contagious smile, that kindness for everyone. He touched every person he met.” Flaget Foundation Director of Development Diane Boyer was surprised by the amount of donations. “I was so new on the job,” Boyer said. “Money was pouring in, in Larry’s memory. I wish I could have known Larry, but through his family and his enormous group of friends, I feel like I did.” The crucifixes blessed at the cancer center ribbon cutting were blessed in Larry’s memory. Knowing that gives Boyer comfort. “Now all those crucifixes are in every treatment room,” she said. “They’re blessing every patient.” For information about cancer care, visit SaintJosephCancerCenter.com. 32

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Love for Haiti [from page 21] Saint Joseph - Jessamine, was one of Phillips’ mentors when she was a new nurse. She served with Phillips in Haiti last August. “I would describe Julia as being an adventurous, dedicated, loving and compassionate person,” Congleton said. “Not many people would give up their vacation time and money to go to a third-world country and serve others. Julia has shown God’s love to the people in Haiti. By doing this, she truly is being the hands and feet of Jesus.” Sara Perdue, an emergency department nurse at Saint Joseph Hospital, is another co-worker who has great admiration for Phillips. “I’m a better person having known Julia,” Perdue said. “She’s an inspiration to everyone the mission fields, I will truly miss her, but who knows her. When Julia goes full-time to I’ll know she’s where God wants her.”

mittens on a

Mission [from page 30] What I brought back to my work is more openness, even if we have 30 people on the schedule, I try to make sure I smile or extend my hand. I wasn’t a touchy person before and I respect people’s boundaries. But, you can just tell by a person’s eyes if they are hurting, that’s when I’m more likely to just touch their arm. Or, in an appropriate situation I just ask, ‘Can I pray with you, right now?’ Before, I don’t know if I was that bold in sharing my faith with patients. It’s enriched my life as a nurse, now.” While the logistics for mission trips are intricate, they all start in the same place: raising the money. Hogg is raising funds to go to Guatemala by crafting a unique item even in Berea’s diverse arts and crafts community. She’s funding her mission by making wool mittens. She collects and shops for wool sweaters at thrift stores to “felt” them, a process that shrinks the wool and transforms it into a dense material. Then, Hogg uses a pattern to cut and sew the mittens. She gave her family and co-workers mittens for a test run. “Dr. Compton told me they are the warmest things he has ever had!” she said. And, compared to internet prices, Hogg’s mittens are cheap: $25 a pair. “One shop wants to sell them. I enjoy making them and I’m learning how to make

them more artsy. People ask me if I can use an old sweater they already own to remake into mittens. I can do that, so the mittens have sentimental value, too. If I don’t make enough money to fund my trip this time, I’ll help fund someone else. I recommend going to anyone. Even if you are not medical you can always help on a medical mission trip.”

The Jesus Film At night, the trip leaders showed a Jesus film wherever we were. It was projected on the wall of a white school building and ran off electricity from a generator we brought. The film had been interpreted into so many languages, even Miskito. And, we had an interpreter with us. They have a simple way to give testimonies. The film would stop after a scene and someone would get up and testify. So, here I was, working on what I wanted to share and that’s exactly where the film stopped! It was the scene in the boat where Jesus tells the disciples not to be afraid when the storms come. I said, “I’m sure you have storms, too, whether it’s your baby crying or wondering if you have enough food. In my life, I’ve had storms. And, I too could only cry to Jesus and say his Name as I went to sleep. He is the One you have to depend on.” In that moment, it was clear to me, we have different lives but we have the same needs. –Jeanie Hogg


etc

reader reward

One lucky person will receive their very own Kindle e-book reader by entering our Reader Reward challenge! The Amazon Kindle (Wi-Fi) allows you to download books in seconds and even browse the Web. The device weighs less than a paperback, yet can hold up to 3,500 books. Read more about it at Amazon.com. The device retails at $139.

story time Share Your Story

We want to inspire others! Please tell us how you or someone you work with has created meaningful change in your community or workplace. Do you know someone who is outstanding in his or her job? Tell us! To submit your story ideas to Common Thread, visit SaintJosephCommonThread.org.

Win a Kindle!

To enter the Kindle giveaway, you must answer this question correctly: Who used to drive a bookmobile? Somewhere in this issue of Common Thread you’ll find the answer. Submit your answer at SaintJosephCommonThread.org. Correct answers will be entered into the Kindle drawing on June 3. Only employees can enter this challenge. (Prizes will be included as taxable income, per the IRS.) Congratulations to previous Reader Reward winner Frankie Woodson who won a Nintendo Wii and Wii Fit Plus.

photo contest

Send Us Your Pet Photos! Visit SaintJosephCommonThread.org and post your funniest or most adorable pet photo for a chance to win a little cash and fame for your furry friends. The top three favorites, chosen by magazine staff, will be published in the summer issue of Common Thread and winners will receive $100 (1st place), $50 (2nd place) and $25 (3rd place). Only Saint Joseph Health System employees are eligible to win. (Prizes will be included as taxable income, per the IRS.) Entries will be accepted through May 20, 2011. To enter the contest, upload your photo at SaintJosephCommonThread. org under the heading, “Have a story idea or pictures for Common Thread?” Make sure to include a brief description of the photo including your pet’s name.


Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Lexington, KY Permit #162

Saint Joseph Health System invites you to join us for an exciting day of a variety of activities that will interest the soon-to-be mom and her family. Flaget Baby Fair

Flaget Memorial Hospital, Bardstown Saturday, April 30, 11 am to 2 pm

Register online at www.Flaget.com or call 502.348.7010.

Maternity Fair at The Women’s Hospital

The Women’s Hospital at Saint Joseph East Saturday, May 14, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm Register online at www.SaintJosephMaternityFair.com or call 859.967.5781.

Maternity Fair at Saint Joseph - London Saint Joseph - London Saturday, May 21, 1 to 4 pm Register online at www.SaintJosephLondon.org or call 606.330.6009.


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