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08 Annual Report 2008

The Cooperation Programme in Higher Education and Research between Norway and Russia


Contents 03 The Programme Board 03 The Programme in brief 04 Education Projects 07 Research Projects 11 Accounts 2008 12 Overview: All Education and Research Projects 15 Agreement

Published by the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education (SIU) and The Research Council of Norway, May 2009

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Editorial staff: Birgit Jacobsen, Arne Haugen, Gro Tjore, Ingeborg Revheim

Layout: Konvoi as Printed by: A7 Print Circulation: 300 ISBN 978-82-93017-00-4


The Programme Board 2008 The Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education (SIU) and the Research Council of Norway have jointly appointed a Programme Board for the cooperation programmes with the Western Balkans and Russia. The Board is the executive and decision-making body and acts as a coordinating unit for cooperation between the institutions.

programme board members 2008 Members Senior adviser Olav Refsdal, Vestfold University College (Chair) Director Gunnar Jordfald, Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) (Deputy Chair) Professor Jasna Bogunovic Jakobsen, The University of Stavanger Associate professor Elisabeth Roman, Narvik University College Professor Magny Thomassen, Norwegian University of Life Sciences Associate professor Karsten Fledelius, University of Copenhagen

Deputy members

The Programme Board acts on behalf of the Research Council and the Norwegian Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and is responsible for the efficient implementation of the programme in accordance with its aims, plans and framework. The Programme Board, together with the Secretariat, is in charge of the programme and responsible for its strategy, content and progress.

Associate professor Karin Hilmer Pedersen, University of Aarhus Associate professor Frode Lieungh, Telemark University College

Observers Adviser Annette Bull, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Section for the Western Balkans Assistant Director General Harald Sandhåland, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Section for Russia Senior adviser Tove Lyngra, Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, Department for Higher Education Adviser Vivil Haraldsen, Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, Department of Research Director Gro Beate Vige, Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, Department for Higher Education

The Programme Board, appointed in 2005, has six members, three appointed by the division board of the Research Council of Norway and three by the SIU board. SIU and the Research Council of Norway appoint the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Programme Board respectively in alternate years.

secretariat THE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF NORWAY:

Adviser Birgit Jacobsen NORWEGIAN CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION (SIU):

Adviser Gro Tjore Executive officer Ingeborg Revheim

The Research Council of Norway and SIU provide the secretariat of the Programme Board. They divide the project applications between them according to the character of the individual project concerned.

The Programme in brief The High North Strategy of the Government formulates the priorities important to the programme. Priority is given to cooperation with Northwest-Russia. Compared to the former Cooperation

Programme (2002-2006), the programme is now more equally based – with a Norwegian Research or Project Manager and Russian cooperating partners required to contribute with their own fi nancial

resources. The total allocation from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for 2008 was NOK 12 million, which covers eight research projects and seven projects within higher education.

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 3


The following is a brief report of the project activities in 2008.

EDUCATION PROJECTS 2008 was the first year for the projects to prepare progress reports. The projects report that the activities are mostly on track, but several projects also mention delays due to bureaucratic procedures, differing academic years, and other practical challenges. Several of the educational projects have for this reason requested transfer of funds from 2008 to 2009. On the basis of the explanations given in their annual reports and the revised project budgets, the transfers were approved by the Programme Board. It is worth noting that all the education programmes aiming at developing joint programmes and joint degrees report that the work is progressing according to plans. Joint programming represents a new dimension in the programme cooperation with Russia, and contributes to the goal of mutually beneficial interaction between the countries in the field of higher education. To ensure sustainability in the projects, special effort has been put into the establishment of English language courses, especially targeting the Russian students and academic staff. Cooperation with industry and authorities in the two countries is also emphasised in order to secure both the relevance of education as well as future collaboration.

■ ASTUIS The project partners are Arkhangelsk State Technical University (ASTU) and the University of Stavanger (UIS). The partnership is focusing on traineeship organised at the University of Stavanger for ASTU professors taking part in the project on training specialists for offshore oil-and-gas field development. The project aims to develop a curricula and work programmes for oil-and-gas specialities according to the credit-and-module system (ECTS) and offer professional English courses for the teachers of Institute of Oil and Gas involved in the project. Establishing laboratories in marine technologies of oil-and-gas and equip computer classes with modern computers and digital learning programmes is also an important task in this project. The project organised three work shops, one in Moscow, one in Arkhangelsk and one in Stavanger. The progress is reported to be in accordance with plan, and a course in English petroleum terminology for students has been established, as well as internship for Russian professors at UiS and joint guidance of graduation thesis. Efforts are taken to obtain the state acknowledgement of the juridical status of the BSc and MSc programmes of offshore field development at ASTU. Among other activities, the project reports that the Institute of Oil and Gas of ASTU now has taken out subscription for international petroleum magazines. The project faces some bureaucratic challenges, related to purchases of equipment to laboratories. Following these challenges, some features are reported to be delayed, such as the development of digital learning programmes. However, the work on equipping one laboratory in gas liquefaction to support research courses, another in offshore petroleum technolo-

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gies and one in simulation of multiphase production transportation has started. There has also been some obstacles concerning the purchase of equipment for two computer classes (for 30 users) at ASTU, but the project seems to have found a way to carry through with their plans. ■ Business in the High North and Sustainability The project partners are the Baltic State Technical University (BSTU) and Bodø University College (HiBO). Additional institution partners in the project: 9. The main goal of the project is to strengthen the Norwegian-Russian education and research cooperation in the field of business administration by focusing on sustainability issues in business cooperation in the High North. By involving new institutions in the existing cooperation network of the North-Western Alliance of universities, the project seeks to develop sustainable network of universities capable of designing and running joint-degree programs and courses at the Master and PhD levels. The project has developed a strategy for ensuring commitment between the network partners, which includes meetings for the project group at least twice a year and close cooperation with authorities and enterprises. According to plan, a reference group has been established, with representatives from both Russian and Norwegian enterprises. Two workshops have been held, one in St. Petersburg in relation to the conference “Inside Russia” and the second in relation with a project meeting in Kiev. The workshops have been focusing on the Bologna process and on sharing experiences between Russian partners and HiBO. With regard to the harmonisation of the curriculum and enrolment requirements,


some of the Russian institutions did not have their Master programmes accredited in 2008 and the enrolment of students was for this reason postponed. However, the project found a solution which allows Russian partner institutions to send students to Bodø for the spring term of 2009. Thus, the basic principles for an exchange model have been developed, ensuring that 2nd semester students are all gathered in Bodø, while for the 3rd semester, they should be gathered in Russia. Practicalities related to the exchange of students remain challenging, such as securing space for students in dormitories and arranging temporary residence permits for students. From the autumn of 2008, detailed procedures on these matters were established as well as good contacts with Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) and the Norwegian embassy/consulates in Russia, to facilitate this process in the future. The project has also extended its activities towards North America and HiBO´s partner institutions there. A successful application to the Partnership in Higher Education Norway -North America 2008-2010 programme was prepared, based on courses and experiences from the programme. Activities are also extended to other universities through the University of the Arctic (UA). ■ Joint Norwegian-Russian Master

of Science Program in Geoecological Monitoring and Rational Use of Natural Resources in the Northern Oil and Gas Production Regions The project partners are the St.Petersburg State University and the University of Stavanger (UiS). The mission of the project is to facilitate the creation of a unified strategy for environmental assessment in the Northern oil and gas producing regions. The main objectives are to develop a joint Master of Science program adapted for the oil and gas industry in the North and reflecting the state-of-the-art in Russia and Norway, and to forge a system of partnerships for

research and applied projects in the field. The development of a joint Master of Science program is completed and has been approved at both universities. After approval, much effort was given to the issue of developing the content of the courses. Practicalities related to student mobility, such as integration measures and accommodation have been mutually presented and a harmonization of exam forms has been made. A formal agreement of Cooperation Master Program in Environmental / Geoecological Monitoring and Nature Management in the Northern Oil and Gas Producing Regions has recently been established between the universities (5. Feb 2009). In addition to the formal agreement, involvement from the oil and gas industry and research activities in the two countries is important for sustainability. The project reports on increased interest from the industry as the courses become more specialised. The language barrier for some of the Russian participants makes it essential to provide English language courses in order to secure the continuity of the project. High costs related to student mobility and differences in the academic year are a challenge that forces careful planning of the exchange of students. The project has found a solution that includes educational modules and distant learning system (also for English language courses), the development of joint accreditation of courses, and the establishment of a dual degree system. An extra workshop is planned for in 2009, due to the need for transfer of competence discovered during the programme process. ■ Joint Training of Specialists and Students in the Field of Electro Catalysis for Hydrogen Energy The project partners are Moscow State Academy of Fine Chemical Technology (MITHT) and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). The project focuses on a Russian-Nor-

wegian partnership for joint training of specialists and students at Master and PhD level to prepare well-educated specialists in the area of hydrogen energy. The project will improve the educational and research potentials of the partners, which will be realised by close interaction between educational plans in the area of natural sciences at both institutions. The scheduled kick-off meeting was held in January 2008, and the work on establishing joint courses for both Master students and PhD candidates is proceeding according to plan. Among the activities is the development of three master courses on MITHT, with NTNU as a consultative partner. Research is an important part of the project synopsis, and the project has carried out several activities. The project reports on delays concerning payments and purchases (equipment, chemicals). Still, the practical challenges have been by and large improved since most routines for meetings, payments and contracts now have been established. Remaining challenges for sustainability and further cooperation in the project are related to language and availability of students. Concerning the activity of research visits (MSc and PhD students from MITHT to NTNU), the project states that the duration of these stays should be extended as this would improve the outcome for the participating students. Sadly, the project coordinator at MITHT, Professor Stromnova, passed away in December 2008, thus forcing a change of coordinator on the Russian side. At this stage, such a change is in itself a risk that may cause delays or other problems for the project. Bearing in mind that the project very much took departure in Professor Stromnova's research activity, and that a substantial effort was made in 2008 to establish relations and calibrate activities, much work probably will have to be redone. However, the project coordinator at NTNU expresses confidence in that

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 5


MITHT and the new project coordinator there, Professor Berenlyum, will ascertain the risks and deal with the situation that has occurred. ■ Master Programme in Comparative

Social Work in the Artic The project partners are the Pomor State University and Bodø University College (HiBo). The main objective is to improve social work practice in the High North through the development and running of a Master programme in Comparative Social Work in the Artic and comparative research at the PhD level addressing social problems and concurrent solutions. Adaptation of the programme to different national programmes within the framework of the Bologna process is an important aspect of special concern for the Russian counterparts. The project had originally planned to include a research component, but due to reduced funding, the research component has been removed. The process of developing a master programme in accordance with the special competence needed in the Arctic area is time consuming, likewise for the adaptation to the Bologna principles. This is partly due to the different education systems. Even so, the project is on track, and the fi rst courses will start in the autumn of 2009, with lecturers from all the participating institutions involved. The intake of Russian students was fi nished in February 2009, and the Norwegian intake was ongoing at the time of reporting. As for some of the other projects, the mastery of English is a challenge, and the project is considering the possibility for students to hand in some exams in their mother tongue. To ensure future sustainability, all the involved institutions are working within the framework of the University of the Arctic, and are also trying to improve a recently established thematic network in social work and welfare policy.

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■ Safe Loading and Transport of Hydrocarbons from the Barents Sea (SafeLOT) The project partners are the St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University and the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). Additional institution partners involved: 5 The objective of the project is to increase the knowledge of Arctic/cold climate technology for safe and sound petroleum production and transport from the Arctic region. The cooperation within the project introduces young specialists in industrial companies working with exploration and exploitation of hydrocarbon resources of the Barents Sea region, improves relations between Norway and Russia in the Barents Sea region including Svalbard and develops common understanding of the regional problems. The activities involved in the project are teaching and exchange of master students, teaching and exchange of PhD students, summer school in St. Petersburg and field investigations of ice in the Barents Sea. Six Russian master students spent one semester at UNIS during 2008. Two Russian PhD students have started their work with funding from the project. Two textbooks are also in progress: the fi rst is the translation into Russian of the book “Actions from Ice on Arctic Offshore and Coastal Structures” – Løset et al. In addition, the book “Hydrocarbon Field Development with Emphasis on Offshore” – Gudmestad et al. is also in print. A new master course programme has been developed and started in 2008 “Arctic Offshore Engineering”. This is a particularly relevant course for students who intend to have contact with the offshore industry. In May 2008 the research vessel “LANCE” departed from Longyearbyen. Students attending UNIS Arctic Technology courses sailed in the Barents sea for 10 days, to carry out ice ridge research and learn modern methods of investigation. All Russian “SafeLOT” students were part of the mission.

The project benefits from coordination with the project “Offshore and Coastal technology for Petroleum, Production and Transport from Arctic Waters”, a PetroArctic project funded by the PETROMAKS programme (The Research Council of Norway) and Statoil. ■ Where Russian meets Norwegian Languages at the Interfaces (2008-10) The project partners are Murmansk Humanities Institute and the University of Oslo (UiO). The project seeks to establish an educational and research-oriented environment for graduate students and scholars from Murmansk Humanities Institute and the University of Oslo working on languages in contrast (Russian vs. Norwegian). It will strengthen advanced second language learning of Russian and Norwegian, and improve the learning environment for students at both institutions by means of additional courses, exchange of students, active involvement of students in seminars and joint supervision by Russian and Norwegian scholars. The project will include activities such as a large-scale survey of grammatical phenomena from the perspective of both native speakers and second language learners. This research will have applications in teaching and in the development of pedagogical materials. Furthermore, a parallel Norwegian-Russian-English corpus will be developed and applied in both teaching and research. The project title is abbreviated to RuN (Russian – Norwegian) and a project website has been developed: www.hf.uio.no/ ilos/forskning/forskningsprosjekter/run/ By the time of reporting for 2008, the RuN parallel corpus contains 600 000 words in each language, in addition to some parallel texts in English. Teaching material is being developed on the basis of this corpus, and parts of this will be made


available online in the form of interactive language exercises and translations. The RuN corpus is actively used by both visiting teachers and scholars, and has also received attention from professional translators. About 20 students attended courses given by the RuN project in the autumn of 2008, with similar numbers for the spring for 2009. Considering the overall situation for Russian studies at UiO, these are quite encouraging figures. Both participating institutions foresee that the development of teaching material, research articles and surveys are likely to continue beyond the project period. A RuN conference “Russian in Constrast” is planned to take place in Oslo in September 2009

RESEARCH PROJECTS The year 2008 stands as a point of departure for all the projects, when they really got started. The projects had their first consolidating meetings and they carried out their field work. As part of the effort to enhance international research cooperation, a programme call was announced in December of BILAT-funding from the Ministry of Education and Research of NOK 4,8 mill. for the period 2009-2010. The funding would cover Personal Visiting Researcher Grants, Support for Travel and Stay, and Support for Events. The aim was to stimulate bilateral research cooperation with Russia that will be going on for the years 2009-2010. Special terms for the applicants were; documented confirmation from the Russian side that they agree to participate with researchers, contribute with financing, or give access to data or infrastructure. Of importance was also the probability of continuation to the cooperation over time. Reference to existing research projects with financing was seen to strengthen the application. The

announcement also required references to further plans, documentation of institutional anchorage and foundation in existing cooperation agreements. The Research Council received 27 applications, of which 21 BILAT-projects were supported. ■ RAPSIFACT - Study of Russian Air

Pollution Sources and their Impact on Atmospheric Composition in the Arctic The project partners are the Obukhov Institute for Atmospheric Physics in Moscow and the Norwegian Institute For Air Research. The project uses the TROICA railway carriage, data from Svalbard, and the FLEXPART transport model. RAPSIFACT interprets existing data and will conduct new measurements of greenhouse gases, gaseous air pollutants, and aerosols in Russia, which is the most important source region for Arctic air pollution. This has especially high relevance and is extremely urgent because climate change is proceeding fastest in the Arctic, and reducing the emissions of short-lived pollutants in the source regions affecting the Arctic is probably the only feasible shortterm strategy for slowing Arctic climate change. The project builds on the combination of a unique Russian measurement platform - the instrumented TROICA railway carriage -, data from several Russian air chemistry measurement stations, the FLEXPART Lagrangian tracer transport model, as well as measurements obtained at the Norwegian Zeppelin research station in Svalbard and other sites in northern Scandinavia. Three new TROICA missions will be conducted within the project, two of which will use the railroad from Kislovodsk to Murmansk, the country’s only all-weather northern port and an Arctic pollution hot spot; the third trip will be along the Trans-Siberian railroad. The focus of the study using data from ten previous and three new missions will be on the measurements taken in air

masses travelling across the Barents Sea into the Arctic. The data will be compared to measurements from Svalbard to assess the impact of Russian sources onto the Arctic. Focus will be on the oil and gas industry, whose emissions in the Arctic are expected to grow considerably in the future. Work on RAPSIFACT was delayed initially, because the hiring process took longer than expected. However, with a new full-time employed at NILU, the delay is expected to be soon compensated for. During summer 2008, one campaign with the TROICA railway carriage was performed, which was co-funded by the IPY project POLARCAT (the RAPSIFACT-funded campaigns will be in 2009 and 2010). The data are now being prepared for analysis. Since October 2008, for two months NILU hosted a visitor from the Russian partner institute. This was not originally planned but is a welcome additional activity, which also helps forge close contacts between the two partners working in RAPSIFACT. The fi rst actual analyses will concentrate on the ozone budget over Siberia. Ozone is very low in the Siberian boundary layer in summer, compared to ozone concentrations elsewhere in the extra-tropical continental boundary layer. With the railroad measurements and data from Russian surface stations, the project has an excellent data set to investigate the sinks of ozone in Siberia that lead to these low ozone concentrations. RAPSIFACT also has access to aircraft data from the YAK-AerosibPolarcat airborne campaigns over Siberia, which will complement the analyses. Analyses of the ozone and other data from all campaigns are now being conducted, and model calculations for all the campaigns have been started. It is expected that within 2009 RAPSIFACT will produce results on the Siberian ozone-budget that can be published in an international peerreviewed journal.

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 7


■ MAretime REsources of the BArents

SEa: Satellite Data Driven Monitoring in the Context of Increase of Commercial Efficiency of the FisheryMAREBASE The project partners are NIERSCH, Polar Research Institute Marine Fishery and Ocean, Russian State Hydrometeorological University and Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center. The overall objective of MAREBASE is to advance the capability to monitor the Barents Sea maritime resources in the context of increase of the commercial efficiency of the fishery. This will be achieved through the following specific objectives: - Identification of the governing marine physic-chemical factors/parameters and dynamical process governing fish behavior and distribution in the Barents Sea. - Development and validation of the satellite SAR and optical data driven method for detection and monitoring of the marine processes and phenomena (e.g. fronts, current convergence and divergence) associated with zones of enhanced biological productivity. - Performance of the pilot monitoring of the Barents Sea based on the satellite and aircraft data, hydrodynamic and ecosystem modeling, and in situ observations on hydrological and biological (zooplankton, fi sh) parameters. - Development of a prototype of the satellite data driven monitoring system The project had two meetings in St. Petersburg during the year, where the project partners presented plans and results in the project. Satellite monitoring of the Barents Sea have started and includes both daily monitoring by SAR and optical satellites and case studies with aircraft and ship data. The satellite monitoring system is developed based on web technology, building on the experience from the HAB system, the SAR-system, the Arctic ROOS web site and other web systems provided by the Nansen Center in Norway. For the case studies, use of aircraft data as well as ship data from PINRO

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will be combined with satellite data from NERSC. Surveys by PINRO are performed in August- September and in the spring time. Three Russian students are involved in the project. ■ The Role of Protected Nature in

Sustainable Local Development in North-West Russia and Northern Norway - A Comparative Analyses NAPROLD The project partners are Kola Science Center, Nordland Research Institute. The objective of this project is twofold: To compare Norwegian and Russian system of organisation and use of nature conservation areas with aim to develop recommendations for their sustainable management directed to benefits for local communities and improving of living condition for residents; and; To increase knowledge of socio-economic aspects of protected areas organisation to enhance competence of Russian and Norwegian stakeholders (environmental authorities, NGOs, indigenous peoples, entrepreneurs and local communities) when it comes to confl ict resolution and local/rural development related to the areas. Preliminary results show that protected areas in Norway and Russia differ according to objectives, regulations and general management of the areas. For example it seems like scientific research is more central to Russian protected areas, their preambles and managerial efforts, than is the situation in Norway. Also when it comes to monitoring and controlling, great differences seem to appear. Compared to Norwegian management, Russian monitoring services are well off in both monetary and personal terms, and administer stricter rules than their Norwegian colleagues. Another pronounced distinction between the two countries is that both federal and regional authorities may initiate and administer protected areas (Zapovedniks) in Russia, while this is merely regulated by national authorities in Norway. Finally, contamination and

area protection is considered coherently in Russia, whereas this is perceived and implemented separately within Norwegian environmental bureaucracy. The local societies surrounding the protected areas in Norway and Russia are diverse. The most fundamental difference is related to the fact that private property is common in Norwegian adjacent areas, whereas Russian protected areas at Kola is established on public land. This strengthens individual rights in Norwegian protected areas. Also demographic and economic variables indicate that settlements and human activities should be considered differently in the two countries. Quantitative studies during winter/ spring will enlighten such differences and provide sound contextual references, within which further use and protection analyses will be conducted. There are several similarities between Norwegian and Russian nature protection. The areas are established for preserving great, untouched areas, flora, fauna, geological sites and cultural heritage. Both nations have used outfields for harvest, hunting and fi shing, and still do. The protected areas on both sides of the borders are also subordinated to the international environmental regimes, conventions, constituting a common point of departure for national protection policies. ■ Neighbourly Asymmetry: Norway and Russia 1814-2014 The partners are: Pomor State University, Institute of General History, Moscow, and University of Tromsø, Faculty of Social Sciences. The purpose of the whole project is to study the historical relations between Norway and Russia / the Soviet Union in the period 1814-2014, and publish two comprehensive, richly illustrated volumes adapted to a broad circle of readers, as a timely contribution to the two centuries of anniversary of the Norwegian Constitution (2014). The Programme is fi nancing the fi rst volume. The secondary


objective is a noticeable increase in competence and recruitment to the field of Norwegian-Russian historical relations, both in Norway and Russia, and this will be achieved, i.a. by including doctorates and postdoc scholarships in the project. A series of dissertations are going to be written that will raise the professional level significantly. Project manager, who had his sabbatical half-year in the autumn, devoted a substantial part of his working hours to this project. The project manager, a Ph.D student and the editorial secretary / editor of illustrations started the work in 2008. Together with Russian collaborating partners they prepared the conference “Third School of Young Researchers in Scandinavian Studies” and a workshop connected with the preparation of the fi rst volume of “Neighbourly Asymmetry”, which took place in Arkhangelsk in September. Authors of volume one were lecturing at the “School of young researchers in Scandinavian Studies”. An extensive description of chapters for volume one was distributed to the authors prior to the workshop, and then discussed in Arkhangelsk. All had in advance prepared a summary of their future contribution, and there was an exchange of comments during the workshop. The project received additional fi nancial support from the received four million NOK from the Tromsø Research Foundation. The money will for the most part be used to cover two post-doc scholarships connected with the project. From September 2008 two doctoral students are involved in the project, one Russian historian and one Norwegian historian. ■ Governance of HIV/AIDS Prevention

in the Northwest Russia The partners are: Centre for Independent Social Research (St. Petersburg); the Pomor University; The Northern State Medical University (Arkhangelsk); The Research Foundation Fafo; the Norwegian Institute of Public Health; Bodø University College; and the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, NIBR.

The project consists of field work at federal, regional and local levels. So far, field work in the form of in-depth interviews has been conducted at federal level, with policy-makers, international and Russian NGOs. Although authorities acknowledge that increased effort is needed in the fight against HIV/AIDS, there are many challenges, particularly in the areas of governance and prevention which this project focuses upon. There are huge regional disparities in terms of prevention activities. Despite large federal health programmes in Russia, the government has not succeeded in preventing a continued increase in infection rates among injecting drug users. HIV/AIDS is largely the responsibility of regional authorities, and in many federal subjects the disease is still considered mainly a medical problem, while drug abuse is treated as merely a criminal offence. This constitutes obstacles to cross-sectoral approaches towards prevention. In some regions there are no harm-reduction activities at all (needle exchange programmes, etc.). Much depends on the competence of and collaboration between the regional HIV/AIDS centre and regional authorities. Russian NGOs in the area of fighting HIV/AIDS, and especially those having received funding through the Global Fund, have become professionalized and represent an example of successful civil society development in Russia. However, their prevention activities are concentrated in regions where the local authorities have a positive attitude towards their involvement, whereas large parts of the huge country have no substantial prevention activities at all. The project studies governance of HIV/AIDS prevention at regional and local levels in three regions of North-West Russia with large differences in terms of the spread of the disease and governance of the response. One Russian PhD student is involved in the project.

■ BENEFITS – Natural and Social Science Research Cooperation in Northern Russia and Norway for Mutual Benefits Across National and Scientific Borders The partners are Moscow State University, Russian Academy of Science, the University of Cambridge, and the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research. The overall project aim is to develop a long-lasting scientific and educational collaboration network between Norwegian and Russian institutions with focus on development in northern regions through combined natural- and social science approaches. The network focuses on young scientist and graduated student activities linked to topics related to processes controlling changes in the boreal-arctic transition zone in Northern Norway and Russia. The overall aim will be reached through emphasis on three focal research themes, based on ongoing nationally funded research projects: I) Development and improvement of tools for characterisation and monitoring of spatiotemporal changes in the transition from forest covered regions to arctic tundra; II) Vegetation dynamics and growth responses to environmental changes and stressors; and III) Construction of a Northern Socially oriented Observation System Network. Through collaboration within these themes the project, which currently consist of 33 scientists and students, will generate comprehensive information on i) environmental status and spatiotemporal changes of northern forest-tundra ecosystem; ii) distribution and change of human land use and underlying environmental and social drivers; and iii) subsequent consequences to human societies and the environment. The most important instruments for the collaboration are joint workshops and fieldwork, and exchange of young scientist. Three workshops have been arranged – Cambridge, Apatity, Trondheim – in 2008. Fieldwork of the summer took place in

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 9


Kola Peninsula, where researchers and student groups collected social science data, and ground and remote sensed data for further analyses of the status in the forest-tundra transition zone. BENEFITS is linked to the International Polar Year project PPS Arctic* which is a multidisciplinary research cluster focusing on circumpolar northern regions and sub-arctic environments, and the transition zone to the Arctic. These regions and the zone are internationally recognised due to its exceptional importance in terms of climate feedbacks, global vegetation, and settlements by indigenous people. Large scale changes in the structure and location of this zone (as predicted) will affect the total northern environment with its people, landscapes and sustainability of resource use. In these regards, changes in forest and tundra distribution are key factors. PPS Arctic includes 115 scientists and students from 10 countries, with activities at 30 sites in the circumpolar forest-tundra zone. PPS Arctic* is the short name for “Present day processes, Past changes, and Spatiotemporal variability of biotic, abiotic and socio-environmental conditions and resource components along and across the Arctic delimitation zone”. The project is coordinated by Dr. A. Hofgaard, NINA and co-coordinator Dr. G. Rees, Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University, UK. ■ Emerging Persistent Organic Pol-

lutants in the High North and Northwestern Russia (NorthPOP) The partners are: St. Petersburg State University, and The University Centre, Svalbard. The project was officially started in January 2008 with a meeting of the secretariat in Oslo. All participants were invited to the fi rst North POP workshop in St. Petersburg/ Peterhof (Russia) in May. The major purpose was the presentations and evaluations of the MSc/ PhD Student pro-

10 • ANNUAL REPORT 2008

jects for the planned Norwegian – Russian exchange program. Suggested projects were evaluated and appropriate adjustments were suggested by the project group. In addition, the students were assigned to the respective Norwegian/ Russian collaboration partners. After the workshop, the NorthPOP secretariat confi rmed the support of four Russian and one Norwegian Projects. During the meeting, the potential for practical instrument based courses was discussed as a vital part of the continuous knowledge transfer within the project. Based upon a general agreement on this type of courses, the fi rst North-POP application course for “chromatographic methods and mass-selective detectors” was scheduled for October. The course was organised by Institute for Pharmacy, University of Tromsø, at the laboratories with seven participating Russian students. The course was organized as a combination of practical exercises and lectures with the aim to cover all important aspects included in method development for chromatographic separation and mass selective detection. The NorthPOP secretariat is currently evaluating new project suggestions from Norwegian and Russian Partner institutions for possible support. The next workshop will take place in Tromsø, Sommarøy, in May 2009. ■ INTRANOR- Impact Assessment of Elevated Levels of Natural/ Technogenic Radioactivity on Wildlife of the North The partners are: International Academy of Modern Knowledge and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. INTRANOR draws on the additional components and methodologies recently developed within the ERICA project and uses EPIC as a foundation to develop a system for assessment of the radiological impact on wildlife of the North from technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) and manmade radioactivity. This will be achieved

through the development of radiological impact assessment tools and through the derivation of appropriate criteria and standards. The major research objectives are: 1) Development of a methodology for assessing the radiation impact on natural biota of the North. 2) Evaluation of radiation dose loads to representatives of terrestrial, freshwater and marine biota in the areas of enhanced levels of radioactivity. 3) Derivation of dose-effects relationships for wildlife, inhabiting the areas with enhanced levels of radionuclides. 4) Development of criteria ensuring the radiation safety of vulnerable northern ecosystems. So far, significant effort has been placed into developing and refi ning environmental impact assessments for ionising radiation within the Arctic. Results from this work were presented at an international Conference held in Bergen, Norway in June 2008. The developments in the last few years concerning issues surrounding protection of the environment from radiation have provided a wealth of information and data that can be considered in the context of its applicability to Arctic conditions. In collaboration with Russian partners, the results from a study looking at effects on vegetation in a boreal area contaminated from the storage of mill tailings of uranium and wastes from radium production have been summarised and incorporated into a scientific report. Significant cytogenetic effects in chronically irradiated vegetation populations were observed at doses 10 times higher than the natural background. Reduced reproductive success (characterized by a significantly increased level of embryonic lethal mutations) was observed at absorbed doses of 0.2 – 0.7 Gy. The kick off meeting was held at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, in February 2008. The forthcoming INTRANOR meeting will be in Oslo on May 2009


ACCOUNTS 2008 Cooperation Programme with Russia

Accounts 2008

Total budget 2007-2010

Allocation from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

12 000 000

48 000 000

Total income

12 000 000

48 000 000

Allocated through SIU

5 545 550

20 100 000

6 900 000

22 500 000

0

600 000

Administrative expenses**

1 200 000

4 800 000

Total allocations/expenses

13 645 550

48 000 000

Balance 2008

-1 645 550

Transfer of remaining funds from previous year

7 800 000

Allocated through the Research Council of Norway

Extraordinary measures*

Remaining funds for the programme period All sums are given in Norwegian Kroner (NOK)

6 154 450

0

* Extraordinary allocations for small projects and other relevant activities, authorized by the Board. Remaining funds are transferred to the next year. **This item shows only the allocation given for administration of the programme and are divided in two between the Research Council of Norway and SIU. For further details on the administrative expenses; see the separate account sent UD, June 2009.

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 11


Overview: All Education and Research Projects

ASTUIS

Business in the High North and Sustainability

Arkhangelsk State Technical University,

Baltic State Technical University, Bodø University College.

University of Stavanger

Joint Norwegian-Russian Master of Science Program in Geoecological Monitoring and Rational Use of Natural Resources in the Northern Oil and Gas Production St.Petersburg State University,

PROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10001 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 3 000 000 PROJECT LEADER: Nicolay Dundin/Terje Froiland

PROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10002

University of Stavanger

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 3 600 000 PROJECT LEADER: Marina Volkova/

Anatoli Bourmistrov

PROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10003 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 3 400 000 PROJECT LEADER: Vladislav Movchan/ Steinar Sanni (from September 2008)

Joint Training of Specialists and Students in the Field of Electrocatalysis for Hydrogen Moscow State Academy of Fine Chemical Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Master Programme in Comparative Social Work in the Artic Pomor State University, Bodø University College PROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10005

PPROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10004

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010

TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 2 200 000

TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 1 300 000

PROJECT LEADER: Marina Kalinina/

PROJECT LEADER: Tatyana Stromnova/Svein Sunde

Where Russian meets Norwegian – Languages at the Interfaces (2008-10) Murmansk Humanities Institute, University of Oslo PPROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10007 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 3 300 000 PROJECT LEADER: Galina Smirnova/Atle Grønn

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Sveinung Horverak

Safe Loading and Transport of Hydrocarbons from the Barents Sea (SafeLOT) St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, University Centre in Svalbard PROJECT ID: CPRU-2007/10006 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: NOK 3 300 000 PROJECT LEADER: Karl Shkhinek/Sveinung Løset


RAPSIFACT - Study of Russian Air Pollution Sources and their Impact on Atmospheric Composition in the Arctic Obukhov Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Moscow Norwegian Institute For Air Research

PROJECT ID: 184696/S50 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: 3 000 000 PROJECT LEADER: Andreas Stohl PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://transport.nilu.no/

projects/rapsifact

MAretime REsources of the BArents SEa: Satellite Data Driven Monitoring in the Context of Increase of Commercial Efficiency of the Fishery- MAREBASE

Neighbourly Asymmetry: Norway and Russia 1814-2014 Pomor State University, Institute of General History, Moscow

NIERSCH, Polar Research Institute Marine Fishery and Ocean, Russian State Hydrometeorological University

The Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø

Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center

PPROJECT ID: 184848/S50

PROJECT ID: 184778/S50 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: 3 000 000 PROJECT LEADER: Stein Sandven

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: 3 000 000 PROJECT LEADER: Jens Petter Nielsen PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://www.uit.no

PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://www.nersc.no

Governance of HIV/AIDS Prevention in NorthWest Russia The Research Foundation Fafo; the Norwegian Institute of Public Health; Bodø University College; and the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, NIBR

BENEFITS - Natural and Social Science Research Cooperation in Northern Russia and Norway for Mutual Benefits Across National and Scientific Borders

International Academy of Modern Knowledge Moscow State University Russian Academy of Science

PROJECT LEADER: Aadne Aasland PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://guango.nibr.no

PROJECT ID: 185134/S50 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010

PROJECT ID: 184931/S50

TOTAL ALLOCATION: 3 000 000

Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority

University of Cambridge; Norwegian Institute for Nature Research

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010

INTRANOR - Impact Assessment of Elevated Levels of Natural/Technogenic Radioactivity on Wildlife of the North

PROJECT ID: 185023/S50 PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: 3 000 000

TOTAL ALLOCATION: 2 400 000 PROJECT LEADER: Justin Brown PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://www.nrpa.no

PROJECT LEADER: Annika Hofgaard PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://ppsarctic.nina.no

Emerging Persistent Organic Pollutants in the High North and North-Western Russia (NorthPOP)

The Role of Protected Nature in Sustainable Local Development in North-West Russia and Northern Norway- A Comparative Analysis -NAPROLD

St. Petersburg State University

Kola Science Center

The University Centre in Svalbard, UNIS

Nordland Research Institute

PROJECT ID: 185104/S50

PROJECT ID: 184781/S50

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: 3 000 000

PROJECT PERIOD: 2007-2010 TOTAL ALLOCATION: 2 100 000 PROJECT LEADER: Audun Sandberg

PROJECT LEADER: Roland Kallenborn

PROJECT WEB-SITE:

PROJECT WEB-SITE: http://www.northpop.no

http://www.nordlandsforskning.no/prosjekter

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 13


OBJECTIVES OF THE AGREEMENT between The Royal Norwegian Ministry Of Foreign Affairs and The Norwegian Centre For International Cooperation in Higher Education and The Research Council Of Norway Concerning Cooperation With Russia in the field of Higher Education And Research 2007-2010 1. The overall objective of this agreement is to enhance the cooperation between Norwegian and Russian institutions in the fields of higher education and research in areas that have academic and thematic relevance to the High North. The priorities of the cooperation programme are to a large extent based on the Norwegian Government’s High North Strategy. The Government’s intention is that Norway shall occupy a leading position internationally with respect to the development of knowledge on, in and to the benefit of the High North. The specific objectives of the agreement are to finance cooperation in the fields of higher education and research between universities, university colleges and research institutions in Russia and corresponding institutions in Norway. The cooperation programme is intended to provide for mutually beneficial interaction between the fields of higher education and research, and establish lasting partnerships/ cooperation between the two countries. The cooperation on education and research is also intended to have effects extending beyond the academic institutions involved, to include participation by businesses, the public authorities and organisations. Priority will be given to cooperation with Northwest-Russia, but the programme is not limited to this geographical area. The programme gives priority to cooperation on themes that are linked to the Government’s High North Strategy, in the following main areas: a) Petroleum and energy, with an emphasis on the promotion of health, safety and environment (HSE) in exploration, production and transportation in offshore petroleum operations. b) Sustainable management and commercial utilisation of the maritime resources in the Barents Sea and protection of the marine environment in the Arctic Ocean, including mapping and monitoring of the marine environment. c) Development of a broad business sector, including ICT, tourism, the marine sector and environmental technology.

14 • ANNUAL REPORT 2008

d) Subjects in the humanities and social sciences that are concerned with enhancing knowledge of socio-economic and political conditions and living conditions specific to the High North, including public health. A gender perspective and the strengthening of civil society will be important in this context. e) Measures for enhancing cooperation and contact between Norway and Russia, for example language teaching. Issues related to the indigenous population constitute an important dimension of the cooperation programme. Both Norway and Russia participate in the Bologna process for creating a European Higher Education Area. The goals of the Bologna process will form the main framework for the cooperation on higher education under this programme. Cooperation on education at the MA and PhD levels will be given priority, but relevant projects at a lower level will also be considered.

5. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs shall keep the Programme Committee informed of activities that may affect the programme. The Ministry shall also keep the Programme Committee informed of other cooperation activities that may affect education and research cooperation with Russia.

THE FINANCIAL FRAMEWORK OF THE AGREEMENT

2. Cooperation projects funded under this agreement will be based on the principle of equality between the two parties.

6. Subject to the budget resolutions of the Norwegian Storting with regard to the overall framework for project cooperation with Russia, it is the intention of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to make an annual grant available for the programme in the period covered by the agreement in the amount of NOK 12 million. The Programme Committee shall be informed of the grant for the year in question at the beginning of the budget year in a letter of commitment forwarded through the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council. Administrative expenses for the implementation of the agreement shall be covered by the annual grant and shall be approved by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

THE OBLIGATIONS OF THE PARTIES

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE AGREEMENT

3. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council have overall responsibility for the implementation of the agreement and shall ensure the distribution of assignments and the implementation of the measures set out in the agreement through agreements with Norwegian institutions.

7. The strategy for activities under this agreement, and their implementation, shall comply with existing guidelines for cooperation with Russia, and shall be decided in consultation with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Matters of principle or matters relating to foreign policy shall be submitted to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs before a final decision is made. During the budget period the Ministry of Foreign Affairs may raise matters of principle, matters relating to foreign policy or other matters of particular importance that need to be resolved outside the time frames set out in this agreement. Furthermore, the parties attach decisive importance to close cooperation and regular contact in order to ensure that the implementation of programme activities has the

4. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council shall ensure that the programme is coordinated with other research and educational programmes under their auspices that involve Russia or the High North. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council shall delegate responsibility for selecting projects and coordinating the programme to a programme committee, cf. section 9.


necessary flexibility and that the overall objective of the agreement is fulfilled. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council are jointly responsible for the practical implementation of this agreement, cf. Appendix 1. 8. Responsibility for implementing the individual projects lies with the Norwegian institution that has received approval and been granted funding for the project. 9. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council shall appoint a programme committee to administer the cooperation programme. The Programme Committee shall be responsible for coordinating the programme and shall have the authority to decide which project proposals are to receive funding within the framework of the grant. The Programme Committee shall be accountable to and shall report to the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council. The Committee shall have eight members, three permanent and one alternate member to be appointed by the Research Council, and three permanent and one alternate member to be appointed by the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education shall appoint members who represent the university and university college sector, and the Research Council shall appoint members from the institute sector. The positions of chair and vice-chair shall rotate annually. Every other calendar year the Programme Committee shall be headed by a chair appointed by the Research Council and a vice-chair appointed by the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education. During the intervening years the Programme Committee shall be headed by a chair appointed by the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and a vice-chair appointed by the Research Council. The chair and vice-chair shall be chosen from among the members of the Committee. In the event of a tie the chair’s vote shall break the tie. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Education and Research shall be

represented on the Programme Committee by observers. This will ensure that the Committee is kept informed of relevant processes and activities. The observers have the right to speak at meetings of the Committee. 10. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council shall serve jointly as the secretariat for the Programme Committee, cf. Annex 1. 11. The Programme Committee shall draw up an annual report and annual accounts, which shall be submitted to the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council and subsequently sent to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs before 1 June the following year. The parties to the agreement shall meet before the end of each year to discuss the overall budgets for the coming year. The budgets shall contain a cost estimate and time frame for each new activity. The Programme Committee shall be in possession of a letter of commitment from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the coming financial year before determining the allocations for the year in question. Before the Programme Committee awards the grants for the following year, the programme plans shall be presented to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at a separate meeting, where policy issues and other matters central to the cooperation may also be raised. In cases where an activity overlaps with other relevant cooperation activities with Russia, the meeting will discuss the possible distribution of the funding. The Ministry of Education and Research shall attend the meeting and is responsible for notifying and discussing the Ministry’s views on the education and research policy aspects of the programme package. Notice of the meeting, the agenda and the necessary documentation shall be sent to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Education and Research no later than 14 days prior to the meeting 12. The implementation of the agreed programme is described in further detail in Appendix 1 to this agreement.

PROJECT COSTS AND TRANSFER OF FUNDS 13. The Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council shall keep the accounts for the programme in accordance with the project portfolio for which these institutions have administrative responsibility. After having sent the letter of commitment, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is responsible for transferring funds for ongoing projects to the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education and the Research Council respectively at the beginning of the year. The administration budget shall be equally divided between the two institutions. 14. The Norwegian institutions in charge of the individual projects are responsible for their academic and administrative implementation in accordance with the agreement they have concluded with the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education or the Research Council. The cost estimates and rates of the various projects are set out in contracts and guidelines.

ENTRY INTO FORCE, AMENDMENTS, TERMINATION 15. The agreement enters into force as from the date of its signature and, provided the Storting continues to grant funds for project cooperation with Russia, shall remain in force until 31 December 2010. 16. Each of the parties may take the initiative to amend the content of the agreement or its appendix. If the parties agree on such an amendment, this shall be confirmed by the parties’ signing an addendum to the agreement. 17. The agreement may be terminated by either of the parties at any time during the agreement period on one year’s written notice. This agreement is made in three original copies in the Norwegian language, which shall be the authentic text, and shall be furnished to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Centre for International Cooperation in Higher Education, and the Research Council. The Ministry of Education and Research shall receive a copy of the agreement.

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 • 15


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http://new.siu.no/nor/content/download/966/9740/file/Annual%20Report%20Russia-%20sendt%20UD%2029.05.