SCS 2019 Calendar

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2019 CALENDAR SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY 2018 ANNUAL REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS

OUR MISSION The Sitka Conservation Society protects the natural environment of the Tongass National Forest while supporting the development of sustainable communities in Southeast Alaska. 2

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Letter from the SCS Board President

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Our Herring are Precious

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Young Alaskans Address Climate Change

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The Living Wilderness Fund

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Carbon Credits on the Tongass

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A Sustainable Southeast

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SCS Board Emeritus, The Salmon Forest

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Empowering New Tongass Advocates

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The Tongass Tiny Home

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Financial Report, Donors and Partners

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4-H Boatbuilding: Alaska Way of Life

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Indigenous Stewardship

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Developing Sustainable Forestry in the Tongass

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Salmon and Democracy

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SCS Staff and Board

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A Global Treasure At Risk

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Giving Back to the Tongass

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About Us, Get Involved


ADVOCATING FOR WILD PLACES A LETTER FROM MELISSA HAMILTON, SCS BOARD PRESIDENT Dear Friends, One of the biggest reasons that I call Sitka my home is the wilderness surrounding us. I feel a sense of escape when I am hiking, camping, or fishing in the Tongass National Forest. When I go from my life in town to the wilderness, I take a leap of faith. I trade the availability of the internet, electricity, and running water for the unpredictability of nature. I realize the bounty that the Tongass has to offer and that I am part of a community that subsists off this land. I became inspired to protect the Tongass so that other people and future generations have the opportunity to experience it as I do. Despite this inspiration, when I think about the Tongass National Forest and the amount of threats it faces, I can feel overwhelmed. Between policy, corporations, unsustainable development, and more, the Tongass National Forest faces enormous changes that threaten the ecosystems we rely on. I am overwhelmed that the future of this living forest relies on our efforts to protect it through conservation and sustainability. In 2018, I was given the opportunity to become President of the board of Sitka Conservation Society. I have been part of SCS for more than 10 years, and I remain passionate about our mission – protecting the natural environment of the Tongass National Forest while developing sustainable communities in Southeast Alaska. Accepting this role was a major decision that I knew would mean stepping up and going outside of my comfort zone. I wanted to use the position to support SCS and be part of a group of leaders who collaborate to make a difference. 1

In today’s climate and with the pressure that the Tongass National Forest faces, the best way to protect the wilderness and support SCS is to become an advocate. Use any and all platforms, resources, events, and opportunities around you to speak for the protection of the Tongass and development of sustainable communities in Southeast Alaska. It means taking the opportunity, whether in a large group or talking to people individually, to speak about the threats the Tongass faces and how we can make a change. If an opportunity for us to speak up doesn’t exist, we must create one. I am proud to be part of a community of SCS supporters who are so dedicated to advocacy. SCS advocates for the protection of the Tongass by mobilizing large citizen responses to legislative and rulemaking threats that put key watersheds and forest areas we rely on in danger. SCS advocates for our region by working with the Sustainable Southeast Partnership to promote and develop sustainable and resilient communities in Southeast Alaska. In Sitka, we advocate for the sustainable harvest of timber and build community by creating the Tiny Home project with Sitka High School. Our 4-H Alaska Way of Life program teaches youth how to be stewards of the Tongass. This calendar presents the people, work, partners, and programs that make up the Sitka Conservation Society. I hope you find inspiration in the stories and I hope that they inspire you to get involved and become an advocate for our community and the place we live.

—Melissa Hamilton, SCS Board President

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I am proud to be part of a community of SCS supporters who are so dedicated to advocacy.

Cover Photo: © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Opposite Page: © Bethany Goodrich Photography. Above: © Sarah O'Leary, ©Andrew Thoms.

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THE LIVING WILDERNESS FUND Written by Andrew Thoms, SCS Executive Director Congress passed The Wilderness Act in 1964 with full bipartisan support, and I now find it hard to imagine that our current Alaska delegation would have voted yes. It was surely a different time when there was more humility in our political leaders, less ego, and more recognition of the need to work together for the greater good of our country and for future generations. The decision makers that voted for the Wilderness Act were recognizing that the earth needs places where intact ecosystems function in their own natural rhythms. Inspired by the Wilderness Act, a group of Sitkans came together to found Sitka Conservation Society with the goal of proposing certain areas of the Tongass National Forest that would remain untouched by clearcut logging. SCS helps continue a long legacy. We are continuing the work today that was started decades ago by Sitkans whose vision, dedication, and integrity built the foundations of a strong community and resulted in areas of the Tongass that we can visit and experience without seeing the impacts of resource extraction. I am eternally grateful to the vision of the Congress members who passed the Wilderness Act and the Alaskans who strived to create the West Chichagof-Yakobi, South Baranof, and other Wilderness areas on the Tongass. These are places that now provide sanctuary for the natural world, where we go with our families and friends, yearly destinations where we hunt and fish, nurseries for wild salmon, and large tracts of forest that I hope will mitigate some of the local impacts of global issues like climate change.

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The Living Wilderness Fund is a gift of Wilderness to future generations. Just as the Wilderness areas were a gift from previous generations to us, the Living Wilderness Fund endowment is a gift of Wilderness to future generations. Any gift to the Living Wilderness Fund is a lasting investment that will ensure that SCS will act as a voice for the Wilderness forever. Dedicated Sitkans and other supporters have made generous gifts to help us grow the fund. Many others have committed to making significant legacy gifts to support our Wilderness stewardship work. Those gifts, and the fund’s long-term support of our Wilderness advocacy and stewardship, are a guiding compass point for our organization. All of the work we do at SCS is meant to carry across generations and benefit future as well as current Alaskans. Tracking political developments and responding to the latest legislative threats are necessary to maintain the current state of the Tongass for future generations. But the natural cycles of the seasons, the growth rings of the trees, the salmon returns, and the breeding cycles of the wildlife that live within the Tongass ground our work and remind us that we are just one part of a much larger universe. Thank you to everyone who makes our work possible.

The Living Wilderness Fund is currently* at $729,326

$500,000 Goal Fund supports part-time staff position. Accomplished!

$1 Million Goal Fund supports full-time staff position.

$1.5 Million Goal Fund supports the entire wilderness advocacy program. *As of September 2018

Above (Top to bottom): © Bethany Goodrich Photography (Top two), © Rafe Hanson Photography; Opposite (Top to bottom): © Ben Hamilton, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Lione Clare Photography, © Ben Hamilton.

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HONORING NELS AS BOARD EMERITUS Through his books, radio programs, cultural anthropology, and writing, Richard “Nels” Nelson has spread the stories of the wild places of the Tongass National Forest far and wide, striking a love for this forest in every person he encounters. He has shared the sounds of the wild, vivid stories of what it feels like to be in the heart of the Tongass, and understandings of the reciprocal relationships between Southeast Alaskan communities and the natural environment around them. In 2018, the Sitka Conservation Society Board of Directors nominated Richard Nelson to the honorable position of Board Emeritus. This title shows our appreciation for his commitment to the SCS mission and his longstanding distinction as a board member since 1983. We are grateful for his ongoing contributions to SCS, the Living Wilderness Fund, the Sitka community, and the Tongass National Forest. Nels has been a spokesperson–both formally and informally– for the Sitka Conservation Society’s work, values, and ideals, and has conveyed his deep knowledge of the people and places of the Tongass and the ecological connections between them. Richard Nelson’s wisdom has helped guide the values and ideas of SCS for many years. Nels once said, “Volunteering for conservation is my way to give something back, in return for the pleasures and rewards that come to us from this beautiful place.” This sentiment drives all of us at SCS, and we look look forward to working with Nels for many years to come.

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Nelson's wisdom has helped guide the values and ideas of SCS for many years.

THE SALMON FOREST Ever since Ben Hamilton first visited Alaska when he was nineteen, he has devoted his filmmaking talents to produce striking films about the Tongass National Forest. This year, we extend our heartfelt congratulations to Ben for winning Alaska Conservation Foundation’s Daniel Housberg Wilderness Image Award for Excellence in Still Photography, Film or Video. With support from the Living Wilderness Fund and SCS, Ben produced The Meaning of Wild and The Salmon Forest, which also won 2018 Best Short Film at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival. These films showcase Ben’s skill at crafting compelling films that immerse his audiences in the wild places of the Tongass and the human communities who depend on them. Ben has inspired thousands of viewers to care about the Tongass National Forest, whether or not they have ever set foot here. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 3


FINANCIAL REPORT These figures represent all of our programs from the first to third quarter of 2018. Expected grant and donation income for the remainder of 2018 is not included in these figures

DONORS AND PARTNERS SCS is immensely grateful for all your support. We would especially like to recognize the following foundations and organizations: 4-H Alaska Community Forest Council Alaska Conservation Foundation Allen Marine American Fisheries Society, AK Chapter The Alaska Center for the Environment Alaska Longline Fisherman's Assoc. Alaska Marine Safety Education Assoc. Alaska Native Brotherhood Alaska Native Sisterhood Alaska Youth for Environmental Action Alpacka Raft Artchange Audubon Alaska Backdoor Café Bagheera Sailing Baranof Island Brewing

Baranof Wilderness Lodge Beak Restaurant Birch Equipment Rental & Sales Blatchley Middle School Brave Heart Volunteers Breakaway Adventures Captain Juju's Food Truck Captain Gary's Sitka Adventures Campion Foundation Citizens' Climate Lobby, AK Chapter City and Borough of Sitka City of Hoonah Clovis Foundation Coast Guard Spouses' and Women's Association of Sitka Common Stream Foundation Cook Inletkeeper

2018 EXPENSES $713,555

Personnel (61%) Office and Rent (10%) Program Support (19%) Fundraising and Outreach (10%)

Personnel (52%)

2017 EXPENSES $708,408

Grants (76%)

2018 INCOME $680,077

Donations and Membership (17%) Other (7%) 2018 Jan – Sep Grant Funding for Specific Projects = $54,699

Crossroads Photography Workshops Eaglemere Foundation Edgerton Foundation Edible Alaska Magazine Esther G Sea Taxi Fisherman's Quay Fortress of the Bear Gallant Adventures George H. & Jane A. Mifflin Mem. Fund Greater Sitka Arts Council Grow Southeast Spruce Root Community Dev. Hames Corporation Hames Center Haida Corporation Harry Race Pharmacy Herring Rock Water Protectors Hoonah Indian Association Hoonah Native Forest Partnership Hydaburg Cooperative Association Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest Kai Environmental LLC KCAW Raven Radio Keet Gooshi Heen Elementary Klawock Cooperative Association Knox College Leighty Foundation Lindblad-National Geographic Fund LFS Marine Supplies Ludvig's Bistro Mean Queen

Mount Edgecumbe High School National Forest Foundation National Park Service National Parks Conservation Assoc. Ntl. Wilderness Stewardship Alliance The Nature Conservancy, Alaska New Ventures Fund North Sister Juice Co Old Harbor Books Organized Village of Kake Organized Vilage of Kasaan Our Town Catering Pacific Wings Patagonia Pioneer Studios Primo's Teriyaki Renewable Energy Alaska Project Russell's Sail Mycia Sailing Saint Tattoo Salmon Beyond Borders Samson Tug and Barge Salmon State Sealaska Seafood Producers Cooperative ScooterBumz SEARHC Sitka Bicycle Friendly Comm. Coalition Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition Sitka Electric Car Group Sitka Fine Arts Camp

Office and Rent (10%) Program Support (30%) Fundraising and Outreach (8%)

Grants (79%)

2017 INCOME $811,497

Donations and Membership (11%) Interest, Retail, Other (10%) Grant Funding for Specific Projects = $160,590

Above (Top to bottom): © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Rafe Hanson Photography; Opposite (Top to bottom): © Shresha Karmacharya, © Bethany Goodrich Photography (Bottom three).


Sitka Food Co-op Sitka High School Sitka Health Summit Coalition Sitka Historical Society Sitka Kitch Sitka Local Foods Network Sitka Lutheran Church Sitka National Historical Park, National Park Service Sitka Native Education Program Sitka Presbyterian Church Sitka Pioneer Home Sitka Public Library Sitka Salmon Shares

Sitka School District Sitka Seafood Festival Sitka Sound Science Center Sitka Sound Seafoods Sitka Spruce Tip 4-H Club Leaders Sitka Sportsman Association Sitka Summer Music Festival Sitka Tribe of Alaska Sitka Whalefest Sound Sailing Southeast Alaska Independent Living Southeast Alaska Conservation Council Southeast Alaska Fish Habitat PTP Spruce Root Community Development

State of Alaska Division of Forestry State of Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game Sustainable Southeast Partnership The Salmon Project The Seattle Foundation Tatoosh School Thimbleberry Bay House Tlingit and Haida Central Council Training Rural Alaska Youth and Leaders Project

University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension University of Alaska, Southeast US Coast Guard USDA Forest Service USFS Pacific Northwest Research Lab Visit Sitka White Elephant Shop Wilburforce Foundation Wintersong Soap Company

Training Resources for the Environmental Community Trout Unlimited True North

We also thank the following individuals for their generous donations and contributions: Luke A'Bear Tom and Diana Allen Kimberly Bakkes Mary Barrett and Jeff Arndt Dane McFadden and Lauren Bell Brenda Berry Annette Blankenship Peter Brabeck Michael and Mary Brabeck Francis Braughn J. Bradley Brickman Tim Bristol Gale and Phil Brownell Brownell Robby Bruce Scott Brylinsky Davey Lubin and Lisa Busch Michelle and Justin Caldwell Larry Calvin Charles Christianson Ben Clark Mike Derzon Joseph Driskill Roger DuBrock Jerry Dzugan Brent and Valerie Edwards Dorie Farrell Kenyon Fields Rick Fleischman Sara Beaber-Fujioka and Tad Fujioka Gail and Andy Fulton Leonard Steinberg and Deborah Greenberg Christine Harrington

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Chris Wilbur and Lily Herwald William and Helen Hodgson Lynn Hubbard and David Zapolsky Bob and Kim Hunter Sonia Ibarra Madeleine Sloane and Michael Ingerman Julie Jarnagin Anna Johnstone Jane Kamvar Howard Pendell and Patricia Kehoe Sandra Kincheloe Joanne and John Kleis Floyd Tomkins and Connie Kreiss Jim and Kathy Kyle Kathy Kyle Marcel and Connie LaPerriere Stephen Lawrie Michael and Klaudia Leccese Arlene Levy Lorraine Inez Lil Michael Litman Bert Loosmore and Family Bill and Diane Marx Michael Mayo Brian McNItt Chester and Miriam Meyers Nicolas and Meridith Mink Darin Nelson Doug Nethercut Carolyn Nichols Julia Smith and Dave Nuetzel Noreen O'Brien

Elias Opgenorth Dorothy and Dean Orbison Jana Ozment- Kirk Susan Padilla Don Surgeon and Galen Paine Cathy and Eric Parker John Patton Frances Paxson Debra Pohlman Mary and Bob Purvis Krisanne Rice Tim Riley Dennis Rogers Robert Schell Linda Schmidt Laura Schmidt Stephen Rhoads and Beth Short Connie Sipe David Sparling David and Marge Steward Libby Stortz Maite Lorente and Andrew Thoms Mike Thoms Victoria Vosburg Nancy Waterman Drew Wilson and Gabrielle Westergren Charlie Wilber Donald J. Wille Michelle Friedman and Roland Wirth Mark Cochran and Paula Wisness Lynn Hubbard and David Zapolsky

We are also grateful to all the fishermen who have donated to the Fish to Schools program, including the following vessels: F/V Born Again F/V Brat F/V Cape Cross F/V Charity F/V Cinnabar F/V Discovery F/V Dryas F/V Endurance F/V Haven F/V Merlin F/V Minke F/V Morning Mist F/V Myriad

F/V Nonas F/V Ocean Cape F/V Point Defiance F/V Rip Curl F/V Sachem F/V Samantha Dawn F/V Sea Lark F/V Sea Miner F/V Seaweed II F/V Ulla F/V Windchime F/V Zapatista

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JANUARY A Sitka black-tailed deer fawn sleeps on a mossy forest floor amongst the deer cabbage plants. This fawn, starting out its life small and delicate, has the chance to grow to be the biggest and most powerful buck of the valley or the most productive and nurturing mother who fosters new generations.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE FORESTRY IN THE TONGASS ZACH LAPERRIERE

Month Photo: © Andrew Thoms; Below: Row 1: © Clarice Johnson; Row 2: © Austin Rice, © Bethany Goodrich Photography (center, right), Bottom: © Deryk Goodrich.

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LOCAL WOODWORKER AND ENTREPRENEUR

The Tongass is our home: it’s where we harvest so much of our food and the base of our local economy. Like so many who have lived here for decades, I love this land as much as anything else. I’m also a logger. My livelihood comes from harvesting old growth trees. I make wood bowls and furniture from salvaged old growth trees that either died of old age or blew over in winter storms. That’s part of the abundance of the Tongass National Forest. I grew up in the era of industrial clear cut logging in the 1980s. Every year, up to 300 million board feet were exported on huge timber ships—headed overseas. When most of the easy and valuable timber was gone, the timber companies pulled out and jobs disappeared overnight. Right now, our political climate can feel like we’re on a sinking ship, especially as we face a series of attempts to roll back laws that protect the forest we depend on. It’s scary to face the prospect of losing big areas of the Tongass. My heart—like yours—would break. These remaining ancient forests are national treasures that belong to all Americans. Exporting raw materials from these public lands for a quick buck is a short-sighted vision that puts corporate profits above the needs of real Alaskan communities. Over a million visitors come to the Tongass every year, supporting our local economy. Our salmon fisheries depend on functional watersheds supported by old growth forests and a healthy Tongass. Here's the good news. Many support protecting the Tongass. When we speak up, people listen, get inspired, and take action. That’s why we need your leadership, your voice, and your action. When more of us speak, our collective voice is louder. Future generations depend on us to do the right thing. We have the ability to create a locally-owned, responsible forest products industry that will provide long-term economic gains. We can support economic development by protecting our forests and making sure our fisheries remain healthy. That is true conservation.

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ALASKANS DEFEND THE TONGASS In 2018, Alaska’s public lands were under attack, including the Tongass National Forest. This year, Senator Lisa Murkowski attempted to repeal the 2016 Tongass Land Management Plan, which protects 77 key watersheds across the forest and phases out old growth logging in favor of more sustainable young growth harvest. Hundreds of Southeast Alaskans spoke up to defend the Tongass, and Senator Murkowski withdrew the legislation that would have repealed the Tongass Plan. Thanks to you, the Tongass remains on track toward a more sustainable future. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 7


FEBRUARY Subtle light casts across the mountains in the Tongass National Forest. Baranof Island is both foreboding and inviting. It is a dangerous place, and also a paradise. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


A GLOBAL TREASURE AT RISK ANDREW THOMS

Month Photo: © Lione Clare Photography; Below: Row 1: © Caitlin Purdome, © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Row 2: © Clarice Johnson, © Shresha Karmacharya, © Rafe Hanson Photography; Bottom Photo: © Bethany Goodrich Photography

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SCS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

One fulfilling thing about working for the Sitka Conservation Society is that our local efforts have global implications. Temperate rainforests only ever existed in a few places around the world and humans have wiped out much of that range. The ancient forests that once stood on the British Isles, in Coastal Norway, in the Pacific Northwest, along the Western Coast of Canada and in Japan have all been fragmented or reduced to simplistic tree plantations. The Tongass, uniquely, hasn’t suffered that same fate, even after the ravages of the pulp mills. Here in Southeast, huge extensions of intact forest ecosystems still exist. This place is our home. Our members and our board live here. We use and depend on the forest and insist on policy that keeps it intact—both for its global significance and for the resources it provides locally. We know how important it is to work on the scale of generations and to resist the lure of short term profits that sacrifice too much. Our work on forest management, fisheries, and community development aims to allow us to thrive for the long term amidst an intact and functional ecosystem. The Tongass has always been home to great cultures that practice reciprocal care for the lands that sustain them. Colonization threatened and continues to threaten these ways of life and the booms-and-busts of the Russians and Americans threatened to extirpate otters, salmon, and then forests. Citizen activism saved those resources and now people and the environment are healing. Still, we must be ever vigilant. It feels that we are again at a precarious moment. The Tongass is threatened by an assault on the Roadless Rule, efforts to privatize public lands, and policies that push to prioritize old growth logging over more sustainable and fruitful uses of our resources. SCS is facing these threats by following the examples of great Native Alaskan and Alaskan activists past and present who have worked to preserve this place. Together we can protect this last great coastal forest ecosystem.

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S AT U R DAY

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Elizabeth Peratrovich Day

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St. Lazaria Wildlife Refuge est. 1909

BRINGING YOU INTO THE WILD Each summer, SCS organizes a series of boat cruises in order to immerse Sitkans and visitors in the wild places that surround us, like Saint Lazaria, West Chichagof Wilderness, Redoubt, and more. Without a boat, it can be difficult to access these remote corners of the Tongass National Forest, but we believe in sharing opportunities to experience wilderness. With the support of Allen Marine, we were able to bring hundreds of people on six journeys to see these important and unique ecosystems firsthand.

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MARCH They move through the ocean with a slow and steady pace that inspires a sense of peace like few other things. Humpback whales have an understanding of the fjords, bays, and marine world of Southeast Alaska that we can’t ever approach. All we can do is watch, imagine, and absorb some of their peace.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


OUR HERRING ARE PRECIOUS LOUISE BRADY LOCAL ACTIVIST AND LEADER

Xh’alitseenxh sitee yaawx’. Herring are precious to those of us who are Tlingit. Kiks.adi women are known as the Herring Ladies. We Kiks.adi have two stories that demonstrate the importance of our relationship to the Herring. One is about a woman who would sing to the herring every spring, inviting them to the Yaaw T’eiyi-the Herring Rock in the Sitka Channel. This is the first place the herring spawned in all Southeast Alaska. The second story is one of greed by the same woman who secretly harvested herring and refused to share any, even with her own mother-in-law. Because of her greed, she turned into an owl and flew out of the village. We all need to find and honor our connections; not only to the herring, but to all of our natural world. One way to develop relationships is through ceremony. They help us define who we are- not as individuals- but as members of a natural community that we must honor. In January more than 200 people came together for a koo.éex’ in honor of the herring. This ceremony was organized by myself and the Herring Rock Water Protectors, a grassroots group of friends and activists. The koo.éex’ built strength and will to conserve Sitka’s herring, the final stronghold of a once abundant staple food throughout Alaska that is now at risk. Neighboring clans offered regalia, masks, dances and songs to provide balance and share strength with the Kiks.ádi. With the connections forged through this ceremony, Sitkans, including members of SCS, rallied to support the Sitka Tribe of Alaska’s proposals to the Board of Fish to limit commercial quotas and expand subsistence-only areas. While the Board ultimately failed to take action for conservation (only adopting the subsistence proposal) many in our community grew to better understand the cultural and ecological importance of the herring. Our relationships with the herring and with each other were strengthened. Grassroots movements based in relationships and respect are how we will protect the natural world.

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Month Photo: © Lione Clare Photography; Below: Row 1: © Lione Clare Photography, © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Row 2: © Lione Clare Photography, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Bottom Photo: © Caron McKee.

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31 TEACHING SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT Last April, our Community Organizer, Heather, accompanied four Mount Edgecumbe High School students to a meeting of the Federal Subsistence Board in Anchorage. The trip was part of a participatory education biology course at University of Alaska Southeast, focused on the creation of policies that impact management of subsistence resources and avenues for community participation in the process. Reflecting on the experience of attending the Board’s meeting, one student wrote, “I know now that every voice in the public, and even the state, matters.” SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 11


APRIL There we were, eye to eye through the sedges. The rising tide had carried me up an estuary channel, while the wolf crept through tussocks and sloughs. A long journey to earn that one instant of magical connection with the Alexander Archipelago wolf in the Tongass’ South Prince of Wales Wilderness.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


CARBON CREDITS ON THE TONGASS ANTHONY MALLOT

Month Photo: © Adam Andis Photography; Below: Row 1: © Bethany Goodrich Photography, Row 2:© Bethany Goodrich Photography (Left, Center), © Shresha Karmacharya; Bottom Photo: © Bethany Goodrich Photography.

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SEALASKA PRESIDENT AND CEO

In 2018, Sealaska received approval from the California Air Resource Board to designate 165,000 acres of forested lands for use in a carbon bank program. This is the first project in Alaska to be issued carbon offset credits. Recognized for their global significance mitigating the impacts of climate change through carbon sequestration, the lands will be protected from industrial timber harvest for over a century. For multiple generations, these acres of Sealaska lands will be untouched by commercial timber harvests while remaining open to shareholders for cultural uses, such as subsistence and the selective harvesting of logs for totem poles, canoes and other community cultural projects. Left standing, these forests will continue to capture carbon, provide healthy habitat for fish and wildlife, and cultivate the clean water, fresh air and ecological and cultural vitality Southeast Alaskans depend on. This revolutionary pivot from a focus on commercial timber to more diversified and sustainable forest management, embodies the ‘triple-bottom-line’ philosophy of cultivating social and environmental responsibility alongside profit. Proceeds will be invested back into communities, businesses, and Sealaska shareholders for generations to come. “Everyone on our team knows their job is to create the greatest financial, cultural and community benefit from our lands,” said Sealaska President and CEO Anthony Mallott. “Sealaska’s carbon project includes sensitive areas such as watersheds that serve as important sources of drinking water for our communities and critical habitat for salmon and other wildlife throughout Sealaska lands. We chose watersheds and fish habitat areas because we are committed to the health and productivity of our ocean waters and marine environment, which reinforces our new strategic direction.” SCS partners with Sealaska through the Sustainable Southeast Partnership. Together we work to find ways to develop a thriving economy while conserving resources and protecting important areas.

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PROTECTING THE HETTA WATERSHED The people of Hydaburg, the largest Haida community in Alaska, rely on the health of the Hetta watershed. This ecosystem produces the wild salmon they depend on. In 2017, Sealaska chose to protect the Hetta from commercial logging for over a century by designating the lands as a carbon bank. As a founding member of the Sustainable Southeast Partnership, SCS applauds our partner Sealaska for taking this stride toward developing sustainable business practices, mitigating climate change, and protecting crucial salmon habitat. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 13


MAY The Tufted Puffin in its home, the North Pacific Ocean. They ride the waves and dive deep into the sea feeding alongside salmon on needlefish and herring. Their experience of the ocean is something we can only dream, but not fathom. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


EMPOWERING NEW TONGASS ADVOCATES LIONE CLARE

Month Photo: © Lione Clare Photography; Below: Row 1: © Lione Clare Photography, Row 2:© Bethany Goodrich Photography (Left, Center), © Lione Clare Photography, © Rafe Hanson Photography; Bottom Photo: © Maia Mares.

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LOCAL NATURALIST AND SCS PARTNER

As a young woman born and raised in Sitka, I am a deeply passionate about the health of our backyard, the Tongass National Forest. I create advocates and supporters of the Tongass. This summer, I became a naturalist on a local wildlife charter and further expanded the ways I created advocates and supporters of the Tongass. Taking on the role of naturalist and photographer with A Whale’s Song Expeditions, a small wildlife and photography eco-tour business in Sitka, has extended my perspective of the greater Tongass ecosystem further than I ever could have imagined. Watching and learning the behaviors of our marine mammals and birds and gaining a deeper understanding of how the abundance of all marine life in the ocean is interconnected with the Tongass’s densely forested island ecosystems, as well as human livelihoods, is an immense privilege. Even more so is being able to share that abundance with clients from all over the world who are visiting the Tongass because of its stunning, world class natural beauty. We are proud members of the Whale Sense program and Alaska’s only partner with the World Cetacean Alliance, making us a leading company in responsible wildlife watching and conservation. We always discuss these organizations and topics with customers, providing guests with an opportunity to learn, beyond just seeing and taking photographs, and allowing them to come away with a greater awareness of, and hopefully appreciation for, the health and sustainability of this place and its wildlife and natural wonders. Whether you grew up as a local or you are visiting Sitka for the first time, the Tongass National Forest is truly striking- a global treasure that is worth honoring and protecting. The guides and outfitters that work in Southeast Alaska are demonstrating ways that our public lands and ocean waters are fostering profitable businesses while also conserving ecosystems.

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SUSTAINABLE TOURISM The Sustainable Southeast Partnership is a network of tribal governments, organizations, native corporations, and local business working together to build regional resiliency. We aim to strike a balance between economic self-reliance and ecological health. In 2016, tourism surpassed fishing as the most economically significant private sector in Southeast. As tourism stretches to our more remote communities, SSP works to ensure that it aligns with local culture and priorities while fitting sustainably within our complex ecosystems. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 15


JUNE Mt. Edgecumbe sits as a sentinel over Kruzof Island—a geological treasure of the Tongass. The volcano sits as if an ancient Titan: her flanks are forests of cedar and hemlock and muskegs of pine and sphagnum. Beyond are her coasts: sandy beaches, rocky cliffs, lava reefs, and kelp forests.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


4-H BOATBUILDING: ALASKA WAY OF LIFE CLAIRE SANCHEZ, KEVAN O’HANLON, JASMINE SHAW

Month Photo: © Lione Clare Photography; Below: Row 1: © Maia Mares, © Shresha Karmacharya, © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Row 2: © Bethany Goodrich Photography (Left, Right). © Shresha Karmacharya (Center), Bottom: © Bethany Goodrich Photography.

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4-H ALASKA WAY OF LIFE

In the Sitka Spruce Tips Alaska Way of Life 4-H Club there are many firsts. Each is memorable and vivid like spruce tips in spring and each of immense value as it is a part of something larger. The Sitka Conservation Society and University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension have partnered to cultivate, grow, and sustain the Alaska Way of Life 4-H Club that serves youth ages 5-18. The club transcends Sitka Conservation Society’s values of conservation and sustainable communities through activities that empower Sitka’s youth to foster healthy relationships and be stewards of the land. The 4-H program continues the timeless traditions in Southeast Alaska of passing along the skills and values it takes to live in this environment. This spring, 4-H partnered with the Sitka Maritime Heritage Society to create the long awaited 4-H Boatbuilding Club. Local shipwrights Paul Rioux, Joe D'Arienzo, Terry Perensovich, and Tom Crane, mentored 4-Hers ages 7 – 3 in building two rowable, sailable Teal model dories in the historic Sitka Maritime Heritage Society (SMHS) Boathouse. Equipped with protective glasses and earplugs, 4-Hers worked side by side with their mentors in measuring, sawing, sanding, drilling, and hammering to transform two dimensional instructions into three dimensional dories. For three months the boathouse was filled with sounds of power tools, the smell of cedar, and the sight of parents, grandparents, and curious community members either supporting their child with hands on tasks, or encouraging them as onlookers. 4-H Boatbuilder Marina Marley comments of her parents, “They say that maybe we could build one (a boat) at home.” Thanks to community support and the dedication of Boatbuilding Club members and mentors, 4-H now has the option to get kids on the ocean where connection, respect, and care of place can grow deeper. Whether collecting the sea’s bounty, commuting, or providing a living space, boats continue to be essential to Sitka’s way of life. The same goes for skills such as boatbuilding and the ethic to protect and preserve our marine ecosystem.

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30 CARVING FOR CONNECTION For two months, Mark Sixbey of Sitka Tribe of Alaska mentored 4-Hers ages 5-10 in carving Red Cedar oars for two dories built by the 4-H Boatbuilding Club, and painting mini paddles with traditional Northwest Coast designs and colors. The series took place at Sitka National Historical Park’s carving workshop. For many, this was their favorite 4-H activity to date. Both the mini paddles, and Red Cedar were donated by Sealaska with supplementary paddles donated by Sitka Tribe of Alaska.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 17


JULY Every summer, salmon begin their return to the forest streams where they were born. As they enter freshwater to spawn, tails turn spotted and red pigment shines through scales. The health of the wild salmon we depend on reflects the health of Southeast Alaskan communities and the ecosystems of the Tongass National Forest.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


SALMON AND DEMOCRACY HEATHER BAUSCHER TONGASS COMMUNITY ORGANIZER

If there's one thing that unites Alaskans, it's salmon. We rely on salmon to fill our freezers and feed our families. We rely on salmon for our traditions and our culture. We rely on salmon for our income and our livelihoods. We rely on salmon for marking the changes in the seasons and providing nutrients to the forest that shelters us. In 2018, the grassroots coalition that makes up Stand for Salmon gathered enough signatures statewide to put a proposition on the ballot to safeguard salmon from the impacts of major development projects. If this proposition passed, ordinary Alaskans will have succeeded in making much needed updates to our 60-year-old fish habitat laws, establishing a more transparent, responsible, and balanced approach to permitting mega development projects. But regardless of the outcome on this particular initiative, the momentum created over the past year in favor of salmon protections is sure to have lasting impacts on our state. As part of this coalition, I traveled to communities across Southeast Alaska to build support for salmon. I am grateful for the generosity of these communities and the people who gave me rides on boats, shared meals, and provided places to sleep. Too often it seems like the needs of people and communities are drowned out by the desires of corporations. This year has shown me the strength people have when we find common ground with one another. Salmon is that common ground for Alaskans. We all want to continue our ways of life and keep our salmon streams healthy for generations to come. I look forward to more opportunities to engage the amazing network of salmon loving folks across the Tongass and I'm grateful for a democracy where people can build power to raise our voices above corporations.

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Month Photo: © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Below: Row 1: © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Row 2: © Bethany Goodrich Photography (Left, Center), © Lione Clare Photography (Right), Bottom: © Bethany Goodrich Photography.

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PUSHING FOR SALMON PROTECTION LAWS In 2018, Alaskans across the state organized in support of updating fish habitat protection laws. Stand for Salmon united fishermen of all stripes alongside tribes and communities to improve the permitting process for large-scale development projects that jeopardize salmon watersheds. In November, Alaska citizens had the opportunity to vote on the the initiative, and the momentum from those efforts continues to inspire Alaskans to take action to protect wild salmon in Sitka and across the state.

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AUGUST We paddled down a narrow channel, with tall sedges all around us. It was a moment of serenity and peace. Our world was the canoe, the water, the wetland we were travelling through, and the paddle strokes that carried us over this beautiful Tongass Wilderness.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


GIVING BACK TO THE TONGASS CAITLIN PURDOME WILDERNESS STEWARDSHIP PROJECT COORDINATOR

One part of what makes Southeast Alaska amazing is the Wilderness and wild places of the Tongass National Forest Wilderness areas, and other protective land use designations, help to ensure that healthy, intact ecosystems on the Tongass sustain wildlife. The Sitka Conservation Society was founded to designate a Wilderness area on the Tongass to ensure that future generations can experience a wild landscape that has not been harmed by resource extraction. Today, we still work to designate the full extent of our original Wilderness proposal. We also act as stewards of the Wilderness areas we have. This past summer, I led an SCS crew of young volunteers to the Petersburg CreekDuncan Salt Chuck Wilderness Area on Kupreanof Island to survey and remove invasive plant populations. We worked in the mud and beauty of huge sedge meadows and pulled an invasive plant that had been accidentally introduced. By pulling and hauling away hundreds of pounds of invasive plants, the crew helped restore the salt chuck to its natural state and collect data that will enable the Forest Service to strategically continue their work. The crew witnessed firsthand the complexity and beauty of the salt chuck’s unique ecosystem. During our time in the field we walked along wolf tracks pressed into the drying mud of a creek bed, watched black bears scouting for food, and stood breathless as the silhouette of a moose emerged from the fog. A sunny day showcased the importance of the rains that came before, as vibrant shades of green coated the landscape. This one small area of the Tongass contained multitudes: muskegs bursting with cloudberries, ancient trees, deep sloughs of mud, and miles of estuary where salt and freshwater mingle. At SCS, we understand the value of wild places like the Duncan Salt Chuck. These places are precious, and we are grateful to live among them in Southeast Alaska. We all have a responsibility to care for the landscapes of the Tongass National Forest because they are public lands and we depend on them. Stewardship is an opportunity to care for the land and give back to the forest that gives us so much.

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Month Photo: © Caitlin Purdome; Below: Row 1: © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Rafe Hanson Photography. Row 2: © Lione Clare Photography, © Shresha Karmacharya, © Rafe Hanson Photography; Bottom: © Maia Mares.

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PROTECTING WILD, INTACT ECOSYSTEMS The Tongass National Forest contains 19 designated Wilderness areas, where wild salmon, brown bears, wolves, and countless others can thrive in diverse habitats like old growth forests, coastal estuaries, rugged mountains, and extensive wetlands. Wilderness areas protect large swaths of intact ecosystems from commercial development, ensuring the continuing existence of the complex web of life that makes the Tongass a global biological jewel. Wilderness areas are truly a treasure of the United States.

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SEPTEMBER If you look closely, you can see the interface between the forest and the ocean in the Tongass. The sea rises as mists through the forest, baby salmon swim from the trees our to the ocean, and orca fish along the coast, ready to meet them.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


YOUNG ALASKANS ADDRESS CLIMATE CHANGE CARLY DENNIS

Month Photo: © Lione Clare Photography; Below: Row 1: © Bethany Goodrich Photography (Left, Right), © Ryan Morse (Center); Row 2: © Lione Clare Photography, © Shresha Karmacharya, © Rafe Hanson Photography; Bottom: © Peter Vu.

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ECO-ADVOCACY AND COMMUNICATIONS INTERN

As a 20 year old, lifelong Alaskan resident, I have a deep love for my state and I care about its future. That is why I’m very worried about the speed and totality of a changing climate. As a young person, I worry for the future of my generation. So I joined Sitka Conservation Society as the Eco-Advocacy Intern through the Alaska Conservation Foundation’s Ted Smith Conservation Internship program. During my internship, I attended the Young Leaders’ Dialogue hosted by the Governor's Climate Action for Alaska Leadership Team. I was one of 25 young people who weighed in on the team’s draft climate change policy. Everyone agreed: we need to take action now. Alaska’s youth from every corner of our state can see the reality of a rapidly warming climate as a result of human’s use of fossil fuels. I see it in the dramatically warm winters I've lived in my home of Southcentral Alaska. Where there was once infallible snow and ice, we now have grey and muddy rains that bring destructive windstorms, vicious freeze-thaw cycles, and the loss of tradition, culture, and identity. In my internship, I learned that Sitka is uniquely able to combat climate change. As an old-growth forest, the Tongass National Forest surrounding us acts as a globally vital carbon sink. This means that to combat climate change, we must keep the Tongass intact to ensure that it continues to absorb and store carbon. We can also lower our carbon footprint and mitigate the impacts of climate change on a local level. I have been impressed to see Sitkans already pursuing many of these solutions. The Sitka Chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby advocates for a national carbon fee and dividend, and the Sitka Carbon Reducers Group aims to reduce carbon emissions at a local level. My generation recognizes that this work is crucial to addressing climate change here in Alaska; I hope to see more of my peers engaged in these efforts as we move forward and I hope to see our political leaders finally step up and think about my generation. The future of our state depends on it.

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BRINGING SUSTAINABLE ENERGY HOME We’re already feeling the local impacts of climate change, yet the remote location of our community means we remain dependent on air travel. In 2018, we supported the creation of the Sitka Carbon Offset Fund, which uses donations from frequent travelers to reduce Sitka’s carbon footprint by helping families, businesses, and organizations convert from oil and gas to local, renewable hydroelectricity. The fund partners with Baranof Island Housing Authority to install heat pumps into resident family homes, making homes more eco-friendly and contributing to local electric usage. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 23


OCTOBER The river cuts a path through the forest, making a trail for coho salmon. It is their path from the depths of the ocean to a back eddy pool under Sitka spruce trees, deep in the Tongass. The salmon fry from that pool have grown into silvery ocean predators, growing from devouring larval midges and bugs to herring and squid. The salmon are at home in both the forest and the sea.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


A SUSTAINABLE SOUTHEAST BETHANY GOODRICH SCS COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Past conservation efforts often emphasized the division between humans and nature, casting all human impacts as negative and idealizing nature as static and pristine. As a result, conservation advocates sidelined the needs of local people and erased the long and rich histories of indigenous presence in these stunning places. The Sustainable Southeast Partnership (SSP) represents a new way of thinking about conservation, one that takes a holistic view of the complex and reciprocal relationships between people and nature. SSP is a growing collaboration of individuals and organizations working together toward regional resiliency in Southeast Alaska. Together, we envision a future for our families and region that includes prosperous self-reliant communities, a vibrant place-based culture, a robust local economy, and a healthy functioning environment. We believe this vision is only attainable if tribal governments, community leaders, local businesses, Native corporations, environmental groups, and other partners work together. Our work is deeply relationship-based and focused on four crucial areas: energy, food, economic development, and natural resource management. Only through collaboration can we effectively take on the complex challenges of achieving community sustainability. Through SSP we work to integrate local knowledge and science into an adaptive approach to resource stewardship through programs like the Hoonah Native Forest Partnership. We’re increasing the use of renewable energy in our communities by training residents through the Home Energy Leader Program. Sitka Kitch offers local culinary classes, commercial kitchen rentals, and community event space. Our workforce development programs build local capacity and prepare Southeast Alaskans for careers in sustainable forestry through on-theground experience. We are honored to be a founding partner of SSP. We are grateful for the opportunity to continuously build trust and long-term solutions with community leaders across the region.

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Month Photo: © Rafe Hanson Photography; Below: Row 1: © Bethany Goodrich Photography; Row 2: © Rafe Hanson Photography (Left, Center), © Lione Clare Photography; Bottom: © Rafe Hanson Photography.

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TRAINING YOUNG RURAL ALASKANS This year, the Training Alaska Youth Leaders and Students (TRAYLS) program offered young Sitkans the opportunity to gain career experience in natural resource management and work to improve the health of the Tongass National Forest. As a Sustainable Southeast Partnership program, TRAYLS operates across the region, with programs in Hoonah, Sitka, and Klawock. The Sitka crew worked with Forest Service employees on stream surveys, tree measurements, forest thinning, and restoration of critical salmon habitat in the Nakwasina watershed. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 25


NOVEMBER Our little home in the vast world: Sitka, Alaska. We sit at the foot of mountains on an island at the edge of the North Pacific Ocean. We are a tiny sliver of humanity in the midst of the enormous and spectacular Tongass National Forest. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


THE TONGASS TINY HOME CHANDLER O’CONNELL

Month Photo: © Lione Clare Photography; Below: Row 1: © Maia Mares, © Bethany Goodrich Photography (Center, Right); Row 2: © Austin Rice © Maia Mares (Center, Right); Bottom: © Matthew Dolkas.

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It’s been a big year for the Tongass tiny home! After seven semesters of diligent work by Sitka High School students, this project is nearing the finish line. What began as an empty trailer bed is now a fully outfitted 160 square foot house, featuring beautiful local wood, custom cabinetry and a surprisingly roomy loft bedroom. Along the way, Sitka’s youth have gained construction and professional skills that will serve them well no matter where the future takes them. A strong workforce is essential to building a sustainable community, and we're proud to partner with the Sitka School District to make a long-term investment in our local youth. This project is just the start. We are working hard to sell the tiny home and will use the revenue to continue supporting the Sitka High School advanced construction class. If you know of a Southeast Alaskan household looking for a small and beautiful alternative housing option, let us know! In addition to being a great learning tool, the Tongass tiny home increased community use of young growth and local timber products produced by small scale regional mills. Young growth lumber is a more sustainable resource and the development of this emerging market is a key step in successfully implementing the Tongass Transition, the move from the extractive practice of old growth clearcutting towards a more economically and environmentally sound model of managing the Tongass. Each purchase that SCS made for the tiny home was an opportunity to invest in the Southeast economy and to further our mission of protecting this forest that we love and depend upon. From start to finish, the Tongass Tiny Home project has been about building healthy people, place and economy. Thank you to our many partners who have made this effort a success.

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KEEPING THE TONGASS TRANSITION ALIVE Old growth trees are a limited, globally rare resource and provide crucial forest habitat. After 60 years of logging Tongass old growth, we need to move toward a more sustainable future. Young growth timber comes from the newer trees that have grown up in past clearcut areas. The development of a local young growth industry of small, family-owned mills and a trained, local workforce could lead to greater economic security for rural communities, build regional knowledge and commerce, and conserve critical forest habitat in the Tongass National Forest. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY | 27


DECEMBER When I want to be alone in the vastness of the universe, I run away into the wild of the Tongass National Forest. Surrounded by quiet, snow-covered trees, my heart is full of joy at being alive here amongst all this majesty. SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY


INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP IN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANDREA COOK INDIGENOUS LANDS AND WATERS INTERN

I am from Hydaburg, a small Haida village located on the southern point of Prince of Wales Island. As the Indigenous Lands and Waters Intern, created by the Sustainable Southeast Partnership (SSP), my job was to explore the meaning of Indigenous stewardship to myself and my community. During this time, I also expanded my capacities in photography and storytelling and worked with the US Forest Service doing fieldwork in the rich environment around my home. I was able to learn about the resources I traditionally harvest through the perspective of western science. Additionally, I interviewed people I found who were passionate about their lands and shared with me their traditional knowledge. The Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people have been stewards of these lands for thousands of years. I recently heard a meaningful quote: “This land does not belong to us, we belong to this land.” I think this paints an image that describes perfectly, the relationship between my people and our surroundings. As an Indigenous person, my homeland is a huge part of my identity. While working with the Forest Service, I stayed in a bunk house with about 20 people who were doing projects all over the island inspecting and monitoring resources from the ocean to the mountains. I was the only indigenous person at that bunkhouse. Easily, this can be seen as an issue to some. I see this as an opportunity. We need more Indigenous representation in resource management fields. I believe this helps build an important bridge between the worlds of western and traditional knowledge, which share the interest of protecting our giving lands and gracious seas. At the same time, it helps my people have more say in the decisions that impact our resources: allowing us to once again, be the stewards of our land. My work over the summer with SCS and the SSP is helping to cultivate more indigenous leadership in public lands management.

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Month Photo: © Rafe Hanson Photography; Below: © Andrea Cook; Bottom: © Bethany Goodrich Photography.

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WALKING HYDABURG'S SALMON STREAMS SCS, Sealaska, Alaska Conservation Foundation, Pacific Northwest Research Lab, Hydaburg Cooperative Association, and Haida Corporation partnered to host the Indigenous Lands and Waters Internship. Andrea Cook, a recent Mt. Edgecumbe graduate, explored the meaning of indigenous stewardship, walking salmon streams with the Hydaburg Cooperative Association stream mapping crew, a group also supported by SCS, and learning how locals understand and document salmon habitats around their home. This information helps ensure timber harvests are done in a way that doesn't harm salmon.

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Together, we are the SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY The SCS team is made up of the following staff and board, as well as community members like you.

Marian Allen Board Member

Carly Dennis Eco-Advocacy and Communications Intern (ACF)

Kevan O'Hanlon Living with the Land and Building Community Jesuit Volunteer

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Debra Brushafer Board Member

Steve Fish

Heather Bauscher

Volunteer Photographer

Bethany Goodrich

Melissa Hamilton

Board Vice President

Communications Director

Rafe Hanson

Clarice Johnson

Contract Photographer

Lione Clare

Tongass Community Organizer

Office Manager

Andrea Cook

Indigenous Lands and Waters Intern

Ellie Handler

Board President

Public Lands Communication Fellow (2018-2019)

Brendan Jones

Shresha Karmacharya

Board Member

Sustainable Wild Salmon Intern (Knox/SSS)


Opposite: © Shresha Karmacharya, © Rafe Hanson Photography; Below: © Bethany Goodrich Photography.

Mariah Leeseberg

Judith Lehmann Board Member

Communications and Digital Organizer

Ryan Morse

Richard Nelson

Chandler O'Connell

Board Secretary

Graphic Designer and Content Coordinator

Board Emeritus

Maia Mares

Sitka Sustainable Communities Catalyst

Andrew Martin SCS Intern

Caitlin Purdome

Wilderness Stewardship Project Coordinator

Dane McFadden Board Treasurer

Sienna Reid

Alaska Youth and Future Intern

Calendar designed by Ryan Morse. Thanks to Andrew Thoms, Maia Mares, the SCS staff, and our SCS partners for contributing their writing and editing skills.

Katie Riley

Policy Reseacher

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Claire Sanchez

Sustainability Organizer for 4-H & Community

Spencer Severson Board Member

Jasmine Shaw Board Member

Andrew Thoms

Executive Director

Thank you to all the the incredible photographers who contributed.


PROTECTING THE TONGASS FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS

Top to Bottom (L – R) © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Maia Mares, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Ryan Morse, © Rafe Hanson Photography, © Rafe Hanson Photography, © Lione Clare Photography, © Maia Mares, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Maia Mares, © Shresha Karmacharya.

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Top to Bottom (L – R) © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Rafe Hanson Photography, © Lione Clare Photography, © Clarice Johnson, © Bethany Goodrich Photography, © Jason Condon, © Andrea Cook, © Lione Clare Photography, © Lione Clare Photography. Back Cover: © Lione Clare Photography.

Our success depends on you. When you become a member, you: Join a community of people committed to protecting the Tongass and working together toward sustainability. Make a commitment to advocacy. Receive action alerts so you know when and how to take action. Raise your voice. We’ll bring your words to the people who most need to hear what you have to say.

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The Sitka Conservation Society, Alaska’s oldest conservation organization, works to protect the natural environment of the Tongass, the nation’s largest National Forest, while also supporting the development of sustainable communities across Southeast Alaska. This calendar and annual report is full of beautiful images of the Tongass and stories of how SCS works to protect it. Thank you for your support.

SITKA CONSERVATION SOCIETY P.O. Box 6533 Sitka, Alaska 99835 info@sitkawild.org (907) 747-7509 www.sitkawild.org