Page 1

Pajoka Eco­Resort Business Plan

modified – Dec 7,  2010

by Noan Fesnoux

Contribute with the Mind Contribute with the Heart Contribute with the Body 1


Letter from the Founder Dear Reader, The document you have in your possession has been a long time coming. Through  the last two years, I have gone through many iterations, each time consulting those  around me for advice and guidance. The final outcome of this process is something I  take great pride in, and am confident is designed to build trust in the business both  locally and internationally. Furthermore, Pajoka will serve as a model for both better  business practices, as well as sound environmental design. I am a naturally inclusive person, and have tried to open up the development  process to any who are interested in participating. During the building process any  and all are welcome to come and establish our first site. For those wishing to  contribute ideas I have created PajokaLearn, a learning commons where ideas can  be readily exchanged and developed. It is people like this who we ultimately wish to  attract.... those to whom it is more than just a beautiful beach in an exotic locale.  I look forward to hearing the feedback this document will generate, incorporating  ideas and concepts my friends and family have to offer, and eventually hosting many  of you at one of the most sustainable beach resorts in the world. Sincerely, Noan Fesnoux

Contribute with  your       m ind    

Contribute with  your       h eart    

Contribute with  your       b ody    

Help develop ideas, design living  systems, and establish a business

Donate money or invest in the  pajoka project

Visit us during building for free, or  pre­book a holiday at discounted  rates

2


Table of Contents Letter from the founder Pajoka as an Open Source Model  Contribute with  y   our     m    ind Introduction      Contribute with  your       h eart Introduction      Contribute with   your b    ody Introduction     Business Overview History Vision and Mission Statement Objectives Ownership Location and Facilities Products and Services Description of Products and  Services Key Features of Products and Services Production of Products and Services Site Selection Transportation Human Resources Future of Products and Services Comparative Advantages in Production Industry Overview Market Research Size of the Industry Key Product Segments Purchase Process and Buying Criteria Description of the Industry Participants Key Industry Trends Industry Outlook Marketing Strategy Target Markets Description of Key Competitors Analysis of Competitive Position Pricing Strategy Promotion Strategy Distribution Strategy Management and Staffing Organizational Structure Management Team Staffing Labour Market Issues Regulatory Issues Risks Implementation Plan Financial Plan Phase I development Phase II development  Socially responsible  profit distribution    

3

2 4 5 6 7

8

8 9 10 10 11 17 17 18 19 19 19 19 20 21 22 22 22 26 25 26 27 28 29 29 30 31 32 33 33 34 34 35 36 36 37 38 39 40 41 47 48


The Open Source Business Model Pajoka's ultimate goal is to act as a successful prototype for a new model of  sustainable tourism. Access to the information and experience Pajoka has gained will  be open to anybody to replicate, modify, and further develop. Sharing information  like this is defined as Open Source. Open Source existed initially as a concept to allow for rapid development and  deployment of web applications and software. It was seen as a way to allow  collaboration and self­enhancing diversification of production models. Since the  dawn of the internet, it has risen to become a vanguard of an open and accessible  information technology era.  Since this beginning, Open Source has extended to more and more human  endeavours. From beverage recipes to designer drugs, many industries have taken on  this model for the benefits it brings to the company and society.  In acting as a model that is freely disbursed, Pajoka will achieve two things. Firstly, it  will provide a means of marketing the concept, and in turn lead to more clients.  Secondly, it will allow for sustainable tourism practices to be rapidly developed on a  global scale. This latter point will improve consumer awareness and may provide a  strong enough impetus to shift industry standard operating procedures. Thus, one of  Pajoka's primary goals (promoting sustainable living practices) will be satisfied. 

Other examples of Open Source Businesses: Instructables Restuarant OpenCola Softdrink Brewtopia The Tropical Disease Initiative The Science Commons Appropopedia – Sustainable Design

4


Contribute with your Mind Any project benefits greatly from the collective imagination of as many people as  possible. Humans are innovative and creative, and can solve seemingly  insurmountable problems using our cognitive abilities. In this light, Pajoka requires input  from many people in the details of development and execution.  Pajoka as it exists today is already an amalgamation of ideas from countless  individuals. One person may see fallacies in what seems like an ironclad idea to  another. Therefore, the first way that people can contribute is by using their mind.  There will be two primary means to voice your ideas and concepts. First is through  Pajokalearn.  The second will be through the Pajoka Facebook page. 

Pajokalearn Pajokalearn will eventually serve as the educational portal for  Pajoka. Everything from helping guests improve their knowledge  and understanding of the region where Pajoka is to the training  of staff will be conducted in an online learning environment. In  the development phase, Pajokalearn will serve primarily as a  forum of discussion about which practices should be used to  ensure Pajoka remains appealing to guests as well as highly  sustainable. 

Pajoka on Facebook Some people may be interested in becoming involved on a  deeper level, but for many the time needed to do so is hard to  find. In that case, Pajoka has a facebook page which will allow  people to post ideas, interesting articles related to sustainable  living, and other comments which may evolve into new ideas  and improve the Pajoka business model. 

All interested parties, whether an investor, beneficiary, or just a passionate  environmentalist, may participate in the development of ideas surrounding Pajoka.  Get involved.... your contributions are always welcome. 5


Contribute with your Heart As with nearly any project, financing is a critical piece of the puzzle. Pajoka refers to  this as a contribution of the heart despite the fact that there will be financial returns  for investors. This is because when money becomes involved, a certain degree of  emotion also enters the picture. A donation may shed light on what passions and  interests an individual may have, while investments indicate a firm belief in the value  of the idea being invested in. Pajoka will search for financing using these avenues:

Investment: The primary means for Pajoka to achieve financing will be  through direct investment. These individuals will buy preferred  shares in Pajoka in blocks of US $5000 , and receive dividends  once Pajoka has become profitable. Investors will also have the  opportunity to purchase and develop adjacent land for their  own use with assistance from Pajoka. When not being used by  the investor, this property will enter the Pajoka rental pool and  profits from its rental will be divided between Pajoka and the  investor.

Donation: In some cases, individuals may want to support Pajoka but not  have the financial means to do so. A donation is a simple way of  providing assistance to the project without a large financial risk.  Once Pajoka has achieved profitability, the amount of money  donated will be returned to the local community and  environmental funds. 

6


Contribute with your body Once financing has been secured and fundamental practices have been put into  place, Pajoka will need to be built and guests will need to fly from around to globe to  experience it. Hence, the visceral stage of contribution will stand as a testament to a  successful venture. Pajoka is pursuing two methods in which people can participate  physically in its establishment:

Assistance in building: Anybody who is eager and willing is more than welcome to  participate in the building of Pajoka. When under construction,  Pajoka will be open and free for anybody to stay (although the  facilities initially will be fairly rustic). Bring whatever skills you may  have, whether that means providing music to work by, a knack  for gardening, or the desire to build walls and roofs.

Holiday package pre-booking: One measure interested parties can take to get involved in  Pajoka is to pre­book a holiday. At US $1000, the recipient will  get a 2 week stay at a time of their choice with all meals  included. That is 50% less than regular bookings. Furthermore,  the holiday voucher is valid for 10 years after purchase and can  be transferred to anybody they like.

7


Business Overview History Tourism has always been viewed as a means to development. Large international  bodies have put billions into foreign economies to promote this type of development.  Naturally, it is seen as a symbiotic venture, since members of the developed countries  profit from improved infrastructure in certain holiday destinations.  The reality of what occurs is much less heartwarming. In many cases locals have been  displaced and dis­empowered within their own community. Surely, jobs and revenue  locals can obtain from the tourists do help. But at what cost? Some mass tourism  destinations have lost their entire cultural identity. Yet tourism still remains a thriving industry, largely because the demand for ever  improved facilities by holiday makers does not relent. If this could be used to promote  cultural preservation, sustainability, and improved living standards all would benefit.  The guest could relaxed in a safe, sustainable, and unique locale, the business would  improve its desirability and ethical status, and investors would be ensured a return on  investment.  Both Noan and Kiky have experience relevant to this type of business. Kiky has worked  many years in the tourism industry and has managed teams of hospitality workers in  the cramped conditions of a cruise ship. Furthermore, she graduated from Tourism  high school and has since worked in many different areas of the hospitality sector.  Noan's studies have brought him to have a good understanding of natural  ecosystems, and what measures need to be taken in order to attain sustainability on  the Pajoka sites. His naturalist background puts him in an ideal position to work as a  nature interpreter, or educate locals in this facet. He has also successfully helped build  a  business which relies on establishing strong connections to the clientele. 

8


Vision and Mission Statement Our mission is to create a multifunctional facility, which can act as holiday getaway  suitable for those who are environmentally conscious, or as a site for a green learning  school. We will strive to have a positive impact on clients and community alike, and  will dedicate a portion of our net profits to community building and conservation  projects. Pajoka will be a business that fits nicely into the green paradigm: a company  built on conservation, sustainability, and profit redistribution into the local economy. Pajoka is designed to become a leader in a new developmental paradigm. As a  sustainable green business, Pajoka will act as a model to both the local and  international community. Through it’s development and operation, Pajoka will incite  positive changes in education, leisure, and global awareness.

9


Objectives Our ultimate objective is to foster environmental stewardship in the local communities  within which we operate, set aside land for conservation purposes, and provide  shareholders with a satisfactory return on investment.   Our immediate goals are to: 1. Obtain a relevant site for the construction of the Pajoka sustainable resort 2. Create an effective marketing campaign and buzz about the Pajoka project. 3. Complete the core habitation units on site, and start to generate revenues  through their rentals. 4. Attract tourist for holidays throughout Sulawesi, particularly in South Sulawesi 5. Develop an ecologically minded community of citizens from around the globe. 

Ownership Pajoka will be licensed as a direct foreign investment corporation (PMA) in Indonesia.  The ownership of the corporation will be shared between investors, and the land  for  phase 2 will be leased from the community on an extended lease (Hak Bangunan).  Land in phase 1 is owned by Reski Amirullah, although structures developed on it will  belong to Pajoka.  This will be done through the Hak Bangunan status.

Ara beach is an unnoticed but stunning strip of sand in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Investors' properties will be purchased through Pajoka, and leased directly to the  investor through a Hak Bangunan agreement with a lease of 50 years, which is  extendable thereafter. These properties may be sold by the owner (ie. Investor), but  the use of the property will continue to be the same. Pajoka will maintain the right to  rent out the property when the owner is not there, and will continue to charge a  community upkeep fee when the owner is present. 

10


Location and Facilities

A clear satellite image of Ara beach. The road in the centre is steep, but the only access aside from the sea.

Pajoka will operate out of Indonesia. The site is located on Ara Beach in South  Sulawesi. The 1.3km long beach contains only a few temporary dwellings, used by  boat builders and fishermen from the local village. Still in a fairly natural state, this  beach does not have water or electricity connections. Therefore, all development will  be off grid. Close to the site are a number of attractions, including many dive sites  around Bira, unique cultural villages such as Kajang, several caves of varying sizes,  and island hopping around the area. 

The dive sites around Bira are well known amongst enthusiasts, and only a short boat voyage from Ara. What lies in between has yet to be discovered.

11


Development will occur in two stages. Phase 1 will start  up operations first, and act as a test site for the viability  of Phase 2. At the first site a main house with lounge,  kitchen, and dining area will look out onto three  bungalows directly on the beach. This site will be nicely  landscaped, with many food gardens laid out under the  fruit groves of this flat terrain. A wall of coconut trees will  shade the walking area between the bungalows. The  white sand beach will be a prime attraction, as well as  the diving and hiking in the area. This small site will be  equipped with a full service dive centre and dive boat.  The sand along Ara beach is some of the  whitest around. The clean intertidal area  is ideal for beach lounging and playing  games.

Phase 2 will consist of 10 bungalows, a  restaurant/kitchen, a service house, and leisure  centre. 7 of the bungalows will be double  occupancy, while three will be designed for  families. Every bungalow will have views of the  water and beach. The restaurant will be able to  provide food for all the guests, and be able to  offer room service if desired. The service house will  provide facilities for storage, laundry, staff housing,  and contain fundamentals of the electricity  infrastructure. The leisure centre will house  equipment for divers, and provide equipment for  other beach activities.

Rocky cliffs flank Ara beach, but make for  interesting explorations of crab filled cliffsides. 

In addition to these two stages of development for Pajoka, there will also be  development led by the investors in their personal accommodation. Pajoka will assist  the investors in acquiring property, a team of builders, and establishing their  beachfront home. The establishment of these sites will be dependent on the investors,  and therefore will not be taken into account in the initial financial statements in this  business plan.

12


Phase 1 Photos

View of Ara beach from Phase 1 site

Phase 1 property as currently seen from the beach. The property goes from the tree on the left to the   palm tree on the far right of the photo

13


Phase 1 property as seen from the North corner. This picture was taken at the end of the  dry season, so some of the trees have dropped their leaves.

14


Phase 2 Photos

180 degree panorama of site for Phase 2

The entrance to the site is   through a large fissure running   parallel to the beach

A view from the hills surrounding the second site

Interesting rocks along Ara beach.

15


Phase 1 Building Design

16


Products and Services Description of Products and Services Pajoka will sell relaxing luxury holidays to ecologically minded clients. These holidays  will include meals and accommodation. 

Accommodation at Pajoka will be in  either in the in Bungalows designed to  host couples, but can be adapted to fit  families of 4 comfortably. 2 bungalows will  have a main room and a bathroom, and  1 will have 2 rooms and a bathroom. All  are isolated from the other bungalows to  give privacy to the guests. Once investors  have added their properties to the rental  pool, there will be more diversity in the  accommodation available. At the moment, the Pajoka site offers comfortable, yet rustic  accommodation.

In the neighbourhood of Ara, there are many fruit groves and  forests. Mangoes, papaya, coffee, and chocolate all grow in  this area. 

All meals at Pajoka will be locally  sourced, and provide guests with a  healthy and authentic gastronomic  experience. Since food is purchased  locally, guests will not be able to choose  from a menu, but instead will be offered  what can be made with ingredients  available. Guests may request other  meals at an additional cost, and are  welcome to use the kitchen provided  they do not interfere with regular  operations. 

The activities available to the guests are numerous, and will increase with time.  Through local partnerships, Pajoka will offer a variety of activities such as diving,  sailing, and fishing. Other activities, such as hiking and touring the local area, can be  done through Pajoka. Special requests are always taken into consideration, and  Pajoka will try to meet these.

17


Key Features of Products and Services Over the past 10 years, the environment has become increasingly important in  people's eyes. Pajoka will cater to the next generation of consumer: those who rate  the quality of their vacation not only on the nature of the vacation but also on its  sustainability. Since Pajoka is based in Indonesia, the initial investment for travellers  from America and Europe (flights and time) will be high. Therefore, it is important to  create a lasting impression for them. Although some repeat guests are expected,  Pajoka hopes that promotion through word of mouth will allow us to expand our client  base. 

The principles behind Pajoka will allow guests to  experience a self sustainable system which does  not rely on polluting machinery (with the  exception of transportation). With the self  sustainability will come a back to nature  approach, the natural beauty of the area will be  showcased wherever possible, and bungalows will  be integrated into the natural landscape. 

Pajoka will work around existing vegetation as much as possible

The bungalows are meant to create a personal space for each family, while the  commons area will provide guests with someplace to meet up and do group  activities. Situated around the site will be a variety of seating areas so that guests can  have some options as to where they want to relax.  Staff will keep the resort tidy and will provide regular laundry and cleaning of the  rooms. The staff will be well versed with knowledge of the local area, will speak both  the local language and English, and will try to accommodate the guests in any ways  possible.

18


Production of Products and Services Pajoka will need to be created from the ground up. There are a number of resources  which need to be acquired in order for Pajoka to come to fruition:

Site Selection A site in South Sulawesi has been chosen as the initial development site. The site has  been purchased and landscaped, but remains without electricity, water, or any  permanent dwellings. It is wild, but still accessible by road and within 40 minutes to  regional hospitals and trade centres.  A village nearby will provide a reliable work  force, as well as food broker. 

Building Materials Most building materials will be sourced locally,  while special building materials such as power  generation, lighting, and waste management will  be shipped to Makassar and then transported to  the site. Installation of the electric systems will  require specialists, but general building  construction will be done in traditional fashion,  Temporary buildings like the ones seen above can using traditional means. This will keep costs down  be reused and incorporated into the building process. and allow Pajoka to invest immediately in the  community through the creation of jobs. One available  option for sourcing environmentally friendly building materials from the local area is to  purchase old houses, and rework the wood into new bungalows. 

Transportation A regular and reliable means of transporting  goods and people will need to be acquired.  This will facilitate rapid construction and later  will help transport guests from the airport to  the resort. 

This vehicle is an example of the type of  transportation Pajoka will initially purchase.

19


Human Resources Initially, we will need to establish a corporation in Indonesia and attain the valid  building permits and licenses from the Government. Reski Amirullah will be in charge  of this, and most of the local purchasing and initiating in dialogue with the  community. Later she will take a managerial role in Pajoka, leading the staff and  establishing procedures. Noan Fesnoux will head site development, coordinate the  deployment of power generation, and act as Foreman of the building project. Once  Pajoka has been completed, two additional individuals will be hired as hospitality  workers, helping with daily operations at Pajoka. 

Future of Products and Services As Pajoka begins to receive guests, we will adapt over time to reflect Industry trends  and the client's needs. Various activities will be added to ensure that we can  accommodate a broad range of clients.  Provided that Pajoka receives a consistent stream of clients, Pajoka will look at  expanding its base of operation and look into the viability of increasing the resort's  capacity. Furthermore, the option of multiple bungalow sites that allow guests to  enjoy a variety of natural landscapes will be looked at. 

Achieving complete self sustainability at our primary location.

Catamaran Camping Tours in remote locations, allowing guests to  explore the area in a natural, relaxed, and carbon neutral fashion. 

Treks through Indonesian national parks which are guided by  experienced English speaking naturalists.

Hosting of Sustainability camps catering to forward thinking  students from across the world, using English as a means of  communication. These camps will be marketed as an experience  designed to both improve English skills and introduce the Green  Paradigm shift.

20


Comparative Advantages in Production Much of the corporate structure will place Pajoka in a leading role in future markets.  Since Pajoka will form as either a social business or a social enterprise, guests will feel  more inclined to frequent our resorts, even if similarly priced with the competition. Pajoka's policy to provide per bungalow rates will encourage families who are looking  for quality that fits their budget. Larger groups of people will also be encouraged to  attend, costing Pajoka marginally more per person but increasing the likelihood that  guests will engage in more activities.  Since the Pajoka site will be relatively  isolated and in a natural environment,  guests may prefer to reside at a  Pajoka resort over the competition.  Pajoka aims at integrating nature into  the design of the resort as much as  possible, and due to the carbon  neutral goals that the company  aspires to, guests will take comfort in  the knowledge that their holiday is  not placing additional burden on the  ecosystem, but rather assisting in its  conservation. 

Looking over the edge of a cliff in the area at the coral  gardens below. Aside from the beaches most of the coast  looks like the picture above.

21


Industry Overview Market Research The tourism industry has been consistently on the rise over the last several decades,  and ecotourism has developed large inroads in carving out their own chunk in the  tourism industry. With the emergence of China as a economic powerhouse, Indonesia  is poised to benefit from tourism from China. Indonesia is also located close to  Australia, Japan, India, and Korea, all with direct air transit to Bali.  In the past 10 years there has been an increase in  foreign interest in Sulawesi, particular to tourists prone  for finding off the beaten track locations. Since the  natural environment is not heavily disturbed, the island  of Sulawesi has become a hotspot for ecotourism.  There are already a number of operators in the area,  however none have as radical of a vision of  sustainability as Pajoka. All the same, these businesses  have established themselves well, and are able to  charge western rates in Indonesia.

Pajoka will lead the market in developing a business plan which suits the Green  Paradigm, the next major economic shift predicted by the majority of economists. In  subscribing to ecologically sensitive practices, and developing a strong role in the  community, Pajoka will cater toward values that are always in demand: charity,  community, and environmental stewardship. 

Size of the Industry The tourism industry has been expanding continuously over the past century, and with  the advent of wide­bodied aircraft which enable people to reach farther and farther  afield, Tourism has particularly grown in developing nations.  Eco­tourism in particular has been in a state of rapid growth over the past two  decades, and is projected to grow even faster in the coming years. In 2004, the UN  World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) found that eco­tourism was growing three times  faster than conventional tourism. In 2005, the Tourism Network rated eco­tourism as  the fastest growing sector of the tourism industry, with an annual growth rate of 5%  worldwide, representing approximately 6% of the world gross domestic product.

22


Key Product Segments Eco­tourism is broken into a multitude of segments. Pajoka will classify as an inbound  tour operator and eco­tourism accommodation provider. As an inbound tour  operator, Pajoka will be required to make arrangements with various local businesses  to provide accommodation, food, transportation, and interpreters (whether language  or nature). Our accommodation will appeal to a number of different segments in the  hospitality industry. 1. Family Package Holidays

2. Student/Backpacker accommodation

3. Educational Excursions

4. Adventure travellers

5. Vacation Rental Property

6. Long term vacationers

These segments in this market are based mainly on pricing and the length of stay.  Pajoka will be able to accommodate these groups since our layout is fairly flexible.  We can also offer long term vacation offers, which will reduce the profit generated  per bungalow, but also fill up bungalows for extended periods of time.  Since Pajoka will be located in a natural setting and will contribute to the  conservation of the environment, it is our hope that we can attract school groups for  nature interpretation and education on sustainability. Of utmost importance will be Pajoka's appeal to Families and groups of travellers. The  bungalows will offer privacy for the group, and communal sitting areas will allow  larger groups to gather and interact as they want. Many of Pajoka's programs will  involve education of the guests about the local culture and the environment.

23


Key Market Segments Eco­tourism caters to a growing body of  travellers who are seeking "green" vacations. The  appeal is generally to families and individuals 30­ 50 years of age, but is not limited to this group. If  affordable, Pajoka will also be able to appeal to  students and younger travellers who are  searching for sustainability in their holidays.

A 2005 Analysis done by the Centre on Eco­tourism and  Sustainable development  found that more than two thirds of U.S. and Australian travellers, and more than 90% of  British travellers, consider active protection of the environment and responsibility for  the community a hotel's obligation. It is Pajoka's main priority to meet these demands. The Eco­tourism market is very broad. While most of the  patrons are between 35 and 55, there is an increasing number  of "mature" adults (older than 55) who are seeking out Eco­ tourism holidays. The market is equally divided by gender, and  it is found that most eco­tourists are physically active  individuals. Eco­tourists tend to be better educated  professionals or businesspeople with college degrees and a  genuine interest in learning about the nature and culture. Kurt Kutay, a tour operator, states that many of the traditional eco­tourists fall into two  main categories: Dual Income, No Children (DINC's) and empty nesters (children who  have already grown and left the house). In the new millennium, two new market  segments are emerging: families and single professionals. For both of the latter  categories, it is of great importance to establish a cultural connection with the locals,  quite possibly this factor is even more important than environmental protectionism. 

24


Purchase Process and Buying Criteria There are many factors people consider when choosing an eco­tourism holiday.  Among factors to consider are: accessibility; location; seclusion; comfort; personal  touch and design of site; price; attractions and activities; and friendliness of staff and  locals.

Since most of the customers will be  sought out through referral (word of  mouth), it is essential that our customer  service is of top quality. Therefore, staff  should be friendly at all times, and the site  should be welcoming for all visitors. It will  also be important for the community to  participate in this through genuine  interaction with the guests which leaves  both parties satisfied. Through such  offerings, we will also expect a fair  number of repeat customers. The eco­ tourism industry often works through  referrals and repeat customers. Remy got a little tour around the beach on a traditional boat. 

Certain amenities are also of importance to the customers. In terms of the basic  needs in their accommodation, beds, private bathrooms, linen, soaps and toiletries,  furniture, look and feel of the room, mosquito netting and ceiling fans are all  important.  Other factors about the site play an important role in what the customer demands as  well. The meals, site design, interaction with locals, staff, activities and attractions all  play an important role in this. 

25


Description of Industry Participants The Eco­tourism industry is hard to define, since many places claiming to be eco­ tourism destinations do not abide by the principles of eco­tourism. There are also  many  other sectors in the tourism industry which get erroneously lumped into eco­ tourism, such as nature tourism, cultural tourism, and adventure tourism. Places in Indonesia which offer genuine eco­tourism are few and far between. The  market for eco­tourism in this country has only recently opened up, and many of the  operators are capitalizing on lax definitions to advertise themselves as eco­tourism  destinations in Indonesia.  Much of the eco­tourism industry in Indonesia  at the moment offer more environmentally  friendly holidays, but neglect to contribute to  the community and protect the environment.  Most of the current eco­tourism locations are  near large population and tourism centres  such as Bali, but a few are in more secluded  and pristine areas of Indonesia.   Misool Eco­Resort in Rajah Ampat, Indonesia. This place is  an excellent example of responsible ecotourism.

Tourism in Sulawesi is still in its infancy.  Much of the island remains  underdeveloped, and no areas have  reached their saturation point. A minute  proportion of the accommodation  options in Sulawesi can be classified as  eco­tourism even in the broadest sense of  the term, and those that do are generally  secluded from one another and offer a  variety of levels of luxury at a variety of  prices. Amatoa resort is in Bira, a town located abour 20 minutes from  Pajoka's site. This resort represents high end holidays which  attract divers from Europe. 

26


Key Industry Trends Current trends demonstrate the eco­tourism is on the rise. As the fastest growing  segment in the tourism industry, it is projected that roughly 30% of the entire market will  be in eco­tourism (in the broad form of the definition, which includes nature tourism  and adventure tourism) by 2030.  Airline travel may limit long distance  vacationers in the future if prices become  prohibitive, however Indonesia is located  close enough to developed countries  such as Australia, Singapore, South Korea  and Japan that the growing demand for  eco­tourism in these countries will sustain  businesses in Indonesia. China is also  becoming a major source of revenue for  international tourism, with hundreds of  millions of Chinese tourists travelling by  2020. Since Makassar is now an  international airport with flights to open  soon to Hong Kong, travel times will be  greatly reduced for East Asians.

Makassar is a short flight from regional hubs, like Singapore

Pajoka is also attempting to cater to long term tourists more in the future as well, in the  event that air travel costs become prohibitive. Most professionals are becoming  increasingly mobile with the emergence of Information Technology such as the  internet and mobile devices. This may allow professionals to have extended "working  holidays" wherein they are able to enjoy the natural environment and seclusion  without affecting their career. Pajoka aims to provide a reliable virtual connection to  the outside world, while also allowing one to enjoy the warm weather and easygoing  manner of the tropics. 

27


Industry Outlook Within the tourism industry, it is expected that high impact tourism has come to its  saturation point. Tourists and local governments alike have become increasingly  aware of the destructive tendencies that the mass tourism market creates. This can  be clearly seen in the tendencies of World Bank lending for tourism. In the 70's tourism  was hailed as a solution to end poverty in developing countries. The World Bank  surmised that heavy development in this sector would allow for developing countries  to limit inflation and improve their GDP. However, coupled with free trade this did  quite the opposite, severely stressing the environment around tourist centres and  generally leaving very little profits in the country where the development took place.  Now the World Bank and other major lending agencies have put a focus on eco­ tourism, especially that which is locally run and profits remain in the host country. The  demand for Eco­tourism has preceded the lending tendencies of the World Bank, as  well as any major regulatory body. Many of the leading authorities in the Tourism  Industry believe that eco­tourism is still in its infancy, and that with increasing  environmental awareness people will be more and more inclined to go on holidays  that involve eco­tourism aspects. Globally, there is a  consistently rising number of people who are environmentally and  socially aware, and this may put further measures into place which favour eco­ tourism. As people become more aware of an individual's impact on their  environment, tourists will seek out locations which minimize this, as well as put valuable  land under conservation.

28


Marketing Strategy Target Markets The target market for Pajoka will depend on the activity that we are selling. Primarily,  we will rely on middle income families and small groups. Due to the low cost of staying  at Pajoka resorts, we aspire to be affordable to the average family who would take a  trip to Bali or other regional tourism hotspots. Pajoka will offer the target market an  affordable eco­holiday in a remote and peaceful location. 

There is a growing awareness among Asian nations about  the importance of our environment. This will inevitably lead  to more interest in eco­tourism, which means that there will  be a much greater number of people in the target market  as ecological awareness develops in Asia. As an indicator,  Korea has recently changed their national paradigm to  "Green and clean". While green living may not be practised,  it is already being exploited for its marketability.  Pajoka's educational division will target yet another market:  the aspiring English students. While costs for summer camps  continue to rise, many Asian families who wish to improve  their child's English are looking towards destinations that are  closer to home. This coupled with Pajoka's green paradigm  makes it a highly appealing location for a camp.    Nature tourism is booming in  China.

Yet another group in Pajoka's target market will be the  adventure traveller. This group has a broad range of  budgets, and Pajoka will work at finding suitable  packages and prices for all adventurers.

Swimming in a cave near Ara beach

29


Description of Key Competitors Pajoka will rely initially on word of mouth as the primary means of attracting clients.  The initial guests will likely be those related or connected directly with staff at Pajoka.  Much of the eco­tourism industry has flourished using this as the primary means of  marketing.  While there are a number of competitors in Indonesia,  most of these do not fulfil the mandate of being a  proper eco­tourism resort. Many resorts claim to be  ecologically conscious, while only doing the bare  minimum required to call themselves an "eco­resort".  These resorts will be considered a threat to Pajoka in  the sense that they can operate with lower budgets    and higher profit margins and do not perpetuate a  Large resorts like the one pictured above  consume great amounts of energy and  sound image of eco­tourism in Indonesia.  produce lost of waste.

The proper eco­tourism resorts which  follow ecologically sound practices may  actually offer access to new clientele.  Since the overall vision is the same, and  the areas of operation are generally far  apart, an alliance between true eco­ tourism operators would be able to refer  clients, trade industry practices, and  potentially work together on overseas  marketing. 

Alila in Ubud is an example of a high end ecotourism resort

30


Analysis of Competitive Position

Green School is Bali is an excellent example of  environmental education.

In some ways Pajoka will have no competition in  Indonesia. Up until now, only one other eco­ tourism education facility has been established in  Indonesia. This niche market will be principally  served by Pajoka. There are other facilities in  Indonesia which offer similar programs, but no  facility to date which educates the students in    English and about the environment. 

With the middle class family tourists, there  is a fair amount of competition, however  it is centralized in Bali. Most off grid  establishments cater to upper class  couples, while Pajoka will cater to middle  class families in its first phase of  development. Direct competition  includes Wakatobi Dive Resort, Selayar  Dive Resort, Misool Eco­Resort, and Maleo  Cottages. These operators are dispersed  throughout Eastern Indonesia, and each  offer a slightly different experience to that  which Pajoka aims to provide. 

Selayar Dive resort in South Sulawesi

Pajoka's greatest competitive advantage will be  that of price for westerners. Most resorts take  advantage of their exclusivity and charge prices  which make travel with a larger group to these  areas prohibitive. Pajoka will count on the target  market of families and middle class travellers to  keep a decent level of patronage in order to offer    lower prices.  The Wakatobi dive resort in Southeast Sulawesi

31


Pricing Strategy Summary of prices: 1 bedroom bungalow and meals ­ $140/night 2 bedroom bungalow and meals ­ $160/night Educational Adventures ­ $25/student/day Adventures – $25/hr for planning and from $50/day for guides. 

Pajoka will have a number of pricing strategies, each catering to a target market: 1. Middle Class Family ­ For this demographic, Pajoka will charge on a per night  basis for a bungalow. The costs will be approximately $160 per night. Each  bungalow will provide sleeping arrangements for 4 people. Included in this  price would be 3 meals, although if the guests want to order particular foods  they will have to pay extra. Extra people in the bungalow will cost $20 per  person per day. 2. Couples – This group will be able to afford a little more per person, and each  bungalow will go for $140 per night. Included in this will be three meals that are  made using sustainable means. 3. Educational Tourists ­ Pajoka will have facilities that will be able to  accommodate a medium sized camp of approximately 20 students. Pajoka will  bill the academic organization who runs the camp directly a rate of $35 per  student per day. This will include meals, accommodation, and transportation.  4. Adventure Tourists ­ Some tourists who come to Pajoka eco­resort will have  arranged custom itineraries with Pajoka. Pajoka will charge these people $25  per hour for the arrangement of the itinerary, and from $50 per day for the  guide. All other costs will be added to the final estimate of each trip.  Pajoka is following an aggressive pricing strategy wherein we will be able to open up  eco­tourism to a niche who until recently have not been able to afford it. Pajoka will  rely on location to add great value for the clients, while initially avoiding costly  infrastructure such as air conditioning in all rooms. When compared to other remote  resorts, Pajoka will have a much more appealing pricing policy. 

32


Promotion Strategy

Pajoka will initially build a buzz through word of mouth.  This has proven effective for many other low budget eco­ tourism operators. However, other marketing initiatives will  be pursued in order to ensure regular patronage. Not our target market, but quite possibly  something that is marketable!

Pajoka will also campaign digitally through the internet. The  main reason for this is that there is a much greater reach,  and since the target market for Pajoka is so broad  geographically it will be necessary to develop online  presence. This has already been initiated through the  Pajoka Blog and Pajoka's website, as well as through  postings on other sites (such as environmental graffiti and  TED). Another reason why Pajoka will use the Internet as the  primary marketing tool is the environmental impact is less. Fliers and brochures are  expensive to create initially, and they also create large amounts of waste, something  Pajoka will avoid wherever possible. Furthermore, Pajoka will strive to establish  connections to like minded businesses through the Internet. These connections may  develop into symbiotic relationships where mutual benefits can be attained. 

Distribution Strategy Pajoka holidays will be bought directly online via the Pajoka website. Bookings can be  made on the telephone, through our representatives, or directly over the internet.  Customer service and sales support will occur directly through the Internet. Email will  be a primary means of communication, along with direct person to person chatting  through online applications such as Skype and Yahoo Messenger. 

33


Management and Staffing Organizational Structure Pajoka is a Social Business, and will have a board of  shareholders who will oversee major investments and provide  overview of the operational budget. However, as preferred  shareholders the board members will not have voting rights,  and instead depend on Noan Fesnoux to adhere to the  company mandate as laid out at startup. Shareholders may  hold a vote of no confidence if the company mandate is  violated, and there is strong evidence of mismanagement. This graphic defines prime motives of Pajoka Eco-resort

Daily management will be conducted by Reski Amirullah, one of the founders of  Pajoka. She will implement the ongoing budget of Pajoka, ensuring efficiency and  staff satisfaction.  Initial start­up of Pajoka will be managed by  Noan Fesnoux and Reski Amirullah. They will  make sure that the construction of Pajoka  satisfies its mission statement, as well as  present clear progress reports to investors  through blogging and regular updates via  email.

34


Management Team Noan Fesnoux has successfully built a previous  business, Little Mountain Campus Academy, from  the ground up alongside the owners of that  company. He has a background in science, giving  him the tools necessary to understand the complex  interactions that are needed to make Pajoka a self­ sustainable business. As a world traveller, he has  witnessed a variety of industry practices, both good  and bad, which will aid him in developing an  appealing and ecologically sensitive eco­resort.

Quite possible the only known photo of my  father and his two sons all wearing suits. 

Reski Amirullah graduated from tourism high­ school in South Sulawesi, and went on to  become a critical member of a liveaboard  dive operation based in Indonesia. She has  experience with staff management, as well as  guest relations. Her knowledge of the local  cultures and customs is invaluable to the  success of Pajoka, and will provide support for  the initial development of Pajoka. In a country  where local contacts are vital for a business'  conception, Reski's network of contacts will  aid in the rapid development of Pajoka.  Resumes for Reski and Noan are attached to  the business plan.

35

Kiky and her consultants discussing 'business affairs'


Staffing While Pajoka is under development, there will be no need for ongoing staff positions.  Upon welcoming the first guests, Pajoka will hire a small staff to maintain the hotel and  provide additional services.  1. Room Service, site maintenance – A local will be hired as  the first staff member with Pajoka. They will ensure a  general cleanliness of the facilities, make beds daily, and  assist with meal preparation. While experience will be an  asset, this is not required. The workers will be paid a  monthly wage that is above national standards, which  will amount to no more that 2 000 000 Rp per month (~200  USD). Initially, no benefits package will be awarded,  however as Pajoka increases its clientele they will receive  health benefits and continuing education scholarships. Training for the position  will require them to learn basic English, as well as what is required in general  housekeeping. This training will be provided by Reski Amirullah. 2. Driver, Groundskeeper – This position will also be one  given to a local resident. They will drive the company  vehicle for guests and maintain the Pajoka gardens. They  must have experience as either a driver or a farmer,  preferably both. They will be paid a monthly salary of 2  000 000 Rp (~200 USD). Benefits will be provided at a later  date as Pajoka increases its usership. The person must  have a valid driver's license. Training in basic English, as well as cooking for  western clientele will be provided by Reski Amirullah. As Pajoka increases its clientele, these jobs will be divided among more staff  members. Each will be provided with an education in a  basic level of English  speaking and understanding, as well as details about the Pajoka site which allow it to  be self sustainable. 

Labour Market Issues Unemployment is quite high in Indonesia, and therefore there will unlikely be any  shortage in qualified staff for Pajoka. Furthermore, given that Pajoka will pay above  national standards for the work assigned, it is likely that the job will be highly vetted.  The remote location may prove to make living off site difficult, in which case  accommodation for staff will be provided by Pajoka. 

36


Regulatory Issues Intellectual Property Protection Pajoka aims to spread green tourism practices across Indonesia, and will attempt to  make much of the documentation and processes within the company open for  public use. Transparency is an issue which many Indonesian companies lack, and  Pajoka wishes to do its best to provide transparent accounting and procedures in a  effort to immunize itself from corruption.  Creative Commons copyrights will be provided to all documentation Pajoka creates.  This will serve the dual purpose of allowing the company to increase brand awareness  as well as promote healthy, sustainable tourism practices in Indonesia. 

Regulatory Issues Pajoka will be required to initially register as a PMA in Indonesia. Indonesian law has  recently changed to permit complete ownership by foreigners, however we will  attempt to maintain foreign ownership for part of the company. As with any hotel, Pajoka will need to register with the local tourism board and gain  approval for commercial use of the site. Pajoka will also attempt to make connections  within provincial and regional government which allows the company to serve as a  model of sustainable tourism in the area. Sulawesi currently has a strong mandate  promoting green business, which may facilitate development.

37


Risks Market Risks The tourism industry is one highly susceptible to a variety of factors. Politics, natural  disasters, terrorism, economics,  and media all have serious impacts on the tourism  industry. While these factors can crush the tourism industry, a low overhead and safe  business practices can help Pajoka sustain itself through difficult times. Furthermore,  using referrals provides some immunity to these factors. Other Risks As with all tourism operations, there is also the liability to keep the client in good  health throughout their stay. Safe business practices in all activities which Pajoka  undertakes will be an essential part in keeping clients safe while staying with Pajoka.  Another risk that Pajoka will have to contend with is under and overexposure.  Underexposure will require Pajoka to develop a new marketing strategy, in which a  broader client base is sought. This can be achieved through working with Outbound  Tour operators, developing new packages to appeal to other market niches, and  lastly hiring a marketing agency to assist with expanding our exposure. Overexposure  could also result in compromising Pajoka's mission of providing high quality tourism  through attracting insincere clients. With such an issue, Pajoka would need to screen  incoming guests to ensure they wish to patron Pajoka for the right purposes.

38


Implementation Plan Implementation Activities and Dates Nov 2009 First Pajoka site has been purchased Dec 2011 Construction of Pajoka main guest house has begun Mar 2012 Primary guests house has been completed, and  work on secondary structures underway May 2012 Pajoka has attracted first clients July 2012 Pajoka continues to further develop site... gardens growing  and further buildings planned Nov 2012 Pajoka profits exceed monthly upkeep costs.

39


Financial Plan Summary of Financial Statement The first Pajoka resort will be created in two phases of development. The first phase will  provide a small and intimate setting on the main beach, and will serve as a test into  the viability for further development of Pajoka. Once the first phase is complete, the  second phase will be started. This phase will cost considerably more to develop, but  have a much shorter recapitulation period. The size of phase two will also mean that  the project will have a considerably stronger influence in promoting conservation,  sustainable development, and cultural preservation in the area. 

Initial Investment: Pajoka aims at collecting the required start­up capital without taking loans from the  bank. Pajoka will seek investment in several manners. First would be a contributor,  who is interested in supporting Pajoka's mission but does not have the capital to  do so. These people can donate money (5­500 dollars) and time to help realize  the goals Pajoka has set out to achieve. While they see no financial benefit for  their actions, they receive recognition and personal reward in helping out. The second group are the Early vacationers. For an investment of 1000 dollars, they  will receive a coupon for two weeks at Pajoka resort once it has been  completed These coupons will be valid for 10 years, and allow the recipient 2  weeks of vacation time at Pajoka. Multiple units of this can be bought per  individual, allowing those interested to purchase as much vacation time as they  may be interested in. The final group are the investors. They will invest in preferred shares of Pajoka in blocks  of 5000 dollars. These investors will receive dividends once Pajoka has achieved  profitability, as well as assistance in purchasing adjacent lands near Pajoka sites.  Following Pajoka's development code, they can then share in the infrastructure  development, as well as create additional units that can be added to the  Pajoka rental pool. Their share status will be that of preferred shareholders.

40


Phase 1: Initial Beachfront Bungalows, Service House, and Dive  Equipment for 4 guests Target Investment:  $120 000 Projected Recapitulation Period: 3 years from start of operations Target Net Monthly Income: $11 000 Target Monthly Expenses: $US 1 856 Phase 1 requires relatively little staff, but will require an international coordinator to  manage bookings and site staff. *After balancing the budget books and providing  investors with a return on their investment, Pajoka will re­evaluate the coordinator’s  monthly income.  *coordinator salary will increase with profitability

Long Term Development Goals for phase 1 core complex: Peak re­investment into the community (per annum): $US 13 900 Peak re­investment into the environment (per annum): $US 16 800 for more information on this, click here

41


Pro Forma Income Statement (all in $US) 2012 Net Sales

2013

2014

3 year overview

20060*

54660**

65500***

0

0

0

20060

54660

65500

Sales & Marketing

120

2700

2700

Property & Utilities

0

2000

2000

2196

4392

4392

5431.29

1175.19

1408.25

6300

6300

12300

Interest Operating  Loan Interest Term Loan

0

0

0

0

0

0

Depreciation

0

0

0

14047.29

16567.19

22800.25

Direct Cost of  Sales Gross Margin

140220

Expenses:

Operations Banking & Other Wages & Benefits

Total Expenses Net Income Before  Taxes Less: Income Taxes

6012.71

38092.81

42699.75

1202.54

7618.56

8539.95

Net Income

4810.17

30474.25

34159.8

*using conservative estimates of an average of 20% occupancy **at 30% occupancy ***at 40% occupancy

42

53414.73

69444.22


Pajoka Projected Net Income over first years: The below graph is an estimate based on an average occupancy of 20% in the first  year, and 30% in the second year. Max. Occupancy is at 70% in the summer of 2013  over this period.

number of nights sold

estimated occupancy through first couple years of operation 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

small beach bungalow large beach bungalow

07/12 09/12 11/12 01/13 03/13 05/13 07/13 09/13 11/13 06/12 08/12 10/12 12/12 02/13 04/13 06/13 08/13 10/13 12/13

date

This next graph shows the net profits Pajoka estimates it will generate:

estimated net income Jun 2012 - Dec2013 8000

net income

6000 4000 Net

2000 0 07/12 09/12 11/12 01/13 03/13 05/13 07/13 09/13 11/13 -200006/12 08/12 10/12 12/12 02/13 04/13 06/13 08/13 10/13 12/13 -4000

date

43


Phase 1 Total Expenses for Infrastructure

Fully equipped has a capacity for 8 guests, as well as diving and sailing equipment.  This is the desirable status for Phase 1. This would enable the resort to attract a broad  demographic of clientele, as well as provide excellent facilities. Main house and 2 guest bungalows would be the minimal functional size in providing  hotel like service. Otherwise Pajoka would be more appropriately designated a  vacation rental. Phase 1 will open Jun 2012 to it’s first guests. With an estimated average occupancy  of 20­30 percent Pajoka would take approximately 3 years to repay the initial  investment.

44


Startup Cost Estimates for Phase I – detailed analysis number

cost per  unit

total

Infrastructure

section total 26450

tapping the source piping general wastewater  gardens solar panels windmill generator battery/power storage inverter and regulator water holding tanks

1 1 1

1000 2500 3000

1000 2500 3000

10 1 1 1 3

1000 5000 4000 500 150

10000 5000 4000 500 450

Service house

26410 main structure outdoor bathroom and WC cooking cove and hearth fridge freezer microwave stove oven HE dishwasher AC unit tables chairs sofa upstairs lounge seating upstairs bookshelf pots and pans dining set for 20 pax lighting side tables coffee table hammocks

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 10 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 8

15000 2500 2500 300 300 120 500 300 300 250 70 40 700 250 50 200 100 2000 30 30 30

15000 2500 2500 300 300 120 500 300 300 250 280 400 700 250 50 200 100 2000 60 60 240

Bungalows

23270 structure wastewater garden plumbing bed frame mattress

3 3 3 4 4 45

5000 1000 500 100 300

15000 3000 1500 400 1200


indoor furniture toilet sink shower fixings outdoor recliners bedsheets towels

4 3 3 3 6 8 12

200 50 60 100 40 40 15

800 150 180 300 240 320 180

dive RIB (rigid inflatable  boat) compressor dive tanks BCD Fins Weight Belts

1

5000

5000

1 4 4 4 4

1000 120 500 70 40

catamaran

1

2500

1000 480 2000 280 160 0 2500

Equipment

11420

Gardens

800 vegetable garden tree planting irrigation hoses equipment shed gardening equipment

1 10 1 1 1

100 10 250 150 200

100 100 250 150 200

business costs

8600 lawyer fees accounting fees business license liability insurance

1 1 1 1

1000 600 5000 2000

Transportation

1000 600 5000 2000

16440 8 passenger vehicle vehicle insurance

1 1

46

15000 1440


Phase 2 – Cliff­side bungalows, central restaurant, expanded  diving and recreational facilities.  Target investment: $US 200 000 Projected recapitulation period: under two years Target Net Monthly income: $US 29 988 Target Net Monthly expenses: $8740 Phase 2 of Pajoka will move the business from the experimental stage into a legitimate  business. In this stage, facilities will be able to provide for up to 40 guests  simultaneously when taking into account the accommodation created in phase 1.  Staffing will be expanded substantially, and new key roles will form. Some of the key  infrastructure costs (ei. Water and power) will be partially covered with the surplus  from phase 1.  Eight new bungalows (4 small and 4 large) and a larger  restaurant/commons area will be the largest expenses in this stage. 

47


Social Business – Profit Distribution Model If Pajoka were to act as a social business, investment into the community and the  environment would need to occur. These components would increase after certain  benchmarks have been achieved. The graph below shows how the profits would be  divided from 0­50%, 50­70%, and 70­100% occupancy. As the occupancy rate  increases, as does the benefit to the community.

48

Pajoka Business Plan mkII  

An open source business plan for an eco-tourism resort.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you