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impact I sioux falls seminary

A North American Baptist Seminary

2100 S. Summit Ave. I Sioux Falls, SD 57105

2016 I Issue 1 Sioux Falls, SD I Omaha, NE I Online 800.440.6227 or 605.336.6588 info@sfseminary.edu

www.sfseminary.edu #SFSeminaryImpact

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Remembering President David J. Draewell We give thanks for the life and service of Dr. David J. Draewell, former Sioux Falls Seminary president, who died on March 13, 2016. During his years as president and beyond, he made an impact on the seminary community and in the lives of students and alumni. Draewell, who was born on April 22, 1929, served as Sioux Falls Seminary’s ninth president from 1970-1981. He was officially installed into office on Friday, November 19, 1971, along with Dr. Gerald Borchert as dean. He joined the seminary from the North American Baptist Conference headquarters, where he had served as secretary of stewardship and higher education. Under his leadership, the seminary focused on advancing its mission and expanding on multiple fronts. Increased enrollment, degree program development, accreditation with the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, construction of student apartment buildings, and addition of administrative and staff positions were among changes that took place during Draewell’s years in office.

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In a special chapel service during the seminary’s 2008 sesquicentennial celebration, Draewell described his presidency as a time of growth: growth in the size of the student body, programs, faculty, and physical footprint. Draewell was an ordained minister, graphic arts collector, oriental gardener, devoted husband, and father. He was described as being a vibrant individual, revealing his enthusiasm for youth, his family, and life. In addition to his work with the North American Baptist Conference office, he also served churches in Michigan and Ohio. In retirement, David and wife Betty lived in Bradenton, FL. They remained committed to the mission of Sioux Falls Seminary and showed their support in many ways, often returning to Sioux Falls to give the gift of service. In 2014, they relocated from Bradenton to Sioux Falls to be closer to their son, Tim, and his family. (Pictured above with Betty at the former Worship and Leadership Centre, after spending a week beautifying the campus.)

Building the body of christ 2016 Issue I


impact I sioux falls seminary 2016 Issue 1

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Jordan Minnich Kjesbo serves as an adjunct professor for Messiah College in Grantham, PA.

Dave Sinkgraven is the Associate Pastor of Life Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

Joshua Klein is the youth pastor

Dwayne Williams is the new Pastor of First Baptist Church in Huron, SD. He previously served as Associate Pastor of Emmanuel Baptist Church in Sioux Falls. He holds the position of Pastor-toPastor in the American Baptist Churches of the Dakotas. He and his wife, Jackie, now live in Huron.

and worship leader at Crosspoint Bible Church in Omaha, NE.

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from the

president

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Sioux Falls Seminary is building on the past and looking toward the future. President Henson talks about the value of rethinking theological education as part of this process.

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taking a

closer look the road ahead

together

Charting the course for the future of theological education is a big task. Sioux Falls Seminary is excited about collaborating with others to explore the best routes forward.

a light in

the darkness

Kerry Koerselman is working

developing

servants

Get to know seminary student Paul Gericke and learn how the seminary is working to develop him and others where God has placed them.

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update:

cameroon

toward licensure as a counselor intern at Sioux Falls Psychological Services in Sioux Falls, SD, in addition to serving a few days per week at the Tiwahe Glu Kini Pi Clinic on the Rosebud Reservation.

Lori Menke is serving at the VA Hospital in Sioux Falls, SD, as a program manager to Post 9/11 combat veterans as she prepares for licensure.

Marcel Mitchell serves as Lead Pastor at Temple Baptist Church in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, and teaches with Hispanics for Christ and Russian Leadership Ministries. He is hoping to begin a ministry in the area of missional church leadership development. Tamara Nelson is working to create

staying in

touch

remembering

dr. Draewell

A tribute to former seminary president Dr. David J. Draewell, who passed away in March 2016.

alumni news + prayer

two ministries: Praynting, which guides participants in painting their prayers, and Aperture8, which uses art, creativity, and adventure to face darkness and help usher in light and healing.

Justin Nielsen is providing mental health and chemical dependency counseling at the Carroll Institute in Sioux Falls, SD. Bryan Rice is the Pastor of Christ

the King Lutheran Church in Bellevue, NE.

Barry Saylor is the Associate

Pastor at Crosswalk Community Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

Dylon Young continues to serve as the Director of Christian Education for his church in the Omaha, NE, area as he prays about a full-time senior pastor position.

in memoriam

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Robert P. Nielsen died on August 2, 2015, in Grimes, IA. He was a WWII veteran and former chaplain and served in the UMC Dakotas Conference from 19501983 and as District Superintendant for the Northern District from 19831986. After retirement, he continued to serve as a hospital chaplain. Robert is preceded in death by his wife of 70 years, and he is survived by three children.

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John Binder died in hospice on November 20, 2015, after receiving a diagnosis of cancer only a week earlier. He was 85. He served the NAB International Office from 1960-1994 and was Executive Director from 1979-1994. He also served on the NABS Board of Trustees from 1979-1994 and was Interim President in 2000-2001 between Presidents Chuck Hiatt and Mike Hagan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and three children. Pictured below with wife Barbara.

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Bernard “Bernie” Fritzke, of Beaverton, OR, died June 15, 2016. He worked for the NAB International Office in the area of church planting as well as planted and pastored various NAB churches in the Pacific Northwest, Dakotas, and Florida. In his retirement years, he and Lorraine resided in Oregon and remained active in the life of the NAB Conference, often attending the NAB Retired Workers’ Retreat and other events. He is remembered by wife Lorraine, his family, and the many individuals whose lives he touched through his years in ministry.

(Pictured above with Lorraine at the 2015 NAB Triennial.)

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Heather Bonander, 37, of Larchwood, IA, died on May 22, 2016. She was a Master of Arts in Counseling student in 2002-2003 but was unable to finish her program due to health concerns.

submit updates online

sfseminary.edu/alumni We’d love to hear from you and so would fellow alumni! Visit our online alumni registration at: sfseminary.edu/alumni. 13

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istry, having served in Nigeria as a field director for eight years and as the Senior Leader of Worldwide Outreach in the NAB International Office for four years.

Earng Han Chan does social work and counseling for Fei Yue Community Services in Singapore.

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‘10

Kelly Mattis provides emergency mental health care to individuals who find themselves in crisis or hopeless and alone. She lives in Jamestown, ND, and serves the south central area of North Dakota through the South Central Human Service Center. Randy Schmor continues leadership of Gateway Teams, which is now part of the NAB International Office. His wife, Shelly, began focusing on other commitments in April 2016.

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Steven Miller and his family moved in January to Camanche, IA, where Steven is Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church of Camanche. He feels blessed to have baptized several new members this year.

Jeff Kilmartin and wife Sonya are preparing to join the NAB missionary team at the seminary in Ndu, Cameroon, in 2017. They previously served in Nigeria in 2008-2009.

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Emily Learing provides child and family therapy at Encompass Mental Health in Sioux Falls, SD. Roger Priestley married Marcie Gothard on May 28, 2016. Both work for The Salvation Army, where Roger is the Director of Practical Ministries, and Marcie is the Development Director. Roger is working on his MBA at the University of Sioux Falls.

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Ali McCormick is the Middle School Coordinator, Outreach Minister, and KIDSTOP program lead for First United Methodist Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

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Chris Gorman is the new Regional Minister to the Northwest Region of the NAB. He had served his church plant, Central Valley Community Church in Hartford, SD, since 2000. He and his wife, Kristi, and their three children are now at home in Washington.

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Mallorie Hansmann was married to Scott Egbers on January 1, 2016. Scott is serving as the Pastor of First Lutheran Church in Beardstown, IL.

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Ryan Albano will become an active duty Navy Chaplain this fall. He is currently in CHI Health’s Clinical Pastoral Education intensive program. He resides in Papillion, NE.

Alan Blankenfeld was ordained

in the ELCA on January 23, 2016. He began serving as the pastor for Colman and Midway Lutheran Churches in February.

Marcus Brooks will begin a one-

year intern residency position with the VA Hospital in Sioux Falls, SD, in October 2016. Steven DeGangi is the Pastor of Grace Lower Stone Reformed Church in Rockwell, NC.

Joshua DeKok is the Youth Pastor at Meredith Drive Reformed Church in Des Moines, IA. He has been serving there since July 2015. Aaron Deutsch is relocating to Hull, IA, where he will serve as Pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Church. Brandon Foster is serving as the Youth Director for Atonement Lutheran Church in Fargo, ND, and as the Pastoral Assistant of New Creation Lutheran Church in Perham, MN. Greg Friesner continues his

chiropractic practice in Sioux Falls, SD, alongside working as a chaplain at the county jail.

from the

greg henson

president Through our website story center, we have looked at the biblical foundations for theological education, the history of theological education, and the need for different thinking to impact the future of theological education. I’m excited to say that Sioux Falls Seminary is building on the past and looking toward the future. Our mission is to develop servants for their participation in the kingdom mission. We do this by pursuing our call to create systems of theological education and integrated counseling that are affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. Our purpose in doing so is to empower people to serve where God has placed them. The future plans of the seminary are rooted in a belief that God is at work and that we are called to participate in that work. At times, this means strengthening work that has been done in the past. While at other times, we will need to honor the past and look toward new models or systems. At the end of the day, Ephesians 4:12 sums up quite well the broad work of theological education. After listing various roles within the church, Paul states, “Their responsibility is to equip God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ.” At Sioux Falls Seminary, we believe that we are called to build up the church, the body of Christ, by developing servants who will engage in God’s work. This means helping individuals discover the unique ways in which they are called to participate in the Great Commission.

Jody Gras continues her work as

I believe the future of theological education is bright if we are willing to think creatively and intentionally about how we remain faithful to God’s word and the essence of theological education while reimagining almost everything else. Theological education is an important aspect of God’s church and something to which all of us are called. This means that we need to think more broadly about the definition of theological education.

Chris Haberman is planting a

Too often, we relegate theological education to graduate degrees offered on the campus of a seminary. While those are vital to the health and well-being of the church, they are not the sole expression of theological education. Such education happens within the church, at various educational levels, and through multiple delivery methods. The key is to “equip God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ!”

the Director of Adult Discipleship and Development at Emmanuel Reformed Church in Paramount, CA.

church in Sioux Falls, SD, with the Anglican Church in North America.

Amy King is serving in a variety of capacitates at Friendship Community Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

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taking a closer look:

affordable accessible relevant & faithful Sioux Falls Seminary is called to develop systems of theological education that are affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. This sentence is one of the best ways to articulate how the seminary is participating in God’s kingdom mission. Here’s a closer look at what the words “affordable,” “accessible,” “relevant,” and “faithful” mean in the context of creating systems of theological education at Sioux Falls Seminary.

Affordable

[uh-fawr-duh-buh l] - Within one’s financial means; a focus on significantly decreasing the cost to educate students at Sioux Falls Seminary, thereby reducing the price of education and service. The average cost for a Master of Divinity is roughly $40,000, which is a 78% increase from the average cost in 2001. As an industry, the primary mechanism to create “affordable education” has been through raising money to offer more scholarships. While this is important work, it isn’t enough. Scholarships simply shift the burden from students to givers. While seminaries have been spending time and energy raising funds for scholarships, total expenditures in the industry have grown at a rate nearly three times faster than the rate of inflation. In 2009, when the seminary moved into its new facility, our annual budget was $3,500,000. Today the seminary’s current annual budget is $2,725,000, a $775,000 difference from five years ago. Innovative staffing models, technology solutions, and maximiza-

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SUBMIT UPDATES ONLINE AT SFSEMINARY.EDU/ALUMNI

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tion of assets has led to these operational efficiencies. There are many things that must happen to effectively operate a school. We’ve decided to invest in our relationships with students, develop partnerships, outsource several tasks, and implement technology that gives students the ability to register for courses, see and pay bills, and track academic progress. Tuition has not been raised in four years, and the hope is that our next tuition change will be a reduction. Through these operational changes, the generosity of many partners, and the grace of God, Sioux Falls Seminary will create an affordable system of theological education.

Accessible

[ak-ses-uh-buh l] - obtainable; attainable; systems of theological education that are within the means of one’s ministry context, educational level, and income. Accessibility means making theological education available to people at the level that best fits their calling and need. For Sioux Falls Seminary, accessibility refers to both level and location. During fall 2015 and spring 2016, about 66% of students at the seminary were engaged in master’s, doctoral, and graduate certificate programs. This means that some students are learning through other types of theological education, such as non-degree programs, course audits, and partnerships. Non-degree certificate programs mirror graduate programs, but students do not enroll at the master’s or doctoral level. These programs, which include the Certificate in Christian Ministry and Training in Spiritual Direction, are affordable, flexible, and designed to enhance personal and professional

alumni news and prayer requests

courages people to be the hands and feet of Jesus on mission trips.

‘51

Jacob Ehman stays busy teaching a Sunday school class of about 25 students and leading a men’s Bible study. He lives in Alpena, MI.

‘71

Jim Green has retired and relocated to Sequim, WA, where he and wife Annette have purchased a home. They enjoy the Olympic Peninsula, a beautiful area filled with friendly people and great views of the Olympic Mountains and the Juan de Fuca Strait.

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El Roy Pankow continues to serve in active ministry. He is currently the Associate Pastor of Wilshire Ave. Community Church in Fullerton, CA, where he leads choir and worship for the traditional service, develops ministry with Boomers and Builders, and en-

Since his seminary days, he has served on pastoral staff at Parma Heights Baptist Church (Ohio), First Baptist Churches in Anaheim, Alhambra, and Santa Ana (California), and now in Fullerton. El Roy and his wife, Joyce, will celebrate their 43rd wedding anniversary in December 2016. They are thankful that their two children and five grandchildren live nearby. El Roy and Joyce would love to hear from former classmates: elroypankow@ aol.com.

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William H. Jones, the seminary’s first D.Min. graduate, recently published a book on Saint Paul titled The Wellness of Saint Paul (available on Amazon.

com). The book deals with Paul’s Hellenistic background and how, with God’s help, he overcame his reaction to conquer his personality defects and, instead, contribute so boldly to the development of the church.

‘81

Barry Landon has been Pastor at White River Fellowship in Elkins, AR, for nine years.

‘82

Eriberto (Eddie) Soto retired from the St. Augustine Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church USA in Jacksonville, FL, in 2015. He continues to minister part-time as a local church pastor and lead mission trips to Latin America.

‘88

Walt Geiszler and wife Jeanette retired from pastoring the New Joy Community Church in Sioux Falls, SD, in 2015.

‘89

Jim Black has completed his eleventh year of pastoral min11

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update:

serving together as family

Representatives of Sioux Falls Seminary and Taylor Seminary recently visited Cameroon, Africa, where a growing partnership continues to take shape with the Cameroon Baptist Convention and its two seminaries. In addition to teaching a class in Kumba, Sioux Falls Seminary president Greg Henson and Taylor Seminary president David Williams had the privilege of coming alongside the work God is doing in Cameroon. Partnership Development The February 2016 trip was the first step in a five-year partnership that took shape in 2015 between the North American Baptist Conference (NAB) and the Cameroon Baptist Convention (CBC). At that time, President Henson; Dan Hamil, NAB Executive Director; Norm Poehlke, NAB Vice President of Ministry Outreach; David Williams, Taylor Seminary President; and Cal Hohn, NAB Director of Cooperating Missions, visited the NAB’s partner in mission, the Cameroon Baptist Convention. That delegation met with Cameroonian leaders to consider how a partnership could facilitate theological education across the entire CBC, including theological education of students in Ndu at Cameroon Baptist Theological Seminary (CBTS) and in Kumba at Cameroon Baptist Seminary Kumba (CBSK) as well as to continue theological education of CBC pastors and ministry workers.

Notice: Comments

Out of this meeting came a vision for a partnership that would serve to edify the system of theological education across Cameroon. It was agreed that a five-year development project would begin in 2016, and February’s

trip was the start of this work. Henson and Williams spent time meeting with representatives of the CBC as well as various leaders and faculty members of the CBC seminaries in Kumba and Ndu. Much was accomplished at this meeting, including: 1) Identification of the priorities that will guide the five-year project and discussion around how these priorities will inform the partnership between the NAB seminaries and the CBC’s newly-formed Department of Theological and Christian Education; 2) Development of plans for moving forward. Over the coming years, Sioux Falls Seminary and Taylor Seminary will aid in the development of the Department of Theological and Christian Education. In addition, programs for faculty development among faculty members at the seminaries in Cameroon will be designed. One such program could be the creation of a Doctor of Ministry track for students in Cameroon. Next Steps Both Taylor and Sioux Falls Seminaries are excited to see what God does over the next five years. “The fact that Taylor and Sioux Falls are working together on this project and doing so in partnership with a host of leaders from the CBC is a testament to what can occur when we think first about the Kingdom of God and the mission to which we have collectively been called,” said Henson. Working closely with the leaders in Cameroon to consider the future of theological education is going to be a very enriching experience for everyone involved.

Sioux Falls Seminary is seeking comments from the public about the seminary in preparation for its comprehensive evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The seminary will host a visit on September 12-14, 2016, with a team representing the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). Sioux Falls Seminary is currently accredited with the Higher Learning Commission and has been accredited by HLC since 1978. On February 26, 2015, the Higher Learning Commission placed Sioux Falls Seminary on probation. The visit team will review the seminary’s ongoing ability to meet HLC’s Criteria for Accreditation. The public is invited to submit comments regarding the seminary to the following address: Public Comment on Sioux Falls Seminary, Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411. The public may also submit comments on HLC’s website at www.hlcommission.org/comment. Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Comments must be in writing. All comments must be received by August 12, 2016. (Reprint of Sioux Falls Seminary’s third party comment notice, which was released in June 2016)

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development. In addition, each semester a number of people choose to audit a course at the seminary, which allows them to sit in the classroom and learn alongside a community of believers. Partnerships with churches bring theological education back into the local church, which is where it is most at home. One such partnership is between the seminary and the All Nations City Church Training Institute in Sioux Falls, which aims to offer training for immigrant pastors. Location should not deter followers of Christ from engaging in theological education. Accessibility also means making education available to people regardless of location. Through online courses, in-context courses, extension sites, and live-stream technology, Sioux Falls Seminary is able to offer a model of education that meets students where they are. When education doesn’t reside in one location, and it is offered at levels that are consistent with the particular needs of individuals, it becomes truly accessible.

Relevant

[rel-uh-vuh nt] - contextual; bearing upon or connected with a student’s ministry context; pertinent. First and foremost, relevant theological education is contextual. That contextualization creates an educational process that is integrative and operates within a developmental paradigm. Because location has such an impact on ministry, theological education is only relevant if it is done in light of one’s ministry context. Students must think critically about what it means to be on mission with God in their particular contexts. Relevant theological education enables students to develop practical skills and critical thought while also creating in them the ability to integrate the two in meaningful ways. By connecting education to ministry or other contexts, the study and practice of theology

immediately becomes an act of integration. Rather than only reading and reflecting on texts, contextual education forces students to read, reflect, and consider how what they are learning impacts their ministry practices and how to act accordingly. Finally, relevant theological education captures snapshots of students’ knowledge, character, and competency through “point-in-time” assignments and encourages ongoing development.

FAithful

[feyth-fuh l] - transformational; rooted in scripture; oriented toward the mission of God; communal. The most important aspects of theological education are its essence and biblical foundation. Faithful theological education is transformational, communal, academicallyappropriate, oriented toward the mission of God, and rooted in the unshakable truth of God’s word. It is at the heart of equipping God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ (Ephesians 4:12). All models of theological education, therefore, must enable students to engage in an ongoing process of spiritual transformation, helping them find their identities in Christ. True spiritual formation and identity development cannot be done in isolation. Faithful theological education must also be rooted in scripture. The gospel is the unchanging and unshakable truth of God’s word and must always be the foundation of theological education. While this is the most important aspect of faithful theological education, it also requires the least explanation. If we are not opening the Bible on a regular basis as part of the journey, then the most important aspect is missing. Sioux Falls Seminary has a rich Baptist heritage, and we stand firmly upon it as we serve those God places in our care by creating affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful systems of theological education. We hope you will join us as we walk boldly into the revolutionary future to which God has called us. 3

2016 Issue I


the road ahead rethinking theological education

together

The rethinking of theological education is a big task, and Sioux Falls Seminary is committed to building up the body of Christ in new and exciting ways—but we are not doing it alone. We are excited to partner with a number of different institutions, organizations, and individuals as we navigate the road ahead.

Educational Models and Practices Forum

We recently teamed up with the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) as part of their Educational Models and Practices Peer Group Forum, working specifically with the Competency-Based Education (CBE) peer group. It is becoming clear that Sioux Falls Seminary will play an important role as we collaborate with peer schools to chart new avenues for the future of theological education. The Educational Models and Practices Forum was organized by ATS to address a range of creative development emerging within seminaries. Over two days in February, presenters shared valuable history, data, and visions for the future. Perhaps most importantly, this conference was the kickoff for “peer groups.” These are groups committed to conducting comprehensive studies of educational program developments in ATS schools. New models are already underway in many areas, from online degrees to accelerated Bachelor/Master of Divinity programs to theological programs in prisons. Sioux Falls Seminary is participating in the Competency-Based Education peer group.

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CBE is education oriented to learning outcomes, starting with professional competencies in mind and helping students work toward them in flexible ways. CBE emphasizes actual proficiency over seat-time or credit hours. Typically students follow a well-planned curriculum, proceeding at their own pace. CBE methods often look quite different than traditional patterns. While certain universities have been experimenting with CBE for decades, only in the last few years have theological schools begun entertaining this mode. Sioux Falls Seminary is one of very few seminaries to have made significant inroads into CBE, implementing creative structures in the Kairos Project as well as pass/fail courses with integrated assessment measures in our traditional tracks. In the months ahead, the Competency-Based Education peer group will look to three Sioux Falls Seminary administrators for leadership. President Greg Henson is leading the Collaborative Opportunities Working Group, which will explore possibilities for shared goals and resources. Dr. Larry Caldwell is overseeing the Global Opportunities Working Group, which will examine the potential of CBE for international applications. Lastly, Dr. Nathan Hitchcock is spearheading the Assessment Practices Working Group, which will map out new methods of assessment for students and programs in the CBE paradigm. Altogether, this means that Sioux Falls Seminary is being recognized as part of the leading edge of new

at the seminary 158th Graduating class ready to serve and build the body of christ Commencement is exciting. It gives the opportunity to celebrate both the culmination of a journey and the new season of life into which the seminary’s graduates are entering. The scripture verse for the commencement service, which was held on Saturday, May 14, 2016, at First Baptist Church in Sioux Falls, came from Ephesians 4. It also inspired the message, “A Rock in the Pond,” which was shared by the Rev. Jim Liske, alumnus and pastor of Christ Memorial Church, Holland, MI. In this verse, Ephesians 4:12, Paul describes the reason that God has given the church the gifts of apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers. It is to equip the body of Christ for the work of ministry. Sioux Falls Seminary desires to not only help students develop into the unique servants God has called each of them to be but also to teach them how to equip and serve others. Put simply, our goal is to make disciples who can make disciples. This year’s 42 graduates are taking the next step in their walks with Christ; they are a group of people who will build the body of Christ for the ministry of the church.

Program developments and news The seminary is continually engaged in conversation about its academic programs. These conversations enable deeper discussions about student learning and program assessment, which lead to program adjustments and the ability to better serve students. As a result, several program developments are in the works for the upcoming 2016-2017 academic year: •

The Master of Divinity will shift to 75 credit hours, down from 84;

The Master of Arts in Christian Leadership and Master of Arts (Bible and Theology) will change to 39 credit hours (from 37 and 62, respectively);

A Ph.D. track will be added to the Master of Arts (Bible and Theology), requiring additional course work beyond the base of 39 credit hours;

Reworking the Kairos Project track for the Master of Arts (Bible and Theology);

Updates to the Kairos Project curriculum;

Enhanced supervised ministry components for the classic Master of Divinity program. 9

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speaker christy fay is inspiring women to uncover their worth

2016 Hiller Recap: Equipping Saints for the work of Ministry

Join us on September 23, 2016, for a day of reflection and fellowship at our annual Women in Community event in Sioux Falls. We look forward to welcoming speaker Christy Fay to campus as she shares with us her inspiration and practical, personal application for growth toward God.

Sioux Falls Seminary featured the Rev. Dr. Charlie Self at its annual Hiller Lectureship on April 13, 2016. Over 120 Christian leaders came together to hear about “Pastor 4.0,” which aimed to redefine leadership and mission for the 21st century. Attendees, pastors or not, described Self’s presentations as “inspiring,” “powerful,” “relevant,” and “top quality.”

Christy Fay is inspiring a new generation of women by helping them uncover their worth. She wrote and recently published a six-week Bible study curriculum and DVD teaching series that follows the lives of five women found in the lineage of Jesus. Christy Fay challenges women to overcome the labels that define them and reclaim their worth by examining the unlikely and surprising presence of these five women in the genealogy of Jesus. Their stories teach women of all ages and backgrounds an important and life-changing lesson: that there is nothing they can ever do to disqualify themselves from a life chosen and used by God, a life that is reclaimed. If you’d like to receive more information, email info@sfseminary.edu.

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Self offered creative descriptions of Pastor 4.0’s job: discoverer-explorer, convener, catalyst, commissioner – even chief listening officer. This pastor’s success should be measured in ways that gauge the flourishing of joy, peace, and justice. This year’s event was a consummation of the powerful presentations from the last few years. Sioux Falls Seminary was also pleased to honor its 2016 Hiller Fellows: Pastors Dean Yurkewich, Pathway Christian Church, Sexsmith, AB; Caleb Bergman, Hope Community Baptist Church, Sterling Heights, MI; David Lindner, 6:8 Church, Vancouver, WA; and Brent Rood, Seed Church, Lynwood, WA.

models in theological education. As a result, we have been encouraged as leaders from the United States and Canada have asked to learn more about what God is doing in South Dakota and at Sioux Falls Seminary! While developing our students remains our number one priority, we give thanks that our commitment to being accessible, affordable, relevant, and faithful is placing us in the wider conversation about the future of theological education.

in North America and the opportunities for innovation that these changes create by introducing the research project and its findings, sharing the reasons why Sioux Falls Seminary and other schools care, and suggesting several practical steps that seminaries can take to begin addressing operational models and student educational debt. The series can be found online at: sfseminary.edu/debtseries.

Group Research Project: Operational Models and Educational Debt

Working together to create academic programs in partnership with others is quite common across theological education. Not only are partnerships a good way to develop academic programs, but they can also dramatically enhance the entire system of theological education. Sioux Falls Seminary is committed to developing a strong system of theological education that reaches beyond our doors at 2100 S. Summit Avenue and, more importantly, involves more people and organizations working together. The body of Christ must work together if it is to develop servants who will participate in the kingdom mission.

The rate of change in the price of theological education is outpacing the higher education price index, which means that it is not only prohibitively expensive but also on pace to be out of reach. It is part of the seminary’s mission to help individuals be equipped to serve God and participate in his mission. If those servants are kept away by cost and debt, then we are failing. As these trends have progressed over the past decade, the Lilly Endowment began to notice a growing issue related to the economic challenges seminarians were facing and asked schools to consider various ways that this issue could be addressed. Sioux Falls Seminary, Northern Seminary, and Indiana Wesleyan University worked together to design a research project that looked into the funding and operational assumptions that undergird theological education. As a result, Sioux Falls Seminary published an online blog series that shared the research and findings in an effort to start a conversation about how schools might need to think differently or, in some cases, simply think about how operational and educational models are structured within theological education. Articles examined some of the significant changes facing seminaries

Partnerships

As we fulfill our mission, we do so with the belief that three different types of partnerships can be very beneficial. These are: 1) program, 2) process, and 3) promotional. In each case, we try to match our strengths with the strengths of another partner so that both sides of the partnership are enhanced. From our shared online course platform with Taylor Seminary in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, to our Doctor of Ministry program in Pastoral Psychoanalysis with the Brookhaven Institute, we are committed to rethinking the future of theological education and navigating the road ahead with other institutions, organizations, and individuals. 5

2016 Issue I


Alumni in Action: Spotlight on Rev. Phil Long

Rev. Phil Long (M.Div., 2012) grew up

in the church and is familiar with the “nice and comfy” surroundings it can provide. However, through a ministry internship and his seminary courses, Phil began to realize that God was shaping his heart to love those outside of the church. In order to serve where God was calling him, Phil needed to step into the dark places where many are not willing to venture. And this is exactly what Phil, his wife Robin, and a small group of individuals did as they started Reverb, a North American Baptist church plant in Rapid City, South Dakota. Phil quickly became immersed in his new community after his seminary graduation in 2012. Through connections and conversations, he learned about Lakota Homes. This HUD (Housing and Urban Development) neighborhood, made up primarily of Native Americans from the reservation, was one of the places that desperately needed hope. Phil and his leadership team slowly cast their light into the neighborhood. First, they began helping with the after-school program at the Lakota Homes community center. Through their presence and their witness, they came to know parents and families, too. They earned the right to speak and to become part of the community. For a time, much of the church’s work was centered on reverberating the hope of Christ. However, according to Phil, they “recognized that a major piece of what’s happening organically is that [they] are discipling . . . .” Weekly worship now provides an outlet for residents themselves to bring light to the darkness. And that is exactly what is happening as those gathering for worship go out and share the hope and light that they have found with others.

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“I think what the world needs is a true, safe, loving, grace-filled community. I don’t care if Reverb is known for great preaching or that we write our own music,” added Phil.

“What I long for is people to say, ‘I experienced the acceptance and grace of Jesus Christ in that place.’ We are here for the community not just our own church community but for the community around us.” As Phil participates in God’s kingdom mission by serving the diverse community of Rapid City, South Dakota, he is “equipping God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12). At Sioux Falls Seminary, we have the privilege of walking alongside Phil and so many others as they prepare to engage in God’s work and serve all people and all nations. If you feel that God is calling you to be a light in the darkness, we’d love to hear your story and help develop you to build up the body of Christ!

Developing Servants Where God Has Placed Them missionaries in Romania and as Paul works toward completing his theological training.

Paul Gericke, M.Div. Student Salaj, Romania Although the decision to pursue theological education often occurs in different ways and at different times in the lives of students, God is always at the center of the discernment process. Sioux Falls Seminary is participating in God’s kingdom mission by developing systems of theological education that are affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. We’re committed to developing individuals for their unique callings. For many, this means finding ways to grow, serve, and be developed where God has planted them. If the seminary’s future is to be built around the idea of developing servants for their participation in the kingdom mission through affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful systems of theological education and integrated counseling, the best explanation of what this really means may come through a story. Student Paul Gericke is one of many students actively serving in ministry who found limited options for theological education in his ministry context. Here’s what affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful has meant for him. Paul and his wife, Tanya, are experiencing God’s faithfulness as they serve as North American Baptist

Paul is passionate about serving in the village churches as well as empowering the next generation of Romania through the ministry to which God has called him. Being on the other side of the world, and with the time and financial constraints of being a full-time missionary, Paul saw there were few opportunities to pursue his Master’s degree – until he heard about Sioux Falls Seminary. Now, Paul is able to pursue his degree, as Sioux Falls Seminary offers a program, at a fraction of the cost compared to other schools, that allows him to work through the curriculum while he serves in his village. The biblical, theological, and leadership education provided by the Kairos Project is having a direct impact upon the ministry of Romania and on Paul’s life. There are many people like Paul whom God has called to engage in his work. If we are to serve them well, we must provide theological education that’s affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. We are excited to say that God is at work in and through Sioux Falls Seminary in order to bring about such a future! We hope you’ll join us as we participate in the exciting things God has already been doing through Sioux Falls Seminary as we seek to develop servants for their participation in the kingdom mission. 7

2016 Issue I


Alumni in Action: Spotlight on Rev. Phil Long

Rev. Phil Long (M.Div., 2012) grew up

in the church and is familiar with the “nice and comfy” surroundings it can provide. However, through a ministry internship and his seminary courses, Phil began to realize that God was shaping his heart to love those outside of the church. In order to serve where God was calling him, Phil needed to step into the dark places where many are not willing to venture. And this is exactly what Phil, his wife Robin, and a small group of individuals did as they started Reverb, a North American Baptist church plant in Rapid City, South Dakota. Phil quickly became immersed in his new community after his seminary graduation in 2012. Through connections and conversations, he learned about Lakota Homes. This HUD (Housing and Urban Development) neighborhood, made up primarily of Native Americans from the reservation, was one of the places that desperately needed hope. Phil and his leadership team slowly cast their light into the neighborhood. First, they began helping with the after-school program at the Lakota Homes community center. Through their presence and their witness, they came to know parents and families, too. They earned the right to speak and to become part of the community. For a time, much of the church’s work was centered on reverberating the hope of Christ. However, according to Phil, they “recognized that a major piece of what’s happening organically is that [they] are discipling . . . .” Weekly worship now provides an outlet for residents themselves to bring light to the darkness. And that is exactly what is happening as those gathering for worship go out and share the hope and light that they have found with others.

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“I think what the world needs is a true, safe, loving, grace-filled community. I don’t care if Reverb is known for great preaching or that we write our own music,” added Phil.

“What I long for is people to say, ‘I experienced the acceptance and grace of Jesus Christ in that place.’ We are here for the community not just our own church community but for the community around us.” As Phil participates in God’s kingdom mission by serving the diverse community of Rapid City, South Dakota, he is “equipping God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12). At Sioux Falls Seminary, we have the privilege of walking alongside Phil and so many others as they prepare to engage in God’s work and serve all people and all nations. If you feel that God is calling you to be a light in the darkness, we’d love to hear your story and help develop you to build up the body of Christ!

Developing Servants Where God Has Placed Them missionaries in Romania and as Paul works toward completing his theological training.

Paul Gericke, M.Div. Student Salaj, Romania Although the decision to pursue theological education often occurs in different ways and at different times in the lives of students, God is always at the center of the discernment process. Sioux Falls Seminary is participating in God’s kingdom mission by developing systems of theological education that are affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. We’re committed to developing individuals for their unique callings. For many, this means finding ways to grow, serve, and be developed where God has planted them. If the seminary’s future is to be built around the idea of developing servants for their participation in the kingdom mission through affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful systems of theological education and integrated counseling, the best explanation of what this really means may come through a story. Student Paul Gericke is one of many students actively serving in ministry who found limited options for theological education in his ministry context. Here’s what affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful has meant for him. Paul and his wife, Tanya, are experiencing God’s faithfulness as they serve as North American Baptist

Paul is passionate about serving in the village churches as well as empowering the next generation of Romania through the ministry to which God has called him. Being on the other side of the world, and with the time and financial constraints of being a full-time missionary, Paul saw there were few opportunities to pursue his Master’s degree – until he heard about Sioux Falls Seminary. Now, Paul is able to pursue his degree, as Sioux Falls Seminary offers a program, at a fraction of the cost compared to other schools, that allows him to work through the curriculum while he serves in his village. The biblical, theological, and leadership education provided by the Kairos Project is having a direct impact upon the ministry of Romania and on Paul’s life. There are many people like Paul whom God has called to engage in his work. If we are to serve them well, we must provide theological education that’s affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. We are excited to say that God is at work in and through Sioux Falls Seminary in order to bring about such a future! We hope you’ll join us as we participate in the exciting things God has already been doing through Sioux Falls Seminary as we seek to develop servants for their participation in the kingdom mission. 7

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F

a bit of

what’s new

speaker christy fay is inspiring women to uncover their worth

2016 Hiller Recap: Equipping Saints for the work of Ministry

Join us on September 23, 2016, for a day of reflection and fellowship at our annual Women in Community event in Sioux Falls. We look forward to welcoming speaker Christy Fay to campus as she shares with us her inspiration and practical, personal application for growth toward God.

Sioux Falls Seminary featured the Rev. Dr. Charlie Self at its annual Hiller Lectureship on April 13, 2016. Over 120 Christian leaders came together to hear about “Pastor 4.0,” which aimed to redefine leadership and mission for the 21st century. Attendees, pastors or not, described Self’s presentations as “inspiring,” “powerful,” “relevant,” and “top quality.”

Christy Fay is inspiring a new generation of women by helping them uncover their worth. She wrote and recently published a six-week Bible study curriculum and DVD teaching series that follows the lives of five women found in the lineage of Jesus. Christy Fay challenges women to overcome the labels that define them and reclaim their worth by examining the unlikely and surprising presence of these five women in the genealogy of Jesus. Their stories teach women of all ages and backgrounds an important and life-changing lesson: that there is nothing they can ever do to disqualify themselves from a life chosen and used by God, a life that is reclaimed. If you’d like to receive more information, email info@sfseminary.edu.

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Self offered creative descriptions of Pastor 4.0’s job: discoverer-explorer, convener, catalyst, commissioner – even chief listening officer. This pastor’s success should be measured in ways that gauge the flourishing of joy, peace, and justice. This year’s event was a consummation of the powerful presentations from the last few years. Sioux Falls Seminary was also pleased to honor its 2016 Hiller Fellows: Pastors Dean Yurkewich, Pathway Christian Church, Sexsmith, AB; Caleb Bergman, Hope Community Baptist Church, Sterling Heights, MI; David Lindner, 6:8 Church, Vancouver, WA; and Brent Rood, Seed Church, Lynwood, WA.

models in theological education. As a result, we have been encouraged as leaders from the United States and Canada have asked to learn more about what God is doing in South Dakota and at Sioux Falls Seminary! While developing our students remains our number one priority, we give thanks that our commitment to being accessible, affordable, relevant, and faithful is placing us in the wider conversation about the future of theological education.

in North America and the opportunities for innovation that these changes create by introducing the research project and its findings, sharing the reasons why Sioux Falls Seminary and other schools care, and suggesting several practical steps that seminaries can take to begin addressing operational models and student educational debt. The series can be found online at: sfseminary.edu/debtseries.

Group Research Project: Operational Models and Educational Debt

Working together to create academic programs in partnership with others is quite common across theological education. Not only are partnerships a good way to develop academic programs, but they can also dramatically enhance the entire system of theological education. Sioux Falls Seminary is committed to developing a strong system of theological education that reaches beyond our doors at 2100 S. Summit Avenue and, more importantly, involves more people and organizations working together. The body of Christ must work together if it is to develop servants who will participate in the kingdom mission.

The rate of change in the price of theological education is outpacing the higher education price index, which means that it is not only prohibitively expensive but also on pace to be out of reach. It is part of the seminary’s mission to help individuals be equipped to serve God and participate in his mission. If those servants are kept away by cost and debt, then we are failing. As these trends have progressed over the past decade, the Lilly Endowment began to notice a growing issue related to the economic challenges seminarians were facing and asked schools to consider various ways that this issue could be addressed. Sioux Falls Seminary, Northern Seminary, and Indiana Wesleyan University worked together to design a research project that looked into the funding and operational assumptions that undergird theological education. As a result, Sioux Falls Seminary published an online blog series that shared the research and findings in an effort to start a conversation about how schools might need to think differently or, in some cases, simply think about how operational and educational models are structured within theological education. Articles examined some of the significant changes facing seminaries

Partnerships

As we fulfill our mission, we do so with the belief that three different types of partnerships can be very beneficial. These are: 1) program, 2) process, and 3) promotional. In each case, we try to match our strengths with the strengths of another partner so that both sides of the partnership are enhanced. From our shared online course platform with Taylor Seminary in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, to our Doctor of Ministry program in Pastoral Psychoanalysis with the Brookhaven Institute, we are committed to rethinking the future of theological education and navigating the road ahead with other institutions, organizations, and individuals. 5

2016 Issue I


the road ahead rethinking theological education

together

The rethinking of theological education is a big task, and Sioux Falls Seminary is committed to building up the body of Christ in new and exciting ways—but we are not doing it alone. We are excited to partner with a number of different institutions, organizations, and individuals as we navigate the road ahead.

Educational Models and Practices Forum

We recently teamed up with the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) as part of their Educational Models and Practices Peer Group Forum, working specifically with the Competency-Based Education (CBE) peer group. It is becoming clear that Sioux Falls Seminary will play an important role as we collaborate with peer schools to chart new avenues for the future of theological education. The Educational Models and Practices Forum was organized by ATS to address a range of creative development emerging within seminaries. Over two days in February, presenters shared valuable history, data, and visions for the future. Perhaps most importantly, this conference was the kickoff for “peer groups.” These are groups committed to conducting comprehensive studies of educational program developments in ATS schools. New models are already underway in many areas, from online degrees to accelerated Bachelor/Master of Divinity programs to theological programs in prisons. Sioux Falls Seminary is participating in the Competency-Based Education peer group.

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CBE is education oriented to learning outcomes, starting with professional competencies in mind and helping students work toward them in flexible ways. CBE emphasizes actual proficiency over seat-time or credit hours. Typically students follow a well-planned curriculum, proceeding at their own pace. CBE methods often look quite different than traditional patterns. While certain universities have been experimenting with CBE for decades, only in the last few years have theological schools begun entertaining this mode. Sioux Falls Seminary is one of very few seminaries to have made significant inroads into CBE, implementing creative structures in the Kairos Project as well as pass/fail courses with integrated assessment measures in our traditional tracks. In the months ahead, the Competency-Based Education peer group will look to three Sioux Falls Seminary administrators for leadership. President Greg Henson is leading the Collaborative Opportunities Working Group, which will explore possibilities for shared goals and resources. Dr. Larry Caldwell is overseeing the Global Opportunities Working Group, which will examine the potential of CBE for international applications. Lastly, Dr. Nathan Hitchcock is spearheading the Assessment Practices Working Group, which will map out new methods of assessment for students and programs in the CBE paradigm. Altogether, this means that Sioux Falls Seminary is being recognized as part of the leading edge of new

at the seminary 158th Graduating class ready to serve and build the body of christ Commencement is exciting. It gives the opportunity to celebrate both the culmination of a journey and the new season of life into which the seminary’s graduates are entering. The scripture verse for the commencement service, which was held on Saturday, May 14, 2016, at First Baptist Church in Sioux Falls, came from Ephesians 4. It also inspired the message, “A Rock in the Pond,” which was shared by the Rev. Jim Liske, alumnus and pastor of Christ Memorial Church, Holland, MI. In this verse, Ephesians 4:12, Paul describes the reason that God has given the church the gifts of apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers. It is to equip the body of Christ for the work of ministry. Sioux Falls Seminary desires to not only help students develop into the unique servants God has called each of them to be but also to teach them how to equip and serve others. Put simply, our goal is to make disciples who can make disciples. This year’s 42 graduates are taking the next step in their walks with Christ; they are a group of people who will build the body of Christ for the ministry of the church.

Program developments and news The seminary is continually engaged in conversation about its academic programs. These conversations enable deeper discussions about student learning and program assessment, which lead to program adjustments and the ability to better serve students. As a result, several program developments are in the works for the upcoming 2016-2017 academic year: •

The Master of Divinity will shift to 75 credit hours, down from 84;

The Master of Arts in Christian Leadership and Master of Arts (Bible and Theology) will change to 39 credit hours (from 37 and 62, respectively);

A Ph.D. track will be added to the Master of Arts (Bible and Theology), requiring additional course work beyond the base of 39 credit hours;

Reworking the Kairos Project track for the Master of Arts (Bible and Theology);

Updates to the Kairos Project curriculum;

Enhanced supervised ministry components for the classic Master of Divinity program. 9

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update:

serving together as family

Representatives of Sioux Falls Seminary and Taylor Seminary recently visited Cameroon, Africa, where a growing partnership continues to take shape with the Cameroon Baptist Convention and its two seminaries. In addition to teaching a class in Kumba, Sioux Falls Seminary president Greg Henson and Taylor Seminary president David Williams had the privilege of coming alongside the work God is doing in Cameroon. Partnership Development The February 2016 trip was the first step in a five-year partnership that took shape in 2015 between the North American Baptist Conference (NAB) and the Cameroon Baptist Convention (CBC). At that time, President Henson; Dan Hamil, NAB Executive Director; Norm Poehlke, NAB Vice President of Ministry Outreach; David Williams, Taylor Seminary President; and Cal Hohn, NAB Director of Cooperating Missions, visited the NAB’s partner in mission, the Cameroon Baptist Convention. That delegation met with Cameroonian leaders to consider how a partnership could facilitate theological education across the entire CBC, including theological education of students in Ndu at Cameroon Baptist Theological Seminary (CBTS) and in Kumba at Cameroon Baptist Seminary Kumba (CBSK) as well as to continue theological education of CBC pastors and ministry workers.

Notice: Comments

Out of this meeting came a vision for a partnership that would serve to edify the system of theological education across Cameroon. It was agreed that a five-year development project would begin in 2016, and February’s

trip was the start of this work. Henson and Williams spent time meeting with representatives of the CBC as well as various leaders and faculty members of the CBC seminaries in Kumba and Ndu. Much was accomplished at this meeting, including: 1) Identification of the priorities that will guide the five-year project and discussion around how these priorities will inform the partnership between the NAB seminaries and the CBC’s newly-formed Department of Theological and Christian Education; 2) Development of plans for moving forward. Over the coming years, Sioux Falls Seminary and Taylor Seminary will aid in the development of the Department of Theological and Christian Education. In addition, programs for faculty development among faculty members at the seminaries in Cameroon will be designed. One such program could be the creation of a Doctor of Ministry track for students in Cameroon. Next Steps Both Taylor and Sioux Falls Seminaries are excited to see what God does over the next five years. “The fact that Taylor and Sioux Falls are working together on this project and doing so in partnership with a host of leaders from the CBC is a testament to what can occur when we think first about the Kingdom of God and the mission to which we have collectively been called,” said Henson. Working closely with the leaders in Cameroon to consider the future of theological education is going to be a very enriching experience for everyone involved.

Sioux Falls Seminary is seeking comments from the public about the seminary in preparation for its comprehensive evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The seminary will host a visit on September 12-14, 2016, with a team representing the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). Sioux Falls Seminary is currently accredited with the Higher Learning Commission and has been accredited by HLC since 1978. On February 26, 2015, the Higher Learning Commission placed Sioux Falls Seminary on probation. The visit team will review the seminary’s ongoing ability to meet HLC’s Criteria for Accreditation. The public is invited to submit comments regarding the seminary to the following address: Public Comment on Sioux Falls Seminary, Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411. The public may also submit comments on HLC’s website at www.hlcommission.org/comment. Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Comments must be in writing. All comments must be received by August 12, 2016. (Reprint of Sioux Falls Seminary’s third party comment notice, which was released in June 2016)

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development. In addition, each semester a number of people choose to audit a course at the seminary, which allows them to sit in the classroom and learn alongside a community of believers. Partnerships with churches bring theological education back into the local church, which is where it is most at home. One such partnership is between the seminary and the All Nations City Church Training Institute in Sioux Falls, which aims to offer training for immigrant pastors. Location should not deter followers of Christ from engaging in theological education. Accessibility also means making education available to people regardless of location. Through online courses, in-context courses, extension sites, and live-stream technology, Sioux Falls Seminary is able to offer a model of education that meets students where they are. When education doesn’t reside in one location, and it is offered at levels that are consistent with the particular needs of individuals, it becomes truly accessible.

Relevant

[rel-uh-vuh nt] - contextual; bearing upon or connected with a student’s ministry context; pertinent. First and foremost, relevant theological education is contextual. That contextualization creates an educational process that is integrative and operates within a developmental paradigm. Because location has such an impact on ministry, theological education is only relevant if it is done in light of one’s ministry context. Students must think critically about what it means to be on mission with God in their particular contexts. Relevant theological education enables students to develop practical skills and critical thought while also creating in them the ability to integrate the two in meaningful ways. By connecting education to ministry or other contexts, the study and practice of theology

immediately becomes an act of integration. Rather than only reading and reflecting on texts, contextual education forces students to read, reflect, and consider how what they are learning impacts their ministry practices and how to act accordingly. Finally, relevant theological education captures snapshots of students’ knowledge, character, and competency through “point-in-time” assignments and encourages ongoing development.

FAithful

[feyth-fuh l] - transformational; rooted in scripture; oriented toward the mission of God; communal. The most important aspects of theological education are its essence and biblical foundation. Faithful theological education is transformational, communal, academicallyappropriate, oriented toward the mission of God, and rooted in the unshakable truth of God’s word. It is at the heart of equipping God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ (Ephesians 4:12). All models of theological education, therefore, must enable students to engage in an ongoing process of spiritual transformation, helping them find their identities in Christ. True spiritual formation and identity development cannot be done in isolation. Faithful theological education must also be rooted in scripture. The gospel is the unchanging and unshakable truth of God’s word and must always be the foundation of theological education. While this is the most important aspect of faithful theological education, it also requires the least explanation. If we are not opening the Bible on a regular basis as part of the journey, then the most important aspect is missing. Sioux Falls Seminary has a rich Baptist heritage, and we stand firmly upon it as we serve those God places in our care by creating affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful systems of theological education. We hope you will join us as we walk boldly into the revolutionary future to which God has called us. 3

2016 Issue I


taking a closer look:

affordable accessible relevant & faithful Sioux Falls Seminary is called to develop systems of theological education that are affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. This sentence is one of the best ways to articulate how the seminary is participating in God’s kingdom mission. Here’s a closer look at what the words “affordable,” “accessible,” “relevant,” and “faithful” mean in the context of creating systems of theological education at Sioux Falls Seminary.

Affordable

[uh-fawr-duh-buh l] - Within one’s financial means; a focus on significantly decreasing the cost to educate students at Sioux Falls Seminary, thereby reducing the price of education and service. The average cost for a Master of Divinity is roughly $40,000, which is a 78% increase from the average cost in 2001. As an industry, the primary mechanism to create “affordable education” has been through raising money to offer more scholarships. While this is important work, it isn’t enough. Scholarships simply shift the burden from students to givers. While seminaries have been spending time and energy raising funds for scholarships, total expenditures in the industry have grown at a rate nearly three times faster than the rate of inflation. In 2009, when the seminary moved into its new facility, our annual budget was $3,500,000. Today the seminary’s current annual budget is $2,725,000, a $775,000 difference from five years ago. Innovative staffing models, technology solutions, and maximiza-

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SUBMIT UPDATES ONLINE AT SFSEMINARY.EDU/ALUMNI

STAYING in

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UCH sioux falls seminary alumni news + prayer

tion of assets has led to these operational efficiencies. There are many things that must happen to effectively operate a school. We’ve decided to invest in our relationships with students, develop partnerships, outsource several tasks, and implement technology that gives students the ability to register for courses, see and pay bills, and track academic progress. Tuition has not been raised in four years, and the hope is that our next tuition change will be a reduction. Through these operational changes, the generosity of many partners, and the grace of God, Sioux Falls Seminary will create an affordable system of theological education.

Accessible

[ak-ses-uh-buh l] - obtainable; attainable; systems of theological education that are within the means of one’s ministry context, educational level, and income. Accessibility means making theological education available to people at the level that best fits their calling and need. For Sioux Falls Seminary, accessibility refers to both level and location. During fall 2015 and spring 2016, about 66% of students at the seminary were engaged in master’s, doctoral, and graduate certificate programs. This means that some students are learning through other types of theological education, such as non-degree programs, course audits, and partnerships. Non-degree certificate programs mirror graduate programs, but students do not enroll at the master’s or doctoral level. These programs, which include the Certificate in Christian Ministry and Training in Spiritual Direction, are affordable, flexible, and designed to enhance personal and professional

alumni news and prayer requests

courages people to be the hands and feet of Jesus on mission trips.

‘51

Jacob Ehman stays busy teaching a Sunday school class of about 25 students and leading a men’s Bible study. He lives in Alpena, MI.

‘71

Jim Green has retired and relocated to Sequim, WA, where he and wife Annette have purchased a home. They enjoy the Olympic Peninsula, a beautiful area filled with friendly people and great views of the Olympic Mountains and the Juan de Fuca Strait.

‘74

El Roy Pankow continues to serve in active ministry. He is currently the Associate Pastor of Wilshire Ave. Community Church in Fullerton, CA, where he leads choir and worship for the traditional service, develops ministry with Boomers and Builders, and en-

Since his seminary days, he has served on pastoral staff at Parma Heights Baptist Church (Ohio), First Baptist Churches in Anaheim, Alhambra, and Santa Ana (California), and now in Fullerton. El Roy and his wife, Joyce, will celebrate their 43rd wedding anniversary in December 2016. They are thankful that their two children and five grandchildren live nearby. El Roy and Joyce would love to hear from former classmates: elroypankow@ aol.com.

‘76

William H. Jones, the seminary’s first D.Min. graduate, recently published a book on Saint Paul titled The Wellness of Saint Paul (available on Amazon.

com). The book deals with Paul’s Hellenistic background and how, with God’s help, he overcame his reaction to conquer his personality defects and, instead, contribute so boldly to the development of the church.

‘81

Barry Landon has been Pastor at White River Fellowship in Elkins, AR, for nine years.

‘82

Eriberto (Eddie) Soto retired from the St. Augustine Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church USA in Jacksonville, FL, in 2015. He continues to minister part-time as a local church pastor and lead mission trips to Latin America.

‘88

Walt Geiszler and wife Jeanette retired from pastoring the New Joy Community Church in Sioux Falls, SD, in 2015.

‘89

Jim Black has completed his eleventh year of pastoral min11

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alumni news + prayer

‘09

istry, having served in Nigeria as a field director for eight years and as the Senior Leader of Worldwide Outreach in the NAB International Office for four years.

Earng Han Chan does social work and counseling for Fei Yue Community Services in Singapore.

‘96

‘10

Kelly Mattis provides emergency mental health care to individuals who find themselves in crisis or hopeless and alone. She lives in Jamestown, ND, and serves the south central area of North Dakota through the South Central Human Service Center. Randy Schmor continues leadership of Gateway Teams, which is now part of the NAB International Office. His wife, Shelly, began focusing on other commitments in April 2016.

‘99

Steven Miller and his family moved in January to Camanche, IA, where Steven is Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church of Camanche. He feels blessed to have baptized several new members this year.

Jeff Kilmartin and wife Sonya are preparing to join the NAB missionary team at the seminary in Ndu, Cameroon, in 2017. They previously served in Nigeria in 2008-2009.

‘11

Emily Learing provides child and family therapy at Encompass Mental Health in Sioux Falls, SD. Roger Priestley married Marcie Gothard on May 28, 2016. Both work for The Salvation Army, where Roger is the Director of Practical Ministries, and Marcie is the Development Director. Roger is working on his MBA at the University of Sioux Falls.

‘13

Ali McCormick is the Middle School Coordinator, Outreach Minister, and KIDSTOP program lead for First United Methodist Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

‘15

‘00

Chris Gorman is the new Regional Minister to the Northwest Region of the NAB. He had served his church plant, Central Valley Community Church in Hartford, SD, since 2000. He and his wife, Kristi, and their three children are now at home in Washington.

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Mallorie Hansmann was married to Scott Egbers on January 1, 2016. Scott is serving as the Pastor of First Lutheran Church in Beardstown, IL.

‘16

Ryan Albano will become an active duty Navy Chaplain this fall. He is currently in CHI Health’s Clinical Pastoral Education intensive program. He resides in Papillion, NE.

Alan Blankenfeld was ordained

in the ELCA on January 23, 2016. He began serving as the pastor for Colman and Midway Lutheran Churches in February.

Marcus Brooks will begin a one-

year intern residency position with the VA Hospital in Sioux Falls, SD, in October 2016. Steven DeGangi is the Pastor of Grace Lower Stone Reformed Church in Rockwell, NC.

Joshua DeKok is the Youth Pastor at Meredith Drive Reformed Church in Des Moines, IA. He has been serving there since July 2015. Aaron Deutsch is relocating to Hull, IA, where he will serve as Pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Church. Brandon Foster is serving as the Youth Director for Atonement Lutheran Church in Fargo, ND, and as the Pastoral Assistant of New Creation Lutheran Church in Perham, MN. Greg Friesner continues his

chiropractic practice in Sioux Falls, SD, alongside working as a chaplain at the county jail.

from the

greg henson

president Through our website story center, we have looked at the biblical foundations for theological education, the history of theological education, and the need for different thinking to impact the future of theological education. I’m excited to say that Sioux Falls Seminary is building on the past and looking toward the future. Our mission is to develop servants for their participation in the kingdom mission. We do this by pursuing our call to create systems of theological education and integrated counseling that are affordable, accessible, relevant, and faithful. Our purpose in doing so is to empower people to serve where God has placed them. The future plans of the seminary are rooted in a belief that God is at work and that we are called to participate in that work. At times, this means strengthening work that has been done in the past. While at other times, we will need to honor the past and look toward new models or systems. At the end of the day, Ephesians 4:12 sums up quite well the broad work of theological education. After listing various roles within the church, Paul states, “Their responsibility is to equip God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ.” At Sioux Falls Seminary, we believe that we are called to build up the church, the body of Christ, by developing servants who will engage in God’s work. This means helping individuals discover the unique ways in which they are called to participate in the Great Commission.

Jody Gras continues her work as

I believe the future of theological education is bright if we are willing to think creatively and intentionally about how we remain faithful to God’s word and the essence of theological education while reimagining almost everything else. Theological education is an important aspect of God’s church and something to which all of us are called. This means that we need to think more broadly about the definition of theological education.

Chris Haberman is planting a

Too often, we relegate theological education to graduate degrees offered on the campus of a seminary. While those are vital to the health and well-being of the church, they are not the sole expression of theological education. Such education happens within the church, at various educational levels, and through multiple delivery methods. The key is to “equip God’s people to do his work and build up the church, the body of Christ!”

the Director of Adult Discipleship and Development at Emmanuel Reformed Church in Paramount, CA.

church in Sioux Falls, SD, with the Anglican Church in North America.

Amy King is serving in a variety of capacitates at Friendship Community Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

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2016 Issue I


impact I sioux falls seminary 2016 Issue 1

STAYING in

T

UCH

Jordan Minnich Kjesbo serves as an adjunct professor for Messiah College in Grantham, PA.

Dave Sinkgraven is the Associate Pastor of Life Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

Joshua Klein is the youth pastor

Dwayne Williams is the new Pastor of First Baptist Church in Huron, SD. He previously served as Associate Pastor of Emmanuel Baptist Church in Sioux Falls. He holds the position of Pastor-toPastor in the American Baptist Churches of the Dakotas. He and his wife, Jackie, now live in Huron.

and worship leader at Crosspoint Bible Church in Omaha, NE.

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from the

president

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Sioux Falls Seminary is building on the past and looking toward the future. President Henson talks about the value of rethinking theological education as part of this process.

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taking a

closer look the road ahead

together

Charting the course for the future of theological education is a big task. Sioux Falls Seminary is excited about collaborating with others to explore the best routes forward.

a light in

the darkness

Kerry Koerselman is working

developing

servants

Get to know seminary student Paul Gericke and learn how the seminary is working to develop him and others where God has placed them.

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update:

cameroon

toward licensure as a counselor intern at Sioux Falls Psychological Services in Sioux Falls, SD, in addition to serving a few days per week at the Tiwahe Glu Kini Pi Clinic on the Rosebud Reservation.

Lori Menke is serving at the VA Hospital in Sioux Falls, SD, as a program manager to Post 9/11 combat veterans as she prepares for licensure.

Marcel Mitchell serves as Lead Pastor at Temple Baptist Church in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, and teaches with Hispanics for Christ and Russian Leadership Ministries. He is hoping to begin a ministry in the area of missional church leadership development. Tamara Nelson is working to create

staying in

touch

remembering

dr. Draewell

A tribute to former seminary president Dr. David J. Draewell, who passed away in March 2016.

alumni news + prayer

two ministries: Praynting, which guides participants in painting their prayers, and Aperture8, which uses art, creativity, and adventure to face darkness and help usher in light and healing.

Justin Nielsen is providing mental health and chemical dependency counseling at the Carroll Institute in Sioux Falls, SD. Bryan Rice is the Pastor of Christ

the King Lutheran Church in Bellevue, NE.

Barry Saylor is the Associate

Pastor at Crosswalk Community Church in Sioux Falls, SD.

Dylon Young continues to serve as the Director of Christian Education for his church in the Omaha, NE, area as he prays about a full-time senior pastor position.

in memoriam

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Robert P. Nielsen died on August 2, 2015, in Grimes, IA. He was a WWII veteran and former chaplain and served in the UMC Dakotas Conference from 19501983 and as District Superintendant for the Northern District from 19831986. After retirement, he continued to serve as a hospital chaplain. Robert is preceded in death by his wife of 70 years, and he is survived by three children.

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John Binder died in hospice on November 20, 2015, after receiving a diagnosis of cancer only a week earlier. He was 85. He served the NAB International Office from 1960-1994 and was Executive Director from 1979-1994. He also served on the NABS Board of Trustees from 1979-1994 and was Interim President in 2000-2001 between Presidents Chuck Hiatt and Mike Hagan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and three children. Pictured below with wife Barbara.

‘51

Bernard “Bernie” Fritzke, of Beaverton, OR, died June 15, 2016. He worked for the NAB International Office in the area of church planting as well as planted and pastored various NAB churches in the Pacific Northwest, Dakotas, and Florida. In his retirement years, he and Lorraine resided in Oregon and remained active in the life of the NAB Conference, often attending the NAB Retired Workers’ Retreat and other events. He is remembered by wife Lorraine, his family, and the many individuals whose lives he touched through his years in ministry.

(Pictured above with Lorraine at the 2015 NAB Triennial.)

‘03

Heather Bonander, 37, of Larchwood, IA, died on May 22, 2016. She was a Master of Arts in Counseling student in 2002-2003 but was unable to finish her program due to health concerns.

submit updates online

sfseminary.edu/alumni We’d love to hear from you and so would fellow alumni! Visit our online alumni registration at: sfseminary.edu/alumni. 13

2016 Issue I


impact I sioux falls seminary

A North American Baptist Seminary

2100 S. Summit Ave. I Sioux Falls, SD 57105

2016 I Issue 1 Sioux Falls, SD I Omaha, NE I Online 800.440.6227 or 605.336.6588 info@sfseminary.edu

www.sfseminary.edu #SFSeminaryImpact

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facebook.com/SiouxFallsSeminary

Remembering President David J. Draewell We give thanks for the life and service of Dr. David J. Draewell, former Sioux Falls Seminary president, who died on March 13, 2016. During his years as president and beyond, he made an impact on the seminary community and in the lives of students and alumni. Draewell, who was born on April 22, 1929, served as Sioux Falls Seminary’s ninth president from 1970-1981. He was officially installed into office on Friday, November 19, 1971, along with Dr. Gerald Borchert as dean. He joined the seminary from the North American Baptist Conference headquarters, where he had served as secretary of stewardship and higher education. Under his leadership, the seminary focused on advancing its mission and expanding on multiple fronts. Increased enrollment, degree program development, accreditation with the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, construction of student apartment buildings, and addition of administrative and staff positions were among changes that took place during Draewell’s years in office.

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In a special chapel service during the seminary’s 2008 sesquicentennial celebration, Draewell described his presidency as a time of growth: growth in the size of the student body, programs, faculty, and physical footprint. Draewell was an ordained minister, graphic arts collector, oriental gardener, devoted husband, and father. He was described as being a vibrant individual, revealing his enthusiasm for youth, his family, and life. In addition to his work with the North American Baptist Conference office, he also served churches in Michigan and Ohio. In retirement, David and wife Betty lived in Bradenton, FL. They remained committed to the mission of Sioux Falls Seminary and showed their support in many ways, often returning to Sioux Falls to give the gift of service. In 2014, they relocated from Bradenton to Sioux Falls to be closer to their son, Tim, and his family. (Pictured above with Betty at the former Worship and Leadership Centre, after spending a week beautifying the campus.)

Building the body of christ 2016 Issue I

Impact Magazine: 2016 Issue I  

Sioux Falls Seminary develops servants for their participation in the kingdom mission. The 2016 Issue I of the Impact Magazine focuses on h...