__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

2018 CALENDAR SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY 2017 ANNUAL REPORT CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF GRASSROOTS CONSERVATION


OUR MISSION Sitka Conservation Society protects the natural environment of the Tongass National Forest while supporting the development of sustainable communities in Southeast Alaska.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

01 02 03

Cover Photo: © Founding members of SCS, 1967 – 1970 Above Photo: © Ian Strachan, National Geographic Lindblad Expeditions Back cover: © Bethany Goodrich Photography

Letter from the SCS Board President   Funding Fifty More Years of Wilderness Advocacy   Honoring Chuck Johnstone

11

Moving Tongass Forest Management Forward

23

4-H Brings Youth and Elders Together

13

Grassroots Activism: Think Global, Act Local

25

Training Alaska’s Next Generation of Stewards

15

The Enduring Legacy of Wilderness

27

Local Food Connects Us to Our Environment

29

Our Future Forest

31

SCS Staff and Board

33

Collage

34

Gallery

04

Financial Report, Thank You List

17

Bringing Locally-Caught Fish to Schools

07

Climate Change: Alaska Youth Demand Action

19

A Fresh Perspective on Public Lands

09

Building Local Economies from Local Resources

21

Alaska: Our Nation's Salmon State


FIFTY YEARS OF CONSERVATION A LETTER FROM SPENCER SEVERSON, SCS BOARD PRESIDENT DEAR FRIENDS, This past year, I’ve felt overwhelmed by bad news and dire stories—threats to our public lands, changing ocean conditions, declining wild species, and surprising internal and external threats to our democracy itself. Around me I see many stressed and depressed as regulations that protect our lands and waters are undone and climate change ravages our communities. In these challenging times, I have to believe that it’s not too late. We live in a time of accelerated change. In astrophysics and biology and all areas of scientific investigation, I’m amazed by wondrous new information and understanding of our world, all while indigenous knowledge continues to ground us. I believe apathy and acceptance are not an option. We can take action, change our ways, and save ourselves and our planet. We can create new, resilient local economies here in the Tongass National Forest and Southeast Alaska. By looking to the insights of traditional and scientific knowledge, we can understand and guide the changes we face.

As the President of the SCS board of directors, I’m amazed by the enthusiasm, knowledge, and hope of our staff, partners, members, and volunteers. Amid seemingly unsurmountable obstacles, I remain committed to living my life in harmony with my community and to personally and collectively taking action to move us all toward a more sustainable future. Like most of us, as a commercial fisherman, I rely on the intact ecosystem and thriving salmon runs of the Tongass National Forest. I love how this beautiful rainforest makes our unique way of life possible and I’m committed to protecting it. Hope comes from witnessing local people and communities coming together to solve the problems we face. In times like these, Sitka Conservation Society’s grassroots and proactive approach to conservation and community sustainability is more vital than ever. IN SOLIDARITY, SPENCER SEVERSON

“Hope comes from witnessing local people and communities coming together to solve the problems we face.”

Above Photo: © Sarah O'Leary Below: © Crossroads Photograph


FUNDING FIFTY MORE YEARS OF WILDERNESS ADVOCACY WRITTEN BY RICHARD NELSON, SCS BOARD MEMBER

Fifty years ago, the founders of the Sitka Conservation Society had an idea. They envisioned at least one place on the Tongass National Forest free from the impacts of logging or development—where people could experience this coastal temperate rainforest in all its majesty, with no industrial human activity to be seen. Inspired by the recently passed Wilderness Act of 1964, they began the first citizen-initiated Wilderness proposal in Alaska. In 1980, their vision and persistence paid off, and the West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness was created. Our founders’ vision for the Wilderness Area extended beyond stopping the clearcuts that had severely impacted Southeast Alaska. They were also thinking about their legacy and what they could do so that future generations would have the same opportunities to experience the original, wild Alaska. We are eternally grateful for their success and for all the hard work it took for them to achieve the Wilderness designation for West Chichagof. The best way SCS can honor our founders is to always have a voice advocating for Wilderness. We established the Living Wilderness Fund with the goal of supporting a full-time staff member who will work to assure that future generations can experience a wild and pristine Alaska. As an endowment fund, the Living Wilderness Fund will provide long-term support for Sitka Conservation Society’s Wilderness advocacy and stewardship work.

"Our founders were thinking about what they could do so future generations would have opportunities to experience the original, wild Alaska."

Photos: Then and Now © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Lione Clare Photography, © Founding members of SCS, 1967 – 1970 Next page: © Chuck Johnstone and Jack Calvin at Dry Pass in West Chichagof, Founding Members of SCS, 1967-1970


THE LIVING WILDERNESS FUND The Living Wilderness Fund is currently at $643,920

HONORING CHUCK JOHNSTONE 1923 – 2017

Written by DAVID STEWARD Chuck Johnstone, one of Sitka Conservation Society’s founders, inspired our work with his enduring love for Southeast Alaska. He played a crucial role in the successful creation of the West Chichagof/Yakobi Wilderness by organizing trips to the island. Chuck believed that once people saw its beauty with their own eyes, they would support the effort to designate it as a Wilderness area. Chuck’s belief in direct experience and access to wild places on the Tongass National Forest continues to guide our work. Chuck was a beloved friend, mentor, teacher, and inspira$500,000 Goal $1 Million Goal $1.5 Million Goal tion. He was admired not only by the people in Sitka who Accomplished!—Fund Fund supports full-time Fund supports the supports part-time staff position. entire wilderness knew and loved him, but also by the thousands of people staff position. advocacy program. across the United States whose eyes he opened to the natural wonders of the Tongass National Forest. In 2010, Chuck and Generous donations and gifts to the fund from SCS mem- his wife, Alice, traveled to Washington, D.C. to accept the bers have already helped us get more than halfway to our Bob Marshall Champions of Wilderness Award from the U.S. second goal. In 2017, we progressed even further and were Forest Service on behalf of SCS. In 2017, the Alaska Legislature passed a memoriam honhonored to receive legacy gifts of stocks, property, and oring Chuck’s life and achievements, which states, “The investment assets from SCS supporters. Many of these Thirtieth Alaska Legislature is honored to recognize the gifts were made in honor of friends and family we have lost. adventurous and full life of Chuck Johnstone.” The memoThe Living Wilderness Fund connects people who share riam also describes Chuck’s passion for sharing Wilderness: a love of Alaska’s wild places across the generations. With “With a twinkle in his eye, he warmly and wholeheartedly your support, we look forward to our next fifty years of shared his knowledge of the area. He felt part of the natural world, not just a visitor to it.” Wilderness advocacy. Lisa Busch, a close family friend, describes Chuck as being To learn more or to make a gift to the Living Wilderness “like the wilderness he loved and fought for: strong and quiet.” Fund, please contact Andrew Thoms at andrew@sitkawild. She adds, “His warm heart and smile will endure in spirit as org or (907)-747-7509. long as the wilderness he helped to create.”

“His warm heart and smile will endure in spirit as long as the wilderness he helped to create." SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 3


Personnel (64%)

SCS 2017 FINANCIAL REPORT These figures represent all of our programs from the first to third quarter of 2017.

2017 EXPENSES $331,819.02

Office and Rent (10%) Program Support (25%) Fundraising and Outreach (1%)

2016 EXPENSES $397,022.07 Personnel (65%) Office and Rent (14%) Program Support (20%) Fundraising and Outreach (1%)

Grants (83%)

2017 INCOME

$378,729.01

Donations and Membership (12%) Interest, Retail, Other (5%)

2016 INCOME $464,847.06 Grants (87%) Donations and Membership (9%) Interest, Retail, Other (4%)

2016 Grant Funding for Specific Projects = $110,426.80 2017 Jan – Aug Grant Funding for Specific Projects = $189,202.76

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT Sitka Conservation Society is immensely grateful for your support. We would especially like to recognize the following foundations and organizations:

Photo: Baranof Island wild country © Kendall Rock Photography

•4-H •Alaska Community Forest Council •Alaska Conservation Foundation •Alaska Department of Fish and Game •Allen Marine •American Fisheries Society, AK Chapter •Alaska Marine Safety Education Association •Alaska Native Brotherhood •Alaska Native Sisterhood •Alaska Youth for Environmental Action •Artchange •Backdoor Café •Baranof Island Brewing •Baranof Wilderness Lodge •Beak Restaurant •Blatchley Middle School •Brave Heart Volunteers •Capitol City Weekly •City and Borough of Sitka •Clovis Foundation •Common Stream Foundation •Crossroads Photography Workshops •Edible Alaska

•Edgerton Foundation •Esther G Sea Taxi •Fisherman's Quay •Gallant Adventures •George H. and Jane A. Mifflin Memorial Fund •Greater Saint Louis Community Foundation •Grow Southeast •Spruce Root Community Development •Hames Corporation •Hames Center •Harry Race Pharmacy •Hoonah Indian Association •Hoonah Native Forest Partnership •Hydaburg Cooperative Association •Citizen's Climate Lobby, AK Chapter •Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest •KCAW Raven Radio •Keet Gooshi Heen Elementary •Klawock Cooperative Association •Latitude Adventures LLC •Leighty Foundation •Lindblad-National Geographic Fund •Ludvig's Bistro •Mean Queeen

•National Forest Foundation •National Park Service •National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance •The Nature Conservancy, Alaska •New Ventures Fund •Old Harbor Books •Organized Village of Kake •Organized Village of Kasaan •Pacific High School •Patagonia •Pioneer Studios •Renewable Energy Alaska Project •Resource Media •Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition •Russell's •Salmon Beyond Borders •Salmon State •Seafood Producers Cooperative •Sealaska •SeaMart Quality Foods •SEARHC •Sitka Bicycle Friendly Community Coalition •Sitka Chamber of Commerce •Sitka Electric Car Group


•Sitka Fine Arts Camp •Sitka Food Coop •Sitka Gymnastics •Sitka High School •Sitka Health Summit •Sitka Historical Society •Sitka Kitch •Sitka Local Foods Network •Sitka National Historical Park, National Park Service •Sitka Native Education Program •Sitka Pioneer Home •Sitka Presbyterian Church •Sitka Public Library •Sitka Salmon Shares

•Sitka School District •Sitka Seafood Festival •Sitka Sound Seafoods •Sitka Sound Science Center •Sitka Spruce Tips 4-H Club Leaders •Sitka Summer Music Festival •Sitka Tribe of Alaska •Sitka Whalefest •Skaggs Foundation •Sound Sailing •Southeast Alaska Independent Living •Southeast Alaska Conservation Council •Southeast Alaska Fish Habitat Partnership •Stand for Salmon

•Stanford University •State of Alaska Division of Forestry •State of Alaska Department of Fish and Game •State of Alaska Department of Commerce •Sustainable Southeast Partnership •The Salmon Project •Tatoosh School •Training Resources for the Environmental Community (TREC) •TRAYLS •Trout Unlimited •True North •Turner Foundation

•University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension •University of Alaska, Southeast •USDA Forest Service •White Elephant Shop •Wilburforce Foundation •Wintersong Soap Company

•Julie Jarnagin •Anna Johnstone •Patricia Kehoe and Howard Pendell •Sandra Kincheloe •Connie Kreiss and Floyd Tomkins •Jim and Kathy Kyle •Susan Padilla •Marcel and Connie LaPerriere •Stephen Lawrie •Michael and Klaudia Leccese •Arlene Levy •Lorraine Inez Lil •Michael Litman •Bert Loosmore and Family •Bill and Diane Marx •Michael Mayo •Brian McNitt •Chester and Miriam Meyers

•Nicolaas and Meridith Mink •Darin Nelson •Doug Nethercut •Carolyn Nichols •Dave Nuetzel and Julia Smith •Noreen O'Brien •Elias Opgenorth •Dorothy and Dean Orbison •Jana Ozment-Kirk •Susan Padilla •Galen Paine and Don Surgeon •Cathy and Eric Parker •John Patton •Debra Pohlman •Mary and Bob Purvis •Krisanne Rice •Tim Riley •Dennis Rogers

Photos below: Young Alaskan research assistants in Kake © Sienna Reid Thank You poster © Bethany Goodrich Photography

We further thank these individuals for their generous donations and contributions: •Luke A'Bear • Tom and Diana Allen •Kimberly Bakkes •Mary Barrett and Jeff Arndt •Lauren Bell and Dane McFadden •Brenda Berry •Annette Blankenship •Peter Brabeck • Michael and Mary Brabeck • J. Bradley Brickman •Tim Bristol •Gale and Phil Brownell •Robby Bruce •Scott Brylinsky •Lisa Busch and Davey Lubin •Michelle and Justin Caldwell •Larry Calvin •Charles Christianson

•Ben Clark •Mike Derzon •Joseph Driskill •Roger DuBrock •Jerry Dzugan •Brent and Valerie Edwards •Dorrie Farrell •Kenyon Fields •Rick Fleischman •Tad Fujioka and Sara Beaber-Fujioka •Gail and Andy Fulton •Deborah Greenberg and Leonard Steinberg •Christine Harrington •Lily Herwald and Chris Wilbur •William and Helen Hodgson •Michael Ingerman and Madeleine Sloane

•Robert Schell •Linda Schmidt •Laura Schmidt •Beth Short and Stephen Rhoads •Connie Sipe •David Sparling •David and Marge Steward •Libby Stortz •Andrew Thoms and Maite Lorente •Mike Thoms •Victoria Vosburg •Nancy Waterman •Gabrielle Westergren and Drew Wilson •Charlie Wilber •Donald J. Wille •Roland Wirth and Michelle Friedman •David Zapolsky and Lynn Hubbard

We are also grateful to all the fishermen who have donated to the Fish to Schools program, including the following vessels: •F/V Born Again •F/V Suki •F/V Sea Lark •F/V Marie •F/V Norfjord •F/V Sachem •F/V Rose Lynn •F/V FishnPohl •F/V Kulla •F/V El Tiburon

•F/V Miracle •F/V Lucky Strike •F/V Cape Cross •F/V Dryas •F/V Woodstock •F/V Merlin •F/V Alexa K •F/V I Gotta •F/V Shelley J •F/V Cinnabar

•F/V Last Dance •F/V Minke •F/V Endurance •F/V Ulla •F/V Charity •F/V Nerka •F/V Chanty •F/V Triad •F/V Ocean Cape •F/V Myriad SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 5


JANUARY In the face of an Alaskan glacier, we as individuals can’t help but feel small and humbled. But as a species, our impact on the planet is huge. Alaskans will face the brunt of climate change. We can already see its impacts around us. Tired of the politics and federal inaction, we’re taking local action to protect the ecosystems we depend on. (Photo © Ian Strachan, National Geographic Lindblad Expeditions)


Photos: Crimson Anemone © Paul North, Lake Eva Forest © Lione Clare Photography, Deer near Lake Eva © Lione Clare Photography, Child at Yakutat Culture Camp © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Tracy Arm Fjords Terror © Maia Mares

CLIMATE CHANGE: ALASKA YOUTH DEMAND ACTION SIENNA REID

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1

ALASKA YOUTH AND FUTURE INTERN

“Dear Editor,” wrote Sienna Reid in our local newspaper. “I am a lifelong Sitkan. As I head off to college this fall to pursue a career in science, it is discouraging to see our nation's leaders still arguing over the existence of climate change.” When she wrote this, Sienna had just graduated as valedictorian from Mount Edgecumbe High School. She has now begun her first year at Western Washington University, after spending her summer as Sitka Conservation Society’s Alaska Youth and Future Intern. Sienna enthusiastically jumped into her project: connecting with her peers across Southeast Alaska to explore their perspectives on climate change, sustainability, local economies, native cultures and other issues that inform their hopes and fears for the future of Alaska. These topics weren’t new to Sienna. Previously, Sienna worked with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska (STA) researching ocean conditions and how climate change might affect our seas. SCS is grateful for the opportunities we’ve had to partner with STA as they model environmental stewardship of the Sitka-kwaan. We look forward to sustaining this partnership into the coming year, including investing further in programs like the one Sienna completed. Continuing her letter to the editor, Sienna writes, “Last year I protested against Congressman Don Young when he visited Sitka. While here, he claimed that global warming was a hoax, and definitely not a concern. During my time at Mt. Edgecumbe, I was able to meet students from all over the state who have seen the effects of climate change firsthand. There are students whose entire communities are having to relocate due to rising sea levels. I urge Sen. Murkowski and the rest of our state’s Congressional Delegation to protect funding for climate change research in Alaska.” SCS thanks Sienna and her fellow young Alaskans for their leadership in confronting climate change, speaking up about the ways Alaskans are affected, and calling upon all of us to take action. Your voices are important, and Sitka Conservation Society is listening.

7

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

2

3

4

5

6

New Year's Day

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

25

26

27

Martin Luther King Jr. Day

21

22

23

24

28

29

30

31

ADVOCATING FOR CLIMATE SOLUTIONS Sitka Conservation Society is committed to taking action on climate change on all levels: local, state, and federal. In 2017, we helped launch the Sitka chapter of Citizens’ Climate Lobby, an international group dedicated to building political support for climate solutions. SCS provides support for Sitka’s CCL group as they strengthen relationships with our members of Congress and build bipartisan support for a national revenue-neutral tax on carbon.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 7


FEBRUARY On the wild outer coasts of Southeast Alaska, the rich waters of the Gulf of Alaska meet the globally unique temperate rainforests of the Tongass. In this dynamic, rugged, and beautiful coastal world, you can witness wildlife and natural processes in their most primeval and elemental forms. (Photo Š Rafe Hanson Photography)


Photos: Aeolid Nudibranch © Paul North, Girl at Yakutat Culture Camp © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Seal at West Chichagof © Lione Clare Photography, Fisherman © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Troller © Lione Clare Photography, Zach woodworking at work © Bethany Goodrich Photography

BUILDING LOCAL ECONOMIES FROM LOCAL RESOURCES ALANA PETERSON PROGRAM DIRECTOR, SUSTAINABLE SOUTHEAST PARTNERSHIP

Sitka Conservation Society believes that conservation and community prosperity go hand in hand. That’s why we work closely with the Sustainable Southeast Partnership (SSP), a diverse network of tribal governments, economic development organizations, nonprofits, and other local groups. Our collective mission is to build a prosperous and more resilient future for the Southeast Alaska. Alana Peterson is the Program Director of SSP and owner of our favorite local coffee shop: the Backdoor Cafe. This year, she put her SSP values into action by sourcing sustainable young-growth lumber for the new benches in her cafe. SCS supported Alana by connecting her with a local mill with young-growth expertise. We also crafted a storytelling display in the Backdoor Cafe to provide resources to other Sitkans curious about using sustainable lumber. We asked Alana why she chose to use local younggrowth timber for her project. Here’s what she told us: Growing up in Sitka, I understood from an early age how closely we’re connected with the physical world around us. It wasn't until I was in college that I realized this upbringing was unique. Not everyone understands how connected and delicate our relationship is with the natural world. As a Tlingit I was raised with values of sharing wealth and showing respect for every resource I used. My background and my entrepreneurial drive come together in my day to day business decisions. I consider three things: how will it affect profits, how will it affect the community, and how will it affect the environment? With these three filters I am able to find more creative and holistic solutions. Building benches from locally-sourced sustainable wood was a fun project. I could get custom built furniture at a competitive price and feel good about the fact that these resources are not damaging the environment. By hiring local, we supported local jobs in the process. Traditional business models don’t take into account costs for society and the environment. That is why I strongly support growing our economy through locally-owned and -operated businesses that care about the future of our community and environment.

9

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Mardi Gras

18

19

Valentine's Day

20

21

27

28

Elizabeth Peratrovich Day

22

23

24

President's Day

25

26

St. Lazaria Wildlife Refuge est. 1909

TURNING BOWLS FROM THE TONGASS What is Zach LaPerriere’s advice for local entrepreneurs with ideas for small businesses? "Talk to the Forest Service about harvesting off public lands." Zach turns gorgeous bowls from dead trees he salvages from the Tongass National Forest, exemplifying the untapped opportunity for innovative local business on our public lands. This year, we covered Zach’s story for a regional newspaper to inspire other entrepreneurs to grow their sustainable businesses from the rich resources of the Tongass. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 9


MARCH

The rivers and streams of the Tongass National Forest span more than 15,000 miles and fill with fish every year. As the largest intact temperate rainforest on earth, trees grow to be hundreds of years old alongside the cascading water. Like the interconnected life of the forest, we must all come together to play our part in protecting it for generations to come. (Photo Š Crossroads Photography Workshops)


Photos: Forest Service Monitoring © Pioneer Studios, Toad © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Lione Clare Photography, Flowers at West Chichagof © Maia Mares, Baranof Warm Springs © Lione Clare Photography, TM Construction © Maia Mares

MOVING TONGASS FOREST MANAGEMENT FORWARD ANDREW THOMS

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

SCS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ten years ago, Sitka Conservation Society made an important decision. We needed to move past dwelling on the losses we had already experienced on the Tongass National Forest and take a forward-facing approach to protect what was left. Our task was to manage the forest and address the existing damage. Thus began a decade of learning about second growth stands of timber, restoration techniques and practices, and sustainable management. We spent a lot of time in the field in order to develop and implement a wide range of projects to restore forest and stream habitat, protect watersheds, and improve overall forest health. But we couldn’t do it alone. We needed a broad coalition to invest in a sustainable future for our region, so we forged new partnerships beyond the traditional bounds of environmentalism. Our partners include agency staff, tribal governments and Native corporations, loggers and mill owners, ATV enthusiasts, and heavy equipment operators. We all share core Alaskan values of living off the land and caring for this place. Very few of us actually want to destroy our amazing environment and resources, but there are complex economic and policy factors in place that often frame resource extraction as the easier and seemingly necessary choice. SCS works to recognize these pressures, dive into the complexity, and develop creative alternatives with our partners. We’re figuring out how to put our highest stewardship ideals into practice as we use and manage our lands and resources. We’re helping local businesses provide reliable and sustaining job opportunities. We’re running local programs for youth and supporting sustainability initiatives within our communities. This on-the-ground experience has immediate impacts, and it also informs how we advocate for sustainable management policy with the U.S. Forest Service. With a new Tongass Land Management Plan in place, SCS continues to push for management policies that align with our shared values and benefit the ecosystems, economies, and people of the Tongass National Forest.

11

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17 St. Patrick's Day

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

28

29

30

31

1st Day of Spring

25 Daylight Savings Time Begins

26

27

Seward's Day

A WIN-WIN FOR BOTH SALMON AND RECREATION When trails go unmaintained, no one wins. Rough, overgrown trails are no fun to ride. Salmon suffer from old impassable culverts and erosion that reroutes water away from natural streambeds. That’s why we partnered with the U.S. Forest Service and TM Construction to improve the ATV trails on Kruzof Island and restore critical salmon habitat—a win for both salmon and people. These are the types of projects that we work to develop across the Tongass.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 11


APRIL

Every evening as we admire the sunset, it gives us a moment to pause and reflect. As the Earth turns and another day passes, we witness the beauty of planetary movement and can’t help but realize that we are only a small fleck in an infinite universe. (Photo Š Rafe Hanson Photography)


Photos: West Chichagof Outer Coast © Lione Clare Photography, Parade of the Species photos © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Anemone Close-up © Paul North

GRASSROOTS ACTIVISM: THINK GLOBAL, ACT LOCAL MAIA MARES

SUNDAY

1

13

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL ORGANIZER

For all of us at the Sitka Conservation Society, the Tongass National Forest is our home and backyard: a vast temperate rainforest where we live, hike, hunt, fish, and work. The Tongass is important for all Americans, but it is essential for those of us who live here, including SCS members, board, and partners. We work to protect this place because we are part of a community of fishermen, subsistence hunters, tourism operators, local business owners, and many others who depend on the environment for our survival and ways of life. As a local organization, SCS has a rich, fiftyyear history of grassroots activism, exemplified by Alice Johnstone, one of our founders. Alice joined with other community members to form SCS and was part of the citizen-led campaign to create the West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness. As the second woman to ever be elected to Sitka’s City Assembly, she helped establish the Sitka Women’s Commission and subsequently served on that, too. Alice’s dedication to both local democracy and conservation shows how the two go hand in hand. Alice is a shining model of citizen engagement and community involvement, two values which continue to inspire our work to this day. Following the example of Alice and our other founders, SCS works locally and at the grassroots level. We are dedicated to amplifying local voices and knowledge in broader discussions of issues that most impact us. We work to involve as many Sitkans and Southeast Alaskans as possible in local, state, and national decision making processes that affect our lives and the future of the Tongass National Forest.

MONDAY

Easter Day April Fool's Day

Earth Day

29

30

LOCAL MARCHES, GLOBAL MOVEMENTS SCS members think global and act local, and fearlessly stand up for the issues they care about. This year, Sitkans fully displayed this passion, coming out in droves to take part in local marches. In April, SCS hosted our 16th annual Parade of the Species, joining forces with the National March for Science this year. Our parade was featured in national news outlets across the country and the world, including The Boston Globe and the New York Post. In October, SCS rallied for Sitka’s Best Climate Solutions, an entry in the Sesquicentennial Alaska Day Parade featuring walkers, cyclists, and Sitka’s own fleet of electric vehicle drivers. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 13


MAY She may look mean, but this mother bear fished alongside hundreds of Sitkans at Redoubt Falls. All summer long, we shared this year’s exceptional sockeye salmon run. The Tongass National Forest has provided food for bears and humans for millennia. As stewards of the forest, we must do our part to ensure that the Tongass continues to produce salmon into the future. (Photo Š Bethany Goodrich Photography)


Photos: SCS' Julia Tawney in West Chichagof, Deer, Yakutat Culture Camp, A camper in the Alaskan wilderness, Wilderness Steward Lione Clare © Bethany Goodrich Photography

THE ENDURING LEGACY OF WILDERNESS JIM KYLE

SUNDAY

MONDAY

SEINER AND GUIDE, LONG-TIME SCS MEMBER

"Is Herman still catching fish?" As a young seine boat captain, asking this question in the Petersburg Fisheries cannery office, I was told, "Yes, he is still doing just fine." Legendary Tlingit seiner Herman Kitka's favorite fishing grounds were in distant Slocum Arm on West Chichagof--far off the beaten path, protected by a rockpile-strewn ocean, and unknown to most of the seine fleet. This was 1979, one year prior to the establishment of the SCS-inspired West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness Area. Slocum Arm was calling me. We answered that call in 1981, learning new sets, watching bright pink salmon jumpers march from the ocean into our net. Sometimes there were only two boats: Herman's Martha K. and our Bessie B. We studied the white painted triangles on the rocks that partially marked the twisting Piehle’s Pass entrance. Having painstakingly learned the safe route, we would return many times over the next three decades. Was this simply following the money? It evolved into following the heart. Every entrance into Slocum through the stone monuments brought a growing personal realization that this coast meant more than simply catching fish. We learned to kayak the quiet tidal passages and outer islands framed by sea foam and spray. I explored the historical mysteries, including Chirikov's lost men. Could they have built the Takanis Bay cairn? We also came to appreciate how Herman's ancestors had lived lightly in this rainforest wilderness. The seine fleet has discovered West Chichagof. During one 2017 opening there were over one hundred boats fishing in the wilderness area. Protected from clear cut logging, these streams contributed eight million pink salmon to the seine harvest in 2017--twenty-five percent ­o f the total SE catch, with an ex-vessel value of twelve million dollars. Follow the money or follow your heart, the protection of West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness Area will pay dividends in perpetuity.

15

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Mother's Day

Memorial Day

ADVOCACY OVER GENERATIONS Fifty years ago, Sitka Conservation Society was created to ensure that the Tongass’s wildest places remain intact for future generations to enjoy. This summer, Lione Clare worked as a Wilderness Steward, a partnership position with SCS and the U.S. Forest Service. As she participated in monitoring and care of the Wilderness areas SCS helped create, Lione relied on her knowledge of how Sitkans use and depend on Wilderness areas. Born and raised in Sitka, Lione is part of a new generation of Wilderness stewards stepping up to care for the wild public lands that surround us. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 15


JUNE

From a distance, we heard a low, rumbling roar coming from the rocky island ahead. Was it the waves making that noise or some mythical sea monster? As we sailed closer, we witnessed one of nature’s most spectacular wildlife gatherings. The rocks were covered with hundreds of steller sea lions; the roar was the cumulative din of their barks and growls. (Photo Š Ian Strachan, National Geographic Lindblad Expeditions)


Photos: Woman and a child at the Yakutat Culture Camp © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Troller © Lione Clare Photography, Leister Sculpin © Paul North, Research assistant samples clams in Kake © Sienna Reid, A hungry bear munching on a salmon on a warm day © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Fish to Schools © Bethany Goodrich Photography

BRINGING LOCALLY-CAUGHT FISH TO SCHOOLS TELE AADSEN and JOEL BRADY-POWER

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN

Every Wednesday, Sitka Conservation Society’s Fish to Schools program brings wild, locallycaught fish to the lunch plates of all kids in Sitka schools. Fish to Schools strengthens our community by connecting students with the fishing community around them. Through our program, students learn how salmon supports our culture, community, economy, and way of life. Students also enjoy a nutritious fish meal every week, cooked from scratch by our hardworking school chefs. Each summer, SCS runs a salmon donation drive among local commercial fishermen. “We donate to Fish to Schools because it’s an amazing program,” says Tele Aadsen, a commercial fisherman who donates part of her catch each year. “I’ve been surprised by how many Sitkans aren’t connected to the water and don't have that access to fish—what seems to be the essence of Sitka. Particularly for kids growing up in Sitka, we want them to be know that they’re part of a fishing community.” Tele Aadsen and Joel Brady-Power, her partner at sea and on land, grew up nourished by salmon and make their living as commercial fishermen in Southeast Alaska. “It wasn’t really a choice for me,” says Joel. “My parents took me to sea when I was two weeks old… From about the time I was ten years old, I knew that I wanted to be a fisherman.” Whether Tele and Joel chose the fishing life or it chose them, they wouldn’t have it any other way. They find joy in providing Tongass salmon for others, especially to school children in Sitka. When asked why, Joel elaborates, “Being able to provide what I think is ultimately the best sort of protein in the world to kids is an awesome thing, especially in a town where most of the seafood is getting shipped out of here.” SCS thanks all of the commercial fishermen whose donations make Fish to Schools possible and bring locally-caught fish to kids in Sitka schools throughout the school year.

17

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

22

23

29

30

Flag Day

17

18

19

20

1st Day of Summer Sitka Natl Historic Park est. 1890

Father's Day

24

21

25

26

27

28

SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY Southeast communities are developing more nutritious, local, and culturally appropriate school lunch programs to improve health outcomes, support place-based education, and create new jobs. We’re proud of these initiatives, so when federal nutritional standards were repealed in 2017, SCS and partners took action. SCS and 17 organizations delivered a letter to Senator Murkowski requesting support for local projects and businesses that provide youth with healthy local foods. By coming together to advocate for local solutions, we have a stronger influence over national policy than any one organization alone. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 17


JULY

On the 4th of July, we celebrate the great things about this country. For Alaskans, that means celebrating the public lands we all use and depend on. On the Tongass, the sight of the ubiquitous bald eagle reminds us that these lands belong to all of us, and that we’re all responsible for the care and stewardship of the Tongass in return for using and enjoying its bounties. (Photo Š Rafe Hanson Photography)


Photos: An American flag behind Tlingit carvings © Bethany Goodrich Photography, A roaring waterfall © Lione Clare Photography, STA harvesting sockeye salmon at Sitkoh © Sarah O'Leary, SCS' Lione Clare flies a kite on public lands © Bethany Goodrich Photography

A FRESH PERSPECTIVE ON PUBLIC LANDS SARAH O'LEARY ALASKA CONSERVATION FOUNDATION STORYTELLING INTERN

With support from the Alaska Conservation Foundation, Sitka Conservation Society hosts a Storytelling Intern every summer. While SCS benefits from the presence of talented storytellers, we invest in the internship primarily as a way to expose new people to the wonders of the Tongass National Forest. Our interns continue to advocate for the Tongass and Alaska’s public lands on their next adventures. We asked Sarah, our 2017 Storytelling Intern, to reflect on what public lands mean to her: I arrived in this beautiful temperate rainforest at the edge of the United States last May. I’ve only been here for a few short months, but the way I think about my country and our public lands has expanded so much. In Southeast Alaska, the public lands of the Tongass National Forest fuel the economy and local businesses, preserve intact ecosystems and protect wildlife, sustain cultures and communities, provide space to explore and recreate, and produce thriving runs of wild salmon. Living in Sitka, I’ve been able to see the interdependence of communities and public lands firsthand. This past summer, I got the chance to travel to remote Sitkoh Bay in the Tongass with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska as they harvested wild sockeye salmon for tribal citizens in their Traditional Foods Program. Witnessing this process showed me how public lands help sustains the traditions and cultures of people who have always lived here. If Sitkoh Bay is privatized, mined, or logged, the sockeye salmon STA depends on could be lost. Privatization of public lands is one of the biggest threats we face today in conservation and it’s critical that we keep public land in public hands. The waters we fish, mountains we climb, and the land that nourishes us will be gone unless we act. Public lands are a critical part of our national heritage, our collective history, and one of the jewels of our democracy. Whether you’ve lived here forever or just arrived like me, we all have a role to play in protecting the Tongass National Forest.

19

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1

2

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

3

4

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

5

6

7

Independence Day

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

SCS DEFENDS OUR PUBLIC LANDS We are dedicated to ensuring that local voices, values, and perspectives shape debate and policy on conservation and sustainability in Southeast Alaska. This year, we collected hundreds of signatures asking our Congressional representatives to keep public lands in public hands. With your support, a key group of Southeast Alaskans traveled to Washington, D.C. to speak out against land transfers and protect the most valuable fish-producing watersheds in the Tongass National Forest.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 19


AUGUST The red pigment of sockeye salmon flesh comes from the krill the salmon eat while they swim in the North Pacific. The salmon bring marine nutrients back to the Tongass National Forest when they head upstream to spawn. Wild salmon connect us all to this forest and the oceans around us. As Alaskans, we feel these deep, spiritual connections are central to who we are. (Photo Š Bethany Goodrich Photography)


Photos: Alaskan Governor Bill Walker is handed a salmon © Maia Mares, Small waterfall at Herring Cove © Lione Clare Photography, Generations working hand in hand at 4-H © Sarah O'Leary, A scenic view of Alaskan cliffs © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Moses Johnson seining © Pioneer Studios, The beginning of Redoubt Sockeye Fillets © Lione Clare Photography, A tail to behold © Bethany Goodrich Photography

ALASKA: OUR NATION'S SALMON STATE SOPHIE NETHERCUT

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

TONGASS COMMUNITY ORGANIZER

In Alaska, we’re proud of our wild salmon. We stock our freezers to feed our families throughout the winter. We make our living as commercial fishermen or working at seafood processors. We prepare salmon in both traditional and new ways, firing up our smokehouses and sharing with our neighbors. We even devote an official day to celebrating these slippery creatures: in 2016, the state legislature passed a law declaring August 10 to be Alaska Wild Salmon Day. Put simply, Alaska is a salmon state. From Ketchikan to Kotzebue, salmon fill our rivers, our freezers, our bellies, and our economies. They feed us, in every sense of the word. And nowhere is this more true than here in Southeast Alaska. Salmon from the Tongass National Forest keep our forests and communities strong. They support one out of every ten jobs in the region and contribute nearly two billion dollars a year to our regional economy. Threading their way through Pacific currents and freshwater streams, wild salmon are a living economic artery. We're all responsible for their health. At SCS we understand that salmon are our past, our present, and our future. That’s why we work with Stand for Salmon, a diverse coalition of Alaska organizations, fishermen, and salmon-lovers who want to see our salmon runs protected for future generations. Alaska’s Constitution specifically protects salmon habitat, but many of the laws enforcing those protections haven’t been updated since statehood. Well, in 2018 it’s time. Join us to make sure salmon run wild, swim freely, and keep feeding our communities and future generations of Alaskans.

21

5

6

7

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

4

8

9

10

11

Alaska Wild Salmon Day

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

"THE SALMON FOREST" We’re excited to announce the release of The Salmon Forest, a film exploring how the Tongass National Forest produces such a large percentage of Alaska’s wild salmon. With already more than a thousand viewers, we are showing The Salmon Forest across the country in order to share the story of our salmon forest. The film shows the value of salmon as a public resource in Southeast Alaska and across the country. For commercial fishermen, tourists, subsistence users, Alaska Natives, and many others, wild salmon are a critical part of life in the Tongass.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 21


SEPTEMBER The glaciers, the snowfields, and the mountain peaks. The sheer cliffs and the waterfalls cascading over their faces. Forests that take hold wherever they can. Each view has its own unique beauty. The azure lakes in the hidden valleys, suddenly revealing even more places to explore. No one person could see them all. Baranof Island. (Photo Š Rafe Hanson Photography)


Photos: Ceremonial Tlingit dance © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Research assistant samples clams in Kake© Sienna Reid, Puffin taking off © Lione Clare Photography, A hiker looking down from above © Lione Clare Photography, Feet warming by a small fire in West Chichagof © Lione Clare Photography, Sitka High School Garden Shed crew © Sarah O'Leary

TRAINING ALASKA’S NEXT GENERATION OF STEWARDS SIENNA REID

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

ALASKA YOUTH AND FUTURE INTERN

For over 10,000 years, people lived on what is now the Tongass National Forest, practicing sustainable resource management. The colonization of Alaska initiated cycles of boomand-bust extraction, in which resources like old growth forests were exploited without considering long-term sustainability. But Alaska’s youth have a different vision of the state’s future. “Every community in Southeast Alaska depends on natural resources in some way,” says Sienna Reid, a lifelong Sitkan and Sitka Conservation Society’s Alaska Youth and Future Intern. “In order to maintain our unique way of life, it is important that rural Alaskans have opportunities to pursue meaningful careers that promote sustainable living and wise management of these resources.” Southeast Alaskans have crucial roles to play in forest stewardship, so SCS helped catalyze a suite of workforce development initiatives as part of the new Tongass Land Management Plan. These projects train Southeast Alaskans in resource management and equip them with the necessary skills to find employment in forest stewardship. Programs include the Forest Academy, which taught youth forestry inventory and management skills, and the Training Rural Alaska Youth Leaders and Students (TRAYLS) program, which trains Alaska Native youth through handson experience in resource stewardship projects. Sienna joined the 2017 TRAYLS crew in the field and talked with them about what they were learning. “I’ve definitely decided that I want to work outdoors after this summer,” said Talia, a 19 year old woman from Kake and TRAYLS crew leader. Sienna reported back that many wanted to pursue careers in forest stewardship after their TRAYLS experience. Investing in youth and providing opportunities is how we ensure a sustainable future for Alaska and our resources. As more of Alaska’s youth pursue careers in natural resource management, we will move closer to a future of sustainable use and conservation within the unique temperate rainforest of Southeast Alaska.

23

3

4

5

6

7

8

10

11

12

13

14

15

18

19

20

21

22

2 Labor Day

9

Tongass National Forest est. 1907

16

17

1st Day of Autumn

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

BUILDING LOCAL SKILLS WITH LOCAL TIMBER Sitka Conservation Society partners with Sitka High School to build local young-growth timber products, allowing students to work directly with natural resources and teaching them practical skills. This year, in addition to working on the construction of a tiny house, the students built a garden shed, which was then sold to a local homeowner. The shed featured spruce and hemlock studs and rafters. Proceeds from the sale will be reinvested in the vocational education program to support new student projects. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 23


OCTOBER Has the world stopped? Could it ever be so still? Nary a ripple on this whole bay and the fog is just getting thicker. On this raft, with this dog, in the heart of Alaska, in a remote cove on the Tongass National Forest‌Where else would I want to be? (Photo Š Bethany Goodrich Photography)


Photos: 4-H in action© Sarah O'Leary, SCS Executive Director Andrew Thoms helps with a bird house © Bethany Goodrich Photography, A beautiful view of the Southeast Alaskan mountains © Bethany Goodrich Photography, A 4-Her holding a salmonberry during Summer Harvest Camp © Sarah O'Leary

4-H BRINGS YOUTH AND ELDERS TOGETHER JULIA TAWNEY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

LIVING WITH THE LAND & BUILDING COMMUNITY JESUIT VOLUNTEER

“This is the first time I’ve ever done any of this,” exclaims one elder, putting the finishing touches on a vegetable sushi roll. Kids scurry around the table with sticky rice, seaweed, and carrots, making rolls with residents of the Pioneer Home. Our Sitka Spruce Tips “Alaska Way of Life” 4-H program engages youth ages 5-18 in placebased, experiential learning unique to the Tongass National Forest. The richness of skill-building with elders, community partners, and volunteers allows participants to learn year-round skills for living with the land and instills the value of stewardship in new generations. Past participants have processed deer, kayaked, learned water safety guidelines, hiked, harvested wild foods, gardened, preserved food for the winter, and more. This year, we began a new weekly activity bringing together elders at the Sitka Pioneer Home and 4-H youth. The Sitka Pioneer Home is an assisted living home located in the heart of downtown Sitka, right next to the Sitka Conservation Society’s office on Lincoln Street. Supporting the development of sustainable communities in Southeast Alaska is a crucial part of SCS’s mission. Though the word “sustainable” has a variety of definitions, I believe connecting youth and elders is an important component of cultivating community sustainability. Seeing 4-H participants connect with the residents of the Pioneer Home has been the most rewarding aspect of my year serving as a Jesuit Volunteer. The program began with a focus on making healthy snacks with the Pioneer Home residents. 4-H youth learned to prepare snacks using local foods, eventually building up to a wild smoked salmon sushi-making finale. These weekly gatherings bring positivity and cheer to the home and give youth a chance to learn from elders in their community. Multi-generational learning experiences like these create important opportunities for youth and elders to share skills and stewardship values. By building intergenerational, resilient communities, we will all be better able to face global challenges together.

25

7

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

13

16

17

18

19

20

26

27

Indigenous People's Day

14

15

Alaska Day

21

22

23

24

28

29

30

31

Daylight Savings Time Ends

25

Halloween

CELEBRATING THE HARVEST Summer in Sitka is an endless celebration of wild and local foods. As part of July’s Summer Harvest Camp, 4-H youth harvested from the ocean and the land, learning new skills and sharing food with their families. The kids participated in a fishing clinic with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, picked berries on public lands in the Tongass National Forest, baked spruce tip shortbread and salmonberry tarts, made sockeye salmon jerky, and toured the Sitka Local Foods Network garden. Together with our community partners, SCS helps cultivate knowledge of and passion for wild and local foods among the next generations of Alaskans. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 25


NOVEMBER The many colors of salmonberries. If they aren’t enough, hike a little further and you could also find red huckleberries; high, lowbush, and alpine blueberries; cloudberries; nagoon berries; lingonberries; watermelon berries; black huckleberries, elderberries, and more. Berries are just one kind of wild food we are lucky to be able to harvest within the Tongass National Forest. (Photo Š Maia Mares)


Photos: Preparing a meal at 4-H © Sarah O'Leary, Tlingit ceremony © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Small fire at West Chichagof © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Freshly grown radishes © Sarah O'Leary, West Chichagof Rockweed © Lione Clare Photography, Woman harvesting kelp © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Wild Foods Potluck © Lee House

LOCAL FOOD CONNECTS US TO OUR EVIRONMENT SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

LISA SADLEIR-HART

27

4

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1

2

3

7

8

9

10

13

14

15

16

17

20

21

22

23

24

PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITIONIST

At Sitka Conservation Society, we know increasing access to local food is vital for the sustainability of Southeast Alaska communities. If we can grow or harvest more of our own food, we’ll be less reliant on expensive, imported food. We support Sitka Kitch, which seeks to foster a sustainable and healthy community and food system through education, business incubation, and community building. Sitka Kitch provides culinary classes that support food security and a healthy Sitka, along with renting or sharing the kitchen space for local businesses and community events. Lisa Sadleir-Hart is a public health nutritionist and avid gardener who first came to Sitka twentyeight years ago. Lisa has since taught many classes at Sitka Kitch. Most recently, she led a “Preserving the Harvest” series that explored different methods of canning and preserving food for the winter. “We’re rich in protein sources,” Lisa says, describing Southeast Alaska. “When it comes to fruits, vegetables, and grains--the kinds of foods we want people to be consuming more of--we’re not in good shape.” Lisa and her husband started their own garden to prove to themselves that they could grow a lot of their own food. “And you can!” she exclaims. “So long as you know what to grow in Southeast Alaska, you can grow an amazing amount of food.” But Lisa’s dedication to local food doesn’t stop at her own garden--she’s helping others do the same. “The thing we’re most proud of is that so many of our neighbors have also started gardening,” she says. “Just by starting a garden, we helped increase the food security in this neighborhood hugely.” Like SCS, Lisa understands how growing more food locally connects to bigger issues, like climate change, that threaten communities within the Tongass National Forest. “The majority of our food comes either on the barge or by plane, both of which have a pretty big carbon footprint,” she observes. “The fact that you can grow your own food means you’re mitigating climate change at a household level. Living in Sitka especially, how can you not want to save and preserve this place?”

THURSDAY

6

5

Election Day

11

12 Veterans Day

18

19

Thanksgiving Day

25

26

27

28

29

30

THE WILD FOODS POTLUCK Baked king salmon with a side of sea asparagus. Venison empanadas. Huckleberry-currant pie. Each dish represents its creator’s relationship to public lands: they caught that fish, harvested that deer, and gathered those berries on the Tongass National Forest. Every year, our Wild Foods Potluck brings us together to fill our hearts and our bellies in celebration of the variety of ways our incredible public lands nourish us and our communities.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 27


DECEMBER The sky crackled and danced. It was cold, but we stayed put, shivering and looking up at the sky. The flowing green curtains of the Northern lights had us transfixed. They swayed, bent, and rippled high above our small town on the coast of this wild and rugged island at the edge of the North Pacific. (Photo Š Rafe Hanson Photography)


Photos: Sitka beach landscape© Rafe Hanson Photography, Winter Muskeg Trees © Clarice Johnson, Aerial view of mountains near Yakutat © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Clarence Kramer program group photo © Ian Johnson

OUR FUTURE FOREST ANDREW THOMS SCS EXECUTIVE DRIECTOR

Southeast Alaska is unlike anywhere else on Earth. As part of the world’s largest temperate rainforest, the Tongass National Forest contains towering ancient trees, miles of lush coastline, and thirty-two culturally diverse and hardy communities. Unlike most other National Forests, the Tongass still harbors large expanses of old growth and a stunning wealth of biodiversity. Sitka Conservation Society works to protect the temperate old growth rainforest and the intact ecosystems within it. By protecting large intact areas of forest, we conserve crucial habitat for salmon, wolves, bears, deer, and other wildlife. Humans also depend on the resources of an intact forest. Our ways of life are intimately tied to the coastal rainforest. Our families hunt, gather, hike, and fish here. These lands fuel our local economies and sustain our unique communities. Animals and people walk through these forests together, as symbolized by the footprints in the SCS logo. We need forest management policy that reflects this interdependence. SCS worked to develop 2016’s Tongass Land Management Plan (TLMP), which protects certain areas of the Tongass from development and designates places where timber management can occur. As the TLMP is implemented, we support projects like the Hoonah Native Forest Partnership (HNFP). HNFP is a science-based community forest approach to watershed planning and project implementation. HNFP aims to achieve a measurable and resilient blend of timber, salmon and deer production, local economic diversification, and improved watershed health. We’re only part way toward achieving our vision of protection of key habitats and achieving sustainable management of forestry resources. The relationship between policy and on-the-ground practice is a complex and complicated challenge we face. There are still certain people who would liquidate the old growth or build mines that forever scar the landscape. But there are many others who are working together locally to find the balance that sustains the natural world as well as our prosperity within it.

29

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

S AT U R DAY

1 West ChichagofYakobi and South Baranof Wilderness areas est. 1980

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

First Day of Hanukkah

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22 1st Day of Winter

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

Christmas Day

30

31 New Year's Eve

THE CLARENCE KRAMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM Sitka Conservation Society believes that young Alaskans are the future of conservation in our state. Through a wide-range of workforce development and capacity building projects, SCS helps Alaskan youth get practical experience in resource management and stewardship. In 2017, we supported the Clarence Kramer Internship Program, which gave a student at the University of Alaska the opportunity to learn forestry and natural resource management on the ground in Hoonah.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 29


Photo right: © Bethany Goodrich Photography Opposite: Deer at Lake Eva and West Chichagof rocks © Lione Clare Photography. SCS Crew in West Chichagof © Bethany Goodrich Photography

THE SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY IS...

Spencer Severson

Melissa Hamilton

Board President

Board Vice President

Steve Fish

Kitty LaBounty

Judith Lehmann

Richard “Nels” Nelson

Jasmine Shaw

Marian Allen

Brendan Jones

Debra Brushafer

Mariah Leeseberg Board Member

Executive Director

Clarice Johnson

Bethany Goodrich

Chandler O'Connell

Maia Mares

Sophie Nethercut

Heather Bauscher

Board Member

Office Manager

Board Member

Communications Director

Board Member

Board Member

Sitka Sustainable Communities Catalyst

Board Secretary

Board Member

Communications and Digital Organizer

Board Member

Tongass Community Organizer

Board Secretary

Andrew Thoms

Tongass Community Organizer

Dane McFadden Board Treasurer

Lexi Fish

Fish to Schools Coordinator

Claire Sanchez

Sustainability Organizer for 4-H & Community


Julia Tawney

Living with the Land and Building Community Jesuit Volunteer (2016 – 2017)

Caitlin Purdome

Public Lands Communications Fellow, Sitka Winter Fellow (2017-2018)

Sean Mackinson

Living with the Land and Building Community Jesuit Volunteer (2017 – 2018)

Ryan Morse

Graphic Designer and Content Coordinator

Calendar designed by Ryan Morse. Thanks to Andrew Thoms, Maia Mares, the SCS staff, and our SCS partners for contributing their writing and editing skills. Thank you to all the the incredible photographers who contributed. Sitka Conservation Society protects the natural environment of the Tongass National Forest while supporting the development of sustainable communities in Southeast Alaska. Find online us at www.sitkawild.org Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Vimeo, and Twitter.

Lione Clare

Wilderness Steward and Storyteller

Alyssa Russell Digital Systems Coordinator

Rafe Hanson Photographer

Sienna Reid

Alaska Youth and Future Intern

Sarah O'Leary Alaska Conservation Foundation Storytelling Intern


HERE'S TO ANOTHER FIFTY YEARS OF CONSERVATION!

Photos: Fish-to-Schools © Bethany Goodrich Photography, SCS West Chichagof Wilderness Trip Crew © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Bear © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Tentacles © Bethany Goodrich Photography, FV Roshell© Lione Clare Photography, Small Owl © Crossroads Photography, Sea Lion © Ian Strachan, National Geographic Lindblad Expeditions, Otters © Ian Strachan, National Geographic Lindblad Expeditions , Sunset © Rafe Hanson Photography, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Kayaker © Lione Clare Photography, Young Alaskan takes a water sample © Sienna Reid, Log and Foliage© Lione Clare Photography, Canoe Point waterfall © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Girl at Parade of the Species © Crossroads Photography


The Sitka Conservation Society, Alaska’s oldest conservation organization, works to protect the natural environment of the Tongass, the nation’s largest National Forest, while supporting the development of sustainable communities across Southeast Alaska. This calendar and annual report is full of beautiful images of the Tongass and stories of how SCS works to protect it. Thank you for your support.

P.O. Box 6533 Sitka, Alaska 99835 info@sitkawild.org (907) 747-7509 www.sitkawild.org

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY FIFTY YEARS OF CONSERVATION 1967 – 2017

Profile for Sitka Conservation Society

SCS 2018 Calendar  

SCS 2018 Calendar  

Advertisement