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SIU DOCUMENT SERIES

D5/2006

Annual Report 2005 Norad Fellowship Programme The International Summer School at the University of Oslo (UiO) The Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education Annual Report from the Programme Board for Scholarship Programmes managed by SIU


 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005


Foreword Gunnar Bjune Chair NFP Board

Table of contents The Norad Fellowship Programme (NFP) at a / 04/ crossroad Higher education – a catalyst in capacity / 05/ building for development Enhancing institutional competence in the South / 06/ Patterns of recruitment and scientific / 08/ production of knowledge Impressions and summing up of Master /14/ programmes offered

Professional and social networking /16/ The Winter Seminar at Sanderstølen The “Vatnahalsen” Seminar

Travails for the future: The evaluation of the NFP /22 / The International Summer School (UIO) /24/ Professional and administrative development /25/ Accounts 2005 Programme Board and Administration 2005 Annual Reports from Institutions The Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural /38/ Edu­cation 2003-2005

Published by the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education (SIU) in November 2006. Lay Out/ Trude Tenold/ Konvoi PRINTED BY/ Grafisk Trykk CIRCULATION/ 150 ISSN 1890-1050 SIU Document Series

The Norad Fellowship Programme (NFP) is coming to an end. The new Norad Programme for Master Studies (NOMA) is going to replace the NFP and a programme document has been prepared for the period 2006-2010. The past year has been a year preparing for a major change. So what can we say about the NFP as it approaches the end? The report of the external evaluation, received in June 2005, says a lot and provides useful inputs that will be important in implementation of the NOMA programme. Under the NFP a large number of students have studied in Norway on grants from Norad. NFP has also contributed significantly to develop commitment and skills in Norwegian institutions for collaborating with the South. The number of Norwegian educators dedicated to work for and with the South is impressive. This would not have happened without the NFP. Knowledge gained through these collaborative networks has definitely been of fundamental importance for the development of a positive relation to countries in the South. At the same time these people have widened the horizon of their respective institutions and thus amplified their personal commitment to become an institutional commitment. On the other hand, an important lesson from the past experience is that in the future we will need to establish better monitoring and evaluation routines and follow up the students who have been supported with grants from Norway. This is important to document the achievements and weaknesses of the Norwegian effort and to make adjustments on the way. Continuous monitoring and evaluation calls for clarity of goals and objectives. During the duration of NFP, Norwegian development cooperation with South went through many changes in goals, strategies and styles, and to what extent these changes were or could be transferred to a documented policy for “higher education for development” for the South is an open question. It will be important to learn and improve performance on the basis of past experience in this context. A related challenge in the future will be to assure that efforts under NOMA are as far as possible compatible with the Quality reform and result-based financing of Norwegian institutions. All change is painful and causes anxiety. NOMA sets into motion a new effort and change and it is the next five years that will give us information as to what extent we have been able to learn from the past to make improvements for the future. The new direction set in NOMA will only be registered if we compare it to experiences of the past. Radical changes are more dependent upon history than “business as usual” style programmes. That is why this annual report, the last of its kind, is important.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 


The Norad Fellowship Programme at a crossroad The Norad Fellowship Programme (NFP) has developed from offering individuals from countries in the South an education to a strategic programme aimed at enhancing institutional competence in the South. The vision has been that good educational opportunities at Norwegian universities and university colleges contribute to increased competence in our partner countries. There are no doubts that this programme also has contributed to the internationalisation of Norwegian universities and university colleges.

 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Promoting linkages between institutions of higher education and public administration institutions and civil society provides the backdrop of the Norad Fellowship programme today. Through academic, social and cultural learning, the programme has invested in human resources to promote development in the South. Enrolment in tertiary education is on the increase in developing countries, and women are continuing to progress toward achieving parity with men. Still there are striking differences in levels of female participation in tertiary education. The Norad Fellowship Programme has made gender parity a goal and in 2005 nearly 42 percent of the enrolled candidates in the study programmes were women. The scope, focus and organisation of the programme have changed over the years. In recent years Norwegian institutions have made some serious efforts to assist institutions of higher education in the South to develop their own Master degree


programmes catering even better to the needs of work force in the South. This is an exciting, although challenging, scenario which opens up for the mutual exchange of experience and development of partnerships between the institutions of learning in Norway and the South. The year 2005 is historic as it marks the end of the last 5 year agreement signed in 2001 and the additional agreement of 2004 between Norad and the Norwegian Council for Higher Education (UHR), for the Norad Fellowship Programme, managed by the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education (SIU). Norad had already commissioned in 2004 a thorough review of the programme. The subsequent evaluation was conducted by an independent consulting group and the report outlining some major changes for the future was presented in August 2005. Negotiations for a new framework agreement with an altered programme focus and content for

the period 2006–2010 between the contracting parties Norad and SIU and stakeholders began shortly afterwards and the process, although not concluded, in 2005 was well under way at the end of the year. The NFP up to 2005 conforms to the major development cooperation policy guidelines which are spelled out in the following documents: St. meld. Nr. 19 (1995–1996), Innst.S.nr.229 (1995–1996). The Foreign Ministry’s strategy for strengthening research and higher education in connection to developing countries, the priority sectors in the individual countries and guidelines for economic assistance to research and competence building in developing countries in the national budget. The agreements of 2001 and 2004 have been instruments for achieving strategic competence development, in the public sector and civil society in the South through international Master programmes mainly offered in Norway and a tool for further development of the programme portfolio, including a Norad Fellows Network.

Higher Education – a catalyst in capacity building for development Today the international community is making a concerted effort to achieve the United Nations Millenium Development Goals that call for universal enrollment in primary education and the elimination of gender disparities in primary and secondary education. If these goals for basic education are to be achieved, developing countries will need skilled human resources. It is here that tertiary education institutions have a part to play. Effective poverty reduction depends heavily on scientific capacity, both to help develop appropriate poverty reduction strategies, and to put them to the test and innovate them. There can be no doubt that higher education institutions are central to human capital formation by training a qualified labour force for the public and private labour market including provision of capacity to deliver goods and services. Higher education can produce a professional and competent leadership that is a necessary foundation for democracy, nation building and social cohesion, and contribute to sound political and economic governance. Over the past forty years some 6000 students from develop­ ing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America have received training mostly at post-graduate level, at mainly Norwegian institutions of higher learning through the Norad Fellowship Programme. A substantial number of them are women. The idea has been to provide students from developing countries with higher education with a view to strengthening strategic compe­tence in public administration, civil society and the private sector in their countries of origin. Thus, the knowledge and skills they obtain are directly ploughed into the insti­ tutions they represent. In addition to the academic skills and

knowledge obtained in the academic programmes, Norad fellows have benefited from the learning and the exchanging of ideas with fellow students from other countries in an environment very different from their home countries. The Norwegian academic environment, which is characterised by egalitarian attitudes, critical reflection and independent thinking, has imparted a further value beyond professional competence to the candidates participating in the programme. The outcome has been individual competence building for institutional capacity building. Yet the record is not unblemished. The external evaluation of the NFP (Evaluation of the Norad Fellowship Programme, 2005) concludes that the impact of ploughing in funds for over four decades has been difficult to identify, that they are dispersed and that activities have not been so goal directed since the objectives themselves of the programme have not been clearly defined. “Wouldn’t it be cheaper and better to develop programmes closer to home – in the students’ own countries,” they suggest? In many cases it certainly might, and the programme has already since 2002 been supporting the development of studies at universities in developing countries.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 


Enhancing institutional competence in the south The NFP’s objective has been to contribute to the strengthening of institutional cooperation and staff development between the North and the South. It has also aimed to cre­ate favourable conditions for the development and exchange of academic, social and cul­tural knowledge as regards important de­ velop­ment issues and relations in the South. The Norad Fellowship Programme has provided 2-year Master’s degree studies mainly at Norwegian educational institutions and since 2002 four Master degree studies in the South aimed at candidates from Norad’s partner countries. The courses place emphasis on relevance through fieldwork, which for most courses are carried out in the student’s homeland or region. An overview of the subjects covered by these theses in 2005 and the fact that they are based on fieldwork in the South show that they address important local and national issues, and contribute thereby to the overall production of highly relevant knowledge for their societies. In connection with the fieldwork, considerable attention has been devoted in 2005 to the further development of course models, such as the sandwich-model, and the establishment of closer links with cooperating partners at institutions in the South.

Some highlights Bodø University Collage, a relatively new actor in the NFP, has in the course of its short participation signed cooperation agreements with the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and with the University of Havana, Cuba, with FLASCO (a research institute that also run master programmes) in Guatemala and University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka. They are at present in the process of signing a cooperation agreement with the University of Malawi, Makerere University, Uganda, and working towards similar cooperation with institutions in Bangladesh and Tanzania. At the local level in the Department of Social Sciences, the programme has lead to an increase in the international activity and has developed a broader international engagement among their staff members. For the Bodø University Collage the pro-

 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

gramme has enabled them to admit more students from the South, and through this diversified their student group. At NTNU institutional collaboration with the South is highly prioritised and forms the basis for the recruitment of fellows to the study programmes. The programmes in Technology, for example, have established significant contact with key people in co­operating institutions over the years particularly as regards the Master’s thesis. In line with Norad’s policy guidelines, this has been a good starting point for collaboration, as students have worked on topics selected together with their sponsoring institutions. Most of the collaborating institutions and organisations in the partner countries use the programmes systematically for continuing education and specialisation of their young professional staff. In addition, each department has had a wide range of international activities in various research areas which have further enhanced the academic quality of the study programmes. Of special relevance have been the cooperative ventures in 2005 between NTNU and Venezuela, Algeria, China, India and Brazil. Similarly the programme in development studies has established important contacts with Makerere University, Uganda, and the University of Dar-es-Salam in Tanzania in 2004-2005. Many of the lecturers at the Department of Geography have been involved in giving lectures and in supervising students for their Master’s theses. A majority of the Norad students recruited to the programme are from collaborating institutions in Sri Lanka, Ethiopia and Tanzania. The Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering has also large scale cooperation with Kathmandu and Tribhuvan Universities in Nepal. Of special interest for the NFP has been NTNU’s focus on recruiting staff from few institutions, and over a long period of time, so as to be able to build up sustainable capacity and enhance institutional competence in the South. For UMB at Ås, Norad fellows have been actively recruited from around 15 institutions in the South with which UMB has formalised academic cooperation. With 40 Norad fellows during 2005, it is obvious that course activities have contributed to the internationalisation process at UMB as well at institutions in the South. Noragric/MNRSA works closely with professional networks in Nepal, Uganda and Ethiopia, while Department of Economics and Resource Management (IØR/DRE) has close cooperation with Makerere University, Uganda and International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and with institutions in Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania, Nepal and Indonesia.


Countries: Norad Fellowship Programme.

The University of Oslo has also established extensive institutional collaboration with partner higher educational institutions in the South during the last five years, and is in the forefront together with NTNU establishing Master studies programmes entirely in the South in the NFP programme period ending 2005. Norad students have been generally recruited through formal cooperation agreements or informal research collaboration with universities, teaching hospitals, local authorities, NGO’s and schools. Of special importance as regards the NFP are the collaborative activities with institutions in Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Uganda, Malawi, Ethiopia, Sudan, Mali, Vietnam, China, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Nicaragua, Guatemala and Cuba. Course activities under the NFP represent an important internationalisation factor at UIO, in particular in the areas of health, education, (including special need education), information technology, and cross cutting issues in connection with development and poverty reduction. Similarly the Universities of Stavanger, Tromsø and Bergen have established institutional collaboration with higher educational

institutions and public and private organisations in the South with the aim of facilitating recruitment and post graduate training of students to the NFP from developing countries in the fields of petroleum, fisheries, health, gender and indigenous studies, anthropology and public administration. In conclusion, the development of North-South collabo­ration and institutional support, particularly the NFP Master’s studies in the South, provide challenges to the institutions involved, both locally and centrally, in the form of increased need for communication between various levels within the institution and between institutions, in relation to course planning, quality control of course content and delivery, practical and logistical issues related to admissions, student and staff mobility, welfare, funding and financial issues and reporting. However, these challenges have in a positive manner necessitated the development of partnerships as well as internal development and international orientation, between the North and South, of the institutions and national authorities involved.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 


Patterns of recruitment and scientific production of knowledge There has been a steady increase in the interest among students for the NFP in the past few years, although 2005 shows a slight drop in the number of applications. Generally, applications have been submitted at Norwegian embassies abroad and then sent to SIU. The procedures for information and submission of applications at the embassies have been made more effective and the cooperation between the embassies and SIU has functioned very well. However, we still experience that a small percentage of the applications are sent directly by students to some educational institutions. A total of 2144 applicants were

registered in the database for 2005, 148 fewer applicants than in 2004. However, if one takes into account the fact that there were fewer courses being offered in 2005 the percentage of applicants is relatively stable. The table below presents the number of applicants sorted by institution and course. Please note that Stavanger University College (HIS) has changed status from January 1, 2005. The new name is The University of Stavanger (UiS). Also, The Agricultural University of Norway (NLH) has changed name to The Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB).

Applications for Norad Fellowship Programme 2005 (by institution and course) Institution HIBO

Course Name Master in Comparative Social Work

UiS (former HIS)

Master of Science Programme in Petroleum Engineering

UMB (former NLH)

NTNU

UIB

UIO

UIT

Course Applications 94

Total 94

60

60

Management of Natural Resources and Sustainable Agriculture (MNRSA) Development and Resource Economics

336 243

579

Hydropower Development Petroleum Engineering and Petroleum Geoscience Social Change

136 93 79

308

Gender and Development Health Sciences (International Health) Public Administration

45 118 208

371

Comparative and International Education International Community Health Special Needs Education UDSM: Health and Management Information Systems (Tanzania and Malawi) UEM: Information Systems (Mozambique) UEM: Public Health (Information Systems Track) (Mozambique) UWC: Public Health (Information Systems Track) (South Africa)

130 188 39 12 117 35 79

600

78 54

132

International Fisheries Management Master Programme in Indigenous Studies

Total number of applications

 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

2144


Gender parity The courses at UMB and UiB had fewer applications, whilst NFP study programmes at UiO, UiT, NTNU, UiS and University College at Bodø had an increase in the number of applications. UiO received the most (600) applications, including their Master studies courses in the South. Similar to 2004, most applicants were from Ethiopia, Bangladesh, Nepal, Tanzania and Zambia. Ethiopia tops the list with 552 applicants, whereas Mozambique had only 11 applicants. New for the NFP in 2005 are the large number of applicants from Malawi, Pakistan and Nigeria.

Strategic investment in education also involves emphasizing the need for a pro active policy aimed at recruiting more women at all levels, including higher education. There is no doubt that such policies are an important instrument for bringing about social and economic change. The Programme Board encour­ ages women applicants and in the case of equally qualified candidates, the selection process favours women. The number of women applicants has been over 20% and stable in the past few years. The year 2002 was exceptional, with nearly 50% women applicants. In 2005, as the table below shows, only 26% of all applicants were women. Representation of women is specially low for high application countries such as Nepal, Ethiopia and Bangladesh. For Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi however, the percentage is relatively higher.

Applicants for Norad Fellowship Programme 2005 (by nationality and gender) Country Angola Bangladesh Bhutan China East Timor Eritrea Ethiopia Guatemala India Indonesia Iran Laos Madagascar Malawi Maldives Mali Mozambique Nepal Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan The Palestinian Territory South Africa Sri Lanka Sudan Tanzania Uganda Vietnam Zambia Zimbabwe Total number

Female

Male

Total

0 21 0 7 1 9 97 2 6 19 4 1 1 58 4 1 5 39 0 14 12 3 2 27 4 61 77 26 47 18

1 87 2 3 3 23 455 2 8 37 6 0 5 95 5 1 6 149 2 105 96 15 6 51 7 126 133 32 94 23

1 108 2 10 4 32 552 4 14 56 10 1 6 153 9 2 11 188 2 119 108 18 8 78 11 187 210 58 141 41

% Of Female Applicants 0,0% 19,4% 0,0% 70,0% 25,0% 28,1% 17,6% 50,0% 42,9% 33,9% 40,0% 100,0% 16,7% 37,9% 44,4% 50,0% 45,5% 20,7% 0,0% 11,8% 11,1% 16,7% 25,0% 34,6% 36,4% 32,6% 36,7% 44,8% 33,3% 43,9%

566

1578

2144

26,4%

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 


Applicants by course and gender 2005 It is positive to note that there were female applicants for all courses starting in the autumn of 2005. As we see in the table below, women are well represented in the fields of Health, Education and Social Sciences. Technical subjects such as Hydropower Development, Petroleum Engineering, Electrical Power Engineering and Information Systems

still attract few women candidates. There is also great variation between the different institutions and courses in relation to the percentage of qualified students from the total mass of applicants. It is not clear as to why this is so, although one explanation can be that the institutions interpret the requirements for qualification differently for the various courses.

Applicants for Norad Fellowship Programme 2005 (by course and gender) Course Comparative and International Education Comparative Social Work Development and Resource Economics Gender and Development Health Sciences (International Health) Hydropower Development Indigenous Studies International Community Health International Fisheries Management Management of Natural Resources and Sustainable Agriculture (MNRSA) Petroleum Engineering Petroleum Engineering and Petroleum Geoscience Public Administration Social Change - specialising in Geography Special Needs Education UDSM: Health and Management Information Systems (Tanzania and Malawi) UEM: Information Systems (Mozambique) UEM: Public Health (Information Systems Track) (Mozambique) UWC: Public Health (Information Systems Track) (South Africa) Total number of applicants

10 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Female

Male

Total

% Of Female Applicants

47 39 51 29 38 12 10 85 10

83 55 192 16 80 124 44 103 68

129 94 243 45 118 136 54 188 78

36,2% 41,5% 21,0% 64,4% 32,2% 8,8% 18,5% 45,2% 12,8%

74 3 10 59 30 16

262 57 83 149 49 23

336 60 93 208 79 39

22,0% 5,0% 10,8% 28,4% 38,0% 41,0%

1 25 4 23

11 92 31 56

12 117 35 79

8,3% 21,4% 11,4% 29,1%

566

1578

2144

26,4%


EnrolLment Out of a total of 2114 applicants, 118 students were enrolled into the Norad Fellowship Programme. The majority of the applicants to the programme came this year from Ethiopia, Uganda, Nepal and Tanzania. Ethiopia and Uganda topped the list with 21 and 17 enrolled candidates respectively.

41.5% of the enrolled applicants were women, which is an increase since 2004 when the percentage was 37,1%. However, women should still be encouraged to apply, so as to again reach the top year of 2002 when the percentage of female applicants for the first time reached 50%.

Enrolled Norad Fellows 2005 (by nationality and gender) Country Bangladesh China Eritrea Ethiopia Guatemala India Indonesia Malawi Maldives Mozambique Nepal Nigeria East Timor Pakistan The Palestinian Territory Sri Lanka South Africa Tanzania Uganda Vietnam Zambia Zimbabwe Total number of enrolled students

Female

Male

Total

% Of Female Students

5 1 1 4 0 1 2 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 7 4 5 8 3

4 0 0 17 1 0 4 4 1 0 4 2 2 2 1 1 2 5 13 2 3 1

9 1 1 21 1 1 6 6 1 4 4 2 2 2 1 3 2 12 17 7 11 4

55,6% 100% 100% 19% 0% 100% 33,3% 33,3% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 66,7% 0% 58,3% 23,5% 71,4% 72,7% 75%

49

69

118

41,5%

For the past few years, institutions have experienced that first choice candidates have refused scholarships at the last moment, creating problems for suitable recruitment of candidates to the study programme. For example, the MA in International Fisheries Management at the UiT had to recruit four out of five new candidates to fill up the available places. A probable explanation is that top students from the South apply for several programmes of study abroad and then select the most suitable offer.

An important development that has facilitated the registration process of applicants and enrollment to study programmes has been the transfer of all relevant data to a common programme used by all NFP institutions in the North, the Common Student Database (Felles Studentsystem “FS�).

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 11


The Production of Scientific Knowledge As the table below shows, a 113 out of a total 118 Norad fellows completed their Masters thesis in 2005.

Master degree theses by institution and programme Institution and programme

Number of Master theses completed in 2005

Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB) M.Sc. in Development and Resource Economics M.Sc. in Management of Natural Resources and Sustainable Agriculture Total UMB

5 21 26

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) M.Phil. in Development Studies, specialising in Geography M.Sc. in Hydropower Development M.Sc. in Petroleum Engineering/ Petroleum Geoscience Total NTNU

3 11 8 22

University of Bergen (UiB) M.Sc. in Fisheries Biology and Fisheries Management M.Phil. in Health Sciences (International Health) M.Phil. in Public Administration M.Phil in Antropology of Development Total UiB

9 4 5 11 29

University of Oslo (UiO) M.Phil. in Comparative and International Education M.Phil. in International Community Health M.Sc. in Information Systems - UEM M.Sc. in Public Health (Information System Track) - UEM M.Sc. in Public Health (Information Systems Track) - UWC Total UiO

5 7 4 2 7 25

University of Tromsø (UiT) M.Sc. in International Fisheries Management (UiT) Total UiT

5 5

Bodø University College M.Sc. in Comparative Social Work Total HIBO

6 6

Total all institutions

The following fields of study dominate the scientific production of knowledge: Management of Natural Resources in Development, Hydropower Development, Anthropology of Development, Fisheries Biology and Fisheries Management, Information Systems and International Health.

12 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

113


In 2005 Norad Fellows came from 18 countries and nearly 42% of all theses were submitted by women. Topping the list were women from Tanzania, Ethiopia and Uganda. Full text publishing of Master theses has been possible for Norad Fellowship students since 2000. In 2005 four students have published their theses online.

M.Phil. in Public Administration, UiB: Dangal, Rameshwor (Nepal) Ref.23-2005 Administrative Culture in Nepal: Does it reflect the dominant socio-cultural values of Nepal? www.ub.uib.no/elpub/2005/h/701002/ ISBN (Only for the electronic document): 82-8088-475-0 Mruma, Rosemary Oswald (Tanzania) Ref.70-2005 Implementation of the National Environment Policy: A Case of the Local Government Authorities in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania www.ub.uib.no/elpub/2005/h/701004/ ISBN (Only for the electronic document): 82-8088-488-2

M.Sc. in Public Health (Information System Track) – UWC, UiO: Phillip, Ajith (South Africa) Ref.89-2005 An Assessment of Equity in geographical allocation of resources relative to need, in public primary healthcare services in the Northern Cape in South Africa www.ub.uib.no/elpub/NORAD/2005/UWC/thesis01/ (Ajith John Philip) ISBN (Only for the electronic document): 82-8088-443-2

Master degree theses by country and gender in 2005 Country Angola Bangladesh Bhutan China Ethiopia India Malawi Mozambique Namibia Nepal Nicaragua Pakistan South Africa Sri Lanka Tanzania Uganda Vietnam Zambia Total

Female 3 2

3 4 1 8 6 4 2

Male 1 9 1 4 8 2 3 1 2 8 1 1 2 4 3 6 7 2

Total 4 11 1 7 15 2 6 2 3 8 1 4 6 5 11 12 11 4

48

65

113

3 7 3 1 1

M.Sc. in International Fisheries Management, UiT: Nguyen, Thong Ba (Vietnam) Ref.80-2005 Fishery Resources of the Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam: The state of indicator species monitored by bottom trawl surveys www.ub.uib.no/elpub/NORAD/2005/uit/thesis01/ ISBN (Only for the electronic document): 82-8088-511-0 For further details see the attached report, A Bibliography of NFP Master theses 2005. An overview of the subjects covered by these theses and the fact that they are based on fieldwork in the South show that they address important local and national issues and contribute thereby, to the overall production of knowledge highly relevant for their societies.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 13


The Norad Fellowship Programme’s impressions and summing up of the annual reports by insti­tutions Thirteen courses at Norwegian institutions and 3 courses in the South were offered by the Norad Fellowship Programme in 2005. During the spring of 2006 the institutions in­volved in the NFP were required to report on the progress of the programme courses in 2005. This annual reporting includes both a report for each course, focusing on the assessment of academic results, fieldwork and changes of an academic and/or organisational nature implemented during the last year. The reporting also includes an institutional report on, among other things, academic accomplishments in relation to aims, institutional collaboration with partner institutions in the student’s home countries and other institutional and organisational factors. Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB) reports of having formalised academic cooperation with 15 professional institutions in the South from which its 40 Norad fellows in 2005 are recruited. All MSc courses for Norad fellows are open for regular UMB students and exchange students. NFP courses are important components of UMB’s international teaching. However, the proposed reduction of student intake from 18 in 2005 to 14 in 2006 has created difficulties for planning and implementation of the NFP Master’s programme. Cooperation between UMB and SIU has been good. The introduction course for new students together with the international week has been extremely successful in integrating students and informing them about Norwegian way of life and study. Bodø University College is one out of two institutions that received their first Norad fellows in the fall of 2004. The institution has signed agreements with several countries in the South. For Bodø University College the programme has enabled them to admit more students from the South and through this diver-

14 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

sified their student group. The one year Master programme in Comparative Social Work consists of courses and a thesis, and Norwegian students also participate in the course programme, because Comparative Social Work can be chosen as elective courses for the Norwegian student at the 2 year Master programme in Social Work. The students join together in internet based discussion groups and they also have common video meetings between the University of KwaZulu-Natal and Bodø University College. There are many challenging and interesting possibilities of creating contacts between social workers in the South and North through the two Master programmes in Social Work. Norad students start their Master course by participating in Bodø International Summer School doing the course Managing Diversity. They get to know the surroundings in Bodø, the library, the ICT system and they get to go to an “Arctic Escape” (Camping and canoeing). NTNU had three courses with Norad fellows, from which 22 fellows graduated in 2005. The wide range of international activities in the various research areas have further enhanced the academic quality of the study programmes. NTNU reports that institutional collaboration is highly prioritised and forms the basis of the recruitment of the fellows to the study programmes. Several institutions/organisations in the South use the technical courses at NTNU systematically for continuing education and specialisation of their young professional staff. The Master degree programme M.Phil Social Change has in 2005 established valuable contacts with Sri Lanka, Ethiopia and Tanzania, and a majority of the Norad students are recruited from collaborating institutions in these countries. Study programmes report that most of the Norad students achieve good academic results as they have a strong academic background and are generally very motivated. NTNU notes that more and more candidates apply for both Norad and Quota financing for the same programme. Stavanger University College is the other of the two new institutions with students from the Norad Fellowship Programme. The


Winter Seminar, Sanderstølen.

institution reports that it has established collaborations with several institutions in the South that are of relevance to the NFP, such as Universities in Madagascar, Nigeria, South Africa, China, Tanzania, Indonesia and East Timor. The establishment of the Master degree programme in Petroleum Engineering and joining the NFP programme has had a substantial institutional impact on internationalisation of the institution. The Master in Petroleum Engineering is important in UiS’s overall marketing and recruitment strategy. Norwegian students attend the same classes, gain the same competence and knowledge, and obtain the same degree. The University of Bergen reports institutional collaboration with several universities in the South, especially in Ghana, Bangladesh, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Most of the Norad fellows also come from these universities and many fellows write their Masters theses on topics of local relevance and conduct their fieldwork in their home countries. Almost all graduates have returned back to their respective home countries and returned to the positions which they had prior to their arrival in the government, semi-government sectors, education and research organisations and NGO’s. The University of Oslo reports that all NFP Master courses in Norway are integrated into the UiO teaching arrangements and degree structure, and are open to Norwegian and international students alike. Courses in the South are fully integrated into the teaching arrangements of their home institutions and are on the whole recognised at the UiO as compatible with, or equivalent to courses given at UiO, since course planning, teaching and supervision is largely carried out jointly by both institutions. NFP courses in the South are also offered to local students in addition to NFP students, and several UiO students take some modules offered as part of their degree in Norway. UiO reports that this kind of cooperation is extremely relevant for the capacity building in the South by contributing to institutional development and transformation in accordance with general development and specific Norad Fellowship Programme goals.

The University of Tromsø has 12 cooperation agreements with institutions in the South of relevance for the study programme under the Norad Fellowship Programme. The University has a centralised system of student recruitment, pre-evaluation and checking of applicants’ credentials and admission apparatus. In 2005 only the International Fisheries Management study programme took new student intake. The courses supported by NFP are open to other students, such as Norwegians and self financed international students. Thus, the courses offered to the Norad students are part of the mainstream study offers at the University and admission is dependent upon fulfilment of regular admission requirements. UiT reports that the applicants’ database prepared by SIU signifies a major administrative improvement for local admissions work. UiT has a ten year long tradition of arranging an introduction week for new international students, including the Norad Fellows, which includes a course on cross cultural understanding. The week was also arranged in 2005 and evaluated as a success by the participants. The NFP’s objective has been to contribute to the strengthening of institutional cooperation and staff development in the South. It has also aimed to create favourable conditions for the development and exchange of academic, social and cultural knowledge as regards important development issues and relations in the South. The programme board is pleased to inform that on the whole in 2005, according to reports from educational institutions, the students involved obtained good results, and there were few who dropped out of their studies. Admission to study programmes is highly competitive and performance standards of candidates are high. Institutions also report that most candidates returned to their home countries after completing their education.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 15


Activities in the Norad Fellowship Programme The NFP is primarily a higher educational programme aimed at enhancing academic competence, although the programme has an added value through the wide range of professional and socio-cultural activities that it offers participating students . The Programme Board believes that such activities can provide an excellent opportunity for building a professional network among fellows from their own country, region and across international boundaries.

2005 was an active year for the NFP institutions and candidates. The noteworthy professional and socio-cultural activities that took place under the NFP’s regi were: • The Winter Seminar at Sanderstølen • The Vatnahalsen Seminar mainly for NFP participatory educational institutions in the North • The Norad Fellows Network (NFN) Seminar in Uganda in February 2005 • Bridges of Knowledge, SIU’s biennial conference 2005, roundtable discussion on the Norad Fellowship Programme

The Winter Seminar at Sanderstølen During the first week of January from 3rd – 8th 2005, SIU arranged the annual Norad Fellowship Winter Seminar at Sanderstølen. The participants were Norad fellows, and academic and administrative staff from the courses in the programme. 94 Norad fellows from a total of 17 countries participated, of whom 35 were women and 59 men, along with 19 academic and administrative staff from NTNU, University of Tromsø, University of Oslo, University of Bergen, UMB, Bodø University College and University of Stavanger.

Totalt

2005 18 21 16 19 0* 4 16

2004 19 22 16 11

94

2003 23 23 35 18

2002 32 30 10 10

2001 38 42 33 24

9

5

6

6

6

106

106

88

137

110

2000 38 32 10 24

* HiBø participated with 2 staff members, but no students since these were on field work in their home countries.

16 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

The main aims and content of the seminar The main aim of the seminar was to provide the fellows with an organised opportunity to discuss experiences as Norad fellows at Norwegian learning institutions. The seminar also gave fellows the opportunity to meet Norad fellows from other academic institutions in Norway and participate in discussion groups where they were encouraged to reflect upon different approa­ ches to analysing questions of local relevance. At the same time they were offered a friendly meeting place in a phase where many of them experience personal and practical frustrations related to being a foreign student in an unfamiliar culture.

The main topics in the programme for the fellows were: • • • •

Norad’s vision for the Fellowship Programme Individual reactions on cultural transition Communication and intercultural understanding Higher education and climbing the ladder - from a gender perspective: What the organisational chart doesn’t tell you.

The academic sessions were held each day for four days from 9:00 am – 12:00 p.m and included film presentations, lectures, group work and plenum discussions.

Participants in the Winter Seminar Institusjon UMB (NLH) NTNU UiB UiO HiBø UiS (HiS) UiTø

The number of participants was somewhat lower than in 2004 because of the Tsunami catastrophe and some withdrew at the last moment due to illness.

There was also a session on full text publishing of Master theses, and students received information about publishing their theses online. Norad fellows were also introduced to the Norad Fellows Network and could register themselves already at the seminar.

Cultural aspects The cultural aspects of the seminar have a long tradition in the Fellowship Programme where the fellows are introduced to snow and skiing. Most afternoons during the seminar week were set aside for the fellows to get skiing instruction by professional ski-trainers. Many coordinators from the home institutions also assisted their students with the ski training. Due


to unfavourable weather unfortunately, the skiing experience could not be concluded with a skiing competition on the last day of the seminar. However all fellows were presented with diplomas for participation in the Winter Seminar. Another important event was the cultural evening where the fellows presented their home country through music, song, dance and other forms of performances. The Winter Seminar was undoubtedly a positive arena for mutual cultural learning and exchange between the participants.

Seminar for academic and administrative staff members The seminar also included a separate seminar for the administrative and academic staff. The focus of the seminar was administrative development of the programme and the main topics discussed were: • Presentation of the report on Norwegian experience with the NFP, an historical overview • The future of the NFP network: Function, form and content. • Triangular relations: How should the institutions, secretariat and students relate in the future. • Institutional co-operation in the South – practical and visionary approaches. • Long-term plan for Norad Fellowship Programme – towards a new five year period. The seminar provided an arena for good discussions on the different aspects of the administration and practical implementation of the NFP. Each year the participants are invited to fill out an evaluation form and below are some of the qualitative suggestions:

Organisation • Winter seminar twice during the stay in Norway, e.g. the first seminar as an introduction week • Students from other programmes should be able to participate, it would be useful for them

While the participant evaluation in general shows a high degree of satisfaction with the arrangements, fellows were interested in a more academic programme and more student participation in the plenary and group discussions, combined with a cultural and social programme.

The Vatnahalsen Seminar 2005 SIU annually invites the members of the Programme Board, administrative staff and academic coordinators to a seminar for development of ideas, good education and sound administration of the Norad Fellowship programme. This year’s seminar took place from 12th- 13th October in Bergen. The seminar was well represented this year by participants from all the academic institutions in the programme in Norway and two institutions from the South.

Focus The Norad Fellowship Programme (NFP) has existed for over 40 years and produced over 6000 graduates from Asian, African and Latin American countries during this period. The year 2005 was a turning point for the future of the programme in the light of the comprehensive external evaluation commissioned by Norad. The framework for the discussion was the external Evaluation Report (Evaluation of the Norad Fellowship Programme 1/2005) and the recommendations made by Norad for the future structure and content of the programme. The seminar had 49 participants and the discussion was lively and well informed. The following issues were identified as the most important: • The role of Norwegian institutions in a future NFP programme • Establishling Courses in the South • Course portfolio and Degrees • Long term commitment and stable funding • Defining needs of the South • Measuring relevance and the effects of higher education on development

Content and form of the lectures

Main conclusions

• Group discussions: more student participation and more time to present the results in the plenary sessions • Students presentations relevant for the seminar could be included • Panel discussion on “preparing a thesis” • Suggested theme: Professional career and opportunities after the study in Norway • Suggested theme: How to make the colleagues in your organization accept new ideas after returning from Norway, how do you make your boss accept new ways of thinking • Suggested theme: How Norway has developed into the country it is: from a poor to a rich country (policy/technology/politics)

Participants emphasised the following: • Institutional cooperation and interdependence between North and South should be hallmarks for a development aid programme that aims to contribute to the development of institutions and capacity building in the South. • The programme should aim to create favourable conditions for the development and exchange of academic, social and cultural knowledge as regards important development issues and relations in the South. • The social and cultural interaction between students from diverse cultures gives an added cultural value to the programme. • That the development process hinges on the availability of a critical mass of well-trained personnel, especially in the context of rapid globalisation. • Development of courses in the South requires a long term commitment from the involved actors in the process, such as donors, academic institutions, public and private organizations and ministries. This process should be based upon institutional commitment and not merely individual interest and enthusiasm. • In principle, stipends in Norway should be harmonised. Although at present there are some differences, not

Other issues • Better communication between SIU and the institutions concerning travelling arrangement • The seminar should be open to more second year students so the first year students can get advice from them • Reflections on Norad programmes and projects and research in various countries

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 17


only for students from the South, but also for European students studying in Norway. • Given the diversity of countries in the South and the cost of living, it can be problematic to define a standard sum for a stipend for all countries. There should however be a set of guidelines governing such payments, so that one can establish a common practice that applies for all participating academic institutions in the programme. • Identifying needs in the South is no easy task. Who should define these needs and how should they be defined? Needs must be defined at the level where they can be identified and assessed. • Gender issues are important and the gender perspective should perhaps be incorporated as an integral part of all study programmes.

Bridges of Knowledge, SIU’s biennial conference 2005 The Norad Fellowship Programme (NFP) was also the subject of a group discussion at SIU’s biennial conference. The framework for the discussion were the major recommendations in the Evaluation Report commissioned by Norad and mentioned in the prior section. The group had 23 participants.

Focus

• The establishment of joint degrees has turned out to be a much longer and more complicated process than first anticipated. Are Norwegian institutions interested in putting time and resources into developing joint degrees with institutions in the South? How will they benefit? • Higher education programmes based on a sandwich model with two semesters in Norway and two semesters in the South should be considered as a viable model for cooperation. • The Norwegian Development agency should have a well defined development agenda both generally and specifically for each country and to tally that more closely to the programme. • The establishment of joint degrees has turned out to be a much longer and more complicated process than first anticipated. Are Norwegian institutions interested in putting time and resources into developing joint degrees with institutions in the South? How will they benefit? • Participating actors in the NFP should try to create synergies between the different but complementary programmes such as NUFU and the Quota Scheme.

The Norad Fellowship Network Conference

These issues were identified as the most important: • The role of Norwegian institutions in a future NFP programme • Defining needs and establishing Courses in the South • The Norad Fellowship Programme in relation to the Quota Scheme and NUFU

The Norad Fellowship Network Conference took place from February 25th to 26th, at Speke Resort Munyonyo, outside Kampala, Uganda. It was arranged by the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education (SIU), the University of Bergen and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås. The conference was funded by Norad.

Summing up

The conference was attended by 59 participants from East Africa. The participants were former students at the Norad Fellowship Programme from the University of Bergen and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. In addition to the former Norad students, there were also 33 persons attending the conference as lecturers, special invited guests or staff.

A consensus emerged around the following views: • The Quality Reform in Norway, has brought about a funda­mental change in the conditions and the govern­ance of the universities. This concerns both the increased labour intensity of the teaching, result based budgeting, payment linked to awarding domestic credits and government appointees on governing boards. The institutions have been forced to be even more conscious of the commercial value of their various engagements. There is a real danger that, for the NFP, moving the education to the South, will result in a lower participation on the part of Norwegian institutions. They will ask “what’s in it for us?” in terms of result based budgeting. • Establishing courses in the South raises important issues of quality assurance, accreditation, monitoring (administrative reporting), viability and following up. • There should be a mapping of costs in establishing courses in the South which includes the establishment and support of an acceptable infrastructure at the institutions in the South as well as the costs for institutions in the North. • The question of relevance is an important but difficult issue. Simple causal links are hard to find between HE and poverty reduction. The NFP is a small programme and can only make a modest contribution. • The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Nora) should have a well defined development agenda both generally and specifically for each country and to tally that more closely to the programme.

18 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Goals and visions The aim of the conference was to facilitate for discussions around a Norad Fellowship Network. Both Norad and SIU have made prior attempts to facilitate for network-activities for former Norad fellows. This includes the production and circulation of newsletters, financial support for network-activities initiated by former fellows and Norwegian institutions and facilitating contact between local business enterprises and Norwegian development projects in the South. Efforts have also been made earlier, to assist former fellows in establishing contact with Norwegian enterprises and missions in their home countries. Some of the future goals and visions of the NFN network have been: • To sustain institutional contact and the exchange of scien­tific information among former fellows. An academic update • Support to conduct collaborative research • Financial and administrative assistance in arranging regional scientific seminars and conferences • Limited financial support to exceptional fellows to attend international professional conferences • Support to publish ongoing research by fellows in journals and books • To promote Norad fellows as participants/consul-


NFN Conference, Kampala, Uganda 2005

tants in appropriate Norwegian development projects in the South • The creation of national and regional NFP fellow groups • The creation of an electronic network of fellows which includes their professional profiles. A data pool of professionals available for international and national development agencies and organisations These goals and visions have to be incorporated in the changing context of Norwegian development assistance priorities to higher education in the South and will largely be dependent upon eventually the new/changed direction the NFP will have in the next contract period, 2006 onwards. Some of these challenges are: • Contributing to building and sustaining institutions in the South • Cooperative arrangements between North and South institutions in the production of degrees, “sandwiching”, joint degrees, courses and collaborative modules • Improving participation by women • Greater relevance to local needs • Broader social recruitment of candidates to the NFP

University, the University of Bergen, and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. In addition, presentations were made by representatives from SIU, Norad, and the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Kampala. The quality and content of the scientific presentations varied, but were generally speaking, reasonably good. Some of the most interesting and critical presentations were made by academics from Makerere University, such as Professor Edward Kirumira and Professor John Kaboggoza, about resource management and socio-economic challenges in the South and the future development and relevance of the NFP. The workshops were marked by keen participation by Norad fellows and lively debate among the participants. Especially the workshops about “Challenges to Public Administration”, “Poverty and Management of Natural Resources” and “Addressing the NFN network” had very interesting, highly relevant and constructive discussions.

Practical aspects

The theme of the conference was “The Role and Management of Natural Resources in Local Environments: Theoretical Perspectives Meet Empirical Reality”.

The application deadline was December 21, but due to unforeseen delays was extended and participation was limited to only the first 100 participants. Norad Fellows from Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Sudan were invited. Common for these Fellows was that they were former students of University of Bergen and University of Life Sciences.

Lectures and workshops were arranged on a variety of related themes. Presentations were given by academics from Makerere

It turned out to be an administrative challenge to get hold of the addresses of the former fellows. SIU’s database was to a large

Theme

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 19


degree not updated and the invitations were therefore sent to former Fellows that had stayed in touch with their former institution. This limited unfortunally the number of former Fellows that received the invitation for the conference. All costs were covered for the participants, including travelling and visa refund. Staff members from SIU, the University of Bergen and Makerere University were responsible for administrative and practical arrangements. SIU was the convenor for the conference. A webpage was created prior to the conference, where information about the conference and its programme was published and updated. As the table below shows, Tanzania was most represented, followed by Uganda and Ethiopia. The domestic situation in Eritrea and Sudan probably made travel difficult and partially explains the low participation by fellows from these countries at the conference.

Suggested themes for future conferences • HIV/Aids • Cultural aspects in natural resource exploitation and management • Conflicts in natural resources management • Institutional roles in development i.e. academia/NGO/ govt/local community • Globalisation and management of natural resources • Use of indigenous knowledge for poverty reduction/ alleviation • Role of markets in natural resource management and poverty reduction • Nexus between good governance and natural resource management and poverty reduction • Rural development strategies and challenges • Norwegian foreign policy towards Africa • Norad-fellows and their roles in their respective countries

Suggested improvements to Norad Fellowship Conferences

Participants Tanzania Uganda Ethiopia Eritrea Sudan Kenya

30 16 8 0 1 4

Total

59

Twelve participants from Tanzania that had signed up for the conference and received tickets for air travel from Dar Es Saalam to Kampala, did not show up. The organisers were later informed that they could not participate due to different personal circumstances. Also some former Fellows from Uganda did not show up, most likely for the same reasons as for the Tanzanians. It also turned out that several of participants that signed up before the deadline, had never been fellows at the Norad Fellowship Programme and were therefore not invited to participate. Another group that could not attend the conference was former Fellows living in countries such as England, Canada and the USA. The budget did not allow covering of their travelling expenses. One of the lessons learned concerning the practical arrangement for the conference, was that it needs to be announced well ahead in time before the conference takes place, leaving enough time to make sure the once that sign up actually are from the group of intended participants. As for participants signing up and then not attending the conference, a pre-paid registration fee could solve this problem. It was intended to be used before this year’s conference, but due to lack of access to a bank account in Uganda, this could not be done. The participants therefore paid the registration fee upon arrival at the conference venue.

20 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Evaluation and suggestions

• Information about employment opportunities to Norad fellows • Change of venue annually from one country to the next within the region • Norad fellow presentations in academic sessions • Hold smaller conferences bringing together fellows from each country individually • Give certificates on attendance • Improving selection criteria for workshop participation – i.e. bring balanced number of participants from each country represented, different age groups (batches) and disciplines • Invite scientists or researchers from other universities/ countries than Norway in order to give Norad fellows experience and different ideas on different studies.

Addressing the Norad Fellowship Programme and Network The conference was a first opportunity for SIU to hear directly from former Norad fellows about their potential need for a network after returning to their home countries. SIU representatives were especially interested in the feedback from participants that had been at home for some time and their views on a professional and academic network for support and updating. The following suggestions for improvements of the network were made during the session: • Annual conference either national, regional or international • Providing short courses that will provide practical competence to members • Support to Norad fellows such as funds for research • Support fellows’ local meetings and encourage reporting to SIU/secretariat • Keep up to date mailing list from database/explore best method of communication • Provide periodic information or initiate fellows’ newsletter on quarterly basis with articles from fellows/testimonies/success stories in diverse aspects etc. • SIU should facilitate universities alumni associations and also networking between the alumni of various universities


• Improve on the web-page of the NFN • CV of all Norad fellows in the website • Thematic/or professional networks could be more effective way of networking. Reviewing the suggestions, the most realistic is perhaps to financially support the establishment and running of national / regional networks based on academic interest. Also to improve and update the website is a realistic activity that could be provided by SIU. An ongoing challenge is to keep an updated database of the former fellows contact addresses. Since taking over the administration of the programme, SIU has established a database where former fellows could register their name, institutional affiliation, what course they attended and their email address(es). However, during the preparation for the conference it became apparent that this database is far from updated. As the former fellows first and foremost feel affiliated with their former institution in Norway, they do to a little degree stay in touch with SIU to update information on for example their (e-mail) addresses if they move, get married and change their name, get a new job etc. The result of this is that SIU’s database is not updated and that the institutions to a larger degree have more relevant information. There are at the moment few good suggestions on how to solve this challenge. Perhaps, information registered in the SIU database could be forwarded to the institutions, who could then update it. It would, however, need continual updating for it to be a permanent solution.

Winter Seminar, Sanderstølen.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 21


Travails for the future: The evaluation of the NFP The Norad Fellowship Programme has existed for over forty years and has undergone changes in line with changing political priorities in Norwegian development cooperation. Since the launching of NFP, the international scene of higher education has changed considerably in both the South and the North. The critical role of public higher edu­ cation in national development is being emphasised around the world and internationalisation and cooperation between higher education instituitions and across borders are becoming more important.

Tracer study of the Norad Fellow­ ship Programme in 2004 As a preparation for the evaluation of the Norad fellowship programme, SIU commissioned a tracer study of the programme in 2004. The study was carried out by an independent research team consisting of Kirsten Alsaker Kjerland and Renate Lunde from the University of Bergen, and their report was submitted to SIU in Autumn 2004. The material for the study consisted of historical archives and interviews with staff at academic institutions in Norway, Norad and SIU. The study did not include material from academic institutions in the South, as the compilation of such data was the task for the external Evaluation Team, Nordic Consulting Group AS and NUFFIC starting their work in late 2004 for the evaluation of the Norad Fellowship Programme commissioned by Norad.

Evaluation of The Norad Fellow­ ship Programme 2005 This evaluation was carried out by an external consultant group, The Nordic Consultant Group AS and NUFFIC, and was commenced in Autumn 2004. The final report was submitted in August 2005. This is the first comprehensive evaluation of the NFP as a programme. The main objective of the evaluation was to analyse and assess the programme in relation to the development objectives defined in major governmental policy documents, especially the “Strategy for strengthening research and higher education in the context of Norway’s relations with developing countries” (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 1999).

22 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

The Terms of Reference placed emphasis on the following: • The role of NFP in Norwegian policies and strategies for international cooperation in a changing development cooperation agenda • The NFP as an instrument for partner countries’ strategic competence development • A comparison of the NFP with other similar international scholarship programmes • The relevance of courses offered to Norad candidates in relation to the overall Norwegian development cooperation objectives. • The cost-effectiveness and efficiency of the administrative arrangements at the programme level.

The mandate for the evaluation group was to mainly study the post 1998 period of the NFP ie. after the transfer of administrative responsibility for the NFP from Norad to SIU. The countries for fieldwork were Tanzania, Bangladesh and South Africa. An important area for investigation was the South based courses being offered under the NFP programme. Finally, the evaluation was to present an assessment of the NFP in terms of medium and long term effects in selected countries. The evaluation report was presented at an open hearing in August 2005 for all relevant actors and stakeholders involved in NFP for their comments (Evaluation of the Norad Fellowship Programme, 1/2005).

Summary of the major findings In this annual report by the Programme Board only a summary of the major findings of the report are presented. The Evaluation Report described the programme as follows: “NFP – with its development aid focus – targets mature applicants with 2 or more years of working experience and a secure


link in an institution or bureaucracy in their home country considered to be a relevant development cooperation partner for Norway, and thus contributes with capacity building in government institutions and NGOs. Applicants shall return to their institutions with new, updated relevant methodologies and understanding of how to address prioritized development cooperation issues. The secure link to their home base institution results in virtually all of them returning to their previous home country institution. Such a selection process also enhances the “ added value” of the programme because returnees to the home country institutions represent a “brain gain” as opposed to the “brain drain” that happens when such graduates remain abroad. The NFP fellows are from this perspective potential “change agents” (p. 120, Evaluation Report).

The arguments against the current programme While acceding this the evaluation report was critical of the programme at various levels and concluded that: • The programme does not follow the needs as defined by the South • It is supply driven • Norad has nothing to say in the defining and selection process • The Norwegian institution selects among applicants from the South to their studies in Norway • The board members are merely looking after their own Norwegian interests • The programme has devolved from a relevant to an irrelevant portfolio of courses and from a vocational to an academic programme • The programme is too much like the Quote scheme, and the two programmes need coordination • Administration is inefficient and too expensive • Scholarship programmes to the North are not trendy. The same courses are offered cheaper in the South and

should be taken there, if necessary with some help from Norwegian experts. The cultural aspects of studies are unimportant. There are 109 courses at Makerere University that could be used. • The programme is not focused on a few institutions in a few countries to secure impact through mass.

Travails for the future The Evaluation Group on the basis of its assessment of the programme recommended the following directions of change: • The development relevance of NFP should be made more visible • There should be synergies between the NFP and other similar programmes such as Quota and NUFU, and a harmonisation of stipends • NFP needs specific objectives regarding what it plans to achieve and indicators for assessing success. • To make NFP more demand driven, the programme must be moved “closer to the South” • Employers should to a greater degree be actively involved in the planning, follow-up and evaluation of study programmes • Norway should assess limiting the number of countries, sectors and courses in the programme to enable genuine societal “value added” impact • Norad should move its focus upwards in the NFP chain providing a clear and timely set of development policies, criteria and priorities for the selection of institutions and courses. These suggestions together with the comments from the higher education sector were the basis for discussions and negotiations between Norad, SIU and other stakeholders in late Autumn 2005. Although no conclusive results can be reported at the end of 2005, the process evolving towards a new Programme Document and Agreement for the period 2006-2010 with a revised focus and content were well under way.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 23


The International Summer School (ISS), University of Oslo The objective of the NORAD scholarship programme at the ISS is threefold: to contribute to increased academic and professional competence of the participants; to strengthen institutional cooperation between the University of Oslo and partner universities in the South; and to strengthen links between Norwegian organisations of development cooperation and their project partners in developing countries.

Altogether 44 participants received NORAD scholarships to take courses at the ISS. 43 of them took courses at Master level in the following subjects: Special Needs Education, International Development Studies, Peace Research, Media Studies, Energy Planning and Sustainable Development, and International Community Health. One participant, with a strong background in performing arts, took a course at bachelor level in Art History, and one student took a course at bachelor level in International Relations in addition to his main Master level course in Peace Research. Altogether 45 exams were taken, and grades were very satisfactory; 14 A, 20 B, 7 C and 4 D. The ISS courses are all fully accredited (all Master level courses at 15 ECTS credits) by the relevant UiO faculties, and are of high academic calibre. They are taught in seminar and workshop format with strong focus on interactive and comparative approaches, which is very fruitful as there are often as many nations represented in the seminars as there are students. The ISS courses, thus, in addition to building academic or professional competence in the relevant field, invite an exchange of knowledge and experience between students from different cultures. The field-based approach is also central to the ISS programme, and classroom instruction is supplemented by visits to relevant institutions and projects. The ISS courses are very intensive and concentrated with seminars every day of the week; ISS students are also housed together and share experiences through an extensive cultural programme. This makes the ISS a unique learning environment, where students thrive, and consequently also perform well academically. Five of the six ISS courses at Master level are taught by UiO departments that also have Master programmes in the field concerned. The sixth course, Peace Research, is run by an independent research institute, International Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO), working closely with the Department of Political Science at the UiO, which also offers a Master programme in Peace and Conflict Studies. ISS courses help the departments to fulfill their goals to develop and strengthen relations with partner institutions in the South, to recruit

24 /ISS ANNUAL REPORT 2005

students to full Master programmes, and also provide opportunities for faculty exchange, i.e. lecturers from partner institutions in the South have been invited as guest lecturers on ISS courses. They also offer collaboration partners who are not in a position to spend two years abroad to do a Master programme, an opportunity for professional development. The departments benefit by the opportunity the ISS courses provide to test the potential of possible future Master students. Moreover, the ISS courses also count as elective credits towards their Master requirements. Many participants in the ISS are professionally qualified and are engaged in jobs for which the ISS courses give them increased competence and useful experience. Some of the participants with a professional background work with Norwegian development cooperation organisations in the South, e.g. Norwegian Peoples Aid, Norwegian Church Aid, Norwegian Refugee Council, or with their affiliated partners in the regions concerned. These organisations often combine ISS participation for their local employees or collaboration partners with an extended visit to the offices of the organisation in Oslo, and an opportunity to meet with key people within their field in Norway. The strength of the ISS programme lies in the opportunity to provide participants with valuable knowledge that will help them better serve their institutions or the organisations/projects they work for in their home countries. Because the ISS courses are short and intensive, they are also more flexible and easy to utilise for people or institutions who do not have the opportunity to spend a longer period of time abroad. The courses are embedded in a wider context, both at the UiO through cooperation with the departments, and internationally through cooperation with partner universities and organisations and networks. Finally, the ISS programme offers participants the opportunity to build professional networks worldwide with colleagues in their respective fields.


Professional and administrative developments Accounts from the institutions Norad Fellowship Programme, Accounts from the institutions 2005 Institution

Budget 2005

Revised budget 2005

Actual accounts 2005

Budget 2006

Bodø University College University of Stavanger Norwegian University of Science and Technology University of Life Sciences University of Tromsø University of Bergen University of Oslo

1 450 800 2 181 600 11 674 278 8 438 951 4 946 876 10 213 923 9 371 955

1 440 376 1 747 436 11 655 420 8 438 951 4 854 020 10 213 923 9 371 955

1 360 107 1 747 436 11 655 420 8 438 790 4 865 078 10 213 923 9 335 862

1 207 200 2 658 000 10 392 000 8 217 600 5 437 800 10 270 200 9 908 400

Total institutions

48 278 383

47 722 081

47 616 616

48 091 200

Norad Fellowship Programme Courses in the South, Accounts from the institutions 2005 Institution

Budget 2005

Revised budget 2005

Actual accounts 2005

Budget 2006

Norwegian University of Science and Technology University of Oslo

853 565 2 857 146

853 565 2 857 146

853 565 2 807 172

583 546 2 932 100

Total institutions

3 710 711

3 710 711

3 660 737

3 515 646

Accounts 2004

Rev. budget 2005

Accounts 2005

1 672 730 1 672 730

1 672 730 1 672 730

1 672 730 1 672 730

1 672 730 1 672 730

1 380 000 220 000

1 380 000 220 000 1 380 000 220 000 72 730 1 672 730 0

Programme Accounts International Summer School 2005 Income Sum from NORAD Total sum Costs Sum UiO 2004, agreement Sum UiO 2004, extended agreement Sum UiO 2005, agreement Sum UiO 2005, extended agreement Administration agreement Total sum salary and costs Difference

Budget 2004

72 730

72 730

1 380 000 220 000 72 730

1 672 730 0

1 672 730 0

1 672 730 0

NFP/ ISS ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 25


Programme Board and Admini­stration in 2005 The SIU Board of Directors has appointed a Programme Board that is responsible for the management and development of both the Norad Fellowship Programme and Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education. In 2004 the composition of the Programme Board was as follows:

Member Chair: Gunnar Bjune, Professor, University of Oslo Vice-Chair: Bjørg J. Bjøntegaard, Associate professor Norwegian College of Music Arne Eide, Associate professor, University of Tromsø Gerd Wikan, Associate professor, University College Tele­mark Jon Kleppe , Professor, NTNU Ruth Haug, Professor, University of Life Sciences Ås Bernt Lindtjørn, Professor, University of Bergen Hanne Holmelin, Norwegian student union

Deputy Karen Crawshaw Johansen, Adviser, University of Oslo Knut Myhre, adviser, Norwegian College of Music Astrid Revhaug, Adviser, University of Tromsø Jørgen Klein, University College Telemark Hilde Skeie, Director of Studies, NTNU Stein Holden, Professor, University of Life Sciences Ås Bjørn Einar Aas, University of Bergen

Observers Betsy Heen, Adviser, Norad/ Tove Kvil, Adviser, Norad

The Secretariat for the Norad Fellowship Programme at SIU in 2005: Veena Gill, Adviser (programme leader), Benedicte Solheim, Higher Executive Officer, Sidsel Holmberg, Higher Executive Officer and Ragnhild Berg, Higher Executive Officer.

Programme Board Meetings 2005: 25 May, 8 September and 23 November Joint Consultative meetings between UHR/SIU and Norad 2005: 13 January, 27 June and 14 December

Annual Reports from Institutions Please note that some courses only admit students every other year.

Agricultural University of Norway M.Sc. in Development and Resource Economics Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Ethiopia: Uganda:

26 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Malawi: Bangladesh: Vietnam: Zimbabwe: 9 3 3 7 19

2 3

Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

1 1 1 1 214 264 242

Location address: Dep. of Economics and Social Sciences P.O. Box 5033 1432 Ås

Professionally responsible: Arild Angelsen: Tel: +47 64 965698 Fax: +47 64 965701 E-mail: arild.angelsen@ios.nlh.no Administrative responsible: Lise Thoen: Tel: +47 64 965682 Fax: +47 64 965701 E-mail: arild.angelsen@ios.nlh.no The aim of the course This Master programme educates policyoriented economists, who are trained to use economic theory and methodology


to understand and integrate knowledge from development, resource, environmental and agricultural economics to design more coherent policies. The programme is addressed to students who are interested in the interaction between development, environment and economy and want to study in an international environment. The course aims to give the students: a) a solid basis in economic theory and methodology; b) deeper insights into the links between the social well-being of rural people, their natural resource base, the underlying causes of poverty and environ-

mental degradation, and c) an insight into relevant policies for poverty reduction, promotion of economic development and conservation of the natural re­source base. Human capital develop­ment in terms of education of policy economists with capa­cities to integrate knowledge from resource economics, de­velop­ment eco­nomics, agricultural economics and international eco­nomics. Such economists are needed in national and regional ministries of agriculture, forestry, environ­ment, and development plan­ning as well as universities

and other teaching and research institutions. This course is a response to this need. Fieldwork The students do field-work for two months between the second and third semester. Six of the nine Norad students went for a two months fieldwork in Uganda in June-July 2005, supervised by a staff member the first two weeks. Data were collected from households that were also surveyed by a similar group in 2001, making it possible to analyse changes over time. The remaining Norad students did field work in their home countries.

M.Sc. in Management of Natural Resources and Sustainable Agriculture (MNRSA) Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Ethiopia: Zambia: Sri Lanka: Pakistan: Malawi: Uganda: Indonesia: Bangladesh: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005: Location address: Noragric P.O. Box 5001 1432 Ås

Professionally responsible: Kjell Esser: Tlf: +47 64 965319 Fax: +47 64 965201 E-mail: kjell.esser@umb.no 9 3 3 8 20

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 533 356 336

Administrative responsible: Ingunn Andersen: Tlf: +47 64 965331 Fax: +47 64 965201 E-mail: ingunn.andersen@umb.no The aim of the course Poverty reduction depends on competent management capacity both in the public sector and civil society at large. To build this capacity, M.Sc. students explore the complex relationship between poverty and the environment, focusing on the importance of natural resource management and sustainable agriculture as means of poverty reduction and sustainable development in rural areas. Graduates are expected to contribute integrated and innovative solutions to complex problems, fostering action and change to overcome people’s economic, social and physical vulnerability. Specifically the programme will: 1. Educate graduates with increased awareness, analytical capacity

and research based knowledge in the fields of poverty, rural development, natural resource management, environment and sustainable agriculture. 2. Develop models for collaboration between NLH/ Noragric and partner institutions in the South, strengthening capacity on both sides, promoting regional training programmes and South-South collaboration. Fieldwork The student is assigned a local supervisor in the country where the fieldwork is to be carried out. There is a contract between the local supervisor and Noragric. The fieldwork is completed during three months (primo October till ultimo Decem­ ber during the third semester of study).

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 27


Norwegian University of Science and Technology M.Phil. in Social Change (specialising in Geography) Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Uganda: Ethiopia: Zambia: Malawi: Tanzania: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Professionally responsible: Ragnhild Lund: Tel: +47 73 59 19 23 Fax: +47 73 59 18 78 E-mail: ragnhild.lund@svt.ntnu.no 5 3 2 9 16

1 1 1 1 1 65 74 79

Location address: Department of Geography 7491 Trondheim

Administrative responsible: Torunn Reitan: Tel: +47 73 59 74 98 Fax: +47 73 59 18 78 E-mail: jorunn.reitan@svt.ntnu.no The aim of the course The main objective of the programme is to provide higher education in social science, specialising in the field of geography, for students who want to work with development in the South. The programme gives students experience in independent research and critical thinking in social sciences. It aims at providing the students with training and experience in independent reflection, rather that just knowledge reproduction. The learning is problem orientated and students have to work on specific problems themselves. Empirical examples, exercises and assign-

ments build on studies and development strategies of the South. Furthermore, the programme encourages interdisciplinary thinking. This is sought through an interdisciplinary introductory course and elective courses in several departments. Another aim is to listen to voices from the South. Accordingly, the MPhil in Social Change uses teachers from developing countries. The Norwegian teachers on the programme have long working experience from the South. Fieldwork Students spend the summer between the first and the second year on field work in their home countries, in total 2-3 months. The fieldwork is carried out individually, but with the supervisor’s approval of the student’s fieldwork plan, interview guides and preliminary questionnaires.

M.Sc. in Hydropower Development (HPD) Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Ethiopia: Vietnam: Sri Lanka: Nepal: Pakistan: Malawi: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Professionally responsible: Haakon Støle: Tel: +47 73 59 47 49 Fax: +47 73 59 12 98 E-mail: haakon.stole@ntnu.no 9 2 2 6 17

2 1 1 2 1 2 99 120 136

Location address: Dep. of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering S.P.Andersens v. 5 7491 Trondheim

28 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Administrative responsible: Hilbjørg Sandvik: Tel: +47 73 59 47 94 Fax: +47 73 59 12 98 E-mail: hilbjorg.sandvik@ntnu.no The aim of the course The main objective of the M.Sc. programme in Hydropower Development is to offer a continuing education course for future managers in hydropower development and planners in the hydropower sector. Hydropower development is a typical interdisciplinary task. Most often the person responsible for organising the activities and coordinating the work of the specialists involved is a civil engineer. Consequently this person needs to have a working knowledge of a wide range of fields. The programme has been organised to meet the training needs of persons, who are, or in the future will be in such key positions. Therefore a wide range of engineering, economic and environmental subjects are covered in the programme,

and both fundamental and applied subjects are included. The programme is suitable for young professional engineers engaged in planning an implementation of hydropower and /or water resources projects, or in teaching and research. Fieldwork The fieldwork starts in first semester with a 4-days excursion to different types of hydropower plants. In summer between first and second year of study, most of the students go to their home countries for fieldwork and collection of data for use in their thesis work. This fieldwork normally lasts for about 8 weeks. Almost all theses are linked to projects or problems relevant to the students’ home countries. In second year there is a geological field investigation followed up by laboratory work. In hydrology there are several one-day excursions where the students practice river gauging techniques. In the last semester the students visit hydropower authorities, research institutions and different companies in the hydropower sector.


M.Sc. in Petroleum Engineering/ Petroleum Geoscience Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Nationality of students Bangladesh: Vietnam: Nepal: Pakistan: Ethiopia: Tanzania:

Professionally responsible: Jon Kleppe: Tel: +47 73 59 49 33 Fax: +47 73 94 44 72 E-mail: kleppe@ipt.ntnu.no 9 3 41 9 59

4 1 1 1 1 1

Location address: Dep. of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics S.P.Andersens vei 15A 7491 Trondheim

Administrative responsible: Pål Skalle: Tel: +47 73 59 49 29 Fax: +47 73 94 44 72 E-mail: pskalle@ipt.ntnu.no The aim of the course Our two parallel programmes are organised in order to develop skills and qualifications at a high, international level. The intention is to be able to solve practical problems on basis of theoretical comprehension. It is also possible to specialise towards a future job or a Ph.D. study. Petroleum geoscience courses emphasise the interaction between geology and geophysics while petroleum engineering courses design practical solution on basis of theoretical foundation.

Fieldwork The mother organizations are very little involved in the effort of defining relevant project/thesis tasks preparation for the field work. Our opinion is still that SIU must make room for tying the bonds of each student to their home country through project work/thesis already in the application forms. In addition we do the following ourselves; In the beginning of the first semester in Norway we will let the candidates (through a questionnaire) point out all the potential collaboration institutions at home, and also ask them to suggest existing problems areas (potential thesis).

M.E in Electrical Power Engineering Degree: Master of Science Duration: 3 semesters Credits: 45 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total

9 0 0 0 9

Nationality of students: Sri Lanka: Bangladesh: Nepal: Indonesia: Zambia:

1 2 4 1 1

Location address: Kathmandu University, Dhulikhel, Nepal Professionally responsible: Arne T.Holen,NTNU B.M Tuladhar, KU Administrative responsible: Rita Kumar, NTNU E-mail: rita.kumar@admin.ntnu.no

The aim of the course The candidates that are admitted to this ME course have a BSc in electrical power engineering and are working in the electrical power sector or in educational institutions. The aim of the course is to enhance their knowledge and academic qualification in electrical power engineering, improving their professional compe­ tence in doing practical engineering and research oriented tasks. The need for reliable supply of electrical power with sufficient voltage quality is extremely important for social and industrial develop­ment in the “third world”. This Master course contributes to educate engine­ers with the qualifications needed to develop the electric power sector in these countries and to build competence in academic institutions. Fieldwork The field work is done in relation to pro­ject and Master thesis. Nepa­lese stu­dents doing studies on the Nepa­lese power system are collecting data from this system supported by Nepa­lese power com­pa­nies. The inter­national stu­dents from out­side Nepal are mostly doing pro­

ject and thesis work related to their home coun­tries, collecting data from their compa­nies. In summer months be­twe­en second and third semester fellows went home for the field work.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 29


Universit y of Bergen Diploma/ M.Phil. in Fisheries Biology and Fisheries Management Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005: Course entry 2004: Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Zambia: Cuba: Ethiopia: China: Malawi: Guatemala Indonesia: Maldives: Vietnam: Tanzania:

Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005: none 10 10 6 0 0 10

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 50 0

Location address: Department of Fisheries and Marine Biology, High Technology Center (HIB) 5020 Bergen Professionally responsible: Arne Johannessen: Tel: +47 55 58 44 51 E-mail: arne.johannessen@bio.uib.no Fax: + 47 55 58 44 50 Administrative responsible: Berit Øglænd: Tel: +47 55 58 44 10 Fax: +47 55 58 44 50 E-mail: berit.oglend@bio.uib.no The aim of the course The main objective of the programme is to give training in assessment and management of fisheries resources at graduate level. The programme is multi-

disciplinary covering both biological and economic aspects of exploitation and management, although the emphasis is on the biological part. The programme is primarily directed to improve the students’ qualifications with respect to applying standard techniques in evaluating fisheries resources, helping them to develop a critical view on resource assessment and making them able to provide their own advice on management. An important part of the MPhil study is the work with the thesis and to give the students training in conducting an independent scientific study. Fieldwork The field work was carried out during the fall semester 2005. 2 of the students collected data in their home country and 7 worked with data in the laboratory in Bergen.

M.Phil. in Health Sciences (International Health) Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Zambia: Tanzania: Ethiopia: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005: Location address: Centre for International Health Armauer Hansens Building 5021 Bergen

30 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Professionally responsible: Bernt Lindtjørn: Tel: +47 55 97 49 75 Fax: +47 55 97 49 79 E-mail: bernt.lindtjorn@cih.uib.no 7 3 1 16 24

2 1 4 123 129 118

Administrative responsible: Unni Kvernhusvik: Tel: +47 55 97 49 27 Fax: + 47 55 97 49 79 E-mail: unni.kvernhusvik@cih.uib.no The aim of the course The Master of Philosophy in Health Sciences is a research degree in health sciences. The programme is interdisciplinary and provides higher education in health topics relevant for developing countries. Particular emphasis is on applied research within fields such as public health, occupational health, nursing, health promotion and selected clinical disciplines. Preferably, some of the research should be done at the home institutions. The programme requires full time study. The general aim for the programme is to prepare the participant for a career in health

research and the programme is structured to provide a combination of formal teaching and research experience. In addition to a thesis, the course consists of introductory, compulsory and elective courses. Fieldwork The candidates go on fieldwork at the end of the second semester. Before they leave, a protocol containing plans for fieldwork and thesis, is written in collaboration with the supervisor. The fieldwork is carried out in the candidates’ home countries. If the students are connected to one of our collaborating institutions, a researcher from that institution is appointed as supervisor for the student during the fieldwork. The supervisors at Centre for International Health will also stay in touch with the student during the fieldwork.


M.Phil. in Public Administration Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Nepal: Bangladesh: Tanzania: Zambia: Zimbabwe: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Location address: Dep. of Administration and Organization Theory Christiesgt. 17 5007 Bergen 5 3 0 6 11

1 1 1 1 1 191 239 208

Professionally responsible: Steinar Askvik: Tel: +47 55 58 24 74 Fax: +47 55 58 98 90 E-mail: steinar.askvik@aorg.uib.no Administrative responsible: Milfrid Tonheim: Tel: +47 55 58 21 54 Fax: +47 55 58 98 90 E-mail: milfrid.tonheim@aorg.uib.no The aim of the course The purpose of the Master of Philosophy in Public Administration programme is to enhance students` ability to conduct independent analyses of organisations, political and administrative structures and processes, and public policy. This programme of study is aimed at

strengthening the analytical ability of students and to provide them with a comprehensive training in methodology. Participation in research seminars and compulsory essays ensure that the motivation of students for and ability to work independently whether in an academic or a professional setting is enhanced. Fieldwork At the end of the second term, five out of the five Norad students returned to their home countries to carry out fieldwork. The length of the stay was approximately 2 months. In order to prepare students for the data collection a Research Design seminar was organized during the spring semester. This seminar included writing of project proposals and learning basic skills in quantitative data analysis. The students needed to submit a supervisor contract before leaving for fieldwork.

M.Phil. in Social Anthropology (Human Ecology) Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005: Course entry 2004: Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total Student’s nationality: China: Malawi: Indonesia: India: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Location address: Institutt for sosialantropologi Fosswinckelsgate 6 5020 Bergen

Professionally responsible: Leif Manger : Tel: +47 55 58 92 67 Fax: +47 55 58 92 60 E-mail: leif.manger@sosantr.uib.no none

5 4 4 5 14

2 1 1 1 0 55

Administrative responsible: Pavla Jezkova: Tel: +47 5558 9257 Fax: +47 55 58 9260 E-mail: pavla.jezkova@sosantr.uib.no

Fieldwork A special course was designed focusing on the writing of a project proposal which incorporates relevant methodological approaches. During the fieldwork all students were visited by their supervisors.

The aim of the Course The purpose of the Master of Philosophy in Social Anthropology is to train participants in anthropological approaches, which are relevant for the study of development and socio-cultural conditions for a sustainable society. The programme is oriented towards exploration of interactions in society defining paths of development. The course will provide training in investigations at the interface between Anthropolgy and other relevant disciplines, especially ecology, demography and economy. The programme is especially aimed at anthropologists working within the university-system or in development organisations.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 31


M.Phil. in Gender and Development Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total Nationality of students India: Uganda : Bangladesh: Zambia: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Professionally responsible: Haldis Haukanes: Tel: +47 55 58 9259 Fax: +47 55 58 96 64 E-mail: haldis.haukanes@skok.uib.no 5 3 0 5 10

1 2 1 1 0 140 40

Location address: Centre for Women and Gender Research Allegaten 34 5007 Bergen

Administrative responsible: Kristin Senneset: Tel: +47 55 58 89 38 Fax: +47 55 58 96 64 E-mail: kristin.senneset@skok.uib.no The aim of the course The chief aim of this interdisciplinary programme is to enable the students to understand the significance of gender within development issues, and to use gender as an analytical category within their research. Students should be made familiar with key concepts and domains of gender analyses. They should learn to examine local level gendered patterns of social organisation as well as understanding gender in a cross-cultural perspective.

In order to achieve this aim, the programme will a) provide the students with theoretical and methodological knowledge as well as research training in important subjects related to gender and development, and b) promote expertise in various fields within the students’ special areas of academic interest, primarily related to their home region. Fieldwork The students are in their first year of studies, and have therefore not yet conducted fieldwork

Universit y of Oslo M.Phil. in Comparative and International Education (CIE) Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total Student’s nationality: Ethiopia: Uganda: Tanzania: Indonesia: Bangladesh: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005: Location address: Institute for Educational Research P.O. Box 1092 Blindern 0317 Oslo

32 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Professionally responsible: Birgit Brock-Utne: Tel: +47 22 85 53 95 Fax: +47 22 85 42 50 E-mail: birgit.brock-utne@ped.uio.no 7 3 6 14 27

1 1 3 1 1 166 116 129

Administrative responsible: Heidi Biseth: Tel: +47 22 85 53 56 Fax: +47 22 85 42 50 E-mail: heidei.biseth@ped.uio.no The aim of the course The Master programme in Comparative and International Education prepares professionals to be capable of analysing, critical assessing and evaluation educational practice, policies and initiatives taken in a wide variety of social and educational settings. The approach of the programme is interdisciplinary and emphasises the acquisition of a broad understanding of educational institutions, systems and their programmes/ curricula, stressing an understanding of the political, cultural, socio-economic, and technological and aspects of educational development and change. The

role of research and innovation in educational development is emphasised, as well as the acquisition of planning, management and evaluation skills to be applied within national, regional and international contexts. Fieldwork The aim of the Master thesis is for the students, through independent research, to acquire skills and knowledge of the research process, including planning, implementation, data analysis, and the written presentation. The thesis has been based on fieldwork conducted in the students´ country of origin. In 2005, 2 of the Norad students have been connected to the ongoing LOITASA (Language of Instruction in Tanzania and South Africa) project led by Birgit Brock-Utne, former co-ordinator for the CIE Master, and been under her supervision.


M.Phil. in International Community Health Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120

Administrative responsible: Ine Andersen/Vibeke Christie: Tel: +47 22 85 06 43 Fax: +47 22 85 06 72 E-mail: ine.andersen@med.uio.no vibeke.christie@samfunnsmed.uio.no

Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total

8 4 5 8 21

Student’s nationality: Malawi: Vietnam: Tanzania: Zambia: China: Mali: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

1 1 3 1 1 1 149 201 186

Location address: Department of General Practice and Community Medicine P.O. Box 11 30 Blindern 0317 Oslo Professionally responsible: Gunnar Bjune: Tel: +47 22 85 06 40 Fax: +47 22 85 06 72 E-mail: g.a.bjune@samfunnsmed.uio.no

The aim of the course The purpose of the programme is to train students to become international community health researchers, well prepared to participate in community-based health promotion and disease prevention, generate new knowledge and use the findings of research to improve the quality and effectiveness of community health action. The programme aims at providing the students with knowledge and skills in the following three main areas: • the scientific and organisational basis for public health and community health work • critical scientific evaluation of the knowledge base for public health/community health work • research planning and implementation, as well as data analysis and reporting from independent research

and aims also at bringing together teachers and students from various countries to establish an environment conducive to discussions and collaboration for the dual benefit of both “North” and “South”. Health problems in low income-countries will play a major role in the programme because of their major contribution to the global disease burden. The programme is also specially designed for candidates who seek both to expand their theoretical knowledge and to gain experience in practical project management and field research. Fieldwork The field work is organised in a “Sandwich-model”: students travel to their home countries to conduct fieldwork for their Master thesis with guidance from a local supervisor at a collaborating institution. The data analysis and writing takes place under supervision in Oslo. Norwegian students are encouraged, but not required to do field work in a relevant country abroad.

The programme has a strong focus on international and global health issues

M.Sc. in Information Systems – UEM, Mozambique Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Tanzania: Malawi: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Location address: Department of Informatics P.O. Box 1080 Blindern 0316 Oslo 5 3 0 17 22

3 2 128 0 115

Professionally responsible: Jens Kaasbøll: Tel: +47 22 85 24 29 Fax: +47 22 85 24 01 E-mail: jensj@ifi.uio.no Administrative responsible: Line Valbø: Tel: +47 22 85 29 53 Fax: +47 22 85 24 15 E-mail: line.valbo@ifi.uio.no The aim of the course The programme aims at educating leading professionals in information systems through providing a first research experience. Implementing information

systems in organisations constitutes the main area of focus, and graduates will obtain specialised competence in this respect. The programme also prepares the student for software work, including development of internet applications. During the thesis work, students will learn how to define their own problems and address these in a scientific manner. Fieldwork Course specific fieldwork is carried out as a 1-2 week common trip for the subjects Qualitative research methods and Health information systems. Fieldwork is done in the students’ home country during 3-6 months supervision from the University of Oslo. Both of these take place in even-numbered years only.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 33


M.Sc. in Public Health (Information System Track) - UEM Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total:

4 3 0 10 14

Student’s nationality Ethiopia: Mozambique :

2 2

Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

23 0 35

Location address: Faculdade de Medicina Universidade Eduardo Mondlane Av. Salvador Allende 702 C.P. 257 Maputo Mozambique Professionally responsible: Mamudo Ismail E-mail: mamudo.ismail@health.uem.mz Administrative responsible: Balthazar Chilundo E-mail: Balthazar.chilundo2health.uem. mz

gement, evidence-based decisions and leadership in integrated community health and development programmes with major focus in utilizing local resources and capacities. The course has two major tracks: one, Information Systems; and two, Community Health and Management. Fieldwork No fieldwork was organised in 2005 due to biennial intake. The students who started in August 2005, will have fieldwork in their home country from June 2006.

The aim of the course The course aims are to strengthen mana-

M.Sc. in Public Health (Information Systems Track), UWC, South Africa Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semester Credits: 240 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total:

4 0 0 43 47

Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

24 41 79

Location address: School of Public Health University of the Western Cape Private Bag X17, Bellville 7945 Cape Town South Africa Professionally responsible: Dr G. Reagon: Tel: +27 219 592 809 Fax: +27 219 592 872 E-mail: greagon@uwc.ac.za Administrative responsible: M. Petersen: Tel: +27 219 592 809 Fax: +27 219 592 872 E-mail: mppetersen@uwc.ac.za The aim of the course The Master of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape is designed

34 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

to provide health personnel with the necessary tools to facilitate the process of transformation in the health sector in South Africa. The course emphasises the primary health care approach, district health management, health promotion and health information systems development. The Masters is structured around practical problems commonly encountered within the health services, so that all knowledge gained can be immediately applied to the students current and future work situation. This synergy of learning and doing generates a lot of creativity, assists depth of understanding and considerably improves health service delivery. Fieldwork All courses and all learning materials within the masters programme are specifically tailored to fit within an African country’s health service. The course is presented in mixed mode format with elements of both face-to-face learning and supported distance learning. In practice this means that students attend intensive short courses at the university for 2 to 3 weeks at a time and then they go back to their work environment. The short courses are then supplemented with distance learning manuals and important readings. The manuals contain an overview of several topics, exercises, background to the readings

and suggestions on how to get the most out of the readings. After the short courses students expand on the knowledge and skills already gained, by practically applying the new knowledge and honing their skills in their work setting, and by working their way through the manuals and readings. All assignments set are directly related to currently prevailing health problems and while answering the assignment questions, the students are also increasing their ability to provide solutions to real-life priority problems. A major chunk of fieldwork is the mini-thesis, which usually takes a health systems research approach, where an important aspect of health information systems is evaluated either quantitatively or qualitatively.


M.Phil. in Special Needs Education (MPSNE) Degree: Master of Philosophy Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total:

7 2 0 9 16

Location address: Dep. of Special Needs Education P.O. Box 1140 Blindern 0318 Oslo Professionally responsible: Berit H. Johnsen: Tel: +47 22 85 80 76 Fax: +47 22 85 80 21 E-mail: berit.johnsen@isp.uio.no Denise A Brittain: Tel: +47 22 85 80 75 E-mail: denise.a.brittain@isp.uio.no

Administrative responsible: Denise Brittain: Tel: +47 22 85 80 75 Fax: +47 22 85 80 21 E-mail: d.a.brittain@isp.uio.no

• to qualify the students for further developing the field of special needs education in their home countries

The aim of the course • to provide the students with a thorough knowledge of contemporary theory and research methods in special needs education • to give the students thorough know­ledge of theoretical and practical issues regarding develop­ment towards inclusive classes, schools and local environ­ments • to teach the students to adapt the learning environment to individual educational needs • to convey insight into the practical application of principles and methods of special needs education and the habilitation/ rehabilitation of persons of all ages inside and outside the classroom

Fieldwork Not as yet applicable for batch of 2005 Report of activities The 2004/2006 Masters group , in which there were 7 students of which two are women, have all satisfactorily submitted and presented three written term papers according to the course regulations for the first semester of the M.Phil. They have also completed a six month field study period in their respective home countries in accordance with the programme schedule. The field studies have been conducted from 1 July 2oo5 to 31 December 2005 and each Norad fellow has also received a scheduled advisory visit from his7her appointed Norwegian adviser during this period. In addition all fellows have had a local supervisor as well.

Universit y of Tromsø Norwegian College of Fishery Science M.Sc. in International Fisheries Management (IFM) Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Vietnam: Ethiopia: Indonesia: Uganda: Maldives: Applicants in 2003: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Professionally responsible: Bjørn Hersoug: Tel: +47 77 64 55 47 Fax: +47 77 64 60 20 E-mail: bjoernh@nfh.uit.no 7 1 2 10 19

1 1 2 2 1 61 43 78

Location address: Norwegian College of Fishery Science UIT Breivika 9037 Tromsø

Administrative responsible: Ane Marie Hektoen: Tel: +47 77 64 60 13 Fax: +47 77 64 60 20 E-mail: anemarih@nfh.uit.no The aim of the course The main aim of the programme at the NCFS is to provide an interdisciplinary education with a practical aim - a programme which combines primarily economics and biology, with other courses in technology, principles of organisation, and law. Students must complete a dissertation on a topic related to their home country.The aim of the programme is to qualify students of both genders for jobs in fisheries managements in private and public administration at regional, national and international levels.

Fieldwork Students are required to do a two-month period of fieldwork in their home country in association with their Master thesis. Norwegian students are encouraged to do their fieldwork in developing countries or in Eastern Europe. Students are free to choose the topic of their thesis, provided that adequate supervision can be given in that subject. It is considered advantageous that the dissertation concerns a topic related to the student’s home country, or has a direct application there.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 35


M.Phil. in Indigenous Studies Degree: M.Phil Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total: Student’s nationality: Zambia: Ethiopia: Tanzania: Eritrea: Uganda: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

Location address: Faculty of Social Science UIT Breivika, 9037 Tromsø 5 2 2 6 13

1 1 1 1 1 30 54

Professionally responsible: Rachel Issa Djesa: Tel: +47 77 64 69 07 Fax: +47 77 64 49 05 E-mail: rachel.issa.djesa@sv.uit.no Administrative responsible: Hildegunn Bruland: Tel: +47 77 64 42 74 Fax: +47 77 64 49 05 E-mail: hbruland@sv.uit.no The aim of the course The Master Programme in Indigenous Studies aims to give the students knowledge in comparative indigenous issues, based on the particular research-based knowledge of issues regarding the Sámi

and other indigenous peoples at the University of Tromsø. The different courses of the Master programme aim to give the students broad knowledge of interdisciplinary perspectives and issues in the study of indigenous peoples. This will be the basis of the in-depth study of the Master thesis, in a relevant topic within research on indigenous peoples of special interest to the individual student. Fieldwork The field work is to be carried out during summer between 1st and 2nd year. The students have finished their lectures and examinations in May. They return to Tromsø late August beginning of September. All Norad fellows do field work in their home countries.

Bodø Universit y College M.Sc. in Comparative Social Work Degree: Master of Science Duration: 2 semesters Credits: 60 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total:

Location address: Bodø University College Mørkvedtråkket 30 8049 Bodø 6 4 2 4 12

Student’s nationality: Not reported Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

36 /NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005

46 94

Professionally responsible: Siv Oltedal E-mail: Siv Oltedal@hibo.no Administrative responsible: Carina Fjelldal: Tel: +47 75 51 71 97 E-mail: carina.fjelldal@hibo.no The aim of the course The objective of the Master Programme in Comparative Social Work is to develop

the students’ ability to analyse, critically assess and develop social work practices through a comparative approach to welfare provision in different societies, emphasising the contextual and relational nature of social work. Fieldwork The fieldwork was carried out according to the plan. Every student went to their home country for field work, from November till the end of the year. Students met with their supervisors regarding their thesis work prior to their departure and also received supervision over internet.


Universit y of Stavanger M.Sc. in Petroleum Engineering Degree: Master of Science Duration: 4 semesters Credits: 120 Course entry 2005 Norad students entered: Women, Norad students: Norwegian students: Other students participating: Students in total:

Administrative responsible: Terje Frøiland: Tel: +47 51 83 17 31 Fax: +47 51 83 17 50 E-mail: terje.froiland@uis.no 6 0 63 11 80

Student’s nationality: Nigeria: Indonesia: Bangladesh: Ethiopia: Applicants in 2004: Applicants in 2005:

1 3 1 1 32 61

Location address: Faculty of Science and Technology University of Stavanger Box 8002 4068 Stavanger Professionally responsible: Svein M. Skjæveland: Tel: +47 51 83 22 82 Fax: +47 51 83 1750 E-mail: svein.m.skjaeveland@uis.no

The aim of the course The aim of the course is to prepare the students for a career in the international oil industry as well as provide a sufficient basis for doctorate studies and the pursuit of an academic career in education and research. The University of Stavanger offer its two-year MS-degree in Petroleum Engineering as a single, integrated degree programme, common to Norwegian and international students. For the international students in particular, there is the possibility of part-time and/or summer training in the oil industry in the Stavanger area, in an international environment of state-of-the-art technology for depletion of offshore reservoirs. Formal linkage to the Petrad courses will be established to provide the international students insight into the Norwegian way of administrating the national hydrocarbon resources. The course will provide the applicants with knowledge related to the needs of

their home country or in preparation for such a future development. Fieldwork The annual geology excursion to Svalbard (Svalex), arranged in cooperation with Statoil, has from 2004 and on, been offered to international students. The teaching language is English. UiS try to encourage and help the students to define suitable theis and research problems from their home country and work on them while in Stavanger. But it has been difficult to motivate students to do field work in their home countries. Stavanger as oil capital of Norway offers a range of possibilities for research at a very high level – much higher than in the students’ home country. Students expect to learn more more their future carrier by doing their projects for companies around or in Stavanger.

NFP ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 37


The Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education 2003–2005 2005 was the final year of the first programme period of the Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education. The report is therefore both an account of the activities that has taken place in 2005, but also a summing up of the results from the projects and the lessons learned during the programme period 2003-2005.

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Background The Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education was initiated in 2001 by Norad that needed support with the administration of support to projects within culture and arts education. Norad made an agreement with SIU concerning the administration of the Programme in 2002. A total of ten projects have received support during the programme period. After an application process, six programmes were awarded funds from 2003; three of these were existing projects. The joint venture project between the Faculty of Performing Arts (Ballet and Dance), Oslo National Academy of Arts and the National Ballet of Zimbabwe were granted funds so that they could be further developed as early as 2002 while the University of Bergen (MPhil Cultural Heritage) and the University of Tromsø (MA Visual Cultural Anthropology) were awarded funding from the Fall of 2003 and was completed in the Spring of 2006.


The Programme included the subject disciplines pictorial art/ sculpture, dance, drama/theatre, music and cultural heritage and was limited to cooperational projects with institutions in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia. It provided funding for studies, but was also open to other types of institutional cooperation such as workshops involving staff and students both from the North and South and research projects.

Goals for the programme The goals set for the programme period were the following: • To provide students from the South with an education in culture and arts through studies in Norway or at institution(s) in the South collaborating with or developing a collaboration with an institution in Norway • To contribute towards the professionalisation of artists and art forms in the South • To contribute towards giving artists and cultural workers increased confidence in their own knowledge, creativity and performance • To contribute towards reciprocal learning between institutions and professional environments in Norway and the South At the end of the period it is clear that the goals set for the programme were a bit too ambitious and vague for a programme limited to a three year period. However, the first goal was met as the programme has succeeded in giving students education with culture and art. Another of the goals that have been reached is the reciprocal learning between the institutions in the North and South. While the institutions reports on the partnerships as economically, administratively and academically challenging, the benefits in terms of mutual competence building and valuable crosscultural experiences for all the partners involved are mentioned as great benefits for students, teachers and the institutions at all levels. Like for other programmes funded by Norad, it is a premises that the institutions both in the North and South provide salaries for the staff members involved in the project. The indirect support from the institutions is crucial for the project to take place. Even though cultural education faces many of the same dilemmas as other forms of development cooperation by the partner from the North being in control of the economical recourses, arts and cultural education is a field where the partners can experience a unique form of equality as type of cultural expression is not more valuable than another.

Main experiences from the programme period The main experiences from the programme period can be summed up as followed: • The partners both in the North and South are dependent on their institutions supporting the activity for the project to succeed. Since the programme does not include staff members salaries, the institutions have to let the involved personal spend time on the project. This seems to be an important part of the success of the projects. • Good projects demand committed staff members both at the academic and administrative level. Different procedures in different countries have made it necessary to make adjustments to the projects during the programme period. • The art and cultural education programme has contributed towards culture and cultural education being seen

as a value in itself, not first and foremost a tool to reach other development goals such as poverty reduction. • The experiences gained during the first period have been central in the development of the new programme period (2006 - 2008/9).

Reports from the institutions The following is a presentation of the reports submitted by the Norwegian partner in the projects. The reports are focusing on the academic accomplishments, information about the students, institutional and organisational factors, social initiatives, communication and distribution of results and work opportunities for graduated students. Not all projects have reported on all aspects due to their different focuses.

Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Faculty of Performing Arts The Faculty of Performing Arts (Ballet and Dance) at the Oslo National Academy of Arts and the National Ballet of Zimbabwe, the Dance Foundation Course (DFC) and Tumbuka Contemporary Dance Company are institutional project partners. The cooperation involves: • Two students taking a BA degree in Dance (2002- 2005) • One individual choreography study (2002- 2003) • Institutional dialogue (2003)

The general aims for the project: • To educate dancers • To educate a choreographer • To develop a further dialogue between the institutions • To develop perspectives of other and own culture expressions and values • To internationalise the institutions

The BA students in Dance should: • Achieve the highest level in dance nationally and internationally • Develop an independent artistic expression as a performer of the art of dance • Acquire relevant repertoire in dance • Be able to analyse, interpret and value the art of dance • Achieve understanding and knowledge of different working methods in choreography • Acquire theoretical knowledge in relevant disciplines for dance and understanding of art • Acquire theoretical knowledge of dance in art and society • Develop a conscious, independent and reflected attitude towards work ethics and the exercise of the work role.

The Diploma student in Choreography should: • Achieve basic competence as a choreographer • Develop knowledge about artistic expression in choreography • Be able to create basic choreographic work with different content and form • Be able to carry out choreographic work as part of another artistic work • Be able to describe and use basic scenic means in relation to choreography • Achieve understanding and knowledge of different

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methods and directions in choreography • Be able to interpret and mediate choreography • Be able to analyse, interpret and value the art of dance from a choreographers perspective • Acquire theoretical knowledge in relevant disciplines for choreography • Acquire theoretical knowledge of dance and choreography in art and society • Be able to choose music to choreographic work

Assessment of results in relation to the project aims The students in the BA programme in Dance have achieved the aims and received their BA diplomas. The students in the BA programme in Dance and the students in the one year individual choreography course (re. report for 2002- 2003) have all achieved the goals of the studies: achieve high level in dance, respectively choreography, and acquire relevant repertoire and working methods in dance, further analyse and understand dance and dance related fields.

Information about the students No. in all

No. of women

Nationality in no. of students

Norwegian No. of students on students the project com­ple­ting the project

Part A 2

0

Zimbabwean

8

2 (10)

Part B 1

0

Zimbabwean

3

1 (4)

The students took part in the ordinary evaluation of the courses, in addition the students had regular meeting with the head of the programme where evaluation was an essential part. As part of their individual contract, the students have also made a written assignment after each term

Institutional and organisational factors No special changes have been made with major influence on this programme, though both institutions have undergone structural changes in the last years. The institution in the South has been reorganised and changed name from National Ballet of Zimbabwe to Dance Trust of Zimbabwe, the National Ballet continuing as one of four branches together with Dance Foundation Course (now called Dance Training Course), Tumbuka Dance Company and Outreach Teaching Project. The partner in South has also reorganised their structure, and changed the administrator of the Dance Training Course. As for the partner in the North, the new structure of re-defining the previous five departments into three faculties was implemented to its full in 2005. The Department of Ballet and Dance is no longer an organisational level, as the dance and ballet educations are included in the Faculty of Performing Arts. An important change of organisational nature that was changed during 2004 was the re-integration grants to secure work possibilities for the students in the programme on returning to Harare.

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The partner in the North has changed the structure of the dance education from 2003. Students in this project were admitted in 2002 and not part of these changes. The performing arts educations moved to new facilities in 2003. This has been a major quality change in premises, regarding dance studios, stages and library facilities etc. The partner in the North has implemented the Quality Reform in the Norwegian higher education sector according to schedule. Students graduating in 2005 were the first exchange students in dance receiving a BA degree. The project has contributed to the main goals of the programme by the students from the South giving workshops in African dance, participating and articulating their dance knowledge as well as reflections upon differences between Norway and Zimbabwe. The students also took part in a dialogue meeting with fellow students reflecting on similarities and differences between own and Norwegian cultures. Today there is no formal dance education at BA level in Zimbabwe. The education given to the students from the institution in the South represents professional training in dance and choreography that leads to new or different knowledge. One project now being produced in Harare is partly a workshop to hand over knowledge from this project to the local dance society, including planning and production skills. The students have developed independent artistic expressions in the art of dance and choreography, and have acquired relevant artistic experience. Results are seen from their own artistic activity after graduating. Written essays and reports are compulsory in several subjects. Students from the South have been specially guided as their previous formal writing experience was limited. They have shown important improvement in this field. Each of the students have shown good development both artistically and technically, specially their personal and individual artistic expressions, as well as matured on a personal level. They have gained their formal education, Diploma in choreography and BA degree in dance. The students are originally being recruited from the high density population areas of Harare and have worked hard to achieve these results, studying on pair with the most talented Norwegian students in the field. The students have articulated their specific goal to return to Zimbabwe permanently when the local situation improves. An important aspect is the professional dance network generating from this programme. The partner in the South participated in Harare International Festival of Arts in 2005 together with a Norwegian professional dance company. This year another Norwegian dance group will be in the HiFA programme. New dance projects generate from the programme, continuing the link between the dance profession in Zimbabwe and Norway. All students have been giving workshops while in Harare, both at the DFC and in their communities. Students have been reporting that this generates some transfer of knowledge. The possibility for young dancers to get a formal education, building upon their local dance education, will by time generate further knowledge back to the institution. The choreography programme 2002- 2003 included a production with the Tumbuka Contemporary Dance Company. This ballet was re-staged and included in the company›s HiFA programme 2005. After the


Photo: Erik Berg/ KHIO

HiFA participation in 2005 the lighting equipment brought from Norway to Zimbabwe were left with Tumbuka Contemporary Dance Company to improve their possibilities to stage more complex ballets. The equipment can also be used as a source of income renting it out.

Contribution to the internationalisation process at the cooperating institutions The course activities have contributed considerably to the internationalisation process, both locally and centrally. As the programmes have included the performing activities and professional exchange on teaching level whenever possible, the network has increased, also generating a professional exchange outside the project. For the institution in the North the programme has given Norwegian students the possibility to perform in and to experience Africa, encouraging the students to seek studies abroad. The Oslo National Academy of the Arts has also been given positive credit for this programme. For the institution in the South one of the important aspects is that the linking of a rather small and fragile dance education to an international programme, in a rather critical period. The project and its two educational parts are fully integrated into the institutions› regular arrangements and structures, with a few smaller exceptions taking into account the differences between the Zimbabwean students and the rest of the groups. Students from South have in addition been offering special language courses in Norwegian.

Challenges in implementing the project Better integration in the small and tight student situation is still a challenge. Through evaluations from both Zimbabwean and Norwegian students, Oslo National Academy of Arts may want to change strategies for the future. Regarding return of students, the partners will include a longer period of performing practice in Zimbabwe (fieldwork) for future projects. Regarding responsibilities and critics, Oslo National Academy of Arts has been emphasising the coaching of independency and responsibility.

Non- student participants in the project and their contribution to the programme 1) Follow- up on students during project period: The main responsibility for the academic and artistic development on a day- to- day base has been by head of dancers programme. Students have made written reports each term, reporting to both institutions. Thus also the partner in the South has played an active part in this aspect. A larger number of teachers and choreographers have taken part in the total education programmes. Administrator at Oslo National Academy of Arts has followed the students through a weekly meeting and social events 2) Institutional contact and administration The contact between the institutions has been strengthened and developed in the programme period, both through partner dialogue meeting in 2003 and other

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programme activities. Academic and administrative coordinators have participated in several activities and meetings. 3) Tumbuka Contemporary Dance Company Tumbuka has been involved in the project of the choreography course, as the student in choreography created his exam dance piece in Harare involving all the company dancers, as well as the artistic director and administrator. 4) HIFA- Harare International Festival of Arts Eight Norwegian and two Zimbabwean students in the BA programme in Dance graduating 2005 were performing at the HIFA in spring 2005. Administrative staff was given tasks related to planning and implementation of a complex performance aboard, broadening and enhancing the capacity of administrative staff. 5) Exchange teaching and examination The institutions have also used each other teachers and directors for classes and examination whenever possible. Visiting Oslo in 2003, artistic coordinator from the partner in the South gave classes at Oslo National Academy of Arts› dance educations. Examination of the choreography of student›s final project in Harare 2003 was done by a joint jury from Norway and Zimbabwe. Head of choreography course at the partner in the North has given classes in Harare. Academic coordinator has given classes and acted as examintator at the Dance Foundation Course on several occasions. A pre-project for the Norwegian Peace Corps took place in 2004, including Dance Foundation Course, Department of Ballet and Dance, Oslo National Academy of Arts and a possible partner in Mozambique. At this occasion representatives from Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Norway served together as examinators for the Dance Foundation Course in Harare.

Social initiatives The students from the South have been fully integrated with the regular studies at the Department of Ballet and Dance. Students were also given Norwegian language course. Most important may be that the student groups are small in numbers and the classes/lectures are compulsory and to a large degree led by teacher. There is also a high degree of follow-up from all teachers, administrative responsible and head of education programmes. Students have furthermore been active through SAIH, and other organisations, like the Nordic Black Theatre, an organisation reflecting the multi-cultural performing art society in Oslo. Several social events in the school as well as in private settings have been held, including the students from the South. They have participated to some degree in students’ activities and social events. They have also had part-time jobs in other fields, thus gaining the insight of the Norwegian way of life. Students in dance have also been offering workshop in southern African dance, based on theory and practice, for students at the opera and theatre educations at Oslo National Academy of Arts, including students from African development studies at the University of Oslo. There have been video shows recordings from Zimbabwe for the class in the dance programme, followed by discussions and reflections of the experience made by students from South about Norwegian habits and manners. Norwegian and Zimbabwean students spending time together in Zimbabwe in their last term was the best mean of integration possible, both ways.

Communication and distribution of results BA in Dance: The artistic results have been presented on various occasions like the 25th anniversary of Department of Ballet and Dance in 2004. Various performances were given to a larger audience,

Photo: Erik Berg/ KHIO

42 /Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005


including for professional dance society in Norway and several public representatives. Students also participated in HIFA in 2005, a major international event. The HIFA participation is presented on the Oslo National Academy of Arts› web page. The academic results were announced in the graduating ceremony at the Oslo National Academy of Arts, and reported in the proper national statistics, as well as communicated to the Dance Foundation Course in Zimbabwe.

aims in the academic year 2004–2005 is that the video editing lab is in place, together with the knowledge of the potential within such a facility. In addition, a programme of ongoing teaching and instruction is in place together with a plan for self financing of the facility. During the programme period, the photo facility has been completed with reference to the analogue part and the digital component has been added. A self financing plan is running and an ongoing teaching programme is in place.

Diploma in Choreography:

A number of spin off projects have been put into place by the course participants within their home areas based on their knowledge gained from the annual seminars, such as photo and film clubs, sculpture and drawing courses

The exam choreography of the student was produced and presented in Harare, and the diploma ceremony took place in Harare with representatives from the professional dance society, the Royal Norwegian Embassy and others present. Academic result has been reported in the proper national registers. During HIFA 2005 the Royal Norwegian Embassy used one of the performances to celebrate the independence of Norway for invited guests; around 120 persons attended the reception and the dance performance afterwards. Information about student mobility of the students who have completed the course during the programme period 1) Went back to their home country: 2, partly 2) Move to another country: 3) Are still in Norway: 2, partly 4) Current recidency unknown: 1 The graduated students are working partly in their home country, partly in Norway and other countries. This is mainly due to the social and economical situation in Zimbabwe.

Work opportunities The work opportunities in Zimbabwe are limited due to the current economical and political situation. As for the students graduating in 2005, Oslo National Academy of Arts in cooperation with the partner in the South has initiated grants for reintegration, to link dancers to the local professional society. The choreographer educated 2002- 2003 is currently engaged in various international projects, and has recently received funds for a new project called “Mutapa” with Zimbabwean and Norwegian dancers, being produced in Zimbabwe and to be presented in both countries. He is partially employed in Norway as a dancer, actor and choreographer, and is also working in France and Zimbabwe. One dancer graduated in 2005 has received development funds as choreographer for his own production, also working partially as dancer.

Oslo National College of the Arts, Faculty of Fine Art The programme is a cooperation between the National Visual Arts Council, Zambia and the Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Faculty of Fine Arts. The project is phase two of the programme “Art Academy Without Walls”. The overall goal of the project is to establish higher education art training in Zambia.

Academic accomplishment Four annual seminars/workshops have been completed, together with the fellowship series, aimed at providing basic technical teaching and maintenance of the sculpture, photography, video & sound facilities provided by the project. The assessment of the results in relation to the course/project

Two of the earlier participants have now moved into M.A. programmes - one a at the Oslo Academy of Arts and the other have been accepted at Goldsmiths Art Theory Course in London. Two more have returned to Lusaka and are making a valuable contribution to the current teaching programs. The Peace Corps has financed a female fellowship, wherein the Norwegian graduate from Oslo National Academy of Arts, Faculty of Visual Arts was in Lusaka and set up a teaching structure for the next 12 months. The Zambian artist/writer started in Oslo in September 2006 has been set up a teaching series based within Post Colonial Studies.

Information about the students A total of 20 students have been involved in the project, four of them women and all Zambian by nationality. Twelve of the students have completed the project. A full evaluation of the project will take place during 2006 with participant evaluation. A graduation process is envisaged which will involve a written text from each, a presentation of works completed, an exhibition and a general discussion day of the project and the way forward. The final project publication, done in Zambia, will have a paper version of an electronic model and is intended to sum up this process.

Institutional and organisational factors Local funding to the Visual Arts Council was cut in 2004; this meant that local logistic costs had to be covered from this budget, thus leading to the delay till 2007 of the final graduation process. The project has contributed to the main goals of the programme by the setting up of reading groups in post colonial themes together with quota students group that focused attention on identity and cultural awareness. In Lusaka a good many of the misconceptions of European art practice and opportunities had to be clarified as well as the responsibilities and role of the artist towards society have been debated at length. Technically there has been a lift as well as an awareness of what is expected within the international field and a clear definition between the local economic commercial market place and its requirements vis à vis the more critically aware international art scene. The project has benefited the participating students by giving them an awareness of the potential within artistic practice and an ability to think beyond the convenient solutions. A part of the teaching has encouraged the participants to research their immediate environment and work with that field to contribute to the identification and visualisation of social problems.

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Work opportunities The work opportunities for the students after completion of the course/project are good. Due to the seminar/workshop input in Lusaka a number of participants are utilising the facilities for both the development of their own creative language parallel to commercial enterprises to sustain the former outside of the previous «tourist art» cycle. These include commercial photography-publications, advertising, TV commercials, wedding videos and architectural decoration work. In addition to the two participants going on to MA studies there has been a dramatic change in Zambian participation in the international arena. Two invitations to the USA on short term scholarships, two have been invited to this years Dakar Biennial, participation in the «Nervous Painting» exhibition in Paris, a planned group photo exhibition at the Horniman Museum in London, a number of individual exhibitions in the Nordic countries, purchase by Arts Council Norway and participation in a video festival in Durban. Two of the fellowship participants are employed full time at the Visual Art Council Centre in Lusaka, one of the quota students is currently developing the new studio phase which he will be leading and administrating when it opens in the near future.

The Norwegian Choir Association The Choir Association is involved in an institutional cooperation with the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) (former University of Port Elizabeth), South Africa. The Norwegian Choir Association is the main partner in a training programme for choir conductors at the UPE.

Academic accomplishment The aims of the project were to build and strengthen the education programme in choral conducting at the university and in South Africa in general, to educate conductors to perform choral music in a variety of styles and on a high artistic level. Further, the aim was to develop the students› abilities to lead and educate choir singers and think and write critically and analytically within the chosen field of specialisation. The programme is established and will continue as an education programme at NMMU, School of Music.

Information about the students The overview shows the distribution of students completing the courses and the percentage of female students.

Information about the students No. in all

2003: 124 2004: 101 2005: 86

No. of women

No. of students com­ple­ting the project

60 % 62 % 63 %

108 89 64

Most of the students came from the rural districts or dis­ advantaged communities with very bad transport possibilities. Because of transport problems some students could not attend

44 /Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005

the minimum of lecture time which is required, and others gave up during the year due to lack of finance support and transport problems. Few students did not pass the examination. This is the reason of difference in numbers between «No. in all» and «No. of students completing the project». Two times a year, during summer- and winter schools, all the students attended intensive courses at the university. At the end of each session they all took part in an oral evaluation, not only of the school sessions but of the total project.

Institutional and organisational factors Throughout the project period the university has become more aware of the needs of distance/satellite education. Especially on lower level and where the students are recruited from the disadvantaged communities. The project has contributed to the main goals of the programme: Through giving the students improved ability to read music, analyse and evaluate different kinds of music as for them to see the importance of their own choral tradition. This has clearly become visible through the students’ work with their traditional music, their rehearsals, and artistic performances. Further, the project has contributed to better understanding of choral music as an artistic expression and has strengthened the students› leadership and confidence. Some of the former students are now employed in universities and colleges and are thereby contributing to professional training of future choral conductors. Many of the students have been awarded regional and national prizes as conductors which have given them trust and respect in the choral life in South Africa. Through Norwegian teachers and vocal ensembles visits to the project the conducting students have experienced the Nordic traditions and ways of rehearsing in choirs. Some South African students (master students) have visited Norwegian Academy of Music and Norwegian Choir Association Summer schools. This has given staff and conductors from the North experience with African choral singing tradition, the aural way of learning, and the South African choral concert tradition. Most of the students are from the disadvantaged communities were they worked as teachers and choir conductors. The education has given them more knowledge of music from all over the world, as well as more knowledge about their own traditional choral music. Through the education programme the students have learned to analyse and work with scores, interpretation of different styles in music, and how to work with a choir as a conductor. This has given them self-confidence, and acknowledgement in regional and national choir competitions. Choral singing is an important part of the culture in the communities in Eastern Cape. Through the project the conductors have become better musicians and leaders, which have raised the standard of choral singing in the province. Many of the conductors have been awarded prizes in regional and national choir competitions. It has also resulted in more interest for education in music, and has strengthened the understanding of the need of education in other fields as well. The project has helped the university to establish an education programme for choir conductors and to take the responsibility


for programmes which help people from disadvantaged communities to get access to higher education. The project activities have contributed to the internationalisation process at the cooperating institutions by strengthened the institutions’ interests to work with other cultures and to take more responsibility for developing programs. The project activities of the programme have been integrated into the institutions’ teaching arrangements and degree structure by becoming a part of the university’s B-Mus and the Master degree programme.

Social initiatives The project has contributed towards providing students from the South with an opportunity for cultural learning and insight into the Norwegian way of life. The master students have spent 2-3 weeks each year at the Norwegian Academy of Music in Oslo. This has given them good insight into the education at the music institution, and academic and institutional knowledge of great value. The academic and social contacts between the students from the North and the South have also been important. Throughout the whole period some students from the project have been invited to take part at our Summer school at Toneheim, Hamar, Norway. This has been of great value for the students’ insight into Nordic choral music. During their visit to the Norwegian Academy of Music the master students have been partly integrated academically and socially with their Norwegian counterparts.

Communication and distribution of results

programme is now established, and the students will get their final degrees in March 2007.

Information about the students No. in all

No. of women

Nationality in no. of students

3

1

South African

The students do not take part in an evaluation of the programme.

Institutional and organisational factors The students should have had their final exams in June 2006. The Norwegian partner became aware, too late, of NMMU’s special regulations in relation to final submission of the doctoral work. According to these regulations, candidates may either submit in early January each year or mid- May of any given year. There is no opportunity to submit a thesis during the autumn. The three candidates find it difficult to finish both their portfolio of concerts and their theses until mid- May 2006. This may be due to the fact that they have to depend on others in completing the concerts. The last concerts are planned in spring 2006, and they also need some time to compile the whole of their doctoral work. The project has contributed to the main goals of the programme through the students experiencing a different choral tradition than the South African and also a different teaching tradition when visiting Norway.

The NMMU has given regularly info on their webpage, through newsletters and magazine. On a national level interviews and articles have been published in newspapers and the national television company has made TV-programmes and interviews.

Meeting other performing traditions, other audiences and different choral traditions give the students the possibility to reflect on an artists’ role in a wider (international) perspective and as such see themselves as professional conductors in their own environment

Work opportunities

Discussing their PhD thesis with master students and staff at the Academy has given them the opportunity to share their own cultural heritage with the Norwegian students and staff.

Master students get work as choir masters/-teachers at high schools, colleges and universities. Lower degree students get jobs as teachers/conductors of school choirs. All of the master students, except one, have good and relevant jobs. Three of the students are appointed as conductors and teacher in conducting at universities; four are choir masters at colleges, one is choir master at a high school. The former students live in different parts of the country and they will be key persons in the development and education of the next generation of conductors.

The Norwegian Academy of Music The Norwegian Academy of Music is the institutional project partner with the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (former University of Port Elizabeth), South Africa in close cooperation with the Norwegian Choir Association.

Academic accomplishment The aim of the course/project was to launch a Ph.D.-programme in Choral Conducting during a period of 3, 5 years. The PhD-

The South African students have experienced the Nordic traditions and ways of rehearsing in choirs. The staff at the institution in the North has experienced the South African choral singing tradition, the aural way of learning music, and the South African choral concert tradition. The students have participated in courses at the Academy on ear- training and vocal technique in relation to the special challenges in choral conducting. They have also participated in master classes in Choral conducting at the Academy in the Nordic traditions, and on Improvisation in Choirs as well as individual and group training in Choral conducting technique. The students have also participated in courses offered at UPE in Research Theory and Application and Philosophy of Culture. Regarding their thesis work, they have received individually supervision during the whole period. The students had rehearsals with amateur choirs on a high level and used the possibility to use parts of another choral tradition in their own musical environment.

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Discussing their PhD thesis with master students and staff at the Academy has given them the opportunity to share their own cultural heritage with the Norwegian students and staff.

Since the visits by the South African students to Norway have been for shorter periods, this particular project has not contributed much to the internationalisation process at the Norwegian Academy of Music, but collaboration with South Africa has become a natural part of the Academy›s international activity. The students have been situated in different regions of South Africa and have only attended course work at NMMU. The course has mainly had its own teaching arrangement. However, in some cases the project has been able to integrate the activities of the PhD- programme with the teaching arrangements of master-students in choral conducting. No non- student participants have participated in this project.

Social initiatives One main theme of the activities offered at the Academy has been to offer the students insight into Nordic Choral Music and the students have on their visits to the Academy been partly integrated academically and socially with the master students in Choral Conducting.

Communication and distribution of results The students have planned for their submission of theses in January 2007 and final examination/disputation in March 2007.

Work opportunities One of the students has already received a new full-time appointment as a lecturer in Choral Conducting at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Another is employed as a choir master at St. Johns’ College, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Photo: Matew Mitchell/ KHIO

Photo: Erik Berg/ KHIO

46 /Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005


Agder University College The Faculty of Fine Arts at Agder University College and Dhow Countries Music Academy (DCMA), Zanzibar are partners in the project. The cooperation focuses on the building of a formal music education at DCMA based on local traditions.

Academic accomplishment The aims of the project are: 1) To formalise the music education offered at DCMA to a recognized degree 2) To establish a course or study programme in music for teachers in Zanzibar and Tanzania, based on local traditions 3) To train music students and teachers at both institutions to work with traditional music in relation to contemporary expressions 4) To train students and teachers at DCMA in music technology 5) (New from mid-evaluation): Create more long-term working modes in the cooperation.

Assessment of results in relation to project aims: • The study programme for teachers has been successfully completed, and the participants have completed an exam and received a certificate. • The crossover work has been successfully completed with a joint CD production • A teacher at DCMA is now specialised in basic studio work after a semester at Agder University College in the Autumn of 2005. • The project has succeeded in creating more long-term working modes, through: i. establishing a Norwegian Peace Corps agreement (from 2006, including a Palestinian partner) ii. working on the same tasks over time through and

between workshops (Song book, CD production) iii. long(er) term exchange; a teacher from DCMA spent a semester at Agder University College from September to December in 2005. This experience proved to be a good way of working on both competence building (see aim 4) and the following up of ongoing projects. The project has not assessed the aim of formalizing DCMA education in a degree. The reasons for this is partly that the planned University of Dar Es Salaam (UDSM) collaboration stranded, but it also reflects that a degree on university level is generally not realistic for the students, who do not meet university entry requirements. However, a certificate has been established, and we work on formalizing this as a university entry level exam for UDSM and elsewhere. Furthermore, the project aims at offering a joint international BA degree for DCMA teachers in the next project period. • As for aim 2, the project has established a teacher programme that can, with some mentoring, be established locally. The principles for the programme are documented, and the programme was presented at the PASMAE1 conference in Maputo, Mozambique, in July 2005. • Furthermore, a Swahili children’s songbook with a CD was published in the spring of 2006, after a long process throughout the project where the workshop participants collected traditional songs and edited a song book. • As for aim 4, through the project the music technology at the DCMA has been build up and a basic studio is equipped.

Information about the students The information concerns teacher’s workshop on music for children. There is an evaluation form after each workshop, and the result

Information about the students No. in all

No. of women

Nationality in no. of students

Norwegian students on the course/project

Other students attending the course/project (quota or other)

No. of students completing the project

37

15

30 Tanzanian

4 (partly – for some work­shops)

3 from UD­SM, taking work­ shops as part of Bache­lor and Master pro­gram­mes. 2 teachers from Baga­moyo Col­lege of Arts (BCA)

102

from this is used planning the next.

Institutional and organisational factors Adjustments were made as pointed out to create more longterm working modes. As pointed out before, the links with UDSM were kept through the whole project period, but not so much in the field of formalization. During the academic year 2004- 2005 re-allocations in the

footnotes

budget were made in order to include CD and song book productions ad part of the educational courses. The project contributed to the main goals of the programme in the following way: Through the children’s music workshop the value of one’s own culture has been the core issue, and the final assessment of producing a children’s song book in Swahili, which the project

Pan African Society of Musical Arts Education 10 students have reached a certificate (so far), 9 of them women, 6 of them now engaged with teaching children’s groups at DCMA

1 2

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hope will be accepted for the national school curriculum, is a major contribution.

trative travels. The social initiative has been a natural part of this exchange, both in Norway and Zanzibar.

Through the musical crossover work and CD production (including music technology workshops), the professionalisation of artists (students and teachers at DCMA) has been an expressed objective.

Communication and distribution of results

The learning in the project has been going both ways. The CD is an example of this, where also the Norwegian students and teachers have gone beyond their previous knowledge. Since the project has generally strengthened DCMA, this has in its turn had an impact on the local community. One example is that the traditional use of the cello in taarab orchestras was near to disappearing, but now, through cello workshops at DCMA, it is slowly reviving. Other traditional instruments are also being kept in use, such as the canun, through DCMA activity. At Agder University College, the project has on a faculty level con­tributed to a new perspective on international work. It has created a lot of enthusiasm for students and teachers involved, particularly in the Department of Afro-American Music and De­partment of Music Education. This has slowly led to an orien­tation in the international work at the faculty where not only Western music institutions are mentioned and worked into the strategies, but the perspective of music and music edu­cation outside Europe and the West are now a natural part of the orientation. As an example of this, the last PhD scholar­ship to be advertised January 2006, mentioned “Ethno­ musicology” and “World Music” first in the possible fields of research. At DCMA, the course in music for children gave a separate cer­ti­ficate, but is for the future also integrated as an optional mo­dule in the three year DCMA certificate programme. The CD and cross­over activities were integrated into the core activities at DC­MA, but at the moment there has been no formal course di­plo­ma. At Agder University College some of the students going on student exchange to Zanzibar have had this as an alterna­ tive teaching practice. Two conservatory students have linked the CD production to their projects in music technology. In 2004/2005 the project faced some challenges in finishing the song book, which is a long editorial work. As mentioned , the UDSM cooperation regarding formalization stranded. But there are now negotiations linked to a new project proposal, which is more concrete regarding that the aims of the formalisation which is to offer DCMA students to go to university after their DCMA certificate, and an international BA to the teachers. Non- student participants also participated and contributed to the project. Among them was Sigbjørn Nedland from NRK, who was the one to establish the DCMA-Agder University College contact, took part in one workshop regarding collecting traditional songs. And, of course, many teachers both at DCMA and Agder University College have contributed a lot. There has not always been a very strict distinction between teachers and students, since the project has targeted institutional development as such, allowing students and teachers to collaborate on equal terms.

Social initiatives One long term visitor from DCMA in Norway and three visits of groups from DCMA for a shorter period, in addition to adminis-

48 /Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005

There have been workshops and presentations at both AUC and DCMA. Public concerts have taken place both in Zanzibar and Norway, with press and audiences giving a lot of attention. Both nationally and internationally the project and its results have been presented through conference papers/presentations, for example at the PASMAE conference in Maputo, Mozambique and the WOMEX – World Music Expo – in Newcastle in 2005. Also, the CD has been played both nationally and inter­nationally amongst others in a BBC radio show.

Work opportunities For children’s music participants, six of them are now engaged in music teaching for children at schools in Zanzibar through DCMA. For DCMA students in general, local musical engagement is the prime target. But through the certificate the future aim is for the student to be qualified for university studies.

University of Stavanger, Institute for Music and Dance Support from the Norad Programme in Arts and Culture is part of a larger project called the NOTA project, a several year long cooperation between the University of Stavanger (former Stavanger University College), the Institute for Music and Dance and the Bagamoyo College of Arts, Tanzania. The goal of the cooperation is strengthening of competence within the field of music, dance and sound production at Bagamoyo College. The sound production student finished in 2004; please see the annual report for this year for further information.

BA degree in Music Academic accomplishment The aim of the project is to give a former student from Bagamoyo College of Arts (BCA) a further education in Music. This is as a part of raising the competence in modern music and dance at BCA. The Norwegian partner was aware of that the student would face some problems coming from Tanzania and join with Norwegian students. Most of the Norwegian students have very high skills in music and instrument performance. The student was a very hard working and devoted student.

Information about the student The student took part in the evaluation and her suggestions were taken carefully notice off. The University of Stavanger had both formal and informal meetings with the student and her teachers. Both student and teachers made annual reports.

Institutional and organisational factors Stavanger University College became Stavanger University 01.01.05, but this actually did not involve the programme. The student attended a special made programme. One of the goals for the NOTA-project is based on the idea of “Make something new from the traditional Tanzanian culture”. The partners feel that they have reached this goal. Also, the Norwegian partners have got a better awareness of their own culture by it being mirrored in the Tanzanian.


The student has got an education which is very practical and relevant to her professional life in Tanzania. She will be working both at the College and with activities in the local community. Through the project, BCA did an analysis of their educational needs, and then sent students to Stavanger to gain the competence needed. The project activities have contributed to the internationalisation process at the cooperating institution by giving teachers and fellow-students insight into the Tanzanian culture. The partner in the North has gained new perspectives on their own methodologies when teaching music due to the challenges they have met. The student had mostly individual lessons, only in a few subjects she joined the ordinary courses. The student did not get a degree, but a Special Diploma. The project did not face many challenges in the implementation and the problems they faced they knew would be there before they started. Lack of skills in some specific areas was one of them. The teaching was mostly done in English, and last year’s supervisor was an American. The fact that none of them were Norwegian might have been helpful in many ways.

Social initiatives The Tanzanian students are staying at the university dormitory, which give them a good insight of Norwegians life and lifestyle. The project management knows Bagamoyo and Tanzania very well, and tries to involve the students in Norwegian culture when they arrive in Norway. They also make sure they get in touch with other Tanzanians staying in Stavanger. The management of the project was somehow worried about the social environment for this student. But she insisted that she preferred to have a smooth and quiet life, and they accepted her decision. She seemed to be satisfied with her stay in Norway.

Work opportunities BCA is in the process of employing the student that graduated from this project. Today she is employed as a primary teacher, but the process of transferring her to BCA is nearly finished. When the papers are ready she will have a permanent job at BCA.

The course/project’s relation to other sorts of funding This is a part of the NOTA-project, mainly funded by Norad. This specific project is not linked to NOTA funding, but the partners can clearly see that NOTA’s existence is important for the students.

BA degree in Dance Academic accomplishment The aim of the project is to give a former student from Bagamoyo College of Arts (BCA) an education in Dance. This is as part of raising the competence in modern music and dance at BCA. The partners knew the student would face some problems coming from Tanzania and join with Norwegian students. Most of the Norwegian students have very high skills in dance technique and performance. The student did a devoted and good job.

Information about the student The student took part in the evaluation and her suggestions were taken carefully notice off. The University of Stavanger

had both formal and informal meetings with the student and his teachers. Both the student and teachers made annual reports.

Institutional and organisational factors Stavanger University College became Stavanger University 01.01.05, but this did not involve the programme. Bagamoyo College of Arts has not yet succeeded to employ the student. But he is doing a lot of work both as a dancer and as a teacher. They hope that BCA will be able to employ him in the future. The project has benefited the student by offering an education that is very practical and relevant to his professional life in Tanzania. Among other things, he is working with the youth in the local community. Through the project, BCA does an analysis of the students needs, and send them to Stavanger to receive the education needed. The project activities have contributed to the internationalisation process at the cooperating institution by giving teachers and the Norwegian students insight into the Tanzanian culture. The partner in the North has also gained new perspectives on their own methodologies of teaching music. The student attended parts of the BA in dance education. In addition he had his own supervisor, and was given extra lessons in difficult subjects. He did not complete a degree, but received a special Diploma.

Social initiatives The Tanzanian student is staying at the university dormitory, which gives him a good insight into Norwegians way of living. The fellow student of this particular student was very eager and aware of integrating him in both the academic and social environments. For the management and the supervisor it seems like this was working smoothly.

Work opportunities The working opportunities should be good for a person with his background both as a teacher and a dancer. BCA wants to employ him, and is working to find a position for him. The Norwegian partner is aware of the fact that the student faces difficulties when he arrives back in Tanzania.

The University of Stavanger (UiS), Norwegian School of Hotel Management The project was conducted as a co-operation between Bagamoyo College of Arts, Bagamoyo, Department of Fine and Performing Arts, University of Dar es Salaam, and Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, Norway. Also central to the project was the Antique Station in Bagamoyo.

Academic accomplishment The goals of the project were formulated as: • Increase local awareness of and strengthen local and international competencies related to cultural heritage and heritage-related tourism within an East-African context

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• Assess the development and possible transformations of selected cultural heritage site clusters in Bagamoyo, in relation to conceivable tourism development.

The sub-goals were: • To identify the present conditions of heritage sites • To depict the present use of heritage sites and non-tangible cultural heritage assets • To explore residents’ and local stakeholders’ assessment of existing tangible and non-tangible cultural heritage assets as they relate to cultural tourism. The project has been worked on in cooperation between the partners and no controversies, difficulties or obstacles have been observed. The project has succeeded in relation to the first part of the goal as will be documented below. International disseminations of the project on relevant research conferences will continue, and one research article is currently being authored. As for the second part of the goal, the process has reached far into these issues. Documentation has also been collected by UCLAS and Lund University, as well as by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts, University of Dar es Salaam. For the academic year 2004-2005 the project aimed mainly at reporting the exploration of residents’ and local stakeholders’ assessment of existing tangible and non-tangible cultural heritage assets as they relate to cultural tourism, and inform the inhabitants and business partners about the findings and our recommendations for future actions. In doing so the partners expected to learn more and be closer involved with these groups, which in turn should facilitate our possible next steps of the programme. In addition, a competence transfer should be made to teach faculty of our cooperating institutions on how to use the statistical programme SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The inhabitants’ and stakeholders’ opinions have been researched through fieldwork, discussions and interviews, the results compiled in a Chief Executive Report, a comprehensive Power-point presentation given to the authorities and business professionals of Bagamoyo (attended by 60 people), and to the Norwegian Embassy, and also to the inhabitants of Bagamoyo at an open meeting at Bagamoyo College of Arts, attended by about 500 people. An artist group from Bagamoyo College of Arts developed a play under supervision of Principal Juma Bakari, and the play was performed at the open meeting and at the meeting of the business professionals and authorities. These feedback processes were highly appreciated by the recipients, as it had never happened before in Bagamoyo that any researchers returned information about findings in personal face-to face presentations and discussions. It also enhanced their insight into the possible values that foreigners see in what they find trivial and of low worth, and it added to their self-esteem to see their own resources displayed as valuable resources and possibilities in the context of cultural tourism development. Future plans have been discussed and inhabitants as well as business professionals have expressed their support to these plans. The final outcome of the project is in accordance with its initial scope: The present conditions of heritage sites have been assessed, the present use of heritage sites and non-tangible cultural heritage assets have been observed and described,

50 /Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005

and the exploration of the residents’ and local stakeholders’ assessment of existing tangible and non-tangible cultural heritage assets as they relate to cultural tourism has been done. In addition, feedbacks have been provided, and the local inhabitants and the business professionals feel personally involved and ask for a continuation. Moreover, a student group from the Norwegian School of Hotel Management has visited Bagamoyo and mapped motivations and travel careers of current visitors to the area. Four student groups from the Department of Fine and Performing Arts, University of Dar es Salaam, has made videos based on intangible cultural heritages in Bagamoyo, which can be used for further development of the understanding of cultural tourism development in the area. A play has been developed and performed, and new ideas created for motivating the inhabitants and the authorities in Bagamoyo for acceleration of cultural tourism development. A good knowledge structure is developed for a second step of this project, and relationships to motivated partners are established. The next step that involves a possible project support as a continuation of the present one is the establishment of educational programmes in South, and also support to the establishment of a destination management organisation in the area. The project certainly has made the partner in the North aware of limitations that apply when attempting to implement a Norwegian mindset and model of organising a project and a future educational programme, with the context of Bagamoyo in particular, and Tanzania in general. The project has mainly made it clear to the partners in the South that a wide range of cultural and art forms may be applied in tourism development, especially within the context of educational tourism. These applications may be a future source of income for the performers involved, and may also contribute to future development of authentic cultural expressions if carefully developed and supported by competent institutions like the Department of Fine and Performing Arts and Bagamoyo College of Arts. The project has contributed with knowledge, research skills and tools to the partners in South, and with new insights into cultural tourism development and Tanzania for the partners in the North. The local community has received input on how cultural tourism may be enhanced in their region, and experienced optimism and increased motivation for developments of such activities. The project has contributed with knowledge, research skills and tools to the partners in the South, and with new insights into cultural tourism development and Tanzania for the partners in the North. The Tourism industry professionals have caught great interest in the project and support its continuation into development of training programmes for industry managers and workforce, as well as a broader and skilled use of cultural assets for tourism purposes. The project activities has contributed to the internationalisation process at the cooperating institutions by new contacts being established, two BA-level students have visited Bagamoyo and conducted research for their BA-thesis, and one PhDstudent has visited Bagamoyo to study educational tourism as phenomenon and business. Focus has been changed to include Bagamoyo and Tanzania in the areas of academic inte-


rest at the faculty level at the University of Stavanger. The project has been informing the students through the teaching of Adventure Tourism-subject, two BA-level students have researched the area for their BA-level thesis, and one PhD-student has researched the area as part of her work. The group of involved researchers has changed to involve two more professionals: Professor Morten Heide, and Associate professor Øystein Jensen. The project was planned on the professional cooperation level, and students have been involved as part of the research possibilities that the project has opened.

Social initiatives The participants in South have all stated their appreciation of learning to know Norwegian academics and work with them.

Communication and distribution of results The result of the project has been communicated through teaching at the BA-level programme of Adventure Tourism. In relation to the ongoing writing of the research article on Bagamoyo as a cultural tourism destination, a presentation will be given to the weekly research seminar for university staff members. Findings have also been presented and discussed at the 14th Nordic Symposium on Tourism and Hospitality Research in Akureyri in Iceland, October 22-25, 2005

The course/project’s relation to other sorts of funding The project has been supported by the use of man-hours and infrastructures paid by the University of Stavanger, and also from the Department of Fine and Performing Arts and Bagamoyo College of Arts. Likewise, the Antique Office in Bagamoyo has contributed with knowledge and man-hours, and the Travellers’ Lodge in Bagamoyo has contributed with their valuable networking and also with man-hours.

MA Visual Cultural Studies, University of Tromsø The MA Visual Cultural Studies (VCS) at the University of Tromsø received three students with scholarships from the programme in the Fall of 2003.

Academic accomplishment The study aims at educating candidates with competence in conducting ethnographic research on social phenomena. The objective of VCS is to develop the specific competence of students from the South and North in communicating local knowledge. This includes acting as a mediator between local communities and government authorities. The main aim is thus to ensure that the voices of local communities are being heard. Visual Cultural Studies has had one intake of students with scholarship from Norad. The period for this programme is 2004-2006. In the Autumn of 2004, the Visual Cultural Studies admitted three students with scholarships from Norad. These students are going to graduate June 2006.

The academic year 2004/2005 finished following courses: SVF-3101 Film Form: Representing reality through the camera

SVF-3102 Crossing view-the qualitative research process SVF-3103 Constructing stories. Montage, narration, editing SVF-3104 Project description for doing qualitative research with a camera From April to August 2005 they did fieldwork in their home countries. Returning from fieldwork they attend course SVF3903: From fieldwork experiences to ethnographic films and texts. Exam film and paper will be ready for evaluation by mid-May 2006.

Information about the students No. in all

No. of women

8

7

Nationality in Norwegian students no. of students on the course/ project Norway Indonesia Nepal Maldives

5

Visual cultural studies evaluate all courses over a period of 2 years. The students are represented in the evaluation group. The main teacher of the courses, the academic leader and the coordinator of the programme also attend the evaluation group. The evaluation is dialogue-based. The students are asked how they experienced the quality of the courses and the coherence between the course description and the overall teaching programme. If any problems are revealed the group has to discuss and propose possible improvements. Students admitted in 2004 have attended three evaluations. Norad scholars are also represented in the Visual Cultural Studies Programme Board which is responsible for the running of the Master’s course. The scope of work of the programme board is to ensure that the students are taken care of academically and socially. The programme Board also produces an annual quality report for the programme to be submitted to the faculty. The report should include possible improvements to be taken into account in the planning of the following academic year according to the quality control system of the University of Tromsø.

Institutional and organisational factors Visual Cultural Studies made changes in the teaching plan in the Autumn of 2005. The reasons for the changes were to improve the teaching for the second year students and to ensure it was possible for them to graduate in June of 2006. Instead of starting with the editing of the film after returning from fieldwork, the students started to prepare the writing of their exam paper and the editing of their exam film. In the spring term the students are editing their exam film for 2.5 months, and finalize their written dissertation. Part of the teaching is organised in “Film and text seminars”, combined with lectures. The students present work-in-progress, both film and texts, in compulsory seminars. Students also receive individual supervision throughout the film and text-making process.

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As part of the work with a quality reform, Visual Cultural Studies worked out a new study plan, which became operative in the autumn of 2003.We are continuously working to improve our study. Visual Cultural Studies have funding from ‘Norgesuniversitetet’ to develop and systematise educational material on the internet. This project, “Exploratory for qualitative method- ethnographic film and text”, which will rationalise and increase the course possibilities at VCS, will be finalised in 2006. Working with the quality reform we have implemented portfolio evaluation as a way of organising the work with our students. Visual cultural studies has admitted students who had jobs and references from employers, from Norad cooperation partner countries. The experiences will benefit the students and their work places, as well as Visual Cultural Studies. In the long term, Visual Cultural Studies wishes to establish cooperation agreements with institutions in the east as well and envisage that this will be easier with former students as contact persons. This report, therefore, mainly deals with the experiences of the students themselves. “This master programme has also expanded my knowledge and generated a new interest and respect in me towards my own culture and people. More respect towards different communities and has helped me to better understand issues in an unbiased manner” – student at the programme “I have realized on myself that, Visual cultural study programme really enhanced my professional skills. Back to Nepal, I was working in television broadcasting media. I was doing television reporting. Beside that, I was also involving in documentary production business. I have already finished one year study at Visual Cultural study programme. With in one year, I have got both technical as well as theoretical knowledge those are really useful in my work after back to Nepal. I feel myself more confidence due to the knowledge which I have got here. I find myself different in compare to previous cultural practices” – student at the programme Since 1992 the partner in the North has been running university collaboration with the University of Ngaoundéré, Cameroon, and later we have started collaborating with the University of Bamako, Mali. They have recruited students from these universities and in 2003 we held a workshop in Visual Anthropology in Ngaoundéré. All this is to build up sister organizations at the collaborating institutions. The master in Visual Cultural Studies has the same structure as other master programmes at the university.

Since the Visual Cultural Studies master class includes an equal number of Norwegian and foreign students, this provides both the parties to get to know each other as all of us proceed as one batch for the two years duration of the study. Also the first short film and fieldwork of the master programme has to be conducted in Norway itself and each international student is paired off with a Norwegian student for two weeks.

“Two weeks of fieldwork and filming gives us an opportunity to learn about each other and get acquainted with a bit of Norwegian daily life” – student at the programme

The study is organised as a participatory learning process: Lectures, exercises, seminars, and tutoring go together in different steps of the cumulative learning processes, and the students are obliged to collaborate in developing skills and understandings throughout the study. The students do a mini fieldwork; make a film and a number of exercises as teamwork together with Norwegian students.

Communication and distribution of results Films that are produced at Visual Cultural Studies are used in teaching at universities, colleges, high schools and conferences and festivals. A catalogue of films produced at Visual Cultural Studies is on the VCS website. Master theses in VCS will be published online. The films made by our students are known to be of high quality. A number of films have been selected and screened at national and international festivals. During the last year four of our films have received internationals awards. In June there will be a public screening in Tromsø of this year’s exam films. The student will also send their films for selection for the Beeld voor Beeldfilm festival in Amsterdam, and attend the festival from 7-11 of June. Hopefully the films made by the Norad students will be selected for this festival.

Information of the study progress The three Norad scholars were admitted to a master in Visual Cultural Studies in 2004. Two of them will graduate in June 2006. The third one has a delay due to sickness in the autumn. He has applied for a quota scholarship for the autumn term 2006.

Social initiatives The whole course is based on the idea that the students learn about the Norwegian way of life through short term fieldwork. They make films and write papers about this experience.

“The Master programme has also helped me get to know a little bit of Norway and life in Tromso, a place very different to my own home country” – student at the programme

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Student progress Norwegian, Quota students and others Class of

Quota students

Norwegian students

2003 2004

3

3

Others

No. of students com­ple­ting the project 4


The three quota students admitted in 2003 graduated in 2005. Two of the Norwegian students have a delay due to sickness and will graduate in the Spring of 2006.

Work opportunities

The course/project’s relation to other sorts of funding The master programme in Visual Cultural studies is mainly financed by the University of Tromsø. A 75% position for an associate professor has been financed with funding from the Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education.

All three Norad students at Visual Cultural studies have left and will return home to work. “I will continue my job in television as a programme producer. My study at the University of Tromso increased the others possibilities beside my permanent job. I can work as a social research consultant in different governmental, non governmental and private organizations. In my permanent job in television, I am thinking to start one programme about the different ethnic and indigenous people and their culture. I am also planning to share my knowledge with some educational institutes. But only the problem for me is the existing conflict in the country. Due to the conflict, we do not have working environment.” – graduated student. “The Visual Cultural Studies master programme has provided the opportunity for me to better understand how further research can be conducted in areas related to people and daily lives. Working as a journalist for the Ministry of Information, Arts and Culture in my home country the Maldives, I am involved in carrying out a project to visit, collect and chronicle disappearing lifestyles, personal stories, traditions and culture from the 200 inhabited islands of the Maldives. Prior to my study in Norway this project was carried out with the help of writing and still photography. With the new experience and knowledge that I have now gained from the VCS master programme in the field of making films and research I hope to expand this 200-island project and include film as a way of recording and research. Then I would also encourage the Ministry to find more innovative ways of representing these films to the public, both national and international. Such films I feel could help the local as well as the international community to better understand the Maldives and are educated on issues that are affecting the people and also capture the disappearing island lifestyle before its too late. Also the Ministry of Information, Arts and Culture has recently opened a Centre for Arts in the Maldives, where film, performing arts, painting, music and other forms of creativity is being promoted paving way for me to contribute to this centre with the knowledge of research and film that I had gained from the Master programme in Visual Cultural Studies” – graduated student. “After I am finished my study, I would like to come back to my country and continue my previous work, which are: First, working as a non-governmental organisation worker that concerned about street children. In this sphere of work, I could use my knowledge from VCS to making films about street children and other social issues in order to increase the awareness of many people about their life, especially to bring out deeper understanding regarding the dignity and courage of these marginal people. Second, working as a lecturer of psychology at Jakarta Art Institute, this has not Ethnography Film study yet. Therefore, it would be a challenge and also opportunity to introduce and spread out Visual Cultural Study as a kind of new knowledge in my country” – graduated student.

MPhil Cultural Heritage, University of Bergen The MA Cultural Heritage programme at the University of Bergen submitted three students with funding from the programme in the fall of 2003.

Academic accomplishment in relation to aims The course aims to prepare the candidates for jobs in archaeology teaching departments at universities, in museums including fieldwork, preservation and exhibition. The philosophy of the training is based on the American approach where archaeology is considered a branch of anthropology, dealing with the prehistoric people’s culture and ecologic adaptations. During the fall term 2004 the students completed two courses: Course 319 and 320, 15 credits each. Further, the students participated in the Cape Town Field school programme at the Cultural Heritage Institute, Cape Town. Course 319 fieldwork (15 credits). The course consisted of field training (survey and excavations) and analysis of archaeological material with a poster presentation. The students were evaluated as passed/not passed. All students passed. Course 320 Essay in African Archaeology (15 credits). Writing an essay on African Archaeology. All students completed with good grades. During the spring term (2005) the students completed three courses: • Course 303 Project presentation (10 credits). All students passed. • Course 304 Essay related to the project proposal (10 credits). All students passed. • Course 305 Archaeological Methods (10 credits) Course related to central methods in archaeological research. Students evaluated according to passed/not passed. All students passed.

Information about the students No. in all

No. of women

Nationality in no. of students

5

1

Ethiopia – 2 Sudan – 1 Kenya – 1

Other students attending the course/ project (quota or other) Zimbabwe – 1

All students did their fieldwork from July 2006 till December 2006.

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The evaluation of the programme is done through continuous discussions of possible improvements with the students.

Institutional and organisational factors When it comes to answering whether the main goals of the programme have been reached through the Master program, these questions cannot be answered until the course has been completed, which will be in 2006.

Social initiatives All Norad students have participated in the Winter Seminar. Both Norad and Quota students participated in the spring seminar (Norway in a Nut Shell) in May 2005 as well as a winter tour to Geilo taking place in February 2006.

The Musical Instrument Academy (MIA) The Musical Instrument Academy (MIA) project was finalised in the spring of 2004. For further information, please see the annual report from 2004.

Norad Programme in Arts and Cultural Education, Accounts from the institutions 2005 Institution

ACE 1 - Agder University College ACE 2 - University of Stavanger, AK ACE 3 - University of Stavanger, NHS ACE 5 - Oslo National Academy of the Arts, SKA ACE 7 Norwegian Academy of Music The Norwegian Choir Association Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Dance, Musical Instrument Academy University of Tromsø (MA Visual Cultural Studies) University of Bergen (Mphil Cultural Heritage) Total institutions

54 /Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005

Allocation 2004

Accounts 2004

Allocation 2005

Accounts 2005

608 140 617 700 491 650 556 856 672 421 737 645 546 560 534 302 360 000 480 000

700 297 550 874 432 821 554 048 413 858 581 770 357 000 746 130 352 251 480 000

754 200 163 174 377 083 499 192 540 100 545 750 490 000 712 251 960 000

758 474 254 169 453 258 499 192 407 353 515 594 545 800 712 251 960 000

5 605 274

5 169 049

5 041 750

5 106 091


Ace ANNUAL REPORT 2005/ 55


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