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WORKSHOP

CREATIVE JOINING VARIATIONS Three Kids’ Sweaters  Start your seam as for the regular vertical seam: Thread your needle with the cast-on “tail” and insert it from the wrong side to the right side over and above the strands of the cast-on edge; pull through. *On the first side, take the needle under the “bump”; on the next side, take it under the bump, and, at the same time, under the strand above it. Continue from * up the seam.

Pattern Striped Turtleneck SEE PAGE 142

 Garter stitch might be the best fabric for kids’ sweaters: It has a nice heft and it lies flat without any need to block. Here I chose a variety of shapes to allow me to explore a few different methods of joining. 52

Garter stitch is such a fun and easy pattern to knit, yet knitters often find it difficult to seam. Here I devised three easy kids’ sweaters, each made in a basic rectangular approach. The shapes couldn’t be simpler or more fun to knit. I used a different means of assembly for each sweater. The turtleneck pullover is sewn in the way I like best for garter stitch, the vest pieces are knit together with a three-needle bind-off, and the pullover with the embroidered flower pocket is crocheted together. Each sweater has a different edging, too. The turtleneck has a ribbed collar. I also added a deep roll of reverse stockinette stitch on the lower sleeve, which I sewed to the wrong side to cover the edge, so that the sleeve could be worn down, or rolled up without a raw-edge look. The crocheted sweater has a simple single-crochet stitch (the only crochet I know!) around the neckline and all other edges as well. I used garter stitch as the trim on the vest—except for the little reverse stockinette stitch rolled edges on the little pocket flap. I look for challenges as a designer, and it helps me to come up with new ideas and keep myself continually interested. These sweaters were no exception. How do you take simple shapes and transform them with finishing? Try it—it’s fun. You could change the elements and make the sweaters in different ways: The pullover could feature pocket flaps, or the vest could be crocheted together. Or you could mix joining techniques in the same sweater! ■

Profile for Sixth&Spring Books

Finishing School  

Master knitter and designer Deborah Newton takes you step by step through the ins-and-outs of blocking, seaming, edgings, embellishments and...

Finishing School  

Master knitter and designer Deborah Newton takes you step by step through the ins-and-outs of blocking, seaming, edgings, embellishments and...

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