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magazine

ADOPT. DON’T SHOP. THE REWARDS OF ADOPTING

PET HEALTH & WELLNESS FLASH YOUR PET'S PEARLY WHITES!

LOCAL TALES

CUDA, THE MOST SPECIAL PIT BULL

PRICELESS please take one

Winter 2015 -16                     

1 


Issue 6 Dec - Jan - Feb

magazine

A Welcome Note from the publisher Founder & Publisher

SIRENA JOHNSON Graphic Designer | Art Director

GULNAR BABAYEVA CaspianMuse.com

Guest Writers

DOROTHY WILLS-RAFTERY JULIE LEROY SAMANTHA A RAY LINDA BLOOMER Cover photo by

TEMELE

Special Thanks PATRICIA MCLOUGHLIN JESS SOYKA-HOLT

Š 2016 Hudson Valley Paw Print P.O. Box 246 Athens, NY 12015 518.567.5707 hudsonvalleypawprint.com info@hudsonvalleypawprint.com

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays Paw Print Readers! With the cold weather upon us and as we stay inside to keep warm and snuggly, we mustn’t forget about our outdoor creatures. Feral cats are home outside, but can always use some extra help during the cold months. There are many simple tutorials online for ensuring our outdoor friends have shelter from the elements. Animals living outdoors also require extra food and water because keeping warm depletes their energy. Keeping on the subject of helping animals in need, there are so many pets who need homes. As there are far too many adoptable pets to feature in a small amount of space, I ask those of you wanting to contribute, to sponsor a space in the magazine for a homeless pet. You not only will be helping a pet find a home, but you will help sustain the mission and publication of Paw Print Magazine! Thank you for your readership and God bless you in this new year! Love for the animals~

Sirena Johnson Founder & Publisher

All articles and content in this magazine are copyrighted by Hudson Valley Paw Print Magazine. Any material, in whole or in part may not be reproduced unless prior written consent is given by publisher. While we strive to feature highly reputable companies and organizations, we are not liable for any claims made by such.


contents

Winter 2015 -16 local tales

Cuda, The Most Special Pitbull 

4, 5

the dinner dish

Recipes: Herbal Bone Broth & Holiday Mini Pies 

adopt. don’t shop.

6

Why Adopting a Pet Is So Much More Rewarding 

rescue spotlight Angels in Waiting Dog Rescue of New York, Inc.

8,10

11

pet health & wellness Flash Your Pet’s Pearly Whites! 

DIY

Pet Lover’s Mug 

12 -14

15

pet resources

Helpful Contact Information 

19

Magazine not in your area yet? Subscribe for only $25/year & get Paw Print delivered directly to your mailbox! Details on hudsonvalleypawprint.com

Hudson Valley Paw Print Magazine  |  Winter 2015 - 2016 


local tales

CUDA Cuda’s Friends Cuda’s Friends Cuda’s Friends Cuda’s Friends Cuda’s Friends

The Most Special Pit Bull An Interview with Julie LeRoy and her dog Cuda. Cuda is one of only 12 dogs in the world with Short Spine Syndrome. They reside right here in the Hudson Valley!

Cleo

Odd

PP: How did Cuda come into your life? JL: I was working as an animal control officer in Durham, NC at the time. While out on an unrelated call, Cuda, who they named for her massive underbite, was surrendered to me by a couple who just two weeks earlier had bought her on Craigslist for $50 and decided they did not want her. They likely bought her from a backyard breeder which are extremely prevalent in that area. An area where it is common to see ‘puppy for sale’ signs posted in front of more than one house on the block. Often due to the breeder's lack of genetics and proper mating processes, the dogs are bred within a family multiple times. I knew I could not bring a dog with so many deformities back to the shelter because I knew she would be immediately euthanized as unadoptable; so with a little coaxing of my husband, five month old Cuda came home with me. We now reside here in Ulster County. PP: What breed is Cuda and what is it that makes her different? JL: She is a pitbull, or more specifically after having her DNA tested, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Cuda looks different because she was born with a genetic anomaly called Short Spine Syndrome; an extremely rare occurance thought to be a genetic result of inbreeding.

Frankie

Izzy

Short Spine Syndrome was first identified in the 1800's in South Africa. These dogs were called baboon dogs because their body appearance is similar to a baboon's shape. Short Spine Syndrome results in a spine that is either compressed between vertebra or with missing vertebra. The characteristics include: bowed rear legs, longer front legs, a sloped back on a shortened body, an elongated lower jaw and a bobtail or no tail. They are also dwarfed in comparison to the size their breed type should be. Inbred dogs can have asymmetrical features and Cuda's front paws are different sizes and her ears sit unevenly on her head.


PP: Are there others like Cuda? JL: Since we first shared Cuda's story on facebook in 2010, we have discovered twelve other dogs with Short Spine Syndrome. They all share the same structure. We noticed that the majority of the short spine dogs appear to be herding breed types. The others include a purebred poodle and several mutts. There are two short spine dogs in Mexico, one in the United Kingdom, four are in Italy. The rest are in the United States in Maryland, Alabama, Texas, Ohio and of course Cuda here in New York. They all range in age from one to eleven years old. I have stayed in touch with all of them. None of them are in pain and they all currently live normal and active lives. All bring smiles wherever they go. PP: How have you shared the joy that Cuda brings you? JL: Aside from social media, Cuda has been featured in many publications and online animal-related web sites. After seeing the happiness Cuda brings not only for myself, but for so many other people, I decided to get her certified as a therapy dog. She is the only short spine dog to have this title! She is especially good with children, which gave me the inspiration to write and publish a children’s book. The book is told from the viewpoint of animals who are just as confused about who they are as Cuda. She helps them learn how to accept others for their differences and value their own unique traits. The storyline teaches about diversity and acceptance. The book is beautifully illustrated by a Michigan college student whom I met online. My wish is to read it in front of children one day, of course with Cuda by my side.

FOLLOW CUDA! Facebook.com/cudacares Twitter @cudathepitbull Instagram cuda_the_pit_bull Thedodo.com/community/CudathePitBull The book is available for purchase at www.cudathepitbull.bigcartel.com To schedule Cuda for a reading of her book contact Julie at cudathepitbull@aol.com 5 


the dinner dish Herbal BONE BROTH

Let them have HOLIDAY MINI PIES

As the days get shorter & colder, this is the ultimate comfort beverage or addition to your dog’s meal. Use organic ingredients so you don’t pass along pesticides and chemicals to your dog.

Makes 24 Mini Muffin Pan size Pies

Ingredients: Whole organic chicken Apple cider vinegar Sprig of fresh organic oregano, thyme and parsley Steps: Fill a crockpot with enough water to cover a whole organic chicken. Add 3 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to water. The acetic acid in vinegar is needed to draw out minerals from the bones. Place a whole organic chicken in water. Place sprig of organic oregano, thyme, and parsley into pot. Put crockpot on high for the 1st hour then switch to low for 24 hours. When broth is finished, remove and strain the bones, skin, herbs and discard. NEVER feed cooked bones to your pet. The removed meat can also be fed to your dog. Store broth in the fridge for up to four days or freeze. *Talk to your vet before making your own homemade bone broth, as some dogs are prone to food allergies.

Ingredients: DOUGH: 1 ½ cups organic oat flour ¼ cup safflower oil ¼ cup water 1 egg FILLING: ½ cup cooked, mashed organic butternut squash ½ cup cooked, mashed organic sweet potato 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 egg Preheat your oven to 400 degrees, cook and mash butternut squash & sweet potatoes, lightly grease a mini muffin pan. In a food processor or bowl combine all the dough ingredients and mix until thoroughly combined. Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface to about ¼ inch thickness. Cut dough evenly into 24 round pieces & press them into a lightly greased mini muffin pan. In a bowl combine all the filling ingredients and mix until thoroughly combined. Spoon about 1 tablespoon of the filling into each mini muffin pan. Bake until the pie crust edges are golden brown about 15 - 20 minutes. Refrigerate mini pies in an airtight container and use within a week.

Recipes created by Linda Bloomer. Linda & Jay Bloomer own Coast to Coast Dog Treats and reside in Stormville, NY. They hand make their treats in small batches using only the finest human grade organic ingredients. Visit their website www.coast2coastdogtreats.com or follow them at www.facebook.com/Coast-to-Coast-Dog-Treats

6   Hudson Valley Paw Print 2015 -16 


“ I’m about one bad relationship away from adopting 30 more of you and calling it a day.”

A Cat’s

TOP 10

Christmas Songs

❶  We Wish You A Meowy Christmas ❷  Knockin’ Down The Christmas Tree ❸  Jingle Bell Swat ❹  What Food Is This? ❺  Away In A Hamper ❻  It’s The Most Slumberful Time Of The Year ❼  Oh Cough Up A Hairball ❽  All I Want For Christmas Is An Empty Box ❾  It’s Beginning To Look A lot Like There Is

LOCAL FARE - NY WINE Craft brews 2014 Best Restaurant in Greene County 2014 World Beer Cup Winner

No Food In My Bowl

❿  Wreck The Halls

PawFact Festive plants such as holly, mistletoe, lilies, amaryllis and poinsettias may cause irritation, vomiting, diarrhea and heart arrhythmia in both cats and dogs.

crossroadsbrewingco.com 21 second street athens, ny


adopt. don’t shop!

Why Adopting a Pet Is So Much More Rewarding I am the owner of some of the most loving animals in the world. Some call me a crazy cat lady because in the past few years I have adopted three cats from animal shelters. Each one has its own personality and temperament that make them unique and interesting. Every day I think “What if I hadn’t adopted them? Would they be out alone in the world? Or worse?” I believe that they are grateful that I saved them, and I know that I’m grateful that they were there to be saved. Adopting an animal is so much more rewarding than purchasing one from a store, and here is why:

1

When it comes to dollars and cents, adoption is cheaper. Buying a purebred animal can get very expensive. Some breeds can reach up to thousands of dollars, and that doesn’t even include healthcare, grooming, or training the animal might need. If you adopt your pet from a shelter, there might be a donation fee from $25 to $100, but that usually includes spaying/neutering and the first round of shots it will need.

2

When you buy an animal from a breeder or a pet store, you can never really tell how the animal will react at home. Once you leave that store, you are on your own. If you have any questions or need help with the animal, the sellers will probably not be able to (or want to) help you. Once the animal is out of their hands, it’s not their problem. If you adopt from a shelter or rescue group, they will more ▲

continues on page 10 8   Hudson Valley Paw Print 2015 -16 


The Story Tree Pet Portraits, Family Trees & Wildlife Drawings by Tammy Liu-Haller

PawFact Studies have shown that infants raised in homes with dogs or cats, develop better immune systems than those in a pet-free environment.

www.story-tree.com *Portion of sales go to animal rescues. See website for details.

Trusted Veterinary Care for dogs, cats, birds, pocket pets and exotics.

Quality Medicine. Compassionate Care

A full service animal hospital with friendly, experienced doctors and staff, we offer traditional veterinary medicine as well as alternative therapies and holistic treatments • General Health Care

• Pharmacy & Prescription Diets

• Specialized Surgeries & Dentistry

• Laser Therapy

• Acupuncture & Chiropractics

• Laboratory, Radiology, & Ultrasound

845-255-5055 • 230 Main Street New Paltz,NY 12561 • www.newpaltzanimalhospital.com 9 


than likely have a history of the animal and will be more than willing to help you with any questions or concerns. Plus, animals in shelters have a longer period to get familiarized with other animals and humans.

3

Almost 100% of animals in a pet store come from breeding mills. Puppy and kitten mills are notorious for the inhumane treatment of dogs and cats. Although the federal government regulates most mills, the minimum standards for treatment are still cringe-worthy. Most of these animals are kept in small cages their entire lives, the females maintain multiple partners to breed the most amount of babies as quickly as possible, and the animals can end up being interbred with others from the same family causing long-term health issues.

4

Mixed-bred animals tend to be healthier than purebred. Pure-bred animals are more prone to health issues like heart, lung, and joint problems. When an animal has hybrid genes, it is more likely to be healthier and have a longer life-span. However, if a purebred animal is a priority, 25% of the animals at rescue homes are pure-bred.

5

You have a larger variety of animals to choose from when adopting. When you go to a shelter, there are more options to choose from; there are animals of all different ages, breeds, and personalities. Although puppies and kittens are adorable, some people can’t handle the hyperactivity and training problems. At shelters, you can get animals that are already house-trained, understand basic cues, and have experience with others.

6

When you adopt, you save a life. Almost 10,000 animals are euthanized every year because of overpopulation in shelters. There is a common misconception that animals in shelters are there because they are unhealthy or misbehaved. Actually, the biggest reason animals are neglected are because their previous owners could no longer take care of them (whether it’s because of a move, divorce, financial reasons, or age). When you adopt, you save the animal from a life in a cage, a life in the wild, or euthanasia.

7

You and your animal will be forever grateful. When you take your pet from a cage to a warm, loving home, they will always appreciate and love you. You won’t find a more loyal, sweet, and caring animal than one that was saved. Caring for an adopted animal also has mental, physical, and emotional benefits. They make life seem more fulfilling and give you a sense of purpose. Saving an animal is saving a friend. By Samantha A Ray Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/ Samantha_A_Ray/2109389

10   Hudson Valley Paw Print 2015 -16 


rescue spotlight Angels in Waiting Dog Rescue of New York, Inc. is a small, volunteer based, non-profit rescue located in Warwick, NY. They take in dogs facing death or uncertain futures in shelters. Volunteers care for the dogs in their homes, providing stability, sustenance and security until they can be placed in their forever homes. Many of the dogs rescued are expectant mothers which means a constant influx of puppies! With limited resources, they are always in need of supplies. Their greatest need is finding people who are willing to foster dogs. At Angels In Waiting, they work with adopters to ensure that the process of a new dog’s integration into their adopted family takes place as smoothly as possible. Each happy adoption makes it possible for them to rescue another wonderful homeless dog who may otherwise face the end of its life alone and unloved in a shelter.

PawFact Many companies still test products on animals - dogs & cats included! There are printable lists online and phone apps to use to ensure your purchases are cruelty-free!

HOW TO DONATE

     

The adoptable puppies and dogs can be found on their Petfinder website at: angelsinwaitingrescue.petfinder.com For more information on adopting, donating or volunteering contact: angelsinwaitingrescue@gmail.com To donate supplies, go to Amazon.com. From the wish list drop down tab, search for Angels in Waiting. Donations may also be dropped off at either of these locations in Warwick: Diva Dogs and Etched In Time

“To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.”

not be “No, I will ne” your Valenti eless said no hom ! pet ever Ralph Waldo Emerson 11 


FLASH YOUR PET’S PEARLY WHITES!

You may not think your pet’s bad breath, drooling, sneezing, or refusal to eat his/her kibble is anything to be concerned about, however, it could be a sign of an underlying oral health issue.

A

By Dorothy Wills-Raftery

healthy smile means much more than what meets the eye. According to the American Dental Association, the mouth serves as a gateway to the body’s health. “It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection.” Therefore, brushing teeth is an important part of a person’s daily routine. The same goes for our pets. With February being National Pet Dental Health Month, sponsored by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), it’s a great time to review your pet’s oral health regimen. 12   Hudson Valley Paw Print 2015 -16 


pet health & wellness “Dental health is extremely important,” states Arnold Rugg, DVM, Medical Director for the Kingston Animal Hospital in Kingston,

we administer the anesthetic while the pet is on intravenous fluids and being closely monitored throughout the procedure. The

NY. “Dogs and cats primarily get periodontal disease, which can lead to bacterial infection. Besides the dental pain and inflammation, the germs are often spread into the bloodstream causing cardiac and kidney disease.”

teeth are cleaned, polished and X-rayed. Any loose or infected teeth are checked closely to determine if they can be saved or need to be extracted. After waking up, we send the dog or cat home on pain relieving medication and often antibiotics.” As for postsurgery, Dr. Rugg says special dental diets are helpful, and “The owner is encouraged to brush the teeth to preserve their health.”

According to the Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC), “The cause of gum disease is the same in cats and dogs as it is in people. Gum disease is an infection resulting from buildup of soft dental plaque on the surfaces of the teeth around the gums. The bacteria in dental plaque irritate the gum tissue if plaque is allowed to accumulate, which often leads to infection in the bone surrounding the teeth.” You may not think your pet’s bad breath, drooling, sneezing, or refusal to eat his/her kibble is anything to be concerned about, however, it could be a sign of an underlying oral health issue. Other signs may include discoloration of teeth, growths on the gums, discharge from eyes or nose, mood changes, problems opening and closing the mouth, pawing at the mouth, or bleeding. Prevention is the key. Dr. Rugg recommends “annual or semi-annual dental exams, teeth brushing, and appropriate diets.” He explains that “early dental cleanings are necessary in many breeds that are predisposed to tooth problems (Yorkshire Terrier for example),” and that “some puppies have retained deciduous or baby teeth. We often remove these at neutering because they cause crowding and potentially trap food leading to infection.” If your pet’s teeth are problematic, discuss with your vet if a professional cleaning is an option. Dr. Rugg explains the process, “When we clean a dog’s or cat’s teeth, it requires general anesthesia, so first a thorough exam and blood test are required. Then

The good news is, “When properly diagnosed, most dental conditions are treatable and the prognosis is excellent,” according to the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Hospital for Animals; Companion Animal Dentistry. “Adequately treated patients usually experience relief and owners normally notice a dramatic improvement in attitude, appetite, and overall health.” If it is recommended that your pet requires a visit to a veterinary dental specialist, but you are not sure how to locate one, check the listing compiled by the American Veterinary Dental College for a specialist in your area at www.avdc.org

PawFact By age 3, 80% of dogs will have some sort of dental disease.

To help maintain your pet’s healthy smile, there are some wonderful aids available designed specifically for dogs and cats, such as toothbrushes, finger brushes, flavored toothpastes and gels, cleansing wipes, water additives, periodontal oral supplements, dental treats and chews, and dental health diets. Talk with your veterinarian for what is the best oral hygiene routine for your pet. ▲

continues on the next page

13 


PawTip

continued from the page 13

For a great video with step-by-step instructions on how to brush your pet’s teeth, visit the AVMA YouTube channel (AmerVetMedAssn). Taking care of your pets' teeth is an important part of their overall health care. After all, healthy smiles are happy smiles, for both pet and parent.

There are many animal holidays and observances throughout the year. Businesses sometimes coincide special offers or discounts with these holidays. For example, February is Pet Dental Health Month, in which many veterinarian offices offer specials on pet teeth cleaning!

14   Hudson Valley Paw Print 2015 -16 

Dorothy Wills-Raftery is a Siberian Husky/Canine blogger and host of “The Sibe Vibe” Dog Works Radio Show based out of the Hudson Valley and Alaska, and a lifelong resident of the Hudson Valley. Blog: www.FiveSibes.blogspot.com Facebook: FiveSibes: Siberian Husky K9 News & Reviews


DIY

magazine

Do It Yourself

Holiday gift

Pet Lover’s Mug Simple & inexpensive DIY gifts for the holidays. Markers and dollar store mugs!

before

Materials: 1. White ceramic mug 2. Super permanent marker

Instructions: Clean and dry your mug to remove any dust particles or residues. Once a mark has been made, it cannot be removed, so carefully plot out your design.

after

When you are done designing your mug, place it in the oven and then turn the oven to 425 degrees. (You want the mug to preheat inside the oven to prevent cracking.) Bake for 35-40 minutes, turn off oven and let mug sit in there for another one to two hours. Note: Make sure to tell the person receiving your gift “No dishwasher”.

PawTip Avoid using tinsel and ribbon which can become stuck in your cat or dog’s intestine and cause serious illness.

15 


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the dog's corner UYUYUYUYUYUYUY Every dog starts life with a blank canvas. His destiny is etched by the hands of the painter, and each one an artist’s original. The portrait painted depends on how the brush is held. Paint it with hostility, and a dog learns to fight. Paint with cruelty, and a dog learns fear. Paint with anger, and a dog learns aggression. Paint with praise, and a dog learns confidence.Paint with boundaries, and a dog learns respect. Paint with tenderness and a dog learns to bond. Paint with affection and a dog learns to love. Every dog is a product of its environment. Bad dogs are not born, they are created. If the portrait is flawed, look at the artist. Stop blaming the dog.        ~ author unknown

PawAlert Dog owners beware! There has been an introduction of a new peanut butter onto the market which contains xylitol. This sweetener, which is used as a substitute for sugar, is extremely dangerous for dogs - even in small amounts could be deadly!

like dogs Men are xcited We are e u to see yo no and have you t a h clue w bout a are mad

it’s all FUN

and GAMES until someone ends up in a

CONE

qr “The road to my heart is paved with paw prints” st 17 


Patrick Rynn,

LUTCF Financial Advisor Financial Services Representative

845 246 PAWS (7297)

PROFESSIONAL PET GROOMING & DOGGIE DAYCARE

Tel (518) 220-3011 Fax (518) 220-3053 Cell (518) 888-4905 prnn@metlife.com

Dogs & Cats

●Bathing ●Trimming ●Breed Cuts ●Holistic Food & Treats ●Dental Hygene & Nail Clips

MetLife Premier Client Group MetLife Resources 24 Century Hill Drive Latham, NY 12110

New Patients Welcome!

New Baltimore Animal Hospital

518.731.2551 Medicine and Surgery • Pocket Pet Care • Experienced Doctors & Staff • Open 6 days a Week

12774 Route 9W West Coxsackie

"Your pet's individual needs are our main concern."

224 Ulster Ave Saugerties, NY (across from Saugerties Lumber Co.)

Poochini’s Pet Salon Your Pet Will Leave Happy, Feeling Good, and Most Importantly Looking Great!!! Located at Copake Lake, Craryville NY

518-325-4150 518-821-3959 Accepting Most Major Credit Cards Fully Insured A Member of PSI and ASPCA Email: poochinipetsalon@gmail.com Web: poochinipetsalon.wix.com/home

newbaltimoreanimalhosp.com

Adopt Peirre!

pussyfoot lodge

PURRFECT TAILS OF CATSKILL Nutrient Rich Raw Diet for Dog/Cat

Peirre is a 7 month old Lab/Shepard mix. This sweet & mellow boy is microchipped, neutered and up to date on all vaccinations. He would make a wonderful addition to a family with children or other pets. Contact: angelsinwaitingrescue@gmail.com This ad was generously donated by Yoshi Shimano

18               Hudson Valley Paw Print 2015 -16 

Purrfect Loving Cat Care without cages A Unique Bed & Breakfast for felines

HEALTHY FOOD, TREATS & SUPPLEMENTS. APPAREL, COLLARS, LEADS, BEDS, TOYS.

Each cat has their own private room with window! Less expensive than caged boarding.

518 943 PURR (7877)

845 687 0330 PussyfootLodge.com

358 Main Street Catskill , NY 12414 PurrfectTails@yahoo.com

Local Art for Sale


pet resources EMERGENCY ANIMAL HOSPITALS & POISON CONTROL Animal Emergency Clinic-Poughkeepsie..........����������������������������������������������������������������845 471 8242 Animal Emergency Clinic-Kingston�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������845 336 0713 VCA Animal Specialty & Emergency Hospital - Wappingers Falls�����������������������������845 632 3200 VetMedics Veterinary Emergency Transport Paramedics��������������������������������������������845 202 7200 Orange County Animal Emergency Service ��������������������������������������������������������������������845 692 0260 Capital District Animal Emergency Clinic-Latham���������������������������������������������������������518 785 1094 ASPCA Poison Control Center | aspca.org/apcc����������������������������������������������������������888 426 4435 To report adverse food & drug effects in pets�����������������������������������������������������������������888 FDA VETS

SPCAs & HUMANE SOCIETIES

Columbia Greene Humane Society | cghs.org����������������������������������������������������������������518 828 6044 Mohawk Hudson Humane Society | mohawkhumane.org��������������������������������������518 434 8128 Dutchess County SPCA | dcspca.org����������������������������������������������������������������������������������845 452 7722 Ulster County SPCA | ucspca.org�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������845 331 5377 Hudson Valley SPCA | hudsonvalleyspca.com��������������������������������������������������������������845 564 6810 Humane Society of Walden | waldenhumane.org ���������������������������������������������������� 845 778 5115 Middletown Humane Society | middletownhumanesociety.com����������������������� 845 361 1861 Humane Society of Blooming Grove | humanesocietybg.com ������������������������������ 845 496 6199 Warwick Valley Humane Society | wvhumane.org ������������������������������������������������������ 845 986 2473 Goshen Humane Society | goshenhumanesociety.org�������������������������������������������� 845 294 3984 Putnam Humane Society | puthumane.org�������������������������������������������������������������������� 845 225 7777 Putnam County SPCA | spcaputnam.org������������������������������������������������������������������������� 845 520 6915 ● To find an animal shelter or rescue group near you: AnimalShelter.org or TheShelterPetProject.org ● To adopt a pet (specific breed, gender, age, etc.): PetFinder.com or AdoptaPet.com ● For low cost spay/neuter services or certificates: SpayUSA.org or FriendsOfAnimals.org ●  For a list of local wildlife rehabilitators: Wildlife.RescueShelter.com/NewYork ●  To find a local T-N-R program for feral cats: AlleyCat.org

PET FOOD PANTRIES

Safe Haven Thrift Shop & Pet Food Pantry ����������������������������������������������������������������������� 845 448 Rte 376 Hopewell Junction Coxsackie Pet Food Pantry������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 518 16 Washington Ave Coxsackie Four Paws Food Pantry ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 845 1765 Rte 212 Saugerties Pet Chow Pantry ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 845 363 Derby Rd. Middletown Hudson Valley Pet Food Pantry��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 914 White Plains, NY 10602

392 5300 478 5414 679 0339 386 9738 907 3487

PETS-LOST & FOUND WEBSITES

LostPetsHV.org or PetFinder.com facebook.com/LostPetsoftheHudsonValley facebook.com/groups/LostPetsGreeneColumbia For additional resources, please visit our website: hudsonvalleypawprint.com

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U The best products & install in the Hudson Valley with world class customer service!

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Hudson Valley Paw Print Magazine - Winter 2015-16  
Hudson Valley Paw Print Magazine - Winter 2015-16  

Dec - Jan - Feb, 2015-16