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Fortunately, the people we were buying the boat from were paying for most of work, as per the contract, so we didn’t have too much of a heart-attack. The prop was enormous at 80 cm and it took two men to lift the shaft. What we didn’t bank on was the ‘band-aid’ style cover on the INSIDE of the hull where the prop shaft went. It was covered with thin ply while we sat back in the water, waiting for the new prop shaft to be made and delivered. What happened next was like a rather stressful carry-on movie. We were not happy with the temporary patch covering the rather large hole and asked the workers not to let the water into the drydock. They believed it was fine. They opened the lock to let the water into the dock, Noel closed it. Tempers were fraying, Noel was grasping the latch to prevent the water entering. Then the owner turned up, switched an emergency switch and the drydock filled. The temporary repairs were fine (after some adjustments at our insistence). Our frantic behaviour and the fact that we locked an engineer (who monitored the patch) in our engine room, for half-an-hour, without realising, were all forgiven. The French ‘way’ is very different from what we are used to. We were exhausted and through lack of energy we finally relaxed and allowed ourselves to ‘go with it’ and things improved. Finally, with the surveyor’s report in our sticky hands, the insurance in place, the funds transferred, and all the owners’ gear removed, we sat on our lovely home all alone and wondered how the hell we were going to manoeuvre an 18.5 metre boat through the middle of France!

ROUGE CORSAIR DETAILS Rouge Corsair is a Dutch Luxemotor. She was built in the Netherlands and was originally a bunker barge for the commercial vessels, hence she has a nice pointed bow (in comparison to many barges) to slice through the water. She has no bow thrusters, but with her enormous prop we could use her prop walk for easy manoeuvring. She is a dream to handle. LOA – 18.5 metres Beam – 3.95 Air draft – 2.95 Draft (water) – 1 metre

CONCRETE IN EXPLANATION

THE

BILGE

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The following information is what we have learned/seen over many years of being around boats (commercial and recreational), reading, teaching maritime and talking to shipping surveyors, master mariners, brokers and many cruisers/sailors etc. The boat (we almost purchased) was steel with concrete poured in the engine room as ballast. Under the bathroom, hallway and part of the galley cement has been laid up to the depth of 25 mm (it was also under the holding tank). We could cope with the concrete in the engine room as we had access to it and therefore we could remove it. Our concerns with concrete (cement and aggregate (or gravel) makes up concrete), it is strong in compression but weak in tension that is why additives such as aggregate (gravel) is used to make concrete and in building/structural work, the additional use of reinforced steel is used. SisterShip 57

Profile for SisterShipMagazine

Sistership Magazine November 2018 Special  

Written by women for women on the water and their families.

Sistership Magazine November 2018 Special  

Written by women for women on the water and their families.