Page 1


SIST E RMAG 4 4

the painting

G u st ave C a i l l e b o t te, Fre n c h . Pa r i s S tre et ; Ra i ny D ay, 1 8 7 7. O i l o n c a nva s . 83 1 / 2 x 1 0 8 3 /4 i n . ( 2 1 2 . 2 x 27 6. 2 c m ) T h e Ar t In s t i t u te o f C h i c a go, C h a r l e s H. a n d Ma r y F. S. Wo rc e ste r C o l l e ct i o n .

Gustave Caillebotte


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

D E A R S I S T E R M AG R EADERS, If you believe this quote, the French painter Gustave Caillebotte (1848-1894) must have loved his hometown Paris very much. With the painting »Paris Street; rainy day« he created an atmospheric work, which is, not the least because of its timelessness, the guiding theme of our very first sisterMAG issue in 2019. This year, sisterMAG will be all about art – whether it is paintings, T H E BE ST T H AT sculptures or photography! A N A RT IST GIVE S

»

IS ME RE LY A RE FL E CT IO N O F W H AT H E L OVE S.«

»

Each issue will talk about a piece of art and will see to highlight its time, place, mood, background or other associations to the work from different perspectives.

Our first painting takes us to a rainy day in Paris – which fits E R N S T perfectly with the typical winter E C K S T E I N mood of January days. Wet roads, gray skies and the melancholy after the Christmas holidays – however there is also a certain buoyancy in the air: The days are getting longer again, and the new year offers countless opportunities for new energy, resolutions and fresh ideas. With this idea of fresh energy, the sisterMAG team takes you into the multi-faceted world of art. Our author Christian Naethler explains why patrons of the art who finance artists are more relevant than ever. Our travel expert Sophia Schillik takes us to Paris’ most beautiful corners

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SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019


– even on a rainy day. As one of the most important everyday objects in January, Alexander Kords explains to us the history of the umbrella. However, if you prefer to stay inside in the warmth of your home, we have some fresh ideas for the kitchen as well: sophisticated and French comfort food on rainy days comes from the masterminds of Claudia Gödke, Maria Struck and Lukas Grossmann. And this is the advice we

Sophie

would like to convey with our whole issue: No matter how bad the weather is, how dark your mood appears, or which problems come your way: don’t forget to brighten your day with something nice, whether it’s a great recipe, a beautiful table setting or simply the most adorable cake toppers for your store-bought cake. A rainy day can turn out great after all! We are looking forward to the New Year of 2019 with you as our readers! Enjoy and have fun with our issue.

& THE SISTERMAG TEAM


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

ALL PARIS PICTURES:

PAR IS AS INSPIRAT IO N

Photos from Steffen Sinzinger (Instagram @berlinerspeisemeisterei | @bertbaxter007)

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TABLE OF CONTENT S I S T E R M A G # 4 4 03 07 08 10 12 14

EDITORIAL TABLE OF CONTENT CONTRIBUTORS COVERMODEL PORTRAIT DOWNLOADS THE YEAR 1877 The year Caillebotte painted "Paris street, rainy day"

PAGE 14 - THE YEAR 1877

– PA RIS –

24

BARON HAUSSMANN

32

DIGITAL LADIES TRAVEL

52

THE MOST INSTAGRAMMABLE

How the modern city was born

Paris; rainy day

SPOTS Best tips & secrets in Paris

66

PAG E 100 TABLE OF THE MONTH

THE RISE OF STORIES Technology & Social Media

– CA IL L E BO T T E – A S IMPRE SSIO N IST A N D PAT RO N

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76

ALTE NATIONALGALERIE

80

IMPRESSIONISTS

An Interview with the head of

Rebels of the Art world


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

86

ART FUNDING Why philanthropists should fund the arts

92

FAMILY COMPANY In the age of Start-Up

– T H E PICT URE A S IN SPIRAT IO N –

PAGE 107 - CAKE TOPPER

100

TABLE OF THE MONTH

107

CAKE TOPPER

112

WOMEN & THE CITY

PAG E 132 - CAILLEBOT TESMENU

Ideas & Styling for our table

»Paris on a rainy day«

Female roles in the 19th.

– RA IN Y DAY –

124 127 130 136 156 170 180

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PRODUCTCOLLAGE SISTERMAG COLLECTION PATTERN How to make our cover outfit FROM AWNING TO KNIRPS How the umbrella came to be CAILLEBOTTE'S MENU For rainy days BOUTONNIÈRES DIY 3 Ideas A TRIP ON ICE with Ford IMPRINT

SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019


CONTRIBUTORS S I S T E R M A G # 4 4

TEXT Barbara Eichhammer

the-little-wedding-corner.de Alex Kords

kords.net Christian Näthler

@iamvolta Elisabeth Stursberg

PHOTO & VIDEO Jaclyn Locke

FOOD Maria Struck

jaclynlocke.com

mariastruck.de

Sophia Schillik

Claudia Gödke

sophiaschillik.com

claudiagoedke.com

Steffen Sinzinger

Lukas Grossmann

steffensinzinger.de/blog

lukasgrossmann.de

sisterMAG Team

@lizziemariees Robert Eberhardt

roberteberhardt.com Sophia Schillik

sophiaschillik.com sisterMAG Team

ILLUSTRATION Jessie Kanelos Weiner

jessiekanelosweiner.com

PROOF Ira Häussler

TRANSLATION Alex Kords

Christian Naethler

kords.net

@iamvolta

Ira Häussler

Alex Kords

kords.net sisterMAG Team

Christian Näthler

@iamvolta sisterMAG Team


STYLING Evi Neubauer

pinterest.com/evin

HAIR & MAKEUP Tina Fischbach

tina-fischbach.de

sisterMAG Team

MODEL Dilek Topkara

@dilekerei

THE COVER PHOTOS Jacklyn Locke

MODEL Dilek

OUTFIT Evi Neubauer

MAKE-UP Tina Fischbach


O U R

PORTRAIT C O V E R M O D E L

S I S T E R M A G

DILEK TOPKARA AKA @DILEKEREI

Whether it is on your first day in Berlin or not until after a few months: at some point you have to make your way to Dilek Topkara’s Café in Berlin Wedding. Her career and life path are just as impressive as her sweet creations…

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# 4 4


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

D I L E K E R E I.CO M

creations. The cotton candy cake in our December issue was only one of Dilek’s breathtaking works. As our cover model, she took on a completely different role this time and became a strolling lady in 19th century Paris - with a modern twist of course (you can find the pattern After studying food technology in

for the blue coat here). Thank you

Berlin and spending a research

so much to Dilek for this amazing

residence in England, she specialized

experience! We had a great time on

in “Cake Design“ and worked, for

set and are in love with the results!

instance, in London, New York and Berlin. While she serves sweet treats for a nice coffee or tea session at her own café, some clients such as weddings (or sisterMAG ;)) inspire her to the most wonderful, magical

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Curious to hear more? In our podcast, sisterMAG Radio, we spoke to Dilek about her career and the journey to "Dilekerei"

SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019


DOWNLOADS LIGHT BLUE PALETOT

COQ AU VIN BLANC

APPLE-POTATO TARTE TATIN exklusive in our next newsletter

ÉCLAIRES WITH ORANGE & CARAMEL

CONSOMMÉ

CAKE TOPPER

DIY VIDEOS BOUTONNIÈRE DIY

TERRAZZO NOTEBOOK DIY

COPPER LADDER DIY


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

S T AY I N T O U C H !

FOLLOW US!

Follow along with our stories and daily news from the sisterMAG office easily on Instagram! You can find magazine content, many behind-the-scenes and snapshots of our contributors. And of course, giveaways, invitations and other exclusive activities can be found on @SISTER_MAG.

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D A Y " R A I N Y S T R E E T , " P A R I S P A I N T E D C A I L L E B O T T E

R E S E A R C H :

How was weather in 1877 when Gustave Caillebotte painted our eponymous picture – did it really rain all year in Paris? What happened elsewhere? While some dates and years immediately evoke memories of history lessons, other dates are just an empty shell to us. To fill these dates with life and meaning is the goal of our new series "The Year X". We look back on the years of our art piece's originating year and explore what people were doing in politics, history or literature. A fascinating experiment, as we see after this first episode talking about the year 1877.

T H E SISTER-MAG.COM

&

ELI SAB ET H ST URSBE RG

Y E A R

The Year 1877

T IME T RAVE L L IN G T O

T E X T

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Our painting of #sisterMAG44 was painted in 1877

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Illustration of women in 1877 fashion. Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019


Sketch: The Punch I N

Politics & History On January 1, 1877, Queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India. This officially incorporated India, which at that time included today's India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar, as part of the British Empire. The coronation was preceded by debates in parliament as MPs feared, among other things, that it could effectively be a step towards absolutism. The famine suffered by British India between 1876 and 1878 cast a dramatic shadow over the celebrations.

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Photo: Steffen Sinzinger

PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

In France, political discourse in the spring of 1877 revolves around a conflict whose outcome sets the course for the continued existence of the Third Republic. The conflict arose from disagreements about the distribution of power between the president and legislature, culminating in the Crise du seize mai. New elections would see a Republican defeat of the royalists. Victor Hugo, among others, was vehemently in favour of a parliamentary system that would take precedence over a presidential system – a decision that would mark the Fourth Republic and which Charles de Gaulle immediately reversed in 1958.

I N

Society Between 1877 and 1900, around 7,348,000 people emigrated to the United States of America. Many of them (72% of all immigrants between 1860 and 1900) came from Europe, mainly from Germany, Great Britain, and Scandinavia. There is no doubt that emigration to America was a prominent topic of conversation. Most people know someone who knows someone who has emigrated or is planning to do so. In retrospect, the period around 1877 is seen today as the prelude to the industrial rise of the USA, including the first national strike (Great Railroad Strike). 17

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I N

Music

Recognized today as one of the greatest plays of all time, the premiere of Piotr Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake on March 4 at Moscow's Bolshoi Theatre was largely met with negative reactions. One of the reasons is that some parts had to be simplified as the ensemble did not yet possess the same degree of excellence as it does today. The premiere’s audience, however, could not be deceived, and did not appreciate the musical modifications or sometimes subpar equipment.

Performing Arts

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Photo: Alice Williamson, Staatsballett Berlin

Angela Duncan was born at the end of May in San Francisco and became world renowned as a dancer under the name Isadora Duncan. After leaving the United States in her early 20s, she toured Europe and convinced luminaries like Sergei Diaghilev of her mission to overcome rigid structures in classical dance. Duncan consistently broke conventions both artistically and in her private life, and was therefore often misunderstood, if understood at all, by the public. She would succeed in ushering in a new era for performing arts is regarded today as the founder of modern dance.


Farmhouse in a Whe a

tfield, van Gogh

PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

r The Tulips Field nea onet Hag ue, 1886, M I N

Literature & History

art

Hermann Hesse was born on July 2, 1877 in the small town of Calw in the southwest of the German Reich. Thanks to his German-Baltic father, he was not only a citizen of the Kingdom of WĂźrttemberg, but also of the Russian Empire. A few months earlier, Russia, a world power, had agreed to the Treaty of Budapest with Austria-Hungary. The ensuing developments, namely the Treaty of San Stefano, negotiated with the Western European powers after Russia's victory in the RussianTurkish war created tensions on the Russian side. The First World War is not yet upon us, but some of the differences that led to its eruption are already beginning to emerge.

19

The Impressionist movement took off and, after initial rejection, saw its representatives begin to use the term "Impressionist" as an identifier. The Third Impressionist Exhibition organized by Gustave Caillebotte in the spring of 1877 was a formative event in which all important members of the movement (even from today's perspective) took part.

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H O W W A S T H E

Weather Paris didn't experience any severe weather in 1877, but what was the weather like when Gustave Caillebotte presented his famous masterpiece at the exhibition in April? Was it really raining? It's quite possible that he strolled to Rue de Peletier in the sunshine on one of the exhibition days (or maybe he travelled by train), as historical weather data from the archives of the British Met Office prove. April 3, 1877 in Paris: b-c, according to the Beaufort scale – "blue sky" and "detached clouds".

Publication The first issue of The Washington Post was published on December 6. It still exists today and is recognized as the oldest remaining newspaper published in Washington D.C. It had a decisive influence on U.S. politics over the course of its eventful history – up to the highly publicized takeover by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. The Washington Post was responsible for the publication of the Pentagon Papers in 1971, and the discovery of Watergate the following year. Fun fact: President Theodore Roosevelt was an early contributor to the paper. SISTER-MAG.COM

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Alexander Graham Bell demonstrates his telephone 1877

I N

Research & Technology The age of the telephone is just around the corner in 1877. Alexander Graham Bell had secured the patent the year before after a nerve-wracking race (allegedly, his patent application was received two hours earlier than that of his competitor, Elisha Gray; the actual merit of Bell's invention, however, is has become shrouded in doubt). In 1877, two people first spoke on the phone in Boston as part of an experiment, and the invention spread rapidly. Ten years later, 100,000 people in the United States owned one.

Thomas Alva Edison announced a second groundbreaking invention on November 21, 1877. With the phonograph, he developed a device that could record and reproduce sound. The significance of this achievement should require no further explanation.

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IN THE RAIN SECTION 1 We start this issue with a section dedicated to Paris. The city is the main topic of Caillebotte's painting. In the background, one can f ind a majestic corner house. That is why the following articles are all about the French capital that is beautiful even when the weather is as rainy as in our painting.



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H O W

T H E

M O D E R N

C I T Y

W A S

B O R N

Baron Haussmann

T H E PA RISIA N CIT YSCA PE O F


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

THE PARISIAN CIT YSCAPE OF

Baron Haussmann HOW THE MODERN CITY WAS BORN

In the 19th Century, the Parisian cityscape, then made up of small individual parts, was ambitiously redesigned through the creation of grand boulevards and magnificent squares. A project of this scale would probably make today's landmark preservationists faint, but this reconstruction undoubtedly created the elegant streets that we now connect with the French metropolis. The Impressionists were especially enamoured with the new aesthetic and captured it in their paintings. TEXT ROBERT EBERHARDT

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EVEN ON A RAINY DAY, STROLLING ALONG A PARISIAN BOULEVARD IS ALWAYS, ABOVE ALL, A PERFORMANCE. The straight path of its course, the wide walkways, and the elegant facades with their castiron balcony balustrades appeal to pedestrians with posture and style. It is difficult to rush through this landscape or to dawdle around with one's head down. The boulevard is a catwalk and nowhere else does the dream of liberty, equality, and fraternity ring more true. On Grand Boulevard, Boulevard Malesherbes, or Boulevard Haussmann, every pedestrian is a noble gentleman or sophisticated lady. It's exactly like in the painting by Gustave Caillebotte, which shows a crossroads (Place de Dublin) that is exemplary of the great reconstruction of the capital in

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the 19th century: various streets converge at acute angles, the corners of the buildings rounded. The trio of square, humpbacked cobblestones, granite curbs, and pristine sidewalks that still exist today forms Paris' recognizable face. • The streets along which the subjects of Caillebotte's painting walk were only about 10 years old when work was completed in 1877. Everything was fresh, but Parisians still had the old cityscape in mind, which, especially in the inner arrondissements, remained a relic of medieval planning. A few baroque squares and public spaces were already present, but those long, wide connecting streets were rare. In the middle of the city were slums with barracks, as in the Polish Quarter.

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

source: Bibliothèque nationale de France

It was the radical urban planning of BARON GEORGESEUGÈNE HAUSSMANN (1809-1891) that brought about change and created the heterogeneous version of Paris we experience today: medieval alleyways in the Marais and in the Quartier Latin, baroque showpieces such as the Place Vendôme and the Place des Victoires, and those fantastic 19th-Century boulevards buzzing with bikes and taxis traversing the city.

BARON GEORGES-EUGÈNE HAUSSMANN (1809-1891)

• Haussmann, a lawyer and subprefect of various provincial towns, attracted the attention of the President and Emperor Napoleon III with his successful construction projects. Napoleon

saw in Haussmann a master of organization, and someone who could implement his idealist vision for Paris. In close cooperation with the emperor, Haussmann transformed

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HAUSSMANN'S PLAN OF PARIS

Paris into the metropolis of the industrial age between 1853 and 1870. An increased need for mobility required wide and long roads. But society’s developing modern attitude in every aspect of life also called for complementary streets, lines of sight, and structure. Many old buildings were demolished to accommodate these developments. Haussmann created 150 kilometres of new roads – all of it in record time. • Many poor neighborhoods became

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upscale residential areas of the bourgeoisie due to Haussmann's restructuring. At the same time, Haussmann paid attention to the redevelopment of green spaces, such as the JARDIN DE LUXEMBOURG and the BOIS DE BOULOGNE . He built a new sewage system and improved miserable hygienic conditions. Masterpieces of his urban redesign include the restructuring of the inner city, like RUE DE RIVOLI, along which you can see cross-city past the LOUVRE to the skyscrapers of the high-rise district of LA DEFENSE.

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

is a certain artificiality to the neoclassical facades of the mostly five-storey residential buildings. The monotony of the rows of façades was interrupted with symbolic or functional buildings and small parks. With their yellowish stone exterior, the white, deep-drawn »French windows« (inwardly opening door, but without a real balcony) and iron balustrades, Haussmann's signature architecture lent Paris its recognizable face. Or the lavish order around the opera, or the star-shaped avenues leading to the PLACE DE L'ÉTOILE , as well as the area around the SAINT-LAZARE railway station. • Haussmann had the new streets lined with uniformly designed multi-storey houses in a classical style. Although the Academy of Arts was involved in the process, and the design corresponded with the strictly elegant Parisian style, it's hard to deny that there

• Such a radical rearrangement of a city that had grown over centuries certainly did not happen without resistance. Even then, there were objections regarding the preservation of historical monuments as many original buildings were destroyed (they were at least documented thanks to the advent of photography). Many inhabitants also had to leave their old houses to be resettled and fell victim to real estate speculation. Others were eagerly awaiting expropriation

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BOULEVARD HAUSSMANN, PARIS

in order to receive compensation payments. Many of the city’s artists immediately moved into the houses of the new spacious streets: EDOUARD MANET, CLAUDE MONET, GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE, STÉPHANE MALLARMÉ. MARCEL PROUST also lived in a typical Haussmann building on Boulevard Malesherbes. Here stood his bed, which he hardly left and in which he wrote renowned literature like »IN SEARCH OF LOST TIME.«

1871 France lost the FrancoPrussian War, and Napoleon III went into exile. Thus the Haussmann experiment was over. He was accused of enriching his personal wealth through the project. What remained was the unmistakable character of the new metropolis of Paris, which radiated architecturally all over the world. No one before (except the Romans) had implemented such a complex urban project

• SISTER-MAG.COM

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

light vibrated through the urban jungle. Paris' revamped setting was the object through which the Impressionists were able to prove themselves, and Claude Monet, for example, undoubtedly lived up to his own claim:

within three decades. Later, Mussolini would commission the Via della Conciliazione from the Tiber river to St. Peter's Square, and Hitler began the first demolitions for massive new buildings in Haussmann style in Berlin to outdo the French Baron.

»I WANT THE UNATTAINABLE. OTHER ARTISTS PAINT A BRIDGE, A HOUSE, A BOAT, AND THAT'S THE END. THEY ARE FINISHED. I WANT TO PAINT THE AIR WHICH SURROUNDS THE BRIDGE, THE HOUSE, THE BOAT, THE BEAUTY OF THE AIR IN WHICH THESE OBJECTS ARE LOCATED, AND THAT IS NOTHING SHORT OF IMPOSSIBLE.«

• The IMPRESSIONISTS captured Paris’ makeover through their paintings. Incorporating both lucid and washed-out lighting was not only their artistic goal in the open air, but also in the new city streets thanks to the new ways

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PICTURES OF A METROPOLIS. THE IMPRESSIONISTS IN PARIS

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S I S T E R M A G

T R A V E L

S E R I E S

Paris; Rainy day

DIGITA L L A DIE S T RAVE L


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

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Digital Ladies Travel sisterMag Travel Series When I arrive at Gare du Nord, heavy drops of rain crash down from the Parisian sky. As if the weather Gods knew that my program for this extended weekend trip includes plenty of cafĂŠ and restaurant hopping, cultural discoveries, a bit of strolling and shopping, and a lot of exploring. It takes me five minutes and a noisette to rearrange myself and allow for the initial disappointment to give way to rushing anticipation. Of course, every traveler wants sunshine, but nothing can spoil my mood. "Je m'en fou," smiles an elegant French woman next to me ("oh, what the hell") as she wraps her scarf around her perfectly styled hair and jumps out into the rain. She's right. Paris is also beautiful in a downpour. T E X T

&

P H O T O S :

SO P HI A SCHI LL IK

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Helló

s ée d I es D et n ai P u D ie Boulanger

RUE YVEC TOUDIC "Deux croissants et un pain au chocolat, s'il vous plaît." With wet shoes but shiny eyes, I stand in line for 15 minutes and wait patiently for my turn. The small bakery »Boulangerie Du Pain et Des Idées« in the 10th arrondissement has a reputation for offering the best baked goods in the city, perhaps even in all of France. It is no longer an insider's tip, especially since American food journalist David Lebovitz declared this hot spot as his personal favourite. It doesn't just attract tourists from all over the world, but also Parisians themselves, who have fallen for Christophe Vasseur's great breads and heavenly viennoiseries. I definitely recommend trying the sweet buns with pistachio and dark chocolate, as well as the almond croissants. 35

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Flower Shops All of Paris is in absolute flower fever. At all corners, in all arrondissements, it blooms and sprouts, bouquets are bound, and wreaths are woven, ferns and mosses are showcased in majestic glasses. Are they florists or artists? Their works are transient, but full of magic and delicacy.

• PEONIES A little less lavish, but just as authentic, is the atmosphere at »Peonies« on the trendy rue du Faubourg

Saint-Denis.

Barista

culture and floral passion meet here in the city's first "café fleuriste." The feminine interior with a turquoise tiled counter, lots of light wood, rosé

• NUE ATELIER

and brass-coloured elements, as well as the concept itself, is the work of DJ

The young florist Claire Boreau

and model Clémentine Lévy. The menu

is a shooting star in the scene.

includes beautifully arranged avocado

She set up Nue Paris, her floral

tartines, creative salads, warm soups,

atelier, in her grandfather's old

granola with fruit, delicious cakes,

painting studio and turned her

matcha lattes, and, of course, the best

fascination for flowers into her

coffee. And when you pay, you can take

profession and vocation.

a few new green roommates with you.

NUE ATELIER FLORAL

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Fle a Market

PEONIES

More he about t aris P f o y r h i s to lea F n e u S a i nt O HERE t e k r a m

Paris without a flea market is like a candlelight dinner without champagne. Sure, it's possible, but it's just not the same. The Marché aux puces de Saint-Ouen is located at the northern edge of Paris, in the 18th arrondissement, and features countless covered stands with small, picturesque backyards spread out over 15 different sections. You'll find all kinds of trinkets and junk, but also real rarities and antiques – from high-quality furniture to crockery, cutlery, and decor from bygone eras. The world's largest flea market (12,000 square metres) and also the oldest flea market in France; people have been digging, trading, and haggling here since 1885.

HOW TO GET THERE Take the Métro line 4 to Porte de Clignancourt. From there, walk about 10 minutes north under your umbrella. Attention: The flea market is only open on Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and again from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

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Best Patisserie What would life be without chocolate? Or macarons? Or cakes? Definitely meaningless. And Parisians know that. The gourmet capital boasts chocolatiers and pâtissiers like sand on the sea.

SOPHIA'S FAVOURITE One of my favourites is the Chocolaterie Cyril Lignac. A rainy day presents the perfect excuse to treat yourself to one of the serotonin seductions of the star chef and restaurateur's cocoa factory. His cafĂŠ-chocolaterie on the Rue de Chanzy in the 11th arrondissement makes fans of brown gold blush. The stylishly illuminated bar and dreamy tiled floor are real eye-catchers, while the beautifully packaged bars make for a wonderful gift. I highly recommended taking a break from the outdoor showers with some dark chocolate with sesame seeds and green tea or milk chocolate with marshmallows and caramel. SISTER-MAG.COM

CYRIL LIGNAC 38


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

O/HP/E

The patisserie O/hp/e on rue du Château d'eau is a concept store, café, and workshop all in one. In the back, you can shop tableware and pretty home accessories, and in the front you can enjoy a view of the street with a café crème, cafe au lait or cappuccino. There are also some delightful pastries to indulge in.

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n i a r e it p es d g n i ee ts h Sig 4 ROUES SOUS 1 PARAPLUIE Literally a perfect fit for a rainy day, 4 roues sous 1 parapluie ("4 routes under an umbrella") puts you in the passenger seat of an old Citroën 2 CV as the guide navigates along a predetermined route highlighting the most important hotspots of the city. Bonjour, Arc de Triomphe. Salut, Notre-Dame. Coucou, Moulin Rouge! We jump from one spot to the next and, keeping dry, pass all the must-sees: the Champs-Elysées, the Place Vendôme with the Victory Column, the Tuileries Gardens, the Palais de Justice, and so on. There's even time for a brief stop at the Eiffel Tower. Finally, when the rain decides to take a break, we get out for a short visit to the Basilica Sacré-Cœur in Montmartre. Take in the majestic view from the steps and, even higher up, from the dome of the iconic pilgrimage church, which is accessible via a stone spiral staircase. You'll be hardpressed to find a better view of the Parisian cityscape.

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• JA


ARDIN DES TUILERIES

PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

• EIFFEL TOWER

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Best Lunch?

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Hotspot hopping creates an appetite. But where to start in a city like Paris? After all, temptations beckon at every corner. Croque monsieur. Moules frites. Steak tartare. Oysters. Rilettes. And cheese, cheese, cheese. The real, the really good, and the new, innovative French cuisine, however, takes place off the beaten track.

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

MOKONUTS

Make stop at Mokonuts in the 11th arrondissement,

where

Omar

Koreitem and Moko Hirayama serve a delectable lunch from Monday to Friday. Vegetables, meat, and fish are transformed under the creative fingers of the gastro couple into delicious dishes

somewhere

between

Orient and Occident, prepared simply but always with a creative twist. Freshness and taste are the name of the game.

in the 10th arrondissement is what they call a real institution. Natural wine fans and fans of standout authentic Parisian bistro cuisine have been making their way here for over 18 years. The scenery is très sympa: A bit loud, a bit narrow, a bit rustic, without big fuss and decidedly real and honest. The evening's à la carte offering is a real treat, while a cheap formule du midi presents itself at noon. Le

Verre

Volé

LE VERRE VOLÉ

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Dinner / Casual Fine Dining Septime is a gastronomic surprise in the city, and getting a table is by no means a guarantee. Bertrand Grébaut made his purist approach to new French cuisine known within a short period of time. In spite of earning a Michelin star, the small restaurant in the 11th arrondissement is very casual; there are neither white tablecloths nor ostentatious dishes. Rather, you'll experience a firework of tastes at, for a restaurant of this category, absolutely affordable prices. Ingredients are the star here – fruit and vegetables from organic farms, and meat and fish from sustainable sources. Grébaut serves them as natural as possible, yet always refined. It's a fine balance of aromas and textures woven into a harmonious whole.

SEPTIME

• MARCHÉ DES ENFANTS ROUGES SISTER-MAG.COM

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Of course, Paris is not just a gourmet city, but also a fashion capital.

Shopping GALERIES LAFAYETTE

I usually only visit the Galeries Lafayette to admire its breathtaking Art Nouveau architecture – it always fascinates me. Apart from that, my heart belongs to small labels and pretty boutiques, where I always find what I’m looking for. Keep an eye out for Des Petits Hauts, Sessun, Petit Bateau, French Connection, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Zadig et Voltaire and La petite francaise.

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Must-see Museum Rainy days are also perfect for long museum visits.

• LOUVRE

A trip to the Louvre is of course an absolute must. Europe's largest museum comprises works of all eras and categories, from paintings to drawings, sculptures, ceramics and archaeological finds.

CENTRE POMPIDOU

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For lovers of modern and contemporary art like me, the Centre Georges-Pompidou with its top-notch exhibitions is the place to be. The futuristic, fascinatingly idiosyncratic architecture alone makes a detour to the 4th arrondissement worthwhile. From the outside, which seems more like an industrial plant than a cultural establishment, you'd never guess which wonders await inside. One enters the revolving gates and is pumped up the pedestrian tube by a conveyor belt into the control centre. Once at the top, worlds open up. There's so much to see that you could easily spend several days here – especially when it's raining. The opening hours present the only obstacle: the Centre Pompidou carefully regurgitates you again at 9 p.m.

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Sunday Brunch

Parisians love a good weekend brunch, whether it's sunny, rainy, stormy or snowy. The hottest addresses are usually booked weeks in advance, so a little planning goes a long way.

• KUBE HOTEL The Kube Hotel in the 18th arrondissement not only offers perfect scrambled eggs, fresh rolls, ham, cheese, fruit, juice, hot

and

cold

snacks,

and

never-ending coffee, but also an unparalleled urban jungle feeling. Oh, and you can also spend the night there, of course.

KUBE HOTEL CAFÉ CANNIBALE

• CROISSANTERIE

• CAFÉ CANNIBALE "Brunch tous les dimanches" is also the motto of Café ­Cannibale crew. On Sundays from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. they serve avocado and salmon toasts, Eggs Benedict, cakes, and granola exactly to my taste.

• BOULANGERIE LIBERTÉ

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Retracing the past "On y va", says the gravedigger, half Pole, half Frenchman, handing me his umbrella and running ahead courageously. He's my guide for an hour and a half, taking me through Paris' largest and most famous cemetery »Le Cimetière du Père-Lachaise«. While I was completely disoriented before, he now leads me from gravestone to gravestone gesticulating and explaining wildly. I observe the resting sites of Frederic Chopin, Oscar Wilde, Claude Chabrol, Edith Piaf, Maria Callas, Molière, Balzac, and many other renowned personalities. He finally leads me to Jim Morrison, by far Père-Lachaise's most visited place of pilgrimage, which I would certainly have overlooked without my guide. Despite the many flowers and candles, the small grave lays inconspicuously in the shade of high columns. I stand there for 10 minutes with a racing heart and a song by The Doors on my lips.

• LE CIMETIÈRE DU PÈRE-LACHAISE

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Thanks so much to Sophia Schillik, who bravely visited Paris during rainy days. We are already looking forward to the next issue when »Digital Ladies Travel« takes you to Spain!

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B E S T

T I P S

&

S E C R E T S

the most instagrammable Spots

PA RIS FO R FO T O GRA FE R & IN STAGRA MME R


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

PARIS IN PHOTO THE MOST INSTAGRAMMABLE SPOTS IN PARIS WE ALL KNOW THEM: PICTURE-PERFECT BLOGGER IMAGES FROM PARIS - FROM ENJOYING MACARONS IN FRONT OF THE EIFFEL TOWER TO A LOVELY PICNIC BY THE THEM? That is what we asked two Paris loving pose to get the most iconic sights in frame - and yourself of course! Dana Berez and Emily Mandagie share their best tips and secrets for you to recreate instagrammable pictures on your next trip to Paris.

Sourcing FRANZI

WINTERLING

53

Photo back: Steffen Sinzinger

instagrammers. Where to stand and how to

SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019

Photo front: Kinga Cichewicz on Unsplash

SEINE. BUT HOW DO YOU ACTUALLY TAKE


the most i n sta grammable S p o ts

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in Paris


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Could you please introduce yourself briefly?

Dana Berez

Dana Berez! I’m a Wisconsin Native who moved to New York City 7 years ago to to pursue my passion for travel, culture, and photography. My blog is centered around New York City featuring travel guides and itineraries, as well as travel reccomendations from other cities around the world. How would you describe your relationship with or feelings towards Paris?

The first word I think of when I think about Paris is: Romance! Paris is such a classic city with old school charm. The architecture reminds me of an old film. The energy of Paris is truly unique spot

@danaberez

TROCADERO

PLACE DU TROCADÉRO 75016 PARIS What are your three most instagrammable locations in Paris?

TROCADERO. This is THE iconic place for the perfect Parisian photo. If you want to capture the Eiffel Tower, this would be my first recommendation. Because this location is very popular amongst tourists, I’d recommend getting there early to have the location to yourself.

@ danaberez

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spot

LOUVRE MUSEUM: The contrast between the opulent architecture vs the modern pyramid is just beautiful. There are also so many fun angles to shoot this location. I loved going there at night because there was less people around, and the photos had a beautiful contrast of light and darkness.

LOUVRE MUSEUM Rue de Rivoli, 75001 Paris

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

@ danaberez

How do you approach people to take your picture?

spot

Fortunately, I have a photographer, Alesnio, who takes my photos. If you don’t have a photographer, I would recommend using a tripod, then you could frame your own photo and not have to worry about asking others.

MONTMARTRE

75018 PARIS MONTMARTRE: I have to add Montmartre, one of the trendiest neighborhoods in Paris. The Sacre Coeur is the main attraction to the area, but you must explore around it. You’ll find cute cafés like: Le Maison Rose or Le Consulat where artists of the 19th century would hang out.

Where do you find new spots or inspiration for poses?

I like to find inspiration through other bloggers via Instagram or Pinterest. I also like looking through magazines for new ideas and poses.

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Emily MAndagie @themandagies

spot

Could you please introduce yourself briefly?

EIFFEL TOWER

My name is Emily Mandagie and I am a travel blogger in Washington, USA.

Champ de Mars, 75007 Paris

@ themandagies

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

I love that the city has a consistent aesthetic: history, luxury, and elegance are found in every corner of Paris!

My focus is on outdoor adventures and lifestyle photography. I aim to inspire my readers and followers to travel to beautiful places, and give them useful photography advice for each location. You can find me and my husband at our Instagram @themandagies!

What are your three most instagrammable locations in Paris?

My three favorite places to shoot in Paris are the LOUVRE, THE EIFFEL TOWER, and the ARC DE TRIOMPHE. They are my favorite because they are easily recognizable as symbols of Paris, and are beautiful from every angle!

How would you describe your relationship with or feelings towards Paris?

My first trip to Paris, France was to shoot an international wedding with my husband! We traveled around the city scouting beautiful locations and landmarks to bring the couple.

spot

ARC DE TRIOMPHE Place Charles de Gaulle, 75008 Paris

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@ themandagies

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

spot

LOUVRE Rue de Rivoli, 75001 Paris

How do you approach people to take your picture?

If you are traveling solo and want your picture taken, here are some tips. Always give your camera to a person who is traveling in a group or with their family. If you have a camera with specific parameters, tell them where you would like them to focus and if you want the photo as landscape or a portrait style. Make sure to ask politely, say thank you, and offer to take a picture of them in return! Where do you find new spots or inspiration for poses?

I take a lot of my inspiration from Instagram, other blog posts, and locals! On instagram, I use the “Saved� feature and create a folder of posts with beautiful locations in Paris to refer to later. In the city, I ask locals for their favorite coffee shops and lesser-known locations for new perspectives of Paris. I also just like wandering the streets and stumbling upon a hidden corner or new shop!

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PARIS ON INSTAGRAM

ACCOUNTS

@ parisinfourmonths

CARIN OLSSON

Carin Olsson moved from Sweden to the city of her dreams, Paris. For a lot more than the four months suggested by her user names, she shares her experiences with her followers from cafĂŠs to palais.

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

@ lostncheeseland

@ parisjetaime

LINDSEY TRAMUTA

Whether

it

is

The official Instagram

her

account by the Paris

podcast and book „ T H E

NE W

PA R IS “

Instagram

or

Tourist Office reposts

her

the

Account,

beautiful

images that are tagged

which seems to be a

with #PARISJETAIME –

true love letter to the

therefore, the account

city – Lindsey Tramuta

as well as the hashtag

is an all-round Paris

are worth checking out

expert!

for your next trip!

@ yleniacuellar

@ seemyparis

This photographer is

This account is hosted

not just worth a follow

by a team of Paris lovers

for

who – as you can tell by

streetstyle

sure that she will find

city through their eyes.

the

The result are beautiful beyond

her

photography – can be

the name – show us the

moments

most

most

beautiful,

pastel-coloured

the

buildings in Paris and

main attractions.

around the world.

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#

HASHTAGS

#PARISCAFE

Parisian street cafés are almost as iconic as the Eiffel Tower itself – you can find locals’ and visitors’ favourites here.

#FALLINPARIS

even though it won’t be fall in Paris for a while, this hashtag is certain to make you long for colourful leaves and strolling along the Seine through a chilly breeze. Until then, make sure to check out

#WINTERINPARIS , #SPRINGINPARIS and #SUMMERINPARIS for travel inspiration whenever you next go to Paris!

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

#MYLITTLEPARIS

a popular hashtag in particular amongst instagrammers that will definitely help you find your next picturesque photo spot.

#PARISLIFE

for everyone who misses all of Paris right now, this # is for you. It shows Paris at all seasons, with all its charme – from the Eiffel Tower to Disneyland.

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Text:

&

S O C I A L

M E D I A

In early December, Thea and I were guests at the ISSUU Generator Summit in New York City, a conference for publishers, activists, content creators, and change makers – basically, all the »generators« who create content today.

T E C H N O L O G Y

The Rise of Stories

W HY ST O RIE S A RE IMPO RTA N T T O T E L L – O N E VE RY PL AT F O R M

ANTONIA SUTTER

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»The Rise of Stories« was a major theme at the conference. Two recent developments have helped accelerate the trend: On the one hand, we are increasingly on the lookout for exciting stories that are well researched and passionately created in an era of lurid headlines and fake news. On the other hand, platforms like Snapchat and Facebook's Instagram have released story functions that allow us to think, tell, and share content in fast-paced, narrative formats. Stories evolve simple snapshots of life towards a more curated form of expression that combines photos, videos and texts.

We t o o k t h i s o p p o r t u n i t y t o e x a m i n e t h e »Stories« Phenomenon more closely and explore the various platforms that offer Stories features. This led to a conversation with Anne -Laure Joliot, an ISSUU expert and product manager who is responsible for the development of ISSUU's Stories feature.

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stories need to be told

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1 Source: Recode [https://www.recode.net/2018/10/30/18044962/facebook-stories-business-user-growth-q3-earnings-zuckerberg]

The Basics

H o w d i d Âť S t o r i e s ÂŤ o n S o c i a l M e d i a s ta r t ? It all started in 2011 with Snapchat, which invented short videos that disappear after a while and can be enhanced with text, filters, and GIFs. Five years later, Facebook copied this functionality for its photo-sharing app, Instagram, and quickly made it omnipresent. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently predicted that people will post more stories than photos from their Facebook and Instagram profiles in the near future. It's easy to understand, then, why Stories is such a big hit for the company.

W h i c h p l at f o r m s o f f e r a S t o r i e s f e at u r e ? Which are the most popular? Most of us will be familiar with the Stories features of Snapchat and Instagram. However, Facebook, WhatsApp, and Messenger also have their own Stories functionality. Facebook is the only company that has released metrics for its various platforms: WhatsApp Status boasts 450 million daily users, followed by 400 million Instagram Stories users. Around 300 million users are active on Facebook and Messenger Stories every day.1

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Filters & masks Open Instagram. Click on the camera icon on the top left of your home screen.

[1]

Content will only be shown to selected friends which you can choose in your settings.

Tap once for photo. Hold button for video.

[2]

Format-Options – i.e. a repeating »boomerang«, »just« text or video/photo = Normal

[3]

Content will be posted to all of your followers. Will be public in your profile + appear in the stories icons

How do Stories work? H o w d o I p o s t a S t o ry ? The functionality varies between Instagram, Facebook, WhatsApp and Messenger. The foundation are essentially photos and videos played in the chronological order in which they were uploaded. Every individual part of the sequence stays online for 24 hours before disappearing. At the beginning, it was only possible to post content recorded from a user’s in-app camera. This was expanded soon after to include the ability to upload content from one’s entire photo and video library. Photos and videos uploaded as part of a Story can be modified with

special filters and masks. It’s also possible to include text, hashtags, polls and geotags. Users are notified of new Stories by an eye-catching circle around the profile photo of a user who has updated their Story. An algorithm determines which profiles, and in turn which stories, appear at the top of your Facebook, Instagram, or Messenger app based on how likely you are to be interested in the content. The »Direct« function gives users the ability to react to Stories with emojis or comments.

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How do the Stories functions differ b e t w e e n t h e s e p l at f o r m s ? Instagram Stories has evolved especially rapidly over the last two years. Highlights, for example, allow users to recall previously disappeared Stories and give them a permanent home on their profile. Business accounts, meanwhile, are able to include swipe up links to their Stories. This makes it possible to direct traffic directly to one’s website or online shop.

Facebook’s Group Stories functionality presents a completely unique offering. For example, anyone attending an event can contribute to a shared story feed hosted on the event page. The organizers of the event have the advantage of being able to moderate the contributions.

2 Source: https://blog.hootsuite.com/ snapchat-instagram-facebook-stories/

W h at a r e s o m e c o m m o n a p p l i c at i o n s f o r S t o r i e s ? These days, the possibilities are endless! Hootsuite has provided a comprehensive breakdown of when and for whom each platform is suitable in an article titled »Snapchat, Instagram Stories, or Facebook Stories—Which is Right For You?«2, Snapchat performs best among the 13-to-18-year-old crowd, especially for spontaneous, behind-thescenes content. Instagram attracts an older demographic (19-49) and is particularly adept for Q&As. Facebook, meanwhile, is used by all demographics and has a stronghold on events.

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

HOW CAN YO U F I LL YO U R ED I T O R I AL ST O RIE S CA L E N DA R?

Ideas for Stories Anyone who wants to fill and curate an Instagram account – whether for personal reasons or in professional life for a brand – quickly realizes how much »content« is needed to fill Instagram/Facebook/ Whatsapp Stories day in and day out. Therefore, here is a first small collection of ideas for your editorial calendar. There will be even more ideas, tips and hacks in #sisterMAG45!

[1]

[2]

[3]

[4]

Tu t o r i a l s Whether it is photos or more elaborate videos: How-To Tutorials and Step-by-step instructions are super interesting and are well received in Stories. Whether it is beauty, DIY or food: There is no tutorial that won't find its followers!

Example sisterMAG

B e h i n d -T h e - S c e n e s You built a great light reflector for your photo shoot? Only a small corner of that DIY tutorial was clean and around it was pure chaos? This content now has a designated place in your stories reel! And we promise: people will love it!

Example a n n s t re e t s t u d i o

The newest news Discount codes, special promotions or news in your life: The Stories format makes news more personal and will let them appear even more »in the moment«. In addition, Business Accounts offer the very practical Swipe-Up function to access other sites or URLs directly from your story.

L i s t s a n d To p 1 0 What already works like a charm on Pinterest or on your blog will prove itself in the stories as well: Share the 10 best restaurants in your city or Top 5 outfits for your favourite Fashion item. Such content is also perfect for saving in your Highlight reel.

Example The Bucket List Fa m i l y

What ideas do you have? On sister-mag.com, we will start an article about keeping up with your Stories editorial calendar. Your ideas can be included!

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I SSU U ST O R I ES

Third Party Apps offer first solutions W h et h e r In st a g ra m , Fa c eb o o k, Me s s e n ge r, o r W h a t s Ap p, p u b l i s h e r s a n d c o n te n t c re a to r s a re re q u i re d to p ro d u c e S to r i e s t h a t fi t t h e st r u ct u re o f e a c h re s p e ct ive p l a tfo r m . Everyone working in Social Media or working on a brand account knows hoch much extra work goes into the content for stories. has encountered this problem first-hand with its generators, which prepare content as long-form magazine articles but also want to share

it with readers via Snapchat or Instagram Stories. We talked with Anne-Laure Joliot about ISSUU Stories. It is a tool that will help publishers to spread their content on any platform's Stories format more seemlessly and with less effort to create the content.

How do ISSUU Stories work? Content available on ISSUU can be transformed into a mobile story using the ISSUU Stories Tool, which converts the magazine PDF into a mobile-friendly format. Three templates (Voice, Inspire, Connect) are used to compile images and videos from the PDF into a story with a user's own fonts and design elements. There is also the possibility to add additional information.

H o w c a n I S S U U S t o r i e s b e i n t e g r at e d i n t o t h e S t o r i e s o f o t h e r p l at f o r m s ? ISSUU Stories will be created in such a way that they can be used as a basis for sharing across all story-

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[below: Example for an ISSUU Story, generated from pictures and texts of a magazine article]

relevant platforms. The first integration will be for Instagram Stories.

How will ISSUU Stories develop in the future? The new ISSUU Stories feature is already a further development of ISSUU Mobile Articles, which are available today and give ISSUU publishers the opportunity to convert their content into a mobilefriendly format. These mobile articles can be shared directly on Instagram from the ISSUU app.

Tools like the new ISSUU Stories format will make it even easier to prepare longer articles for sharing on social media and story platforms. They combine the two initial reasons behind the Âťrise of StoriesÂŤ: We are increasingly interested in exciting content, which we search and find more and more on Stories platforms.

73

Do you have questions about the Stories functionalities of the various platforms mentioned? Feel free to ask us via email at mail@sistermag.com or direct message on Instagram or Facebook. We will answer them in the second part of our Stories Special in sisterMAG 45!

SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019


S e l f p o r t r a i t f r o m 1 8 9 2


SECTION 2

IMPRESSIONIST & PATRON Front and centre of our second section is the painter Gustave Caillebotte. Born in 1848 in Paris, he was a major influence on the new arts movement, impressionism. As a collector and patron of the arts he supported young artists tremendously. And there are many more facets to his life that inspired the following articles.


17.05 – 15.09.2019

I N T E R V I E W

W I T H

D R .

R A L P H

G L E I S

A lt e N at i o n a l g a l e r i e , B e r l i n

A N

Alte Nationalgalerie

IM PRE SSI ON IST M A ST E R PIE CE IN BE RL IN . TA L KIN G T O T H E T H E H E A D O F T H E

G U S T A V E C A I L L E B O T T E . T H E P A I N T E R P A T R O N O F T H E I M P R E S S I O N I S T S

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© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Maximilian Meisse


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Situated

on

the

famous

Berlin Museumsinsel, the Alte

Nationalgalerie

premiere about

an

the

will

exhibition

Interview: Carolin Kralapp

impressionist

painter Gustave Caillebotte

Dr. Gleis, who was Gustave Caillebotte?

on May 17 2019 – including the sisterMAG title painting

The French artist GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE (1848-1894) was the silent force amidst and behind the Impressionists. He supported his painting colleagues financially and collected their work. As a patron, he organised and financed the first Impressionist exhibitions. His own paintings have unjustly been forgotten for a while…

»Paris Street; Rainy Day«. The painting is a part of the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago and has rarely been to Europe since

its

origination

in

Paris. One of many reasons to take the chance and see it soon! Talking Gleis,

to head

Dr. of

the

Ralph

What makes »Paris Street; Rainy Day« from 1877 an Impressionist icon?

Alte

Nationalgalerie, we found out some background scoop

At the ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO , this painting takes centre stage in one of the

about Caillebotte and the upcoming exhibition…

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»… Gustave Caillebotte was the silent force amidst and behind the Impressionists. «

© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Maximilian Meisse

What else will be on show at the special exhibition »Gustave Caillebotte. The Impressionist’s Painting Patron.«? Can you tell us something about the structure of the exhibition?

most impressive Impressionist collections outside of France. Even though Caillebotte’s paintings don’t depict impressions in the strict sense of the word. His trend-setting painting with its near life-size people and the unconventional point of view was first presented at the third Impressionist exhibition in 1877 and has lost none of its suggestive drawing power. Caillebotte’s independent interpretation of Impressionism excites with a striking closeness and the bold choice of framing.

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The focused exhibition will show three aspects 01 | Caillebotte as a painter of

modern urban life. 02 | Caillebotte’s main work is

the »SPECIAL GUEST« among the Impressionist collection of the Nationalgalerie and gives us the opportunity to show the network between him and his friends MONET, RENOIR and DEGAS .

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Gustave Caillebotte, French. Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877. Oil on canvas. 83 1/2 x 108 3/4 in. (212.2 x 276.2 cm) The Art Institute of Chicago, Charles H. and Mary F. S. Worcester Collection.

03 | The parallels between

REVOLUTION and WORLD WAR

Caillebotte‘s goal to establish Impressionism in PUBLIC COLLECTIONS and HUGO VON TSCHUDI , who started realising this goal in his buying strategies at the ALTE NATIONALGALERIE in 1896 .

1 , between CLASSICISM and SECESSIONS .

The harmony between our collection and the museum buildings is unique. Next to one of the first museumowned collections of French Impressionists (including work from MONET, CEZANNE, VAN GOGH and MANET ), we have paintings and sculptures by ANTONIO CANOVA,

A final, general question: what is on show at the Alte Nationalgalerie in Berlin at the moment? The Alte Nationalgalerie has an extensive collection of art from the periods between the FRENCH

CASPAR

DAVID

ADOLPH

MENZEL

FRIEDRICH,

and MAX

LIEBERMANN.

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H I S T O R Y A R T

IMPRE SSIO N IST S

rebels of the art world

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HOW A GROUP OF DEFIANT PA I N T E R S B R O K E F R E E F R O M THE C O N F I N E S O F C O N F O R M I T Y

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

Text: CHRISTIAN NÄTHLER

It all started with a dinner party. In attendance were the artists Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, Alfred Sisley and Édouard Manet. The year is 1877. You can already imagine that this was no ordinary gathering.

LOOKING AT IMPRESSIONIST ART MAY NOT EVOKE THE SPIRIT OF REBELLION, BUT THE ARTISTS OF THIS 19TH CENTURY MOVEMENT WERE DECIDEDLY DEFIANT WITH THEIR WORK. LED BY THE PATRONAGE OF

Indeed, even grander than the guest list was the agenda of the evening’s host, Gustave Caillebotte. Much like his guests, Caillebotte was a painter who had begun to dabble in a new form of expression: impressionism. Armed with riches from the family business he inherited, Caillebotte wanted to set a new course for modern French art. Pissarro, the most senior member of the group, would serve as the ambassador

GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE, THE EARLY IMPRESSIONIST ARTISTS – INCLUDING REVERED NAMES LIKE CLAUDE MONET, AUGUSTE RENOIR, AND CAMILLE PISSARRO – TOOK A STAND AGAINST WHAT WAS DEEMED ACCEPTABLE BY THE FRANCE’S ART AUTHORITY, THE ACADÉMIE DES BEAUXARTS. OUR AUTHOR CHRISTIAN NAETHLER EXPLAINS HOW CAILLEBOTTE, MONET AND CO. STARTED A PERIOD OF UNPRECEDENTED CREATIVITY.

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Société for this new movement while Caillebotte played the role of financial patron. It was the beginning of a conspiracy. As masterful as their work was, the impressionist artists were still very much outcasts in France’s rigid art world. This world was dictated by the Académie des Beaux-Arts, an academic association that set the standard for the style of work that was deemed acceptable to be a representation of French art. Since realism was the form du jour, there was very little room for impressionist artists to be recognized. This was especially true at the Paris Salon, the Académie’s flagship exhibition and biggest commercial stage for aspiring artists at the time. The Salon was painfully conservative and die-hard status quo. So many

SISTER-MAG.COM

ANONYME

paintings were turned away by the Salon in the mid-19th century that Emperor Napoleon III created a Salon des Refusés, which displayed all of the works rejected by the Salon’s jury. The impressionists, meanwhile, laid the foundation for their own forum. This actually happened three years prior to Caillebotte’s dinner party, when 30 fellow impressionists, including some of the evening’s attendees, exhibited their work under the autonomous Sociètè Anonyme des Artistes Peintres, Sculpteurs, Graveurs, etc., free from the shackles of government and jury. Two years later, a second showcase of the sort would take place, albeit with fewer exhibiting artists than the inaugural edition. Caillebotte debuted at the second gathering, and while it didn’t show any more

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PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

PARIS STREET– RAINY DAY, 1877 GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE

promise than the first, he must have sensed enough potential to orchestrate five more such events.

»Impressionism; it is the birth of light in painting.«

The third event, in April of 1877, a few months after the dinner party, exhibited 230 works and drew around 15,000 visitors. Monet showed 35 works; Caillebotte showed six, including his iconic Paris Street: A Rainy Day. Perhaps most significantly, an identity began to form around the series. Caillebotte marketed the third event as the »Exhibition of Impressionists«. The term

ROB ERT D EL AUNAY

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(Salon de Paris) UN COIN DU SALON EN 1880 ÉDOUARD JOSEPH DANTAN

» Since the appearance of impressionism, the off icial salons, which used to be brown, have become blue, green and red…«

»impressionist« had already been coined, albeit as an insult. Here, in an empty apartment financed by Caillebotte, it was a loud and proud boast. While the remaining Impressionist Exhibitions – in 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, and 1886 – failed to expand the scope or prestige of Caillebotte’s vision, they set a precedent for what was possible outside the federal gatekeepers

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BOULEVARD HAUSSMANN, 1880 GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE

of fine art. The Salon’s stronghold waned as other independent associations provided a platform for artists to exhibit their work. New galleries opened and a wave of young impressionist painters rose to prominence despite a lack of coherence in the movement. By 1890, the Salon was effectively dissolved.

foundation for the avant-garde. Compare impressionism with its predecessor, realism, and then with the art movements that followed in France: symbolism, fauvism, cubism, surrealism. Such drastic swings in style had never been seen before. And it all started with a group of painters who dared to defy academic art.

Peak impressionism lasted less than two decades, but it laid a

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A R T S T H E

Why

Philanthropists should fund

F U N D

why Philanthropists should

A RT FUN DIN G

T e xt : Chr is tian Näthle r

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the

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IN THE ABSENCE OF PUBLIC MONEY, IT`S UP TO PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS TO SUPPORT CREATIVE EXPRESSION.

The act of philanthropy can be understood as wealthy individuals contributing money to something considered for the good of humanity. This could mean a cause dedicated to alleviating poverty, or expanding access to healthcare, or improving the environment. But what about the advancement of arts and culture? With public funding for the arts often shrinking or inadequate, it’s imperative for philanthropists to recognize the importance of creative expression.

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YOU WOULDN,T HAVE DISCOVERED ANY OF THIS AT THE SALON, OF COURSE. FUNDING ART IS THEREFORE ALSO AN INVESTMENT IN EDUCATION, AS WELL AS A CALL FOR CRITICAL THINKING.

It’s easy to understand why philanthropists might feel less inclined to fund the arts than, say, cancer research or schools in underdeveloped countries. Philanthropy is, after all, a contribution to the greater good, and it takes a little finesse to recognize the greater good of being a patron for creative expression. Plus, there’s usually a degree of self-interest beneath the altruism. A philanthropist may ask themselves which cause

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presents the best optics, or wonder about the impact of their contribution. You’d be a hero if your contribution restored the world’s rhino population, and there’s a tangible way to gauge your return: either there are more rhinos, and your donation was worth it, or there are less rhinos, and you can move on to the next cause. When it comes to the arts, these things are more difficult to quantify.

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There is a very strong case for private financial contributions to the arts, of course. Let’s rewind a century and a half for some inspiration. In the French art world, a single entity, the federal ACADÉMIE DES BEAUX-ARTS , had the authority to determine which art was acceptable and which was not. If a painting appeased the academy’s committee, it would be exhibited at the PARIS SALON , the most prestigious marketplace for art in the world. The jury was decidedly conservative, and a very narrow

range of works were admitted. Dismayed by the state of things, painter GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE took it upon himself to advance a new manner of interpretation in art: IMPRESSIONISM . Not just through his work, but also with his money. The beneficiary of a considerable family fortune, Caillebotte funded exhibitions of impressionist art to give artists like CLAUDE MONET and PIERREAUGUSTE RENOIR a stage. Perhaps more importantly, the public was treated to new forms of interpretation and creativity.

FINANCING INDEPENDENT ART – THE IMPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT – DISSOLVED THE POWER OF AN ARTISTIC OLIGARCHY AND OPENED THE GATES FOR THE AVANT-GARDE.

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France ACADÉMIE DES BEAUX-ARTS

ÉDOU ARD JOSEPH D ANTAN, UN COIN DU SALON EN 1880

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Now, let’s take this example and draw some modern socio-political parallels where the stakes are bigger than mere artistic oppression. In conservative societies, art allows for fringe subcultures to thrive where they otherwise can’t. Criticism, skepticism, and freedom of expression are integral to healthy societies. If these groups can’t exercise such liberties in the political arena, it’s crucial that they can do so through other platforms – galleries, musicals, theatre. Only then can we expect to gain a better understanding of society’s full spectrum of opinions, wants, needs, and interpretations.

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Furthermore, art is a permanent public record. While history books can gloss over inconvenient nuances, the same cannot be said about art. For example, many would consider Paris’ ambitious urban renewal project starting in the mid-19th-century to be an indisputable triumph. But look closely at how Caillebotte portrayed his subjects on those grand new boulevards – they are estranged by the change, their faces cast to the ground in seeming despair. Perhaps we can gather that rapid modernization left a trail of silent victims; that there is something to learn for the future. You wouldn’t have discovered any of this at the Salon, of course. Funding art is therefore also an investment in education, as well as a call for critical thinking.

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Art lends a voice It exhilarates. Think briefly about to the oppressed, how your life would look in the encourages civic absence of art. Design, writing, e n g a g e m e n t , movies, photography, music, builds community dance, theatre – all of these art bonds, and can forms contribute to the vibrant reveal the devil communities that everyone should in the details – traits have the right to participate in and essential experience. These expressions of strong liberal allow us to form bonds and better democracies. Add understand other cultures. We to that the purely would be a pretty dull population recreational element participating in if the only thing that defined us of the discourse of human were industry and tech. imagination and there’s a pretty strong case to be made that the arts are a worthy E N C H . PA R I S S T R E R F , E T E T; R OT B E L AINY L investment. CAI D LASTLY, ART IS JOY.

GU

E V A ST

A Y,

187

7

OIL ON C ANVA S. 212.2 X 276.2 CM, THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHIC A GO, CHARLES H. AND MARY F. S. W ORCESTER COLLECTION.

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I N

T H E

A G E

O F

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Fa m i ly C o m pa n y

L IFE A S


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S F A S

I S T E R M A G O U N D E R N T O N I A U T T E R :

This past August, I published an article ON LINKEDIN about launching a startup as a family. I was very surprised by the interest in the topic and the positive feedback on our approach. It had always seemed to me that although many mid-sized companies are run by families, family-run startups with digital business models are rarely in discussion. The feedback on my article was an occasion for me to pay more attention to startups that have been or are being built by families. The result is a list of exciting companies that we want to present to you in sisterMAG 44. After all, Caillebotte was also part of a founding family (see page 77). Afterwards we want to answer some questions concerning starting a company as family. This time Thea answers some questions. Which questions do you have for us? You can send them to us HERE.

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1

Drybar is a California-based chain of hair salons that focuses exclusively on different blowout styles. The company was founded in 2008 by Alli Webb and her brother Michael Landau. Since founding they've opened up more than 37 locations and employed over 2,200 people – among them also Webb's husband Cameron as Creative Director as well as Landau's wife Sarah. If you want to know more about the importance of Alli’s family in the creation and development of Drybar, check out the Second Life podcast, Episode 20!

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WWW.DRYBAR.COM thedrybar thedrybar Second Life Podcast Episode SISTER-MAG.COM

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Co-founded by husband and wife duo Carley Roney and David Liu, "The Knot" is a website focused on all things marriage. It is based on 18 years of startup and married life. As the two recently revealed in the NPR podcast "How I Built This", the couple's family background has harmed their fundraising efforts. On the other hand, being a married couple has bound them closer together as they have a unique understanding of the crazy life of a startup.

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theknot NPR "How I built this" Podcast

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Foto: Brooklyn Community Foundation

SLIDESHARE.COM

Slideshare is a platform to easily share presentations. Founded by Rashmi Sinha and supported by her brother, Amit Ranjan, Slideshare was sold to LinkedIn and integrated into its offering in 2012.


4

Opinary's debate tools allow users to share their opinions about online content. Fifteen of Germany's largest online news publications and international editorial offices already use Opinary. This makes the public’s positions more visible and shows opinion trends. Two of the three founders are the brother and sister duo Pia and Cornelius Frey.

Siblings Cornelius & Pia Frey

Co-founder Max Meran

WWW.OPINARY.COM

Careship offers hourly care for senior citizens and people in need of care. Siblings Antonia and Nikolaus found inspiration for the idea in their own family when their grandmother became in need of care and they could not find a suitable nurse. Antonia considers the special trust and openness that she associates with her brother as advantages for founding a company as a family.

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A company founded by two brothers, their father, and stepmother? This special constellation is the basis for the success of Math24. The tutoring app explains difficult mathematics tasks step-by-step – so successfully, in fact, that the family behind the Klett-Verlag bought the company and then sold it again to Chegg for 20 million EUR shortly afterwards.

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SECTION 3

AS INSPIRATION In our third section, we take a closer look at the painting itself. We use its colours and shapes to put together our ÂťTable of the MonthÂŤ, create adorable cake toppers f rom elements in the painting and f ind out more about women's roles in cities during the 19th century.



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& S T Y L I N G

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T A B L E

Table of the month

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THe Table I N S P I R A T I O N

&

S T Y L I N G

Christmas and New Year's Eve are

inspired by the topic of our current

over. After the festive season we are

issue. For the start of 2019, we were

looking for a little more clarity and

inspired by the Caillebotte painting.

minimalism on our tables! Sparkly

Not only does it establish the blue

ornaments and golden details are

and turquoise colour palette, but also

being stored away for now.

makes for a beautiful background

In our series »Table of the Month«,

element - how do you like it?

Sophia and Thea

we regularly show you ideas and inspiration for tables and parties –

Minimal Times 1 5

M I N U T E

T A B L E

S E T

An evening with friends can be a perfect reason to set a beautiful table - without spending hours decorating it. Our tip: Stick to one colour scheme when selecting or buying fabrics and dishes. That way, you can easily mix and match the individual elements.

An eyecatcher

Twig instead of bouquet

A few It-pieces can be all you need for a lovely table. Invest in a pretty caraffe or a unique wine cooler. Even if you then pick your »every day« dishes and silverware, you can achieve a sophisticated look and feel.

Don't get us wrong: we always love an exuberant bouquet! But when there is no time or money for that, a few twigs of eucalyptus or a single flower can be just as effective. Don't forget to look around your own home or garden: even feathers or other unusual souvenirs can make a great impression.

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S e rv i n g P l at e »Organic« in black by Kare Design | 4,90€

Silverware in black at H&M Home, from 9,99€

Glasses in a smokey grey | H&M Home | 4,99€

S l at e p l at e 30cm from Genware | around. 10€

P l at e s & Bowls DINERA series in petrol | IKEA | 2,99€ and 1,99€

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Inspired by a painting We were inspired by our issue's painting, but you can easily do it in your home as well: Do you have a prominent painting or poster in your living or dining area? Take it as inspiration for shapes and colours on your table!

Carafe self cooling ceramics by Magisso | around 50€

Wine cooler self cooling ceramics by Magisso | around. 60€

Linen napkin Dark Petrol | H&M Home | 4,99€

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Cheese, wine and a tasty soup – that can be all it takes for a great night with friends!

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#sistermagDIY

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Please have some cak

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J E S S I E

K A N E L O S

W E I N E R :

CAKE TOPPER ÂťPARIS ON A R A I N Y D AY ÂŤ Something we all need on a grey

season or our issue's painting.

and rainy day? CAKE! And since

And of course, you will be able

we all love cute cake toppers, we

to download them for free on our

want to start a new series this

website or as an exclusive goodie

January. In each issue, artists or

as part of our newsletter, as it is

illustrators will help us create

the case this time!

cake toppers inspired by the The illustrator Jessie Kanelos Weiner is a Franco American illustrator, author and food stylist, who lives and works in New York and Paris. She works for clients in the fields of gastronomy, travel, lifestyle, architecture and pop culture. Jessie has been part of the sisterMAG network since 2013 when she illustrated the table of contents for our 10th issue (check it out here) Download the toppers: just subscribe to our newsletter!

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VANILLEKUCHEN M I T

B U T T E R C R E M E - F Ü L L U N G

I N G R E D I E N T S

THE NIGHT BEFORE SERVING Step 1

FOR THE CAKE 225 g soft butter 300 g caster sugar

6 large eggs

350 g plain flour 1 / 2   t s p b i c a r b o n a t e o f s o d a 250 g plain fat-free yoghurt

Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C Fan/gas mark 4/350ºF and put a baking sheet in at the same time. Butter or oil a large, round tin (2.5 litres capacity / 2½ quart capacity) very, very thoroughly. (you can use oil-sodden kitchen paper.) Step 2

4 tsp vanil la extract

FROSTING 100 g soft butter 100 g icing sugar (sieved) 100 g soft cream cheese Optional: dried cornflower & berries

Either by hand or in a freestanding mixer, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, whisking each one in with a tablespoon of flour. Fold in the rest of the flour, and add the bicarbonate of soda, the yogurt and vanilla extract. Don't overbeat or the cake will rise too much, giving an overly-domed bottom later - though it's not the end of the world, as you can always trim it if necessary. Step 3

Pour and spoon the mixture into your greased tin and spread about evenly. Place the tin on the preheated baking sheet in the oven and cook for 45–60 minutes until well risen and golden. After 45 minutes, push a skewer into the centre of the cake. If it comes out clean, the cake is cooked. Let it sit out of the oven for 15 minutes. Step 4

Let your cake cool down over night. SISTER-MAG.COM

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FOR THE FROSTING Step 5

Cream the butter until light and fluffy. Carefully add the icing sugar. Finish off with the cream cheese and cream the mixture for a little bit. A S S E M B LY Step 6

After your cake has cooled down over night, cut it into three layers.

FOR THE CAKE TOPPER Subscribe to sisterMAG Newsletter and simply get the free illustration via eMail. Download PDF and print on a sturdy paper (at least 250g/ m2). Cut out all elements. You can either use the line of the illustration or leave a little border (approx. 3mm). Glue the elements on toothpicks with a piece of tape and stick into the cake. SISTER-MAG.COM

Place the top layer on your serving plate upside down and spread about 1/3 of the icing. If you like, you can decorate the edge with cornflowers. Step 7

Put the bottom layer on top of the first one, decorate with frosting and flowers. Step 8

Finally, place the middle layer on top of the other two, and spread the rest of the icing on top. Decorate with berries and carefully insert the cake topper.

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George Sand, Photograph by Nadar

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women & the city

FE MA L E RO L E S IN T H E 1 9 T H .


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Women & the city of the 19th century How department stores and literary salons changed gender roles

�

I WA N T E D T O B E A M A N I N S O FA R A S I C O U L D E N T E R R E A L M S A N D M I L I E U S T H AT W E R E C LO S E D TO M E A S A WO M A N G E O RG E S A N D

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In the 19th and early 20th centuries, some courageous women like French writer George Sand or Vita Sackville-West dared to exchange their skirts for grey suits and dressed like men in order to freely walk the urban streets of Paris and London. They transgressed spatial as well as legal boundaries, as wearing men’s clothes as a woman was strictly prohibited in Paris at the time. How did women eventually succeed in coming out to the European cityscapes legally? A little overview.

Georg Sand 1864

S S E PA R A T E SPHERES

Vita Sackville-West, by William Strang, 1918 SISTER-MAG.COM

At the beginning of the 19th century, city spaces, public life, and the workplace were regarded as predominantly male domains. According to such a bourgeois ideology of separate spheres, women of the middle classes were restricted to the home. The contemporary ideal of femininity was Patmore Coventry’s »ANGEL IN THE HOUSE«, a domestic angel who devotedly cared for the family and home. Making it even more complicated was the fact that women who dared to move around 114


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W O M E N W H O DA R E D T O M OV E A R O U N D T H E URBAN STREETS WERE REGARDED AS EITHER M O R A L LY E N DA N G E R E D O R DA N G E R O U S .

Rue de Sèvres, 1892

the urban streets were regarded as either morally endangered or dangerous. If they wished to spend some time in the city, they had to be accompanied by gentlemen, chaperones, or servants. For women who were seen wandering the urban streets were mostly considered to be prostitutes or »FALLEN ANGELS«, i.e. the Other of the bourgeois gender norm. In Paris and London, prostitution turned into a mass phenomenon at the end of the 19th century. In 1887, 80,000 prostitutes are said to have been working in London’s West End. But prostitution had nothing to do with free movement in the city: the women had to register with the police and health offices, as well as sticking to strict clothing regulations. Even the places where they could go were controlled.

T THE RISE OF THE D E PA RT M E N T STORES The rise of urban consumer culture and department stores such as LE BON MARCHÉ (1838) on the RUE DE SÈVRES in Paris contributed largely to the fact that women could more freely frequent the urban streets. As the world’s first department store, Le Bon Marché offered its female customers

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public spaces within the city where they could spend time without male company and outside their domestic spheres. With their rise, department stores helped to normalise the image of women on urban streets during the 1850s and 1860s. Stores like Galeries LAFAYETTE in Paris (1895), KADEWE in Berlin (1907), and HARRODS (1884) in London’s WEST END became popular daytime destinations. Tour guides recommended places in London where »ladies could eat lunch when they are without the company of a gentleman« as early as 1870. Thus, shopping itself turned into a public leisure activity for bourgeois women. When they walked the urban streets, they filled the city topography with cultural meaning and conquered the commercial marketplace. Walking can be seen in this context as an act of cartography with one’s feet. As French sociologist HENRI LEFEBVRE explains, the city is a space which is actively constructed and created by our social activities. In this vein, women shopping created the cityscape by walking.

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S SHOPPING ANGELS & THE MODERN CITY This was made possible by the emergence of semi-public spaces within the cities such as cafés, ladies’ tea rooms, and the most intimate space of all: womens’ public toilets. The opening of the LONDON TUBE (1863) and PARIS MÉTRO (1900) further supported this development. Though women in Paris had to wait until the turn of the century for ladies’ restrooms to open, ARISTIDE BOUCICAUT offered a crèche in his Bon Marché to make shopping as pleasant as possible. A new target group had been found: THE FEMALE MIDDLE CLASS. Critics, however, regarded the comfy interiors of the department stores as a continuation of the private sphere, a »home away from home«, so to speak, where the »SHOPPING ANGELS« still adhered to the bourgeois ideology of domesticity

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GALERIES L A FA Y E T T E , 1 9 1 4

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Salon de Madame Geoffrin, 1755

TO BU Y S O M E T H I N G A N D TO S E L L O N E ’ S B O DY WA S O N E A N D THE SAME IN THE I M A G I N AT I O N O F 1 9 T H C E N T U RY M E N .

and were considered morally endangered. To buy something and to sell one’s body was one and the same in the imagination of 19th century men. Shopping was often associated with a sexualised femininity, which was underlined by the immediate geographical proximity of department stores to brothels. In London, for instance, the shopping district was almost next to the red-light district in Regent Street and Burlington Arcade. Thus, the modern city was imagined with the help of opposing discourses: On the one hand as a pulsating landscape of modern consumer culture, and on the other as a Victorian Babylon that put innocent women in sexual danger. SISTER-MAG.COM

T THE SALON AS F E M A L E C U LT U R A L S PA C E The literary salon was for aristocratic women what department stores were for women of the middle class. In general, the literary SALON was a place of female culture, where guests got together under the direction of a woman, the SALONNIÈRE, for educated conversation. CATHERINE MARQUISE DE RAMBOUILLET was regarded as the founder of the

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salon tradition. When she invited her guests to the Parisian city palais in 1610, she opened the first literary salon and founded a public space as an alternative to royal court: There was witty conversation, music, poem recitals, and small performances. Although the salonnières were themselves aristocratic, they lead their salons according to the principles of equality and

liberty. During the 18th century, philosophers, literates, and artists like VOLTAIRE and DIDOT loved to socialize in the salons of Paris and laid the intellectual basis for the FRENCH REVOLUTION. Thus, the salon also established new gender spaces, which empowered women from a political and intellectual perspective – notably at a time when women were not seen as equal.

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Natalie Clifford Barney, Portrit by Alice Pike Barney, 1896 SISTER-MAG.COM

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R REBELLIOUS SALONNIÈRES During the 19th century, sociocritical writer GEORGE SAND used her literary salon as an adequate forum where she could voice her socio-political and feminist thinking. Rebel through and through, she broke with many gender stereotypes of the time: She was regarded as unconventional, illicitly smoked cigars in public, wrote under a male pseudonym, and loved to stroll around the streets of Paris in men’s clothing. As ancestor of the COMTE DE SAXE, she was herself aristocratic but moved in the circles of Paris’ bohemian society. Her salons in the French capital, as well as at her country estate in NOHANT-VIC, were popular gathering places for well-known novelists such as HONORÉ DE BALZAC, GUSTAVE FLAUBERT, and ALEXANDRE DUMAS, as well as composers like FRANZ LISZT or FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN, with whom she had a love affair. Salonnières such as GEORGE SAND, MARIE

D’AGOULT, and MATHILDE BONAPARTE were so very popular during the 19th century that they gave women unprecedented cultural significance. Parisian salons were prevalent until the 1960s, like the literary salon of the USAmerican author NATALIE CLIFFORD BARNEY. She was well known at the time for her lesbian love relations and used to assemble famous European writers like DJUNA BARNES, GERTRUDE STEIN, COLETTE, RAINER MARIA RILKE, EZRA POUND, and ISADORA DUNCAN. Until today, the literary salons of the 19th century exert great fascination. Despite all class and gender boundaries, men and women came together to have educated conversations. To be visible as woman and walk the urban streets is still a highly relevant aspect in the 21st century, as the women’s marches in Washington, New York or London in 2017 have shown.

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Whether it is a cozy coat for wet days, the perfect menu which could have almost been written by Caillebotte himself or the most beautiful fashion items that protect you f rom wind and cold - this section gets you all prepared for gloomy, rainy January days

DAYS IN JANUARY SECTION 4



ZARA

Slightly transparent raincoat 49,95 EUR Rain Coat with detachable hood RAINS

Curve rain jacket 100 EUR With a slightly A-shaped cut and tie belt

W E A T H E R P R O O F

Even on rainy days, these accessories and fashion pieces make it possible to endure the weather outside. Our editorial team shows you their favourite items to stay warm and dry!

COS

Tie-Up Hood 49 EUR A versatile accessory HUNTERS

Smartphone Bag 80 EUR With water-repellent leather and five card slots, perfect for festivals SISTER-MAG.COM

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HUNTERS

Original short tour rubber boots 105 EUR Boot socks from 20 EUR M.A.C

In Extreme Dimension Waterproof Mascara 26 EUR

COS

Classic Wool Beret 29 EUR Minimal seams for a clean finish and a full lining STELTON

To Go Click in Petrol 24,95 EUR Perfect for keeping your beverage warm while on the go

ARKET

48-Hour weekend luggage 79 EUR

Not enough inspiration? Discover the most beautiful umbrellas and umbrella DIY's in the sisterMAG issue N°35 »Mary Poppins«

Made of a durable and water-repellent Nylon shell fabric SKAGEN

Aaren Kulør

Clic k H ERE 

99 EUR 125

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O U T F I T C O V E R O U R M A K E T O H O W

SIST E RMAG CO L L E CT IO N PAT T E RN

The Coat

P h o t o s : J AC LY N L O C K E Design & Pattern: EVI NEUBAUER Ha i r & Ma ke u p : T I N A F I S C H B AC H Model: DILEK TOPKARA

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A CO AT F OR RAINY (AND COLD) DAYS Wrap yourself up in a cuddly but yet elegant coat – this can definitely sweeten up January and take the cold from a rainy day! Always striving for new beautiful patterns, our fashion director Evi Neubauer created this new coat pattern with a striking collar. Best worn pulled back a little or snuggle up in the big collar. Whether it is paired with pants or a skirt, whether you choose a light turquoise like us or a more muted colour – this coat will complete every outfit and will bring you many years of enjoyment! D O W N L O A D P A T T E R N 4 4 / 1

The beauty lies in the detail: Old buttons give the coat individuality and special value. Maybe you'll find them in the attic of your grandma or a store for vintage goods. Flea markets usually sell great buttons. Or you simply look for »old buttons« on ebay – real treasures can be found there as well!

Do not be afraid to wear coloured accessories! A great hat or long, colourful leather gloves help to lift the mood on gray days. And of course they look amazing.

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B E T O C A M E U M B R E L L A T H E H O W

from awning to Knirps

SISTER-MAG.COM

TEXT ALEX KORDS

MILLIONS OF UMBRELLAS ARE SOLD EVERY YEAR – NOT BAD AT ALL FOR A PRODUCT THAT INITIALLY WAS DEVELOPED AS PROTECTION AGAINST THE SUN AND WAS REJECTED ENTIRELY BY MEN AND ENGLISHMEN. It’s so calming to experience rain from inside! It gently ripples against the window and slowly runs down the glass. But it gets unpleasant as soon as we have to go outside. Of course, we can always wear a rain coat. But what if we are surprised by rain? Hopefully, we have a small, practical helper with us: an umbrella. Usually, it is folded in the handbag. But until it reached this handy format, it had to undergo an eventfulhistory.

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UNWIELDY SUN PROTECTION The umbrella was invented about 4,000 years ago in China –not as protection against rain but against the sun. Also, it was more of an awning several servants carried over the ruler to provide shade. At least as important as its function was its impact: Only the most powerful man in the state is protected from the sun and seems even bigger and more sublime because of the richly decorated canopy. However, the antique model wasn’t handy at all since it was made of bamboo canes covered with oiled paper or palm leaves. Soon, there were versions one person could carry but they still were heavy. From Far East, the awning came to Persia and then to Europe. In Ancient Greece, it was unmanly to use it, which is why only women and their female slaves used it. Only in a short phase between 505 and 470 BC, awnings were part of rich men’s equipment.

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SISTERMAG 44 | 01 / 2019


PRA CTIC AL BUT HEAVY It took a while until awnings were also used as rain protection. Around 800 AD, the abbot ALCUIN OF TOURS sent a »protective roof«, as he called it, to the bishop Arno of Salzburg. However, the umbrella wasn’t common at all back then. In the Middle Ages, it didn’t prevail because when there was a dispute, it always incapacitated one hand. Only when the merchant JEAN MARIUS from Paris invented a foldable umbrella at the beginning of the 18th century, the practical piece became suitable for daily use. However, the construction made of wooden sticks and whalebone that were covered with waterrepellent cloth still weighted five kilograms.

SISTER-MAG.COM

k COMPETITION FOR CARRIAGE DRIVERS

Interestingly enough, the Englishmen who are constantly plagued by rain initially refused the umbrella. When the travel writer JONAS HANWAY came back from Paris around 1750 with an umbrella and was the only man in London who carried one, he was mocked. The Englishmen antagonised the Frenchmen and didn’t accept that an English gentleman walked through the streets of London with a French invention. But it mainly were the drivers of carriages who treated

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Hanway with hostility. When it rained, they had a monopoly on dry transportation because their carriages were covered. They considered Hanway and his umbrella bad for business, which is why they threw garbage at him. One driver even tried to run him over. On this occasion, Hanway turned the weight of his umbrella to account and beat up the disgraceful driver. Soon, the Englishmen recognized how incredibly handy an umbrella was against permanent rainfall.

And it was an Englishman who gave the umbrella the light steel frame we know today. SAMUEL FOX was the name of the man who brought the final breakthrough for the umbrella in 1852. Over time, the design of the handle became a veritable art. Ivory and silver, bamboo and leather – there was barely a material that wasn’t used for it. Also, clever craftsmen incorporated items like watches, torches and pillboxes into the handle. Really practical was the development of the automatic umbrella in the middle of the 19th century. After pressing a button, it opened automatically – a technology we still use today.

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THE BIRTH OF THE KNIRPS

HANS HAUPT

© KN IR PS GM BH | KN IR PS .C OM SISTER-MAG.COM

k

Somehow, it’s due to the First World War that umbrellas fit in a handbag today. HANS HAUPT from SOLINGEN was injured in the war and, subsequently, wasn’t able to carry his walking stick and his umbrella at the same time. This made him think about a possibility to put an umbrella into his pocket. He equipped it with a telescopic frame so he could push it together into a handy format. In 1928, he applied his invention for a patent, four years later, the businessman Fritz Bremshey started the series production. Despite a rather hefty price of 12.50 Reichsmark, the KNIRPS (German for »tot«), as the umbrella was called, became a bestseller. Even though the competitors used slogans like: »A LORD WITH AN UMBRELLA, A TOT WITH A KNIRPS«, business continued to prosper. Until today, about 200 million copies were sold all over the world. Even JOHN F. KENNEDY, BEATRIX OF THE NETHERLANDS and POPE BENEDICT XVI. purchased some. 134


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© K N IR P S G M

CHEAP FROM FAR EA ST

However, the cult brand struggled when cheaply produced umbrellas from China emerged in the 1960s. They were sold for little money and overstocked the market. Until today, China is by far the biggest producer of umbrellas in the world. About 98 per-cent of all umbrellas sold in Germany are from China. There are more than 1,000 factories for umbrellas in the city of Shangyu alone. The average price for an umbrella is under five Euros today, around

B H | K N IR P S .C

OM

a third is even free of charge – thanks to the advertising industry. Who thinks that the design of the umbrella couldn’t be enhanced is wrong. The US-American patent office employs four staff members who only examine the thousands of patent applications dealing with umbrellas. Recently, the entrepreneur Alan Kaufman developed the NUBRELLA – an umbrella whose frame is buckled onto the shoulders. You see: It’s still possible to redesign this everyday object.

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CA I L L E B OTTE'S

MENU F OR RA I N Y DAYS

N° 44 L'ENTRÉE

P L AT P R I N C I P A L

P 130

P 136

Ta r t e Ta t i n Coq au vin PHOTOS Claudia Göd ke claudiagoed ke.com

DESSERT

P 142

STYLING Maria Struck mariastruck.de

RECIPE & FOOD Lukas Grossmann lukasgrossmann.de

M A N Y T H A N KS T O Soeur Maison for the wonderful props

soeur_maison

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ONION & MUSHROOM CONSOMME W I T H

B A G U E T T E

A U

C O M T É ,

P I C K L E S

I N G R E D I E N T S 1 bunch of red radishes 1tbsp mild white wine

METHOD

TIME

S ERV ES

STOVE

45 MIN

4

vinegar 2tbsp brown sugar

Step 1

250g brown button mushrooms

10g dried porcini 4 red onions of 80g each

Clean the radishes and cut into thin slices, halve or quarter. Add sugar, vinegar, a pinch of salt

1 0 0 m l d r y w h i t e w i n e

and 2 tbsp of water and leave

5 0 0 m l v e g e t a b l e b r o t h

to marinade.

1 bayleaf Step 2

3tbsp butter 1tbsp olive oil

Halve the onions, peel and cut

100g smal l king oyster

into thin strips. Clean the button

mushrooms

mushrooms and remove the

Fr e n c h b a g u e t t e

bottoms of the stalks. Cut into

150g Comté

thin strips.

1 b u n c h c h e r v i l

Step 3

Melt 1 tbsp of butter and 1tbsp of olive oil over medium heat, add the onions and mushrooms. Cook until they have a nice, golden brown colour.

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Step 4

Add the white wine and cook until the alcohol has evaporated

Step 6

– the mixture will caramelise. Add the broth and 250ml of

Take the baguettes out of the

water, crumble the dried porcini

oven, grate half of your cheese

into the broth and let simmer

over the top and toast again for

with a lid on a low heat for 45min.

3-5min.

Step 5

Step 7

15min before the mushrooms

Season the soup with salt and

are done, pre-heat the grill of

pepper, grate the rest of your

your oven to 200°C. Cut 4 slanted

cheese

slices of baguette (1cm wide)

garnish with radishes.

over

the

toast

and

and butter them. Toast under the grill for 5min.

Step 8

Serve the soup with toast and chervil.

BON APPETIT

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THE MAIN COURSE IT MOST CERTAINLY IS THE FIRST DISH YOU THINK OF, WHEN YOU HEAR "FRENCH CUISINE": THE COQ AU VIN. SISTERMAG TAKES ON A CLASSIC.

Coq au Vin is a classic recipe for poultry and one of the French national dishes. Poultry and chickens have always been an affordable animal with little need for caretaking. That's why the chicken is one of the main meat suppliers for the French nation but also many other European countries for centuries. The popularity of chicken as a meal has therefore produced numerous preparation possibilities. SISTER-MAG.COM

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C O Q AU V I N B L A N C G L A Z E D

C A R R O T S A N D J E R U S A L E M A R T I C H O K E , D U K K A H & C A R R O T G R E E N

I N G R E D I E N T S

8 0 0 g c h i c ke n d r u m s t i c k s 1 onion

METHOD

TIME

S ERV ES

STOVE

50 MIN

4

2 s t i c ks o f c e l e r y

200g small button

Step 1

mushrooms

2 5 0 m l d r y wh i t e wi n e 5 0 m l Pe r n o d

5 0 0 m l c h i c ke n s t o c k

1 b ayl e a f

1 c l ove

1 sprig

o f t hym e

100ml cream

1 b u n c h of carrots with green tops

2 0 0 g Je r u s a l e m a r t i c h o ke

Separate the chicken legs into 3 equal pieces. Fry on medium heat in 2 tbsp of olive oil. Season with salt. Step 2

Peel the onions and cut into small cubes. Wash the celery and remove woody

parts.

Cube.

Clean

the

mushrooms and halve or quarter depending on their size.

1 lemon Step 3

5 t b s p o l i ve o i l

2tbsp butter

1 t b s p s u ga r

2tbsp cornstarch

2 t b s p D u k ka h ( E g y p t i a n

In another pot, heat 2 tbsp of olive oil over medium heat and sautĂŠ the vegetables for 5min.

spice/nut mix)

Step 4

Take the chicken out of its pot and add to the vegetables. Add white wine to the chicken pot and bring to a boil. Add this mixture, the Pernod and chicken stock to the vegetables and chicken. If necessary, add water

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to cover the chicken. Add spices,

season and keep warm.

thyme and pepper and cook for 1-1.5hrs until the chicken almost falls off the bone.

Step 8

Add the cream to the chicken

Step 5

and bring to a boil. Stir the starch

Wash the carrots, clip the green tops and boil in salty water for 3-5min until al dente. Rinse them

into a smooth paste with 2 tbsp of cold water and mix into the

with cold water and put aside.

sauce. Grate 1 tbsp of lemon zest

Do the same to the Jerusalem

and use it to season the sauce

artichoke.

with salt and pepper. Step 6

Step 9

Take a couple of carrot green leaves, wash thoroughly and

Marinade the carrot greens in

throw away the rest.

lemon juice, olive oil and some salt.

Step 7

5min before the chicken is done,

Step 10

heat a big pan over medium heat, melt the butter and add the vegetables, 2 tbsp of water and sugar. Glaze the vegetables,

Plate the Coq au Vin alongside the

vegetables,

dukkah

and

greens.

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A P P L E - P O TAT O TA R T E TAT I N W I T H

R O Q U E F O R T

I N G R E D I E N T S

3 small apples

500g small potatoes

2 t b s p b r own s u g a r

1 r o l l o f s h o p - b o u g h t p u ff pastry

1 c l ove o f ga r l i c

B u t t e r

&

F R I S E E

Step 1

Wash the potatoes and boil in salted water for 15-20min. Drain and let sit. Step 2

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C fan. Caramelise the sugar in a 30cm nonstick pan and take off the heat. Halve

Ro q u e fo r t

the potatoes and apples and place

1 h a n d f u l l o f c r e s s

them in the sugar without space in between. Add some small knobs of butter. Season with salt and pepper. Step 3

TIME

S ERV ES

30 MIN + 30 MIN BAKING

4

Cut a 30cm circle out of the pastry. Put on top of the apples and potatoes and press down lightly. Put the pan on the centre shelf of your oven and bake for about 20-30min. Step 4

Take the pan out of the oven, let cool for a couple of minutes and then turn it out onto a plate. Step 5

Add the cheese onto the hot tarte and garnish with cress.

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ECLAIRES WITH O R A N G E A N D CA R A M E L

I N G R E D I E N T S PA S T RY

450ml water

METHOD

TIME

FOR

OVEN

60 MIN

16 PIECES

170g brown butter 200g flour

5 eggs

C R E M E P AT T I S I E R E

250ml milk

1 organic orange

Step 1

1 organic lemon

3 egg yol ks

To make the Creme Pattisiere, pour

75g brown sugar

20g flour

10g starch

the milk in a pan, add 1 tsp of lemon zest and 1 tbsp of orange zest. Bring to a boil, put to the side and let sit for 10min. Step 2

4 0 0 m l h e a vy c r e a m 1 s a c h e t v a n i l l a s u g a r

4EL Caramel Creme or Dulce di Lecce

Whip the yolks with the sugar. Add flour and starch and stir until smooth.

1 - 2 E L h e a vy c r e a m

Step 3

Stir while adding the warm milk, then put the mixture back into the pan and heat while stirring vigorously until the mixture thickens to a pudding-like texture. Pass through a fine sieve and cover with cling film with little holes pricked into it.

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Step 4

Step 7

To make the pastry, bring water,

Pipe the batter into 12cm strips

butter and a pinch of salt to a

with a space of 4cm between

boil. Reduce the heat and slowly

them. Brush with egg wash and

add the flour while whisking

bake for 30-35min or until crisp

quickly to avoid lumps. Stir

and risen. Don’t take the eclairs

with a wooden spoon to keep

out of the oven while soft or they

the thickening mixture from

will collapse.

burning.

After

5-10min,

you Step 8

should get a thick, shiny pastry with a light brown layer at the bottom of your pan.

Whip your cream and vanilla sugar and put the mixture into a piping bag with star nozzle. Mix

Step 5

Put this „burned“ pastry into a

the caramel with a little cream.

bowl and let cool for 5min. Whisk up the eggs in a second bowl. Slowly add the egg mixture to the pastry while stirring with an electric whisk. Mix until all lumps are gone and you have a thick

Step 9

Cut the eclairs in half. Dip the top into the caramel cream and let it drip off.

batter.

Step 10 Step 6

Fill the bottom half with a little

Pre-heat the oven to 160°C fan.

cream, then drizzle over the

Cover two baking trays with

orange cream and decorate with

paper. Cut the tip off a piping

orange peel. Add the top and

bag so you have a 2cm opening.

serve.

E N J OY

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154

E T

B O N N E

J O U R N É E

Bon Appétit

#SIST E RMAG4 4


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D I Y

B O U T O N N I È R E

Boutonnière

T H RE E IDE A S FO R T H E PE RFE CT


PARIS STREET ; RAINY DAY

The term 'boutonnière' generally describes the flowers worn by men in the buttonhole of their jacket lapels, mainly during the 19th century. The most famous boutonnière is a carnation. During the French Revolution, noblemen often approached the scaffold for their execution with a carnation in their buttonholes as a sign of bravery. At demonstrations, a carnation was worn during the labor movement in the 1840s if the carrying of flags was not permitted. Communists and socialists were thus able to recognize each other by their red blossom. And even dandys (who we introduced to you HERE), wore flowers in their buttonholes. Although boutonnière didn't disappear entirely during the 20th century - Nelson Mandela was known for wearing a carnation as well - we seldomly see them anymore, sometimes as little bouquets at weddings. But we think: Boutonnières deserve a modern comeback! That is why we show you 3 different ways to create your own boutonnière ... 157

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l

L AV E N D E R F L O W E R S

A S

A N

A C C E S S O R Y

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1

P A P E R L A V E N D E R

In this step by step tutorial, we'll show you how to make your own paper lavender twig as an ornamental blossom. Everything you need is listed here.

S u p p l i e s

Violet Paper (different shades) Green Paper (different shades) Wire Green Tape Flower Motif Punch, about. 15mm Tongs Glue Cord Safety Pin

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W A T C H

T H E

T U T O R I A L

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O

O L I V E

L E A V E S

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2

P A P E R O L I V E

L E AV E S

For those who prefer green shades, the version with olive leaves is perfect! We'll show you how to easily make your own in our tutorial.

S u p p l i e s

Green Paper (different shades) Wire Green Tape Scissors Tongs Glue Cord Safety Pin

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T I P

O

Choose different shades of green to make it look more "realistic".

Use the tongs to prepare about 6 cm long wire strips.

2

1

Cut out a few long strips from the green paper for the leaves. Round off the tips with scissors.

SISTER-MAG.COM

2

Apply glue to a green leaf and attach the wire. Press wire onto the glue with a little pressure. Repeat this process a few times. 164

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3

We used about 15 leaves. Put all the leaves together in a nice bouquet and fix them with tape.

3

4

4

Finally, brush the stem of the bouquet with glue and wrap a drawstring around the waistband. Finished! With a safety pin you can now fasten your new boutonniere to your clothes.

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3

P O M P O M S B O U T O N N I È R E You prefer warm and earthy shades? No problem! This boutonniere fits perfectly with grey clothes or as an eye-catcher for particularly autumnal occasions.

M a t e r i a l

Yellow Pompoms Thin Wire Felt (brown & white) Scissors Tongs Glue Cord or Cotton Yarn Safety Pin

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1

p

O M P O M S

1

Prepare about 5 cm long wire strips with the pliers. Round off a bit to keep the pompom firm.

2 2

Pull a pompom through the wire. Wrap some tape around the wire so that the wire is no longer visible. SISTER-MAG.COM

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3

Cut another 5 cm of wire pieces with the pliers and round off the tips. Cut out a 1x1 cm square of the white felt and attach the wire with glue. Fold to a semicircular sheet. Make 2 more of them.

4

4

Cut out 3 leaves from the beige felt. Attach the wire in the middle with glue. Push together with a little pressure.

4

5

5

Tie the leaves and pompoms firmly together with tape.

6

6

Finally, wrap the cotton yarn or the cord around the bouquet and tie a knot. Done!

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PROMO

A TRIP ON

ICE

sisterMAG co-founder Alex had the chance to refine his driving abilities on ice and snow when he visited Sweden in early December to test drive the new Ford Edge. When he arrived back at the office, he told us all about his frosty-fresh experience… INTERVIEW WITH ALEX SUTTER PHOTOS FORD EDGE SISTER-MAG.COM

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PROMO

Th e

SISTER-MAG.COM

NE W FO RD ED GE

Åre /Ös ters und

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Dear Alex, where exactly did you get on thin ice? Ford Germany invited me to test drive the new Ford Edge in the snowy surroundings of Åre/ Östersund as part of a group of journalists. I flew in from Berlin via Stockholm and it was my first ever trip to Sweden. Åre is situated more than 600 kilometres

the car. When you start sliding, it’s important to quickly and valiantly steer against the direction that the car is moving. I got this tip from my co-driver, a seasoned professional from the Auto Bild Allrad who taught me a lot

and drive over a wooden

about driving in theory

see-saw that slowly

and practice.

tilts as you drive over it – very exciting! I loved

north of Stockholm and is famous for winter sports. I now know why: there was an incredible amount of snow.

What do you have to keep in mind when driving on ice and snow? First of all, it’s advisable to take things more slowly than usual. It takes time to get used to the different reactions of

IT IS INCREDIBLE HOW SAFELY AN OFFROAD VEHICLE LIKE THE FORD EDGE CAN DRIVE ON SNOW THANKS TO ITS COUNTLESS ASSISTING SYSTEMS. We also had spiked wheels that you (sadly) rarely need in Germany. In Åre we had the chance to test the Edge on an offroad parcour, navigate on only two

the bits of fast driving and drifting on a closed circuit… without the electronic assistance, of course!

I REALLY FELT LIKE I IMPROVED MY

WINTER DRIVING

SKILLS AND CAN

ONLY RECOMMEND TAKING PART IN A

PROGRAMME LIKE THIS.

wheels on a steep hill,

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PROMO

What will you remember about the Ford Edge? The Edge is so sleek and has a very remarkable grille that reminds me of an Aston Martin – a very

in the day (the sun set tufted seats and an

around 2:30 p.m.), but

optional sound system

with temperatures below

by Bang & Olufsen.

-10 degrees, sun, blue

Other than that, I will

skies, and lots of snow,

remember that this car

the days were nothing

drives on snow like on

short of stunning.

train tracks. I was quite sad that I had to return it.

YOU CAN TAKE GREAT ROAD TRIPS AROUND ÅRE BECAUSE THE

AREA IS SO SPARSELY POPULATED BUT THE

well-rounded design.

ROADS ARE VERY

There is so much space

WELL PLANNED AND

inside and a couple of great features: A very

EASY S M A RT P H O N E CONNECTION

quick heating system with heated seats and a

MAINTAINED. .

Other than that, I loved the tasteful Christmas

heated steering wheel

decorations and of

that was quite nice at

course the beautiful

-14 degrees. The Edge

nature. We visited the

can easily be connected with an iPhone, and the more comfortable

SOUNDSYSTE M BY BANG & OLU FSEN

Tännforsen Waterfall on one of our drives, the biggest one in Sweden,

model, »Vignale«

which was fantastic.

(named after the

The same goes for the

and car designer Alfredo

How was Sweden?

Swedes. As a wine lover,

Vignale), is very well

My first visit will most

however, I was terrified

equipped with button-

certainly not be my last.

of the price of alcohol.

Milanese coachbuilder

It got dark pretty early

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relaxed and hospitable


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HE AT IN G SY ST EM (S EAT & ST EE RI NG WH EE L)

CO MF OR TA BL E MO DE L »V IG NA LE «

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PROMO

The bright side is that a holiday in Sweden will always be good for your liver.

Did you see an elk? Only on the road signs between Ã…re and SISTER-MAG.COM

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Östersund – and on my

tasted like deer but

plate, as meatballs.

even more refined. I can

They’re supposed to

recommend herring in

be quite common, just

all its forms , too. As you

like the brown bears

can see, the trip was a

you can spot in the wild.

culinary success!

The meatballs were quite delicious, by the way. My favourite was a reindeer fondue that

THIS TRIP WAS SUPPORTED BY FORD GERMANY

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PARTNER

2018

NOV

s i st e rMAG i s pu bl i s h e d eve r y m o n th ! READ NOW 

ALEX Sales

MARKETING & ADMIN

W H AT H A P P E N E D SO FAR »A YEAR IN MOVIES« was 2018 for

the sisterMAG team! We made a tour through film history and let ourselves be inspired by movie classics to the content in sisterMAG. From »BREAKFAST CLUB« , and »BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S« in January/February, to the two musical films »MARY POPPINS« and »SOUND OF MUSIC« in March/April, the Doris Day and Rock Hudson movie classics »SEND ME NO FLOWERS« and »PILLOW TALK« in early summer, the summer issues to »TO CATCH A THIEF« and »CATCH ME IF YOU CAN« to the fall movies »GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL« and »METROPOLIS« in September/October – we'll miss them!

TONI Marketing & Finance

CAROLIN Social Media

MEDEA Administration

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OPERATIONS

THEA Chief Editor & Design

CHRISTINA Content Management

FRANZISKA Content Management

SOPHIE Content Management

SOPHIA Content Management

CREATION

EVI Fashion

LALE Video & Design

MARIE Design & Creation

SONGIE Design

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IMPRINT

SISTERMAG – JOURNAL FOR THE DIGITAL LADY www.sister-mag.com

Chief Editor Operations

Theresa Neubauer Christina Rücker, Vera Schönfeld, Sophie Siekmann, Sophia Werner, Franziska Winterling, Carolin Kralapp, Medea Moir

Fashion

Eva-Maria Neubauer (Fashion Dir.)

Design

Theresa Neubauer (Art Dir.), Marie Darme, Lale Tütüncübaşı, Songie Yoon

Contributing Editors (Text) Barbara Eichhammer, Alexander Kords, Christian Näthler, Elisabeth Stursberg, Robert Eberhardt, Sophia Schillik, sisterMAG Contributing Editors (Photo & Video)

Jaclyn Locke, Sophia Schillik, Steffen Sinzinger, sisterMAG

Translation

Alex Kords, Ira Häussler, sisterMAG

Proof

Alex Kords, Ira Häussler, Christian Naethler, sisterMAG Team

Published by Carry-On Publishing GmbH, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, 13355 Berlin, Germany. Re-use of content is only allowed with written permission of the publisher. There is no liability for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. The Carry-On Publishing GmbH assumes no liability or guarantee for the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information provided. All information is provided without warranty. Contact: mail@sister-mag.com Management

Antonia Sutter, Theresa Neubauer, Alex Sutter

Sales

Alex Sutter (Sales Dir.)

Marketing

SISTER-MAG.COM

Antonia Sutter (Marketing Dir.)

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N E X T I SS U E B E G I N OF FEBRUARY! FO L LO W U S O N I N S TAG R A M TO D I S C O V E R MORE!


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