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good at ‘living’ with family, let alone strangers, we started to practice our French.

Upon arrival to St Jean de Losne we booked into a Gite (self-contained accommodation).

‘Le iceberg.’

The boat went like a dream. The survey went very well, despite the surveyor being dressed like a teenager ready to go skate-boarding. He was thorough with the boat but left us a bit perplexed with some of his answers.

‘Le pointy end.’ ‘Merde.’ (We thought that’d be useful). Plus, Noel had a few German words he could throw-in just to confuse me or them, or perhaps everyone. At least we knew the important words, ‘Je voudrais du vin blanc & bierre, s’il vous plait!’ The owners were sweet people, extremely gracious to invite us on board, and trusting too. However, they thought we should be fluent in French within two-days. If we didn’t understand they would literally shout down our ears. Important aspects of the boat, like start-up procedure, central heating functions etc, were ignored, but detailed training sessions on how to stow the cushions in the cupboard and clean the floor were a daily event! My patience became gossamer thin when I was told I was cutting potatoes the wrong way.

‘What paint do you recommend for the hull?’ Noel asked.

The Surveyor straightened his spine, rolled back his head, looked straight down his nose and replied, ‘I do not know, I am not a painter, non!’ Some expert! That said, he did find the slop in the rudder bearings and shaft – resulting in a new prop shaft and bearings. We were thinking ‘worn key-way’. We didn’t know anything about a NEW prop shaft until it was ordered! We were only the purchasers after all (and we were happy to leave the painting to the professionals at the yard).

Jackie at the helm. SisterShip 56

Profile for SisterShipMagazine

Sistership Magazine November 2018 Special  

Written by women for women on the water and their families.

Sistership Magazine November 2018 Special  

Written by women for women on the water and their families.