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SPHINX ADVERTISING

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE 2009 NSAC CENTURY COUNCIL CAMPAIGN BOOK

What’s Your Story?


P PAGE AGE 1 2


0ur Story THE GREAT SPHINX IN EGYPT IS CARVED OUT OF ROCK. IT HAS THE HEAD OF A PHARAOH AND THE BODY OF A LION, REPRESENTING WISDOM AND STRENGTH.

SPHINX MEASURES AND DEFINES SUCCESS BY BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

WITH CLIENTS AND PROVIDING INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO THEIR CHALLENGES. IN THE SPIRIT OF OUR NAMESAKE, WE BELIEVE THAT THE BEST IDEAS COME FROM A SYNERGISTIC BLEND OF INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS.

BRAINS AND BRAWN. YOUTHFULNESS AND YEARNING. INTELLIGENCE AND INSTINCT. LEARNING AND LIVING.

IT IS OUR BELIEF THAT EACH OF THESE ELEMENTS IS FUNDAMENTAL IN CREATING AN INVIGORATING AND SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN. DELIVERING STRONG RESULTS AND POWERFUL IDEAS, WE ARE SPHINX ADVERTISING—AN INTEGRATED MARKETING AGENCY.

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CARBONDALE IS THE HEART OF “LITTLE EGYPT” IN SOUTHERN ILLINOIS. IT IS THE HOME TO SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, THE SALUKIS, AND SPHINX ADVERTISING.


EXECUT

IVE

SUMMARY

The case study provided by The Century Council directed us to develop an integrated communications campaign to raise awareness about dangerous overconsumption of alcohol and its consequences among college students. According to the study, the proposed plan required that the emphasis be placed on tactics that can be executed independently and part of a broader cohesive strategy. The suggested budget for the national campaign is $10 million. SPHINX ADVERTISING at SIUC dove into the problem head first by investigating the extent of dangerous overconsumption of alcohol by conducting a series of primary research activities and by utilizing the resources offered by the CORE Institute here on campus. Our research suggested that we belong to a typical campus where a majority of students frequently engage in binge drinking, but have the feeling that they are not vulnerable to the negative consequences associated with dangerous overconsumption of alcohol.

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Based on our research inputs, SPHINX ADVERTISING developed and executed a campaign that centered around the strategy of ‘What’s Your Story?’ that highlights college students’ personal experiences that arise from the dangerous overconsumption of alcohol. The campaign is driven by creating one-on-one personal interactions between students to raise awareness about the afore mentioned problem. The campaign was implemented on campus at SIUC with great effectiveness and resulted in achieving most of our set objectives. The campaign created a buzz and was widely reported in the local media. SPHINX ADVERTISING has devised a scalable plan that will help us execute this campaign at a national level. The plan suggests that the $10 million be used by offering half of the budget to scholarships to deserving students who will then become student ambassadors in the 250 largest universities in the United States. These students will act as ambassadors for The Century Council and will play the vital role of spreading the message of responsible drinking habits. The remaining half of the budget will be alloted to executing promotional tactics. The campaign will solely focus on spreading The Century Councils’ message to all college students targeted. No dollar spent during the duration of the campaign will be spent without the seriousness and importance of the problem in mind. To ensure this, we have set up a number of evaluations at every level to measure the success of the campaign.

TABLE 0F CoNTENTS

ABOUT SPHINX EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION SITUATION ANALYSIS COMPANY & COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS CONSUMER ANALYSIS MESSAGE ANALYSIS RESEARCH FINDINGS CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVES CREATIVE STRATEGY CREATIVE STRATEGY CREATIVE & GUERILLA EXECUTIONS ONLINE MARKETING RAWATHALON & PUBLIC RELATIONS MEDIA STRATEGY FLOW CHART EVALUATION REFERENCES ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

2 3 4-5 6-12 6 7 8 9-10 11 12 13-24 15-16 17-20 21-22 23-24 25-30 29 30 31 32

CHARTS & TABLES CHART 1 CHART 2-4 CHART 5-6 CHART 7 TABLES 1-2

7 9 10 28 28


INTRoDUCT IoN

The Century Council (TCC) is the sponsor of the 2009 National Student Advertising Competition. The Council, founded in 1991, is a national, independent, not-for-profit organization dedicated to creating programs that fight drunk driving and stop underage drinking. This year’s competition is notable because it is the first time the NSAC will address a social issue; that is, combating dangerous overconsumption of alcohol by college students.

The case study calls for the development of a communications campaign that is national but can be implemented by a single campus. True to their values, the campaign must be research-based and avoid prescribing a social norm. The expectation is that TCC will be recognized as a leader in responsible decision-making concerning alcohol. Ultimately, the organization will be seen as providing solutions to the problem; solutions that will create a ‘buzz’ among youth.

“I spent Saturday night in the ER getting my stomach pumped, while my friends had fun...”

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Even though TCC has been instrumental in creating strategies to assist campuses across the country, the problem of overconsumption of alcohol persists. In fact, studies indicate that binge drinking has become a major health and safety concern for today’s college students.


INTRoDUCT IoN CoNT

INUED

Defining the problem

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SPHINX ADVERTISING recognized that this problem of dangerous overconsumption of alcohol has many dimensions. Traditionally binge drinking has been defined as the consumption of more than four alcoholic beverages among women and five drinks among men in about two hours. But this notion of binge drinking tends to be very rigid and does not encompass all the nuances of the average college students’ drinking habits. Our research suggested that we use a definition of dangerous overconsumption of alcohol that students’ could relate to on a personal level based on their individual experiences. This level could be as low as a single drink for certain students and could be several drinks for certain others. However, the ultimate goal of our campaign remains in creating awareness about negative consequences that arise from dangerous overconsumption of alcohol.

Scope of the suggested plan SPHINX ADVERTISING realizes that binge drinking is an issue of grave importance to universities and college student communities, because of the harsh realities that exists in the statistics that abound relating to dangerous overconsumption of alcohol. This plans book spells out our campaign by first looking at the primary and secondary research to reveal the situation analysis, followed by the objectives and strategy of the campaign, leading to activities that were executed on the SIUC campus, which guided us to develop parameters for the national campaign. The campaign spells out in detail the logistics that need to be carried out which includes the creative, the media, the public relations and various other promotional elements that ties the campaign into a cohesive whole.


SITUAT IoN ANALYSIS Company Analysis

The Century Council partners with all parties of the community, including wholesalers and retailers of alcoholic beverages, law enforcement and public officials, educators, insurers, health care professionals and private citizen organizations, in the fight against drunk driving and underage drinking. The Century Council recognizes the problem in society that stems from the lack of information on the dangerous overconsumption of alcohol and funds programs to raise awareness about the consequences to people of all ages. The Century Council conducts this with the shared goal of having a research-based communication strategy with a “menu” of creative tactics at different budget levels.

“I had unprotected sex with a stranger... now I have a disease to live with forever.”

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Founded in May 1991, and headquartered in Arlington, Va. As a national, independent, not-for-profit organization, The Century Council is dedicated to fighting drunk driving, underage drinking, and promoting responsible decision making regarding alcohol drinking habits. In pursuit of this, The Century Council has developed an arrangement of programs meant to educate audiences from middle school youth to adults, as well as to reducing drunk driving.


CoNSUMER ANALYSIS The consumer analysis focuses on college students as the primary target audience for this campaign. These students belong to both sexes and are typically in the age group of 18-23 year olds. In order to get a better idea of our target audience, SPHINX ADVERTISING conducted a survey and supplemented this with two focus groups comprised of drinkers, non-drinkers and numerous in depth personal interviews.

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The primary research was conducted by using an online questionnaire linked to a database at which SPHINX was able to track and monitor the results and number of surveys taken. The online database was used in order to reach our target audience most effectively through Facebook, email, and other online contact sources. The questions were formulated using multiple choice options, Likert type scale questions, as well as open-ended questions that probed for answers on an individual basis. Our survey was well represented by students among various class standings and the distribution was similar to the university’s population by male to female ratio, ethnicity, and various academic majors. There were a total of 200 participants that completed the survey. Of the 200 surveyed, 59% were female, leaving 41% male. The education breakdown was 10% college freshman, 20% sophomores, 29% juniors, 36% seniors, and 7% with a higher education level. All of the participants were between the ages of 18-23 years old. Chart 1. College standing of survey respondants 40%

Other

36%

35% 30%

Senior

29%

Junior

25% 20%

20%

Sophomore

15% 10% 5% 0

Freshman

10% 5%


MESSAGE ANALYSIS PSA Effectiveness

The PSAs on HIV/AIDS seem to have a strong impact on youth due to the prevalence of the virus in our target audience. They work because the dangers are real and can affect anyone at anytime if they are not protected. Furthermore, political PSAs that urge voter registration and voter turnout to this target audience have had a fair amount of success. These messages stressed the importance of voting and that every voice counts. As noted by the Century Council, NBC’s The More You Know campaign is one of the more popular and successful PSA campaigns in recent times. The PSA reached over 53 million people each week dealing with serious societal issues and motivated viewers to take action.

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Public service announcements serve an important purpose in society in that they communicate important messages about issues that hinder the well being and safety of the community. The dangerous overconsumption of alcohol has potential consequences that have serious repercussions, such as alcohol induced accidents, alcohol poisoning, being a public nuisance, and general decline in social standing. When PSAs highlight these issues, there is a general tendency to ignore these messages because of the feeling that they do not apply to ones self, but are meant for others with serious alcohol problems. This results in the lack of effectiveness and attention of PSAs. Our research revealed that our target audience takes public service announcements (PSA) less seriously than their original intent, thus making them less effective. The Truth campaign against smoking had some effect because of its shock value, but did not make college students want to stop smoking.


RESEARCH FINDINGS Drinking Patterns

Chart 3: Frequency of alcohol consumption. 50%

Conclusions from our primary research indicated that college students go beyond the traditional definition of binge drinking; yet they claim to make responsible choices when it comes to transportation, such as calling cabs versus getting behind the wheel. The majority of the college students surveyed revealed that they drink an average of two to three nights a week, and drink between five to seven drinks per night. At the same time, 33% of the college students surveyed believe that five to seven drinks is excessive. Although the college students seem to be drinking in excess of the binge drinking definition, the majority state that they know what their limits are and stick to them when they drink and take full responsibility for their drinking habits.

42%

40% 30% 23%

20% 12% 10%

10%

4% 1%

0%

y da

ery Ev

o

4t

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Chart 2: Universities should promote the consequences of excessive drinking

Strongly Agree

Neutral

28%

28%

8%

s ay 6d

k

ee

aw

o

2t

k

aw

ce

n to

ou

Ab

aw

Strongly Disagree

14% 6%

k rin es ’t d ag on er I d bev lic ho

r he

Ot

o

alc

Chart 4: Excessive drinking is a problem on campus. 31%

32%

25%

23%

20% 15%

Disagree

aw

Even though the vast majority of the college students that were surveyed confirmed the fact they drink in excess, they also agreed that it is a serious problem on college campuses that needs to be addressed. They strongly feel that drinking is part of the college experience, but certain individuals abuse this privilege by over consuming. Students responded that they would attend alcohol free events, such as concerts, if they occurred on campus. The college students also felt that universities should do more to promote awareness about the negative consequences of excessive drinking.

30%

24%

k

ee

ce

n no

tha

ss

Le

Attitudes towards Drinking

35% Agree

k

ee

ee

s ay 3d

12%

10% 5% 1%

0% Stro

gree ngly A

Agree

al Neutr

e

re Disag

e

isagre gly D

Stron


Consequences of drinking Although 67% indicated that drinking has not negatively impacted an important obligation of their own, but 91% said that they know someone whose personal life has been adversely affected by alcohol. This is despite the fact that our primary research showed that the great majority of the college students experience more than one negative consequence when they drink. A staggering 36% stated that they have been cited for underage drinking, and another 50% said that they had been in physical altercations, yet still engage in excessive drinking behavior. Chart 5: I have experienced these consequences due to drinking. DUI Hangover

5% 87%

Hospital Visit

6%

Public Indecency Ticket

3%

Under Age Drinking Ticket 36%

Physical Altercations

30%

Engaging

Verbal Altercations

50%

20

40

60

80

X YouTube

100

Secondary Research Binge drinking is a serious subject with serious consequences; therefore, we needed to ďŹ nd out how to most effectively reach our target audience. It was apparent the traditional media sources and other online sources are not as effective in communicating the seriousness of the issue as one on one interaction has proven to be. SPHINX had a guest speaker from one of the leading alcohol and drug research and development centers in America, the CORE Institute, to help us better understand college students’ attitudes toward drinking. Our secondary research with the CORE indicated that messages resonate more with our target audience when it comes from one on one interaction. Our survey reinstated that information with about 90% of the college students stating that they pay attention to messages that come directly from their peers, friends, parents, teachers, etc. Our survey also concluded that 66% of the students stated that when they are exposed to messages about the negative consequences of binge drinking, it makes them want to be more responsible while drinking.

X T.V. Not Effective

X Radio X Newspaper

X Twitter X Facebook Personal X Interactions X Magazine

Boring

Most Effective

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Other

6%

0

Chart 6: Perception of popular media options their effectiveness in communicating messages about responsible drinking.


CHALLENGES & SoLUT IoNS C:

“College students tend to ignore responsible drinking messages on traditional media.”

S:

Our campaign utilizes social media and one on one interactions to communicate the message about the negative consequences of the dangerous overconsumption of alcohol.

C: “The media environment for college students is highly cluttered with messages from numerous brands vying for their attention.” S: We will carry out various guerilla marketing tactics in order to cut through the clutter to reach out to our target audience.

C: “It is difficult to relay a message of responsible drinking to college students, PAGE 11

and not come across as having an anti-drinking agenda.”

S: Our campaign stresses the aspect of responsible drinking by showcasing the negative effects of the dangerous over consumption of alcohol.

C: “Instilling responsible drinking habits into the minds of future college students.” S: Our campaign also focuses on future college students in order to encourage responsibility early on.

C: “Existing college campus culture, which stresses on the overconsumption of alcohol as part of the college experience.” S: Our campaign identifies events, and other activities, that suggests drinking,

when done moderately, is the best way to have fun.

“My friends trusted me to be the DD... now they’re all dead and it’s my fault.”


CAMPAIGN 0BJECT

IVES

Campaign Objectives 1) To create national awareness of the consequences of the dangerous overconsumption of alcohol among college students in the 250 biggest colleges and universities in the United States. 2) To encourage students to make more responsible decisions while they drink. 3) To build and create a campus culture that takes proactive measures to hinder the problems that arise from the dangerous overconsumption of alcohol.

Creative Objectives

2) To deliver edgy, passionate, and graphic messages that will remain and resonate in the minds of our target audience for a prolonged duration. 3) To create messages that stand alone on an individual level and also are part of a broader, cohesive strategy.

Media Objectives 1) To reach 40% of the target audience an average of ďŹ ve times and 60% of the target audience at least three times over the course of the campaign. 2) To increase interaction between members of the target audience using social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and the RAW website. 3) To break through the clutter of everyday advertising faced by college students by choosing media options that are effective and accountable. 4) Use a pulsating pattern of scheduling to execute the campaign with periods of heavy intense media activity followed by sustained reminder activity. 5) To maximize media coverage and effective spending by using strong public relations initiatives. 6) Use social media to build interaction and buzz among target audiences.

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1) To communicate messages that college students can relate to on a personal level.


Creative Strategy PAGE 13


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What’s Your Story? Campaign


CREAT

IVE

STRATEGY Target Audience The primary target audience for this campaign will be college students, with a heavy focus on full-time college students in the United States. These tech-savvy, trendsetting individuals are connected 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and have grown up with the Internet involved in their daily lives. The secondary target audience includes prospective college students, from high school or junior colleges. The tertiary target audience would include university administration, law and order officials, parents, professors, and other stake holders in the university community.

Key Selling Idea PAGE 15

SPHINX ADVERTISING has devised a strategy that taps into the individual experiences of college students related to the negative consequences of the dangers of over consumption of alcohol. We call this the ‘What’s Your Story?’ campaign. The strategy is driven from the imputs that we found through our research that suggested that college students are more likely to be influenced by one on one interaction with their peers and elders. Executions to carry out the strategy have been planned out with the goal of highlighting personal stories that will resonate and reflect the average college students experiences with excessive drinking.

Support In order to create a personal connection with our communication initiatives, the ‘What’s Your Story?’ campaign utilizes guerilla marketing and ambient marketing tactics that push our message into the face of the target audience. These tactics will allow the target audience to interact and reflect in their own personal stories while driving home the message of being more responsible while drinking.

“I thought she was teasing when she said no. Now I have a record and both our lives are ruined.”


Tone The tone for the creative executions is intense, aggressive, and gritty with a no holds barred approach that will show the negative consequences of the dangerous over consumption of alcohol. A side that college students seem to deny and no one thinks or realizes can happen to themselves. The tone of the campaign will forcibly confront them with this ugly side that tends to be avoided but is a huge reality.

The tag line for this campaign is ‘Responsibility Always Wins’ or RAW for short. This tag line emphasizes the key selling idea behind our ‘What’s Your Story?’ campaign. RAW also refers to the gritty and alternative nature of the campaign that relies on provoking thought and reaction through the use of unconventional tactics.

Logistics of the Campaign For this campaign to be successfully implemented, The Century Council will set up an internship program at various colleges around the United States. The internship program will require the selection of a student who will serve as the chapter president for the particular college. The president’s role encompasses the management of Ambassadors whose role is to carry out the message of The Century Council on their campus. The president along with the ambassadors will be conferred the honorary title of ‘RAW Ambassador’ and also be offered an academic scholarship. A committee will select ambassadors based on academic achievement and leadership experience. This student will receive a $5,000 scholarship with the runners up receiving $1,000 in scholarships. This will be for internship credit conducted through their advertising or marketing school. Century Council will provide the team with a budget, based on the school size, for them to execute tactics for large programs in both spring and fall semesters. A selected faculty member will oversee the whole RAW Ambassador program including the budget. This faculty advisor will act as a liaison between the student ambassador and The Century Council.

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Tag Line


CREAT

IVE

EXECUT IoNS & GUERILLA TACT

ICS

In order to ensure that the strategy we suggest in our plans book is the best possible option for The Century Council, we implemented some of the tactics in the SIUC campus to test and evaluate their effectiveness. The following is a brief run down of some of the initiatives that were carried out in the SIUC campus and are also suggested for the national campaign.

RAW AMBASSADORS The students that are awarded the position of RAW Ambassadors will be responsible for the various events that take place on campus. They will be accountable for developing, creating, and documenting the tactics used on campus. The ambassadors have the opportunity to bring The Century Council’s message to the forefront of the campus environment. They will have the opportunity to do so by networking and establishing a collaborative relationship with the student organizations on campus. SPHINX partnered with organizations such as Hammered and the Greek community.

RAW WEEK PAGE 17

The following tactics will be utilized for the duration for RAW week in order to most effectively spread the message of the dangers of over consumption of alcohol. RAW week will occur in the month of February to coincide with alcohol awareness month.

RAW STAMPS To ensure that college students everywhere are being informed about the risks of binge drinking we wanted to spread the RAW message. By making stamps with the word RAW we can go to special events (specific to that college) at bars throughout the country and stamp students attending these events. The idea is not only to generate buzz about RAW through word of mouth, but also to have the students take the RAW oath to help them understand what the stamp is all about; informing them of the risks and dangers of binge drinking. By taking the oath it’s a way for the students to pledge that they too, will exercise responsibility while drinking.

RAW 0AT H


Thursday, February 12, 2009

DAILY EGYPTIAN

News

RAW POSTERS & NEWSPAPER AD A newspaper advertisement will be used to create buzz and capture the attention of students’ on campus. Campus newspapers have a high readability among and pass along among college students. An interactive advertisement will be created for the newspaper to create buzz amongst the student reading the paper. Five posters with five different personal stories will go along with the ‘What’s Your Story?’ theme. These posters will be displayed around campus on and in every building and surface that generates high traffic. The posters illustrate how everyone has a story when it comes to binge drinking. The goal of this is to create buzz around campus and get students to think about the consequences of binge drinking and similar stories they, or their friends have participated.

NEWSLETTER INSERT RAW Ambassadors will send out a monthly newsletter via campus newspaper to inform students on activities done around campus that are non-drinking events. The newsletter will provide a calendar of events that will give students a sober event to attend in that month around campus. The ultimate goal of this newsletter is to promote a healthier lifestyle when drinking and show how smarter choices can affect your future in a positive way by pointing out how negative ones can really ruin yours.

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8


MOCK PASS OUT A demonstration will be conducted to represent the large number of college students who fall victim to alcohol abuse. The mock pass out will become an improv to affect the onlookers of the show. A large group of students will congregate in a particular spot that will gain attention from students. The demonstration will begin when RAW Ambassadors and volunteers fall to the ground as if poisoned by alcohol at the same time. A representative from a campus health center will speak at this event to provide the gathered crowd with drinking statistics that will drive the message of responsible drinking.

LINE UP PAGE 19

‘What’s your story?’ The headline asks onlookers to gaze back into their own personal experiences with binge drinking. Each poster will be held by a RAW ambassadors and don a personal story of how they where affected by binge drinking. Walls of students holding these stories will cause congestion in heavy flowing traffic areas on campuses and force the audience to be effected by the realities of danger overconsumption of alcohol. Powerful, proactive, real and personalized stories will grasp the attention of anyone walking by. The line-ups can last anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour and still have a powerful impact.


Message in a bottle The RAW Ambassadors will use a unique form of guerilla marketing to help spread the message of responsible drinking on campus. Ambassadors will stuff informational pamphlets into empty beer cans and pass them out to students in high traffic areas. The information will have statistics on the dangers of overconsumption of alcohol and ways of prevention. This will be done year round to help keep the message fresh in college students’ minds.

Raw Concierges SPHINX realizes that it is important to connect with freshmen so that responsible drinking messages resonate with them early on. RAW Ambassadors will act as RAW concierges, or door men, at dormitories on campus with a table set up with various information about responsible drinking and the dangers of the overconsumption of alcohol. They will do this at time when students usually leave to go out and return for the night. This will be to keep the message of responsible drinking in the minds of college students at all times.

RAW Ambassadors will place large piles of beer cans in different locations that generate high traffic, across campus in order to demonstrate the extreme amount of alcohol that is consumed by college students. Signs will be placed next to the beer can piles displaying various statistics on the amount of money college students spend on alcohol. The ‘What’s Your Story?’ campaign will bring attention not only to the physical harm that binge drinking can cause, but also to the large economical impact of binge drinking on college students. RAW Ambassadors will approach students to discuss their reactions to the displays, and also raise the question, “How much is too much?” The beer cans will create a buzz among students.

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BEER PILE


0NLINE MARKET

ING

YOUTUBE VIDEOS Documentation from the RAW events will be posted on the RAW channel through YouTube to create buzz and increase awareness. With the popularity and evolution of viral marketing, SPHINX found it essential to incorporate YouTube into the campaign. The videos will be used in two ways, to spread the message of responsible drinking habits and to monitor the effectiveness of the campaign.

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RAW Twitter

Facebook Application & RAW Website A RAW website will be used as a social networking tool. It will be implemented as a Facebook application to help get the word across. Suggestions for the website includes a video contest to make the website more interactive and to get people involved. It will also involve a calendar of events section, a past events section for those who want to see photos, and lastly, a contact us section for anyone interested in contacting the RAW Ambassadors. We will also be converting the website in to a Facebook application so that people can send it to their friends, which will in turn spread the message of responsible drinking via social networking.

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Using the growing social network Twitter, RAW Ambassadors will establish an account to provide a live feed to their weekend needs. The twitter account will provide followers a real time update on the activities that is happening around that don’t involve alcohol. The feed will help students gain awareness of non-alcoholic activities around campus by other students. An application will have the exact locations of the students on a campus map. Also the twitter proďŹ le will have live feeds and updates on the action at the events and future events that will be non-alcoholic events. The Twitter page is an online space where students and businesses can discuss and share events going on around the campus where alcohol is not the top priority.


RAWATHAL0N

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A series of radio liners will be ran on the days prior in order to create buzz about the sober and fun event as an alternative option to binge drinking activities. We will feature a marathon of events that showcase the effects of the over consumption of drinking alcohol and promote responsible drinking. In an allotted amount of time, we will have students crush beer cans as fast as they can to symbolize crushing the problem of binge drinking. We will have a strength contest to see who can throw a keg the farthest which is symbolic of tossing binge drinking out of the college experience. We will also feature a three-legged race run across the finish line. Our premier event will be the obstacle course with beer goggles allowing students to run through an obstacle course with their vision impaired. We will have local businesses provide food and drinks for the event on campus. Once the event has concluded, an alcohol addiction specialist will be onsite to speak to participants about the consequences of excessive drinking. We will also have a large graffiti wall, asking ‘What’s Your Story?’ for students to write their own personal experiences about drinking. cost to a minimum we will team up with the student ran radio stations where they offer us free air time for our liners, and we will in turn attach their logo with some of our printed literature. The liners themselves will be simple spots in which an adolescent voice over can tell an unfortunate story involving binge drinking, followed by the question, ‘What’s Your Story?’ The end of the liner would be information on the RAW events and a website for the audience to learn more. The overall time of these liners would be no more than 30 seconds, with the hopes of teasing the audience, thus intriguing them to find out more.

RAW!

WHAT’S

Rawathalon will also be featured in the campus newspaper in order to reach our target audience most effectively. The advertisement will showcase each event and the incentives such as the t-shirts, medals and a trophy.

YoUR

SToRY!


PUBLIC RELAT IoNS

Our campaign that was implemented on the SIUC campus, involved an extensive effort to ensure that the local media covered all of the activities that were carried out. The campaign generated multiple stories and photo opportunities in the campus newspaper and news station, and the regional newspaper. This coverage helped our campaign achieve a far greater reach than the individual tactics by themselves. Thus expanding our message to the local community, as well as on the SIUC campus.

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The cause espoused by The Century Council is an ideal ďŹ t for news coverage because it highlights the problems of the dangerous overconsumption of alcohol that plagues our society. This emphasis on public relations should be placed on every team in different campuses as proof that the campaign has been carried out in an effective manner. The ambassadors are required to submit periodic reports of the coverage that their activities have received in the local media.


Media Strategy

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MEDIA STRATEGY

Media objectives

1) To reach 40% of the target audience an average of ďŹ ve times and 60% of the target audience at least three times over the course of the campaign. 2) To increase interaction between members of the target audience using social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and the RAW website. 3) To break through the clutter of everyday advertising faced by college students by choosing media options that are effective and accountable 4) Use a pulsating pattern of scheduling to execute the campaign with periods of heavy intense media activity followed by sustained reminder activity. PAGE 27

5) To maximize media coverage and effective spending by using strong public relations initiatives. 6) Use social media to build interaction and buzz among target audiences

Media Plan The media plan for the campaign hinges on the ability to create social interactions among our audience through the use of nontraditional media. This would include ambient, guerilla marketing, public relations, and online initiatives.

Media Strategy The strategy stresses on using half of the budget towards awarding scholarships to students who will be the brand ambassadors for The Century Council at their respective schools. The second half of the budget will be allocated to the campus RAW Ambassadors so that they may organize, execute, and promote various events and activities that will engage students across the campus.


BUDGET With the allocated budget of $10 million, 50% will go to scholarships leaving the other 50% to implementing the RAW promotions on 250 of the largest universities in the United States. Table 1

Table 2

Chart 7

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TARGET MARKET OF TOP 250 UNIVERSITIES IN THE UNITED STATES


FLoW CHART 2 RAW Allocation of Funds 250 Scholarships $5,000 each 3,750 Scholarships $1,000 each RAW Promotion Money

9

Aug 16 23 30

6

Sep 13 20 27

4

Oct 11 18 25

1

8

Nov 15 22 29

6

Dec 13 20 27 28

4

Jan 11 18 25

1

8

Feb 13 18 22

1

Mar 8 15 29

5

Apr 12 19 26

3

May 10 17 24

% of Budget

12.50% 37.50% 50% Total

Academic Year for a Campus of 20,000 Students Year-Round RAW Promotions RAW Website - Design RAW Twitter RAW Facebook RAW Monthly Newsletters - For a Campus Newspaper with a Circulation of 20,000 RAW Ambassador Handouts - 5 RAW Ambassadors Pass Out 100 Handouts Each Month Subtotal

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RAWatholon Keg toss - 2 Empty Kegs Can Crushing - 2 can crushers Drunk Goggle Obstacle Course - 2 Drunk Simulation Goggles 3 Legged Race Sponsored Food Tent Health Service Speaker T-shirts - 350 Shirts 4 Medals 1 Trophy Posters - 200 Color Single-sided Subtotal RAW Week RAW Stamps - 10 Self-inking Stamps RAW Posters - 200 Color Single-sided RAW Newspaper Advertisement - 1 Full Page Ad with One Color in Campus Newspaper Message in a Bottle - 100 Color RAW Concierge - Rent 5 tuxedos RAW Line-up - 50 Posters Beer Bottle Pile Mock Pass-out Health Service Speaker Subtotal Total of all Categories Contingency TOTAL

1% 0% 0%

Cost

$1,250,000.00 $3,750,000.00 $5,000,000.00 $10,000,000.00

$250.00 FREE FREE

54%

$10,800.00

2.62%

$525.00 $11,575.00

2% 0.02%

$398.00 $40.00

1.50% 0% 0% 0% 10% 0.16% 0.10% 1%

0.75% 1%

3.50% 0.50% 5% 0.45% 0% 0% 0%

$300.00 FREE Sponsorship Volunteer $2,000.00 $22.00 $20.00 $200.00 $2,980.00

$150.00 $200.00

$700.00 $100.00 $1,000.00 $90.00 Provide Your Own Volunteers Volunteer $2,240.00 $16,795.00 $3,205.00 $20,000.00


EVALUAT IoN 1. EVALUATION: Use performance studies and surveys within the top schools to evaluate effectiveness. 2. EVALUATION: Use current marketing metrics to calculate impressions on the target audience.

4. CREATIVE EVALUATION: Creative executions will be evaluated by copy testing various creative elements in order to insure it’s effectiveness among the target audience. There will be a post creative execution survey distributed to measure the effectiveness of the campaign. These evaluative tests will be used for pursuasive ability and effectiveness.

“The fun I had Freshman year isn’t worth failing out and living back at home.”

PAGE 30

3. EVALUATION: Use click through rates and calculations of the number of people posting/commenting/blogging on all of the sites to determine effectiveness.


REFERENCES The Century Council Home web page http://www.centurycouncil.org/ Sphinx Advertising primary research The CORE Alcohol and Drug Survey (Core Institute at Southern Illinois University) www.siu.edu/~coreinst/results.htm NIAAA www.collegedrinkingprention.gov National Survey on Drug Use and Health (Dept. of Health and Human Services) www.oas.samhsa.gov/

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Syndicated research studies and software US Census Bureau 2006 Simmons Media Research

Xaverius, P., Tenkku, L., Salas, J., & Morris, D. (2009, January). Exploring Health by Reproductive Status: An Epidemiological Analysis of Preconception Health. Journal of Women’s Health (15409996), 18(1), 49-56. Retrieved March 24, 2009, doi:10.1089/jwh.2007.0629 Wilson, R. (2008, December 5). Despite Alcohol Crackdown, the Party Goes On. (Cover story). Chronicle of Higher Education, 55(15), A1-A21. Retrieved March 24, 2009, from Academic Search Premier database. McCulloch, A., & McMurran, M. (2008, December). Evaluation of a treatment programme for alcoholrelated aggression. Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health, 18(4), 224-231. POPE, J. (2008, September 8). College Presidents Spark Debate on Drinking Age. Community College Week, 21(2), 8-8.

Academic and Scholarly publications Song, E., Reboussin, B., Foley, K., Kaltenbach, L., Wagoner, K., & Wolfson, M. (2009, January 15). Selected Community Characteristics and Underage Drinking. Substance Use & Misuse, 44(2), 179-194. Colby, S., Colby, J., & Raymond, G. (2009, January). College versus the real world: Student perceptions and implications for understanding heavy drinking among college students. Addictive Behaviors, 34(1), 17-27.

Sharma, M., & Kanekar, A. (2008, August). Binge Drinking Interventions among College Students. Journal of Alcohol & Drug Education, pp. 3,8. Kerr, W., Greenfield, T., Bond, J., Ye, Y., & Rehm, J. (2009, January). Age–period–cohort modelling of alcohol volume and heavy drinking days in the US National Alcohol Surveys: divergence in younger and older adult trends. Addiction, 104(1), 27-37. Eshbaugh, E. (2008, December). Factors that Predict Self-Perceived Problem Drinking Among College Students. Journal of Alcohol & Drug Education, 52(3), 72-88.


ACKNoWLEDGEMENTS This campaign was a true collaborative effort involving numerous departments across campus including: School of Journalism, Dept. of Cinema and Photography, Dept. of Radio and Television, Dept. of Speech Communication, American Marketing Association, Saluki Advertising Agency, and Public Relations Student Society of America.

We would like to extend a special thanks to Dean Gary Kolb, Ron Graves, Clare Mitchell , the Daily Egyptian, Jerry Bush, Zach Englum, the JRNL 301 students, the Hammered Student Group and our photographer Madelyn Kime. AAF OfďŹ cers President: Karyn Graham Vice President: Cole Singleton Creative Director: Jenna Smith Design Manager: Tiffany Cochran Media Director: Erin Kressner Presentation Team Eugene Wilson Nicole Williams Erin Kressner Andrew Disper Heather Fegan Thanks to the following AAF Members: Kristina Kaganer, John Robbens, Anthony Gladney, Kate Lulinski, Kelsey Marlow, Kristina Skoniecke, Jake Feasby, Katilin Marlow, Izzy Lara and Erin Koelkebeck.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR FACULTY ADVISOR PROF. NARAYANAN IYER

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We are extremely grateful to Dir. William Freivogel, Ms. Karen Waldron, and Ms. Sherida Evans at the School of Journalism for their help in organizing our trip and representing Southern Illinois University Carbondale at NSAC. We would like to thank our professors in the School of Journalism for laying a strong foundation towards our future careers in advertising.


Responsibility Always Wins

Sphinx Advertising AAF 2009 Campaign  

DELIVERING STRONG RESULTS AND POWERFUL IDEAS, WE ARE SPHINX ADVERTISING—AN INTEGRATED MARKETING AGENCY.

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