Sistema Tulsa Annual Report 2020-2021

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2020-2021 ANNUAL REPORT


We have finished our 6th academic year and Season. In spite of the challenges the pandemic posed, we never stopped learning or performing whether virtually, in-person, or a combination of both. Our students showed diligence and motivation. Their music-making and resilience was powerful.

JOSE LUIS HERNANDEZ THE JAMES AND MARY BARNES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR OF SISTEMA TULSA

Some of our collected data show that attendance kept rising and peaked in April with 98% student engagement. Over 70% of families reported to us that regular instruction helped lessen pandemic anxiety or confusion. 85% noticed musical gains in their students. 83% were always or often motivated to participate in their lessons. 100% of polled parents would recommend the program to other families. Flexible, responsive, and attentive communication was an important piece of our success this year. We completed a successful summer camp that marked our return to full in-person programming at our Boston Avenue United Methodist Church hub. Together with the Fine Arts Department at Tulsa Public Schools, we are launching a new Sistema satellite program to begin at Wayman Tisdale Fine Arts Academy. We have also identified Mayo Demonstration School as an upcoming satellite. This initiative leverages resources from our partners and is part of our goal to seed 10 new satellite programs in the next 10 years. In April and May, our students performed outdoor concerts to memorialize the Tulsa Race Massacre. They performed music by African American composers, read poetry, and also sang and played in places of meaning such as the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation and Vernon A.M.E. Church. This year we welcomed new Advisory Board members including our first ever program alumni to serve. We also welcomed new donors including the Tulsa Rotary Club Foundation. Foundations and individuals have continued to renew their gifts. We finished the year with an important performance invitation from City of Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum’s Office of Equity and Resilience. Students performed to welcome new young Americans in a Naturalization Ceremony at the Gathering Place in July. We are thankful for the opportunity to serve our community and to work together with our extraordinary staff as we bring an important educational opportunity that builds community, promotes excellence, and civic responsibility among Tulsa youth through the musical arts!

Jose Luis Hernandez Jose Luis Hernandez THE JAMES AND MARY BARNES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR OF SISTEMA TULSA (jlhernandez@bostonavenue.org)

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INTERACTIVE: See our video highlighting our mission and vision.

A SUCCESSFUL YEAR Students from Elementary through High School representing 23 Tulsa Public Schools and many others in the metro area including Jenks, Bixby, and Sapulpa participated during the year across all our free-tuition programs. A Holiday Special hosted by Michael Grogan of Fox23 News drew over 5,000 viewers. Four of our students were selected to perform in the El Sistema USA National Virtual Orchestra this year. We also commissioned new works, expanded partnerships, and sent off graduating Seniors to their college of choice.

S I S T E M A T U L S A M I S S I O N S TAT E M E N T

To nurture community and improve young people’s lives through the practice of music.

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“Sistema stayed committed to the mission despite the pandemic and adapted quickly to use the tools they had at their disposal.” - 2 0 2 1 PA R E N T

“Sistema Tulsa has created a transformational community of love and learning that crosses barriers of age, ethnicity, economy, gender and religion. It is an inspiration any time I am able to participate.” D AV I D W I G G S , S E N I O R M I N I S T E R AT T H E B O S T O N AV E N U E U N I T E D M E T H O D I S T C H U R C H

“Teachers in the program are music professionals and trained educators who are fully committed to growing their students’ selfesteem and talents. Public performance, caring mentorship and skilled instruction all combine to make El Sistema a standout for music in our community.” DR. DEBORAH GIST, SUPERINTENDENT OF TULSA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

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SISTEMA TULSA

BY THE NUMBERS

“I’m fortunate to teach with a team of like-minded musicians who care about our students. At Sistema Tulsa we help them discover a love for music, a sense of belonging to the community, and a lasting confidence in themselves. I’m proud to be a part of an organization that provides for these priceless developments in the young people of Tulsa.” B R I A N G A U LT

TEACHER AND DIRECTOR’S AWARD 2021

15 PROGRAM VOLUNTEERS 17 VOLUNTEER HOURS 233

PROGRAM TEACHERS

140 SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 40 SNACKS SERVED 1221

CONCERT ATTENDANCE DAYS OF INSTRUCTION

NUMBER OF STUDENTS SERVED

FACEBOOK POST REACH

71,347

10 8,275 133

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCES

62%

113 SUPPORTING FOUNDATIONS 14 INDIVIDUAL DONATIONS

42%

“Despite all of the challenges that Covid-19 has thrown at us, Sistema Tulsa has remained strong and has continued to grow and change lives. I especially appreciate how effectively they were able to learn and adapt during the pandemic.” D R . J O E L PA N C I E R A BOARD MEMBER

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S I S T E M A

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ACCOLADES

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Kate Huckaby spent most of her high school years playing cello in our Community Youth Orchestra. She graduated from Booker T. Washington High School and was named an Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence All-State Scholar. She received an academic scholarship sponsored by the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Philanthropies of Tulsa.

Gracie Loney writes: “I got into Bowdoin College in Maine and the University of Oklahoma. I decided that I would go to Bowdoin! I received 5 scholarships: the Simon Estes Foundation Scholarship, the Latino Development Community Agency Scholarship, the H.J. Green Scholarship, the Booker T. Washington Hall of Fame Scholarship, and the J.B. Wade Scholarship. So happy to begin my new journey!”

Megan Merrill received an Academic Excellence Scholarship to attend Oklahoma State University. She is majoring in mechanical engineering and performs in their music program with an additional scholarship award. She received the AISES-Cobell scholarship and the TPS-Gladys Whetstine Memorial Scholarship!

Hunter Miller was accepted into the Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute chorus division. He spent two weeks learning together with accomplished singers from across the state at the University of Arts and Sciences in Chickasha. He is one of our inaugural 2015 students and plays trombone in our Community Youth Orchestra.


Four of our students proudly represented Sistema Tulsa in the El Sistema USA National Virtual Orchestra this year. Congrats Chloe Grey, Amaya Harbin, Moriah Malone, and Lucas Beiter! (Students pictured clockwise)

“Sistema was very helpful in helping lower anxiety during the past year and created a sense of normalcy. Thank you!” - 2 0 2 1 PA R E N T

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OUR GOALS

At the core of Sistema Tulsa’s vision is the idea that all children and youth have the tools and means to succeed in music and in life. During the last six years, we have been relentless in our pursuit of opening doors to arts learning in an environment of trust and respect. People from all backgrounds, beliefs, and ages come together to make music and celebrate a community that strives for excellence. Our long term goals are: • Becoming the most effective after-school music learning program in our region • Identifying and engaging communities where access to music learning is limited • Creating systems of equity in music learning for marginalized and diverse students • Training and supporting music teachers who can make a social impact • Partnering with arts leaders and organizations to leverage our resources • Inspiring excellence as a musical arts and social services non-profit organization • Advancing development and fundraising for continued financial stability

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TRENDING RESEARCH

If the brain is a muscle, then learning to play an instrument and read music is the ultimate exercise. Two new studies from the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC show that as little as two years of music instruction has multiple benefits. “Music training can change both the structure of the brain’s white matter, which carries signals through the brain, and gray matter, which contains most of the brain’s neurons that are active in processing information. Music instruction also boosts engagement of brain networks that are responsible for decision making and the ability to focus attention and inhibit impulses.”

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After two years, El Sistema participants at the YOLA program in Los Angeles showed “greater ability to perceive pitch, rhythm and frequency of sounds, as well as enhanced development in the auditory pathway, the neurological route that connects the inner ear to auditory association areas in the brain (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 21, 2016).” After the third and fourth years in the program, they also began to perform better on tasks unrelated to music, involving working memory and delayed gratification—likely because of the discipline required to patiently learn pieces of music. (Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 28, No. 12, 2018). This study has been tracking brain and learning outcomes of 75 children who are either participating in YOLA, a community sports program or no afterschool program. Now that is good news! AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL A S S O C I AT I O N NOV. 2020

JOSE ANTONIO ABREU E L S I S T E M A’ S F O U N D E R

In 2013, the Boston Avenue Senior Pastor and Director of Music were moved by the example of the late Dr. Abreu and his work with El Sistema and together with the congregation discerned to host a chapter for children in the Tulsa community. We launched the program and welcomed an inaugural group of 35 students in September of 2015. As an example of an innovative mission for the community, we trust that imparting music education can encourage children and youth to reach their full potential and awaken the spirit of a fruitful life.

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PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS

INTERACTIVE: Sistema students performed at The Gathering Place, pictured here with Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum and city leaders.

See our recruitment video: “Inspire your life.”

Sistema Tulsa students love to perform for others. We play and sing music from all genres, from classical to sacred, holiday to folk in and around churches, civic venues, sports fields, concert halls and historical sites whenever available to us. During a pandemic year, we presented 10 meaningful performances while being mindful of Covid-19 health and safety protocols. Highlights this year were our pre-recorded Christmas Special seen by 5,000 people on Facebook and our 3-part outdoor concert series to memorialize the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921. Our summer camp concert in June marked our return to our hub site to play in our beloved Boston Avenue Jubilee Gym.

“In spite of the pandemic, we strived to keep concerts an important part of our programming. We found creative ways to engage audiences online and outdoors. Far from being an obstacle, it allowed us to be bold and innovative.” MR. HERNANDEZ

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“Music has to be recognized as an agent of social development, in the highest sense because it transmits the highest values – solidarity, harmony, mutual compassion. And it has the ability to unite an entire community, and to express sublime feelings.” JOSÉ ANTONIO ABREU


For our Holiday Special, our middle and high schoolers performed pieces such as Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus interwoven by archival video of past years’ mainstage performances. Faculty performed an upbeat arrangement of Sleigh Ride by Brian Gault. Over 5,000 people were reached online!

Full orchestra or band rehearsals were very special this year. Whenever it was safe to do so, we gathered to play together, mindful of the great gift that it is to be together in community, in person!

During the pandemic, we turned to Chamber Music, an approach of music-making based on duos, trios, and quartets where each musician plays an individual and specific part. This practice makes for deeper engagement in ensemble playing including preparation, concentration, and communication among the players. The approach to learning is democratic and students express their opinions about tempo, nuance, and style. The discussions are lively and interesting each time. In May, we presented our first ever chamber music performance featuring students from beginner to advanced levels. They played eleven different works including music by Handel, Haydn, Bartok, and a piece for Clarinet Quartet with poetic recitation based on the work of Maya Angelou.

Student Levi Davenport continued his piano recital series with music by Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Chopin. He performed for an empty Sanctuary with his parents, teacher, and production staff in attendance. This was his first broadcast performance experience.

We performed the National Anthem and band selections at the Tulsa Drillers’ ONEOK Field, our fourth annual performance!

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SPRING SERIES

We dedicated our Spring Performance Series to Healing and Remembrance at Historic Vernon A.M.E. Church, John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation, and Boston Avenue United Methodist Church Unity Park. We guided our students to reflect and understand the magnitude of their role as musicians embracing a narrative for healing in the context of the Tulsa Race Massacre and the local and national movements for social justice. More often than not, concerts are events with celebratory or social flair, but this time, we offered a public art of solemn reflection. Outdoor performances were based on three themes, one for each site: grief, hope, and unity. We chose a repertoire that honored the African musical diaspora and its many expressions. An original work was commissioned to feature the poem “Equality” by Maya Angelou. Observers were welcome to join and witnessed our practice in the same solemn spirit we presented it.

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The Rev. Dr. Turner shares an invocation at Vernon A.M.E.

We are thankful for the support of the Rev. Dr. Robert Turner, Vanessa Adams-Harris, Rev. David Wiggs, our teachers, parents, and leadership team, for their encouragement to bring this educational and memorializing experience to life.

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BENEFIT CONCERT Not all piano recitals are created equal. Join us Friday, February 18th, 2022 as we present “Piano Illusions” with Igor Lipinski, a thrilling and mystifying evening of music and magic. Originally from Poland, Lipinski first started working on the idea of music and magic as an undergraduate piano performance major at the Eastman School of Music. After an inspiring collaboration on the show with Teller of Las Vegas duo Penn & Teller, Lipinski won the WQXR Classical Comedy Contest at Caroline’s on Broadway. In light of his success in New York, he presented Piano Illusions across the world, from Hong Kong to New York City, and performed the show with several U.S. orchestras including Rochester Philharmonic and Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra. As an Assistant Professor of Piano at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Lipinski continues to explore a variety of unconventional and multidisciplinary recital practices to re-imagine the traditional format of the piano recital, and to think outside of the box about the changing tastes of today’s audience. Tickets and more information available at sistematulsa.org.

“I have seen Igor’s musical show twice already. His pianism is exceptional and when you add the element of magic into the mix, the results are spellbinding. This is a show that people from all ages will enjoy. It is full of virtuoso moments and tricks that make you constantly ask, how in the world did he do that?” MR. HERNANDEZ

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SATELLITES INITIATIVE TO BEGIN 10 Sistema Tulsa communities planted across Tulsa by 2030

Our goal is to serve students with the least resources and greatest need for music education. Effective outreach means that we keep all of our programs free of cost and accessible to everyone. It also means that we now must also engage students in their own communities and ask that like-minded leaders in those communities help us build programs that impact their specific context and reality. All in all, this is a process of shared ownership and responsibility for expanding artistic educational opportunities across Tulsa. With this vision in mind, we are announcing our expansion project to create and facilitate “Sistema Music Satellites.” We hope to nurture a Students join Superintendent Dr. Deborah network of Sistema communities across Tulsa that share a culture Gist, school and Sistema leaders in a ribbon of musical achievement and social impact with children and youth cutting ceremony at Tisdale. right in their own neighborhoods. Over the long term, this growth includes mentoring and identifying new teachers and non-profit leaders to help sustain progress. Our first satellite is housed at Wayman Tisdale Fine Arts Academy. Located in northwest Tulsa, the Tisdale Fine Arts Academy is a distinguished TPS and A+ Elementary School that prides itself on arts integration into its curriculum for students Pre-K through 5th grade. Sistema advocated on behalf of the school to acquire new band instruments which were purchased through the most recent bond proposal. Mr. Schmenk, teacher and leader of the program says, “I hope that I can give more kids a head start into the world of music and a better chance in academics by giving them a chance to play band instruments such as flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, and trombone.” In the works for 2022-2023: A satellite at Mayo Demonstration School. Currently Mayo students are being bussed to our site and their music teacher is training at our hub as a Sistema leader. We hope to begin a satellite in-school the following year.

4 1 32 W CAMERO N ST, T U L SA, OK 74127

1 301 S B O S T O N, T U L S A , O K 74119

1 1 2 7 S CO L U M BI A AV E , TULSA, OK 74104

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I CAN DO THIS!

A reflection from our Education Director, Kelsey Rooney-Dorst.

Over the last 6 years, I have had the privilege of teaching and working with over 350 students at Sistema Tulsa. One of those students is Iyana, a f lute player. She’s been with the program since its inception in 2015. I distinctly remember many of our flute students in the first year getting frustrated with the instrument. It is a difficult instrument to learn, especially for 4th graders. I recall them saying that they would “never be able to play this passage” or that they “should just give up” if they made mistakes. This is what educators and researchers call a “fixed-mindset.” The belief that failure limits our abilities or that one’s potential is predetermined. Part of a teachers’ job is to help students believe in themselves, trust that their potential is limitless, and understand that they can do anything if they work hard, practice, and make a commitment to improve. Iyana is still taking lessons at Sistema. She now plays First Flute in our advanced symphony, CYO. During a lesson the other day, we were practicing one of our pieces for our Spring Performance Series. In this particular lesson, Iyana was learning 4 new notes in the highest range of the flute. While we were practicing, I asked her to play a scale that was written in the music that included the 4 new notes. She played it and made a few mistakes. I looked at her and said, “Try again, you can do this.” She looked back at me and said, “I can do this.” “Is it okay if I practice for a minute on my own?” she asked. She practiced and played it perfectly, and we moved on with the lesson. Something like this seems so small: A student makes a mistake and the teacher gently says, “Try again.” What stood out to me was how confident Iyana was that she would be able to learn this passage. It was a moment of conviction for her. She took something she had just made mistakes on and affirmed, “I can do this.” This is what educators and researchers would call a “growth-mindset.” The belief that failure is an opportunity to grow and that you can learn anything. Six years ago, I guarantee that none of my students were saying “I can do this” immediately following a mistake, but during that lesson, Iyana did. It shows how much she has grown as a lifelong learner and musician. My hope is that all students at Sistema understand that mistakes are a part of the process of learning and feel this growth-mindset as they advance. References: Dweck, C. S. (2007). The perils and promises of praise. Educational Leadership, 65(2), 34–39.

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RESEARCH AND EVALUATION In addition to reaching musical and artistic milestones, our formula for measuring success is based on two broad longitudinal questions: How can the program grow effectively? What is the impact of the program over time? Sistema Tulsa is expanding carefully based on prior operational and pedagogical experience as well as the strength of its earned recognition and support networks. We are tracking outcomes from several source points and piecing together a bigger picture of the positive effect this program has on our learning community. This report highlights data points from our last six years. As we develop our program over time we strive to enhance evidence that it has become:

A. A proven provider of high quality and sustainable educational services B. An organization recognized as an asset to all of its community partners and stakeholders C. A community-wide program known both for its musical excellence and for its positive association with the socio-emotional success of its students

D. A model for eliciting motivation and a growth mindset from all participants What we strive to be…

• Inclusive of all races and socio-economic groups • Giving students a proficiency in music and broadening their horizons

• Nurture discipline, creativity, resilience, and community

YEAR 1: Key Findings from the Sistema Tulsa Year-End Report as reported by the Center for Family Resilience at Oklahoma State University (Merten, 2016)

97% 93% 100% 19

OF STUDENTS WANT TO GET BETTER AT PLAYING THEIR MUSICAL INSTRUMENT. OF PARENTS BELIEVE THAT THE PROGRAM HAS TAUGHT THEIR CHILD TO WORK HARD TO REACH HIS/HER GOALS. OF PARENTS WOULD RECOMMEND THE PROGRAM TO OTHER PARENTS.

87% 100%

OF STUDENTS BELIEVE THEY HAVE MADE THEIR PARENTS/ GUARDIANS PROUD BY BEING IN THE SISTEMA PROGRAM. OF PARENTS TALK WITH THEIR CHILD ABOUT WHAT HE/SHE IS DOING IN THE PROGRAM.


YEAR 2: Key Findings of in-house surveys on musical and self-efficacy in high-school level groups (Hernandez, 2017)

90% 100%

9 OUT OF 10 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS REPORT THAT IN ALL OF THEIR TIME PLAYING MUSIC, THIS YEAR MARKED THE MOST IMPROVEMENT. AUTONOMY AND PROGRESS ARE CLEAR PREDICTORS OF STUDENT SUCCESS. SEEING IMPROVEMENT OVER TIME ENHANCES A GROWTH MINDSET. 10 OUT OF 10 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS REPORT THAT THEY WOULD RECOMMEND SISTEMA TULSA TO THEIR PEERS. OUR PROGRAM GROWS AS A RESULT OF POSITIVE EXPERIENCE AND RECOMMENDATIONS. STUDENTS WHO RECOMMEND THE PROGRAM ALSO FEEL MORE RESPONSIBILITY FOR ITS SUCCESS.

YEAR 3: Key Findings based on Wolf-Brown’s social development survey for national Sistema-inspired programs (adapted by Hernandez, 2018)

RESILIENCE

FOCUS

NO MATTER WHO YOU ARE, YOU CAN BECOME BETTER AT MUSIC.

I ALWAYS PAY ATTENTION IN CLASSES, I NEVER LET MY MIND WANDER.

10.26 %

10.26 %

10.26 % VERY TRUE

20.51 %

VERY TRUE

25.64 %

A LOT TRUE

79.49 %

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

A LOT TRUE LITTLE TRUE

43.59 %

NOT TRUE

AFFIRMATION

COMMUNITY

MY PARENTS ARE PROUD OF ME BEING A MUSICIAN.

I WORK WELL WITH OTHER KIDS IN MY GROUP.

10.53 %

18.42 %

13.16 % VERY TRUE A LOT TRUE

71.05 %

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

VERY TRUE

31.58 %

A LOT TRUE

50 %

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

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RESEARCH AND EVALUATION

CONT...

YEAR 4: Sistema Tulsa Elementary age students are performing at a high standard on various socio-emotional indicators including: curiosity, grit, optimism, self-control, social intelligence, and zest. *Key findings based on KSDE socio-emotional character growth tool kit (adapted by Hernandez, et al 2019)

I TAKE AN ACTIVE INTEREST IN LEARNING MY MUSIC

I STICK WITH LEARNING MY MUSIC FOR MORE THAN A FEW WEEKS

12% VERY TRUE

56%

32%

22%

A LOT TRUE LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

I ACTIVELY SHOW ENTHUSIASM WHILE PLAYING MUSIC

VERY TRUE

51%

12%

A LOT TRUE LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

I PAY ATTENTION AND RESIST DISTRACTIONS IN REHEARSAL

3%

12%

14%

37%

46%

VERY TRUE

39%

A LOT TRUE LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

I CARE ABOUT THE SUCCESS AND FEELINGS OF OTHERS AT SISTEMA

49%

NOT TRUE

7% VERY TRUE

21

LITTLE TRUE

I AM THANKFUL FOR BEING IN THIS MUSIC PROGRAM

17% 17%

VERY TRUE A LOT TRUE

A LOT TRUE

66%

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

VERY TRUE

22%

A LOT TRUE

70%

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE


12%

14%

37%

46%

VERY TRUE

39%

A LOT TRUE LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

I CARE ABOUT THE SUCCESS AND FEELINGS OF OTHERS AT SISTEMA

49%

A LOT TRUE LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

I AM THANKFUL FOR BEING IN THIS MUSIC PROGRAM

7%

17% VERY TRUE

17%

VERY TRUE

A LOT TRUE

66%

VERY TRUE

22%

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

A LOT TRUE

70%

LITTLE TRUE NOT TRUE

YEAR 5: Sistema Tulsa Long-Term Engagement Survey (Hernandez, 2020) We asked Sistema students questions about the impact music learning has had over time. Responses were documented from students who had been part of the program for at least 4 years. All students reported receiving an average of A and B grades at school, with the majority receiving A’s. Music is important or very important to them. The majority agrees that it has taught them discipline, focus, and responsibility. All students reported that they would continue playing their instrument after high school. They are more likely to consume music on YouTube or via a streaming service rather than listen to the radio or attend a live performance. 100% of students reported that if given the choice to start learning something new right now, it was “very likely” that they would choose music. 100% of students share a strong identification with the concept of being a “musician” and not just a student of music. This sense of agency or ownership of your identity, we believe, is a strong factor in navigating membership in an orchestra or community with confidence. 40% of students had wanted to quit learning music at some point but didn’t. In some cases, they reminded themselves that music “was meant to make people happy” or that it is “something to be enjoyed” even in the midst of failing to win an audition. Students appreciate their peers and community and this is often a motivator to carry-through: “Going to rehearsals and knowing I get to see and play with some of my best friends truly encouraged me.” Since the Sistema model plays an emphasis on ensemble playing, we asked students to tell us: What makes an orchestra or ensemble performance successful? Students pointed to the “need to communicate their music” while playing with others; or the symbiotic relationship between “striving to work collaboratively while also striving to do your best individually.” The sense of knowing there is community and support in the process is important: “I’m not alone in this,” they stated.

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ACHIEVING IN PANDEMIC TIMES During the 2020-2021 school year we needed to be creative in how we offered the program. Our goal was to continue to be present and relevant in the lives of our students and families. We asked parents various multiple choice and open ended questions to understand how the program made a personal impact this year. The following data is a snapshot of how we achieved in spite of challenging circumstances.

10.7 %

3.6 %

DID YOU NOTICE GAINS IN YOUR STUDENT’S MUSICAL ABILITIES THIS YEAR?

YES NO MAYBE

85.7 %

DID HAVING REGULAR SISTEMA LESSONS AND COMMUNITY HELP LESSEN PANDEMIC ANXIETY OR CONFUSION?

10.7 %

17.9 %

YES NO MAYBE

71.4 %

23

11.2 %

3%

DID SISTEMA PROGRAMMING HELP YOU ESTABLISH ROUTINES OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR STUDENT THIS YEAR?


17.9 % 42.9 %

STRONGLY AGREE

NEUTRAL

AGREE

DISAGREE

STRONGLY DISAGREE

YES NO MAYBE

42.9 %

71.4 %

11.2 %

DID SISTEMA PROGRAMMING HELP YOU ESTABLISH ROUTINES OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR STUDENT THIS YEAR?

3%

42.9 %

STRONGLY AGREE

NEUTRAL

AGREE

DISAGREE

STRONGLY DISAGREE

42.9 %

Our parents reported to us:

“Sistema gave my child hope. She was able to stay connected with instructors who have been present in her life over a considerable amount of time and who have always encouraged her to invest in herself and her music. The Sistema community was invaluable during the pandemic experience.” “When playing, one can feel calm, relaxed, and happy. Sistema helped decrease anxiety during this difficult year.” “My student had mixed emotions about Sistema in the beginning, but by the end, he now feels like he is part of the community and he cares about making music.” “Sistema helped with a routine. When she was only in virtual school, it allowed her to connect with others.” “Sistema maintained some sense of normalcy for us; enforced that people outside of our home were taking precautions and that the precautions worked to protect us.”

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AWARDS

T U L S A

Director’s Award For any staff, teacher, and volunteer member who portrays exceptional dedication during any given year to help our organization fulfill its mission. 2021 RECIPIENTS: Brian Gault (teacher) and Jeff Pascoe (volunteer)

Brian has helped grow our students’ musical skills. He shares additional skills in audio recording arts. His original work, “Equality,” for Clarinet Ensemble and Poet/Speaker was first performed by Sistema Tulsa students. It is one of beauty, transcendence, and in tune with the needs for healing in our time. Jeff is invaluable as a volunteer documentarian, TV and streaming producer, and member of our musical and church community. We are thankful for his efforts and especially during a time when social distancing made digital platforms more important than ever. We were able to reach so many more people and uplift their spirits in new ways.

Visionary Award 2021 RECIPIENT: Sara Phoenix

Sara excelled as the TPS Fine Arts Content Manager. During her tenure, she worked to bring impactful artistic opportunities to deserving students in Tulsa Public Schools. We developed a new partnership together to bring a new Sistema satellite to Tisdale Elementary. She showed an optimistic vision to serve all students with the gift of the arts. Optimism in what can be possible, we believe, is a hallmark expression of being visionary.

Perfect Attendance Attendance is one of the most important differentiators of student achievement. This year’s perfect attendance students were: Melanie Becerra, Henry Fischer, Ayana Lewis, Fernando Vasquez, Lucas Beiter, Victor Fischer, Elizabeth Fischer, Tiara Myers, Autumn Brennan, Raylene Crow, Malik Malone, Hanna Ramirez Zeigler, Adeline Carter, Carter Dodson, Emily Fischer, Venice Lampkins, Kellan Maner, Cora Schultz, Mary-Grace Spears, Liam Kerney, Hayley Ramirez Zeigler, Isaiah Russell, Chase Slovacek, and Eli Zelenski.

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ORGANIZATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE Chair: Janet Purinton

Recording Secretary: Ahmed Omar

Senior Advisor: Dr. Joel Panciera

Governance Committee: Janet Purinton, Angelyn Dale, Cheryl Chambers, Linda Frazier,

Director: Jose Luis Hernandez

Jose Luis Hernandez, Jim McCann, Dr. Joel Panciera, Mary Wheeler-Brown, Rev. David Wiggs

At-large Members:

Dr. Bill Burnett

Angenette De Bose

Scott Gregory

Ann Nelson

Kelsey Rooney-Dorst

Terri Brannin

Rev. EvaMarie Campbell

Mary Elliott

Jennifer Huckaby

Kate Parker

Dana Solomon

Karen Gaddis

Grace Markes

Elaine Reusser

Irene Brown

SISTEMA TULSA FACULTY & STAFF Jose Luis Hernandez (teacher/ program director) Kelsey Rooney-Dorst (teacher/education director) Ahmed Omar (operations manager) Gregory Dorst (brass) Valerie Fischer (piano accompanist) Brian Gault (woodwinds) Travis Henson (musicianship)

Rachel Horton (musicianship/choral) Ethan Landis (strings) Joshua Lowery (strings) Victoria Mayfield (strings) Tracy Megli (musicianship/choral) Bryson Miller (musicianship/choral) Debra Morgan (lead strings) Eric Noble (brass)

*Special thanks to guest faculty and musicians Jennifer Miller, Janet Coleman, Jack Thompson, Rob Reck, Amanda VanVleet, Blaire Hines, and Caleb Barrows (Boston Avenue Instrumental Music Guild).

Ahmed Omar (musicianship/choral) Douglas Perry (strings) Benjamin Schmenk (woodwinds) Helena Singleton (strings) Bekah Stoops (brass) Keelson Engles (brass TU work-study student) Alyssa Perez (strings TU work-study student) Diego Velasco (administrative assistant TU work-study student)

YEAR-ROUND VOLUNTEERS (10 HOUR OR MORE) Laura Beltran

Janet Purinton

Debbie Rooney

Kelly Knight

Mary Wheeler-Brown

Jessica Ramirez

Jennifer Solis

Sarah Jenkins

ADDITIONAL VOLUNTEERS John Campbell

Gregory Dorst

Kathryn Jones

Joe Morgan

Cheryl Chambers

Taylor Hernandez

Scott Morgan

Dr. Joel Panciera

Patrick Rooney

CONCERT AND EVENT PRODUCTION SUPPORT: Vanessa Adams-Harris

Angela Gault

Joe Morgan

Debbie Rooney

Laura Beltran

Brian Gault

Scott Morgan

Jennifer Solis

Irene Brown (Oklahoma Methodist Manor)

Alex Kossakoski (Tulsa Drillers)

Rev. Dr. Robert Turner

Belynda Clanton

Jen Logdson-Kellogg

Jeff Pascoe and Hannah Campbell (BAUMC TV)

Angelyn Dale

Sara Pugh Montgomery

Janet Purinton

TPD Officer Isaac Wall

Cliff Duncan

Debra Morgan

Jessica Ramirez

Mary Wheeler-Brown

Gregory Dorst

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Diego Velasco


BOSTON AVENUE UMC FACILITIES TEAM: Upul Aththatage, Margaret Davis, Nick Noland, Willard Wiley – Thank you for your support! TULSA PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPRESENTED: Booker T. Washington High School

Disney Elementary School

MacArthur Elementary

Tulsa Virtual Academy

Carnegie Elementary

Dove School of Discovery Tulsa

Mayo Elementary School

Carver Middle School

Dual Language Academy

Patrick Henry Elementary

Wayman Tisdale Elementary

Chouteau High School

Edison High School

Cooper Elementary School

Edison Middle School

Thoreau Demonstration Academy

Council Oak Elementary

Eliot Elementary School

Daniel Webster High School

Lanier Elementary

Tulsa School of Arts and Sciences

Will Rogers High School Zarrow International Elementary School

OTHER PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS: Bishop Kelley High School

EPIC Charter School

Marquette Catholic School

Town and Country School

Bixby West Elementary School

Holland Hall

Monte Cassino School

Union Middle School

Boevers Elementary School

Jenks High School

Sankofa Middle School

Union High School

Cedar Ridge Elementary School

Jenks Middle School

Sapulpa High School

Darnaby Elementary School

Jenks West Intermediate School

Get Involved: Professionals of all backgrounds and high-school age students participate as Sistema Tulsa mentors and volunteers. Roles include inventory manager (in partnership with Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma). Volunteer Front Desk Managers and Evening Ambassadors are needed as well. If you have time and skills you would like to share with our students and program please contact us. During the Covid-19 contingency, we follow a safety protocol and modified activities.

Sistema Advisory Board Members and Honorees

Teacher Eric Noble has been with Sistema Tulsa for all 6 years.

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S I S T E M A

DONORS

T U L S A

We are grateful for our donors who have taken a leap of faith with us to help develop and sustain a program that can transform communities through music education. List of Donations from August 1, 2020 through July 31, 2021.

INSTITUTIONAL SPONSORSHIP:

Boston Avenue United Methodist Church** F O U N DAT I O N S:

Pauline Dwyer Macklanburg and Robert A. Macklanburg Jr., Foundation*

Jim and Mary Barnes Family Foundation **

State Farm Foundation

Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation*

George Kress Foundation

The Mervin Bovaird Foundation*

Brannin Family Foundation**

The Helmerich Trust*

Children’s Medical Charities Association

Rotary Club of Tulsa Foundation

Saied Family Foundation

George and Wanda Brown Foundation

Charles and Marion Weber Foundation*

Oklahoma United Methodist Foundation ** ENDOWMENT GIFTS:

John Paul and Shirley O’Neal** Pauline Dwyer Macklanburg and Robert A. Macklanburg Jr., Foundation Terry and Pam Carter* GROUPS AND INDIVIDUALS:

Jeff Allen Wesley SS at BAUMC Tom and Sheila Baker Alexandra Bergman Laura Bottoms Mary Wheeler and Spencer Brown* Sue and Alan Buratto Tom and Karla Campbell Opal Carson Terry and Pam Carter*

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Rosa Castellanos Claudia Cea-Uy Becky Chandler Marguerite Chapman Judy & Robert Chezem (monthly donor) Tina Clayton Latisha Crow (parent) Jacques and Cindy Cunningham Ronald Dean Dee Dueck

Mary Mac Elliott Rick and Melanie Evans Barry and Gayle Farmer Jamie Farrah Douglas Fischer Eileen Ford Linda and Marc Frazier Rosemary Frew Karen Gaddis Maggie Galloway


S I S T E M A

DONORS

T U L S A

Jane Goodwin Vondale and Jan Graham Tom and Charlotte Hardgrave Ruth Ann and Blair Harp Doug and Elisabeth Harrington Tara Harris Judith Haug Taylor and Jose Luis Hernandez Ana-Maria Jones Suzy Ketch Anne and Ilan Kozlowski Linda Larson Sarah Maldonado Philelle McBrayer Evelyn McPherson Scott Merrill (parent) Scott and Debra Morgan

Ann Nelson John Paul and Shirley O’Neal** Ashley Owen Kate Parker Sheila Parr Ed Payton Linda Pierce Jerry Pocopanni Patricia Pocopanni Nancy Portteus Janet Purinton Gordon Richards Jim and Pam Ritchey Roger and Charlotte Rowe Bill and Shirley Schillinger Greg and Emily Shaver Barbara Slagle

Jennifer Solis Dana and Stuart Solomon Mark Storey Jeri Strange Charles and Marlene Tefertiller Darlene Tegeler Bill and Susan Thomas David and Mary Wiggs (monthly donor) Carol Willis

Our donors have said: “We want to improve the lives of deserving youth through music education which has spiritual, emotional, intellectual, social and cultural benefits.”

Visionary Circle ** Director’s Circle *

A Family Legacy We were one of the first families contacted to think about sponsoring a Sistema program through Boston Avenue. Dr. Joel Panciera and Rev. Wiggs had been in Oklahoma City seeing a model in action and they thought it also would be beneficial for the Tulsa community. This program was a great fit for our family foundation since my mother-in-law, Neva Brannin, loved music and sang in the church choir for 40 years. Music in my own family has been a cornerstone. My siblings and I all played instruments and sang in choirs growing up. I was one of the 12 original Trojaneires at Jenks High School and my brother sang with the Tulsa Boys Choir. Reflecting on Neva’s passion along with my own for music seemed only logical that we would overwhelmingly approve this sponsorship. Music and education go hand in hand, it helps with mental health issues as well. My husband Graham and his family join me in offering our gratitude for this opportunity. All kids should have the chance to experience the Arts! -Terri Brannin

We currently operate Sistema Tulsa as a program under the umbrella of the Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, which is a 501(c) (3) organization. Funds donated to Sistema Tulsa are held in a segregated church account to benefit Sistema Tulsa exclusively. All monetary donations receive a tax-deductible receipt. To donate, please make checks payable to Sistema Tulsa at Boston Avenue UMC or donate online through our partner Network for Good at sistematulsa.org/donate

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S I S T E M A

T U L S A

FOUNDING PARTNERS We count on the dedication and support of our community partners to build and sustain a successful program. They provide us with exemplary support and encouragement. BOSTON AVENUE UMC LEADERS:

Rev. David Wiggs, Senior Pastor Angelyn Dale, Executive Director and General Counsel Rev. Eva Marie Campbell, Associate Pastor Dr. Joel Panciera, Director of Music Ann Nelson, Finance Director OKLAHOMA UNITED METHODIST F O U N DAT I O N L E A D E R S:

Bill Junk, Executive Director Linda Petree Lambert, Committee Chair Julie Nance, Director of Administrative Services

Sheri Nellis, Accounting Director Belynda Clanton, Administrative Liaison Cliff Duncan, Facilities Director Caitlin Dryke, Communications Director

TULSA PUBLIC SCHOOLS LEADERS:

Dr. Deborah Gist, Superintendent Tulsa Public Schools Erin Lester, Executive Director TPS Teaching and Learning Sara Phoenix - Content Manager TPS Fine Arts Department

N E W PA RT N E R S P OT L I G H T:

The Mayor’s Office of Resilience and Equity (MORE) works to achieve equality for all Tulsans through partnership building, education, cultural awareness, and advocacy. The office is charged with implementing a broad strategy to promote resilience and equity in Tulsa in all aspects of city life from employment, economic development, health, mental health, and human rights.

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John Potter, Supervisor TPS Transportation Elaine Buxton - Principal Wayman Tisdale Fine Arts Academy


S I S T E M A

T U L S A

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS PA R T N E R S H I P S A N D C O M M U N I T Y C O L L A B O R AT I O N S:

Partnerships: Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, Tulsa Public Schools, El Sistema USA, Saied Music Company, University of Tulsa True Blue Neighbors, EmpowerMusic Project, Oklahoma Arts Institute, John Hope Reconciliation Center, Vernon A.M.E. Church, Resilient Tulsa, Tulsa Drillers, our dedicated TPS Principals from partner schools and beyond, the Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma who provided “Super Snacks” to our students and faculty, and Sunday School groups at BAUMC. Special thanks to the City of Tulsa: Mayor G.T. Bynum, Leticia Calvillo, Krystal Reyes, and staff at the Office of Resilience and Equity for the opportunity to perform in community events at The Gathering Place and City Hall. MEDIA AND BRANDING:

Tulsa World (Director’s Op-Ed), Bandzoogle Inc. (in-kind web design and hosting), Brand New Corporate Swag (t-shirt printing), Facebook (social media), Tenth Floor Studios (graphic design), Caitlyn Dryke (institutional photo and video), Jennifer Solis (documentary photo), Gitzel Puente (photo/video), Ethan Landis (video editing), BAUMC TV Ministry (video crew), Rev. David Wiggs (pulpit announcements).

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S I S T E M A

T U L S A

FINANCIALS

SISTEMA TULSA

SUPPORT AND REVENUES

INCEPTION AUGUST 1, 2020 TO JULY 31, 2021 AMOUNT

PERCENTAGE

60,000

18%

184,000

54%

Individual Contributions

69,810

20%

Trust Income

27,235

8%

341,045

100.00%

Institutional Support Foundation Grants

TOTAL INCOME AND REVENUE Operating Fund Balance

$426,496

Endowment Fund Balance

$157,441

Endowment Fund Earnings

$19,573

8%

18%

20%

54%

Endowment Funds for Matching $51,244

SISTEMA TULSA

EXPENDITURES

INCEPTION AUGUST 1, 2020 TO JULY 31, 2021 AMOUNT

PERCENTAGE

180,215

62%

Educational Delivery Support

25,600

9%

Development and Administration

18,169

6%

Program Management

68,087

23%

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

292,071

100.00%

TOTAL BUDGET

331,683

Teaching and Learning Services

Budget vs Expenses Difference Inception August 1, 2020 to July 31, 2021

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12% under

23% 6%

9%

62%


S I S T E M A

LEADERS

T U L S A

JOSE LUIS HERNANDEZ

KELSEY ROONEY-DORST

AHMED OMAR

DR. JOEL PANCIERA

Program Director

Education Director

Operations Manager

Senior Advisor

MAILING ADDRESS:

CALL US:

Sistema Tulsa at Boston Avenue UMC 1301 S. Boston Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119

918.699.0150 (Program Director) 918.519.6059 (Sistema Tulsa cell phone)

E-MAIL US: sistematulsa@bostonavenue.org

jlhernandez@bostonavenue.org

joelpanciera@bostonavenue.org

kelseyrooney@bostonavenue.org

ahmedomar@bostonavenue.org Find us on Facebook at facebook.com/sistematulsa

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Visit sistematulsa.org SISTEMA TULSA PROUD We are Performers We are Respectful of everyone We take Ownership of our actions We are Understanding of others We celebrate our Diversity

Sistema Tulsa at Boston Avenue UMC 1301 S. Boston Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119

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