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F I R E

R E S C U E

2016

ANNUAL REPORT

CFAI

Commission on Fire Accreditation International


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Message from the Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7 Itemization of Incident Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–9 Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–12 Fire Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–16 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17–19 Emergency Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Professional Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22–29 Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30–33 Fire Rescue Organization Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Map of Current and Proposed Fire Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

2016 Fire Annual Report

Table of Contents | 5


MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF

The mission of Sioux Falls Fire Rescue is to protect lives and property from fires and other emergencies through education, prevention, and emergency management. We were able to meet that mission in 2016 with 210 dedicated and professional members. The Sioux Falls Fire Rescue team is committed to providing the best possible approach to fire prevention, safety, emergency management, training, and preparedness. Our goal is to ensure the members and visitors of this community feel protected and safe when we are called to handle your emergency. As you read through this annual report, I am confident you will see our commitment, dedication, and professionalism shining through in each of our four divisions. The following are the 10 most significant achievements for 2016.

Training for a Purpose

Sioux Falls is fortunate to have highly trained teams to lead search and rescue efforts. While the downtown building collapse on December 2 resulted in tragedy, the rescue and recovery efforts were immediate, strategic, and thorough. The efforts of many helped save the life of a young woman who had survived the initial collapse of the building. The largest rescue operation in the city’s history for a multiple building collapse captured the attention of the community and the nation and has reinforced the confidence in Sioux Falls Fire Rescue’s ability to respond.

Maintaining Service Levels with Increased Call Volume Sioux Falls Fire Rescue responded to almost 13,000 calls for service, an increase of 3.5 percent. 2016 was another record-breaking year for emergency responses.

No Fire Fatalities

It’s been more than three years since the most recent fire death in Sioux Falls, which surpasses the previous record of 18 months. In addition, only $4.3 million in property loss was reported as the result of fires, which is below other cities our size. This is due to the synergistic effect of all divisions focused on common goals and values.

New Defibrillators and CPR Procedures

In 2016, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue implemented state-of-the-art cardiac care with new defibrillators that can also detect carbon monoxide levels and include a new advanced airway. “Pit Crew CPR” also was implemented, which is a new team-oriented approach for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) between Sioux Falls Fire Rescue, the Sioux Falls Police Department, and ambulance service provider Paramedics Plus for treating cardiac arrest patients.

CPR Training

Sioux Falls Fire Rescue provided CPR training to 7,500 citizens in 2016! In addition, Fire Rescue crews installed more than 750 car seats and checked another 1,000 car seats for proper installation.

Technology Implementation

Electronic Engine Company Surveys with iG Inspect were implemented to allow Fire Prevention crews to use iPads to upload information regarding pending and completed inspections, increasing efficiency of operations.

Collective Bargaining

Successful and productive contract negotiation occurred in 2016 between the City of Sioux Falls and the International Association of Firefighters, Local 814. Human Resources and other City departments successfully negotiated a two-year labor contract with the union.

6 | Message from the Chief www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Equipment

Several replacement units were put into service in support of the Sioux Falls Fire Rescue mission. These include an Incident Support Unit, a 109-foot ladder truck, and a safety attenuator.

National Study

2016 was the second year Sioux Falls Fire Rescue was invited to participate in the Carcinogenic and Cardiovascular Study at the University of Illinois/Illinois Fire Service Institute. This is a groundbreaking study on the effects of the byproducts of fire and their relationship to certain cancers in firefighters.

Wildland Firefighting

Sioux Falls Fire Rescue aided other departments across the state battling wildland fires this fire season.

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Sioux Falls Fire Rescue does not operate alone, but embraces a collaborative environment with many other public safety agencies and city departments. Sioux Falls Fire Rescue appreciates the continued support of the Mayor and City Council which has allowed us to build on our own successes. We also thank our many community partnerships that have allowed us to be involved in several well received programs.

2016 Fire Annual Report

� Message from the Chief | 7


ITEMIZATION OF INCIDENT TYPE SFFR Organization and Resources

Sioux Falls Fire Rescue is one of 12 major organizational units of the City of Sioux Falls. The department is led by the Fire Chief who reports to the Mayor. The department is divided into four divisions: Administration, Operations, Fire Prevention, and Professional Standards. This report contains sections from each division. The department had an operating budget of $26,232,082 in 2016 used to provide services in the areas of fire suppression, emergency medical basic life support, technical rescue, hazardous materials mitigation, fire prevention, public education, and maintain 11 fire stations, and 24 response apparatus. The department has 210 personnel assigned to it, with 181 of those working in the operations division.

Fire Statistics

Sioux Falls Fire Rescue looks at National Fire Protection Association statistics to measure the department’s performance to either national averages or regional (Midwest) data if available. This provides the department with quantifiable performance indicators for self-assessment and quality improvement. In 2016, Sioux Falls had zero deaths from fires keeping the five-year average to 1.8 compared to the national average of 1.12, and the Midwest region average of 1.37 per 178,500 people. Sioux Falls had 282 fires and fire loss was $4,335,278 in 2016, our five-year average is $3,701,805. According to national statistics, a city the size of Sioux Falls can expect to have 513 fires and a fire loss of $4,265,644 annually.

Insurance Rating

The Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating is important because it is the basis for property insurance for most insurance companies. It has a direct bearing on insurance costs for our citizens. The rating is based on the fire department, water delivery system, and emergency communications dispatch system. SFFR was designated a rating of 1 on November 2015. 8 | Itemization of Incident Type www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Private Dwellings Apartments Hotels and Motels All Other Residential Total Residential Fires Public Assembly Schools and Colleges Health Care and Prisons Stores and Offices Industry and Manufacturing Storage Other Structures Total Nonresidential Fires Cars, Trucks, and Buses Planes, Trains, and Special Use Outside Storage, Crops, Etc. Grass and Wildland Fires Rubbish All Others Total Nonstructure Fires Emergency Medical and Rescue False Alarms Mutual Aid Hazardous Materials Other Hazardous Responses All Other Total Nonfire Total for All Incidents 2016 Fire Annual Report

2016 57 37 3 2 99 10 1 4 9 6 8 2 40 51 16 16 22 32 6 143 6,821 1,680 44 749 305 3,051 12,650 12,932

2015 64 44 3 1 112 4 3 2 3 2 7 1 22 48 16 22 31 36 7 160 6,793 1,587 31 760 243 2,658 12,072 12,366

2014 57 42 5 0 104 5 1 3 12 2 7 2 32 68 14 23 28 36 11 180 6,227 1,604 50 733 217 2,270 11,101 11,417

2013 67 47 0 2 116 7 0 1 10 3 4 5 30 81 10 20 20 32 16 179 5,809 1,599 39 782 290 2,205 10,724 11,049 Itemization of Incident Type | 9


OPERATIONS DIVISION

The Operations Division is tasked with emergency response and is responsible for the management of day-to-day activities of the 181 personnel assigned. In 2016, SFFR responded to 12,932 various emergency situations, up from 12,366 in 2015. Included in this total were 9 incidents in the Wayne Township response area, and 44 mutual aid responses in surrounding communities. Major fire responses and loss included fires at 1601 West 2nd Street ($917,555 property and contents), 301 South Garfield Avenue ($575,000 property and contents), and 1721 East 60th Street North ($300,000 property and contents). The city of Sioux Falls had no fatality fires in 2016. The city of Sioux Falls incurred $4,335,278 of fire loss in 2016. Fire loss in 2016 was below the national average. $141,103,904 worth of property and contents were exposed to fire. This means that Sioux Falls Fire Rescue saved 96.93 percent of all the property and contents that were exposed to fire. As the growth of the city continues, SFFR now provides services to 178,500 citizens and covers approximately 75 square miles within the city of Sioux Falls. We also contract our services to approximately 1,196 people within the 21.94 square mile coverage area of Wayne Township. The population of the city grows by an additional 25 percent during the daytime as workers commute into the city. 10 | Operations Division www.siouxfalls.org/fire


During 2016, SFFR traveled to 90 percent of all code 3 or 4 emergencies (lights and sirens) in 5 minutes, 5 seconds. Our 90 percent turnout time; the amount of time that it takes a crew to be paged, put on their firefighting gear, and leave the station was 57 seconds. Keeping low response times is a key component of maintaining our status as an internationally accredited fire department and our ISO rating of 1. Less than 40 departments in the world have attained this distinction.

Sioux Falls Fire Rescue saved 96.93 percent of all property and contents that were exposed to fire.

The division is divided into two battalions. They are the North Battalion and the South Battalion. Other than the Operations Division Chief, all personnel work a 24-hour schedule. Emergency response included responding to and mitigating medical calls, injury accidents, fire notifications and related incidents, technical rescue, and hazardous material incidents. In addition to standard mutual aid agreements, SFFR has agreements in place with counties for response to weapons of mass destruction and 2016 Fire Annual Report

hazardous materials incidents in the region. A response agreement is being developed with the South Dakota Office of Homeland Security to provide assistance to the rest of South Dakota in the event of an emergency that exceeds the capabilities of the local responders. A contract has been signed with the South Dakota Wildland Division to assist with wildland fires and prescribed burns in eastern South Dakota. In 2016, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue responded to two building collapses. The first collapse was on August 1, at Madison Street and Ebenezer Avenue. A tilt up construction building collapsed trapping a worker. SFFR USAR crews successfully extricated the worker from the structure. The second collapse occurred on December 2, at 136 South Phillips Avenue. A brick and mortar building collapsed trapping two people. This incident tested City resources, department resources, and especially our USAR teams. SFFR located and rescued one occupant. SFFR located the second victim; unfortunately, he had already passed away from his injuries. South Dakota Task Force 1 responded to Sioux Falls to assist with this incident. In 2016, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue personnel assigned to SD Task Force 1, trained in Rapid City during the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. This training put specialized resources in the west part of the state

“Our 90 percent turnout time;

the amount of time that it takes a crew to be paged, put on their firefighting gear, and leave the station was 57 seconds.

in case they were needed. SFFR Urban Search and Rescue teams participated in 5 rescue specialty drills, and a collapsed building scenario. SFFR deployed to Aberdeen for a state drill to train with other SD Task Force 1 members from Aberdeen, Rapid City, and Watertown. The state drill was a simulated building collapse that resulted in confined space rescues and a hazardous materials release.

Our hazmat team went from three stations to two stations. This decision was made so we could better maximize specialized training opportunities and certifications without sacrificing service to the citizens of Sioux Falls. Hazmat crews trained together throughout the year. SFFR hazmat members participated in a joint training exercise at Augustana University. The purpose of the exercise was to successfully mobilize multiple state agencies. The 82nd Civil Support Team and Emergency Management from 114th Air National Guard also participated in the exercise. Operations Division | 11


The objectives of the drill were to: • Establish communications • Conduct a hazard assessment • Establish medical support • Conduct a recon • Sample and identify chemicals • Decontaminate civilians and responders • Manage and account for all responders on scene SFFR completed wildland land refresher training for all fire suppression members of the department. SFFR crews responded to the following wildland fires: • The Cold fire • Crow Peak fire • Red Canyon fire • Highway 36 fire • M Hill fire • Whitehorse fire • Indian Canyon fire • Freeman fire. A crew also stood by in Custer State Park because of fire severity. SFFR has locations identified as target hazards within Sioux Falls that we have set up specific response levels for. In addition to these locations we have designated locations that have a high life safety concern, are critical to the infrastructure of Sioux Falls, or pose a serious threat to

the surrounding area and plotted them on mapping software. In the event of a major disaster such as a tornado, the incident commander or our crews will follow a predesignated route through their territories to rapidly assess the amount of damage to these sites. Our initial response level is dictated by the risk assessment of each of these target hazards. For example, the initial response may vary from 4 apparatus and a command vehicle (17 personnel) to 6 apparatus, 1 hazardous materials response team, 1 support vehicle and 1 command vehicle (30 personnel). SFFR is in the process of using ESRI to collect target hazard and pre-incident planning information. This vital information is available to all members of our department when responding to one of these locations via an onboard data terminal. The operations division of Sioux Falls Fire Rescue strongly believes our responsibility to be ready for all emergencies never ends, and we will continually prepare ourselves to help our fellow citizens in their time of need.

The City of Sioux Falls had no fatality fires in 2016.

12 | Operations Division www.siouxfalls.org/fire


FIRE PREVENTION

The mission of the Fire Prevention Division is to save lives and property in City of Sioux Falls through the strategies of code enforcement, public education, fire investigation, and engineering. The division’s effectiveness is measured through trend analysis of fire behavior resulting in dollar loss, injury, or fatalities. During 2016, fire prevention made strides in reducing fire dollar loss and fatalities. Trends for fire loss continue to decline and the year ended with zero fatalities. Completing a third consecutive year with zero fatalities is a monumental accomplishment validating the departments overall efforts. The division promotes collaborative relationships with other local charitable and noncharitable organizations to provide community risk reduction efforts. The division conducts risk reduction outreach while managing other normal annual activities. During 2016, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue conducted fire safety training for 10,650 grade school students, fire reviews for over 400 projects, and fire inspections on 7,500 occupancies. Despite this workload, Fire Prevention Division continues to seek ways to leverage technology, streamline processes, and gain new efficiencies—all in an effort to provide outstanding fire and life safety services to the community. 14 | Fire Prevention www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Code Enforcement

Enforcement of adopted fire code is the responsibility of all Firefighters. Sioux Falls Fire Rescue provides fire and life safety services to the community through comprehensive code enforcement activities, including model code adoption, plans review, permitting, operational licensing, and recurring inspections. During the year, the 2015 International Fire Code was adopted with amendments. This adoption requires input and collaboration of fire contractors and design professionals. Installation practices outlined in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) references are used as industry standard when referenced within adopted code. Whenever applicable, nationally recognized standards and products certified by Underwriters Laboratory (UL), Factory Mutual (FM), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and American Petroleum Institute (API) are used as the framework for all building, installation, and technical design criteria.

Public Education

Sioux Falls Fire Rescue provides a variety of fire safety and injury education programs. Working in conjunction with American Red Cross and other public safety organizations, our communitybased risk reduction strategy continues to thrive. “Growing Resilient,” a collaborative effort of organizations, canvassed 1,000 2016 Fire Annual Report

homes in the Garfield neighborhood and installed ten-year smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors to address targeted community needs. This public/ private partnership effort also included blood pressure checks and emergency preparedness tips. A new opportunity arose in 2016 with a collaborative effort with the Good Samaritan Society. Volunteers from Good Sam installed 100 combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in homes of elderly citizens during their founder’s day of service. Sioux Falls Fire Rescue’s grade school education is conducted through programs focusing on kindergarten through fifth grade and through delivery of programs tailored to specific audiences. As a new function, Fire Prevention added additional capabilities by providing online scheduling for grade school fire safety programs. As the community grows, public education programs are continually evaluated for content and effectiveness to enhance future delivery.

Fire Investigation

Fires occurring within the city of Sioux Falls are required by state law and adopted fire code to be investigated for origin and cause. These determinations are necessary to define whether the fire was incendiary, accidental, natural, or undetermined. This determination provides the framework for developing strategies Fire Prevention | 15


to minimize future fire occurrence and injuries. When a fire is determined to be accidental in origin, investigation results are used to eliminate or reduce future occurrences through fire code revisions and public education programs. If a fire is determined incendiary, investigators work in conjunction with Sioux Falls Police and other investigative agencies to conduct full investigations with the goal of prosecuting those responsible.

Engineering

A centerpiece of fire engineering within Sioux Falls Fire Rescue is conducting plans review on infrastructure and fire protection features for new construction and renovations. As the city continues to annex in undeveloped property, key fire code provisions of vehicle access and hydrant layout are reviewed for compliance during the planning process. New structures are reviewed for required fire protection features including fire sprinklers, alarms and special extinguishing systems. Implementing new Land Management software has proven to be a critical asset, as 2016 was the fourth consecutive record year in construction valuations. Implementing new technology will continue to be a focus in 2017, online permitting applications, reviews, and inspections all move toward becoming a digital process. These enhancements will hopefully bring improved focus to customer service and streamlined processing for future projects. 16 | Fire Prevention www.siouxfalls.org/fire


ADMINISTRATION

The Administration Division is responsible for a broad range of services that support, enable, and partner with all divisions to meet the mission of the fire department. These include promotional and hiring processes, accreditation, ISO, department budgeting, purchasing, facilities maintenance, fleet apparatus and their maintenance, area grant, contract and agreement oversight. Keeping all 11 stations functioning, updated, and running smoothly requires planning and budgeting. Working with facilities to develop plans and needs for all the locations that SFFR works out of was further developed in 2016. Station 4 and Station 9 underwent an exterior brick updating to ensure the stations can be maintained and viable into the future. Fire Headquarters (HQ) underwent upkeep in the form of tuck pointing to further extend the life, look, and usability of Fire Headquarters and the adjoining Station 3. Team work is the key to success and the department continued to work collaboratively with all City departments and support services. With an approximate budget of nearly $28 million, the department worked within that budget to ensure we provided the services that the growing city needs and expects.

2016 Fire Annual Report

Administration | 17


ISO 1 was achieved and Accreditation first accomplished in 2003 through the Center for Public Safety Excellence was continued. Both achievements work together and require continuous evaluation and self-assessment to ensure the City’s fire rescue services meet the highest standards and is continually working toward improvement and best practices. Meeting annual compliance reports is part of the administrative responsibilities, but the continued evaluation and compliance requires the entire teams’ commitment to meet the standards set forth through our accreditation process. In 2016, we continued to meet accreditation standards and are committed to continuing the self-assessment into the future. As part of continued assessments and improvement, the department researched and began plans for updating and improving our department’s use of technology in such areas as Incident reporting, data analytics and computer aided dispatch (CAD). These steps forward will enhance the department’s and the City’s ability to use data and technology to help make decisions.

Fire Engine—Engine 1 • Freightliner chassis with Rosenbauer body and crew module • 1500 GPM pump, 500 gallons water, 20 gallons Class A foam, 20 gallons Class B foam • Idle reduction technology—battery and diesel APU

In 2016, the centralizing of all fleet for the city was completed. This included the Fire apparatus maintenance shop and its staff which continued to provided excellent preventative maintenance and repairs to keep all the engines, rescues, ladder trucks, tenders, command vehicles, and support vehicles in service 24 hours a day. The three personnel, including two Emergency Vehicle Technicians (EVTs) also kept front line emergency equipment, saws, and small engines ready for use on emergency scenes and for day-to-day operations. The Fire EVTs and staff remain an integral part of meeting SFFR’s mission. The office team at Fire Headquarters and Fire Prevention had another busy year in support of the department and its members through payroll, purchasing, data collection, quality assurance, and clerical support. In 2016, replacement and new equipment and apparatus were purchased to meet the growing needs and risks of the community.

Aerial Quint—Truck 6 • Rosenbauer • 109’ aerial ladder, 2000 GPM pump, 500 gallons water, 20 gallons Class A foam, 20 gallons Class B foam • Idle reduction technology—battery and diesel APU

18 | Administration www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Incident Support Unit—ISU 9 • Freightliner chassis with Rosenbauer body • Eagle air SCBA compressor and fill stations • 9KW light tower • Rehabilitation equipment including inflatable tents with heaters • Additional ventilation and forcible entry equipment for large incidents

Traffic Attenuator Trailer—Station 9 • Scorpion traffic attenuator trailer • Meets U.S. and European crash testing standards for impact absorption • Pulled by new incident support unit • Deployed on all highway and interstate calls for crew/ apparatus/scene protection 2016 Fire Annual Report

Administration | 19


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

The mission of Emergency Management is to lessen the loss of life and reduce injuries and property damage during natural and man-made incidents through mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Major Emergency Management efforts for 2016 included: Preparedness • Disaster Exercises • Training • SF Community Organizations Active • Advanced Incident Command in Disaster Tabletop System 300 Course • FEMA EOC Tornado Tabletop • Advanced Incident Command System 400 Course • Airport Tabletop • FEMA Basic Public Information • Airport Full-scale Mass Casualty Officer Course • Flood Control System Drill • FEMA Liaison Officer Course • Heart Hospital Active Shooter Full• Rapid Needs Assessment scale • ICS/EOC Interface • Outdoor Warning Sirens: Emergency • Mass Care Management maintains a system of • Division Supervisor seventy-seven (77) outdoor warning sirens to alert the public in the event of • Social Media tornadoes threatening the community. • Storm spotter/severe weather safety Two new units were installed in growing training with National Weather areas of the city to ensure coverage. Service for 500 attendees. Response • Limited activation of the City Multi Agency Coordination Team (MACT) for significant rain/flash flood incident on September 15, 2016. • City MACT and Emergency Management fully engaged in response and recovery operations during December 2, 2016, building collapse in downtown Sioux Falls. 20 | Emergency Management www.siouxfalls.org/fire


PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

The Professional Standards Division is responsible for a broad range of services that support and enable the mission of Sioux Falls Fire Rescue (SFFR). These include oversight of the training center, health and safety program, Individual Physical Ability Test (IPAT), annual physicals, recruiting, diversity and inclusion, post incident analysis, public information, community partnerships, and management of the department’s Emergency Medical Services.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

EMS related incidents continue to lead SFFR’s emergency response numbers. With 6,821 EMS calls in 2016, SFFR continues to play its part in providing the citizens and visitors of Sioux Falls with lifesaving care. SFFR continuously reviews and monitors how to best provide our medical services and strives to develop solutions based on best practices and national standards. SFFR works closely with the Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority (REMSA) and other agencies to ensure quality EMS care in Sioux Falls. Highlights in 2016 included protocol additions for the I-Gel which is a new supraglottic airway, Epi-Pen Auto-injectors, and a multi-agency CPR discipline called Pit Crew CPR. These additions help improve cardiac arrest

outcomes and improve the overall EMS system in Sioux Falls. SFFR also purchased, implemented, and trained on new LifePak 15 cardiac monitors. In order to meet these needs, our two EMS educators, Amy Marsh and Jeremy Robertson, keep up with not only training all of SFFR’s EMTs and paramedic level members, but provide other departments, organizations, and community members training and support in many EMS, fire, and other life safety areas. Our two EMS educators are an integral part of the training and education of the SFFR members. These two EMS educators worked tirelessly to meet and exceed the requirements of training, public education, certifications and emergency response for all the members of our organization. In 2016, the educators continued the commitment to providing four structured EMS quarterly drills for all SFFR EMTs. The topics during the 2016 EMS drills included such areas as: • Pediatrics • ALS Assist Skills and supraglottic airways • Environmental and Metabolic Emergencies • PHTLS and Pit Crew CPR Not only does SFFR and the EMS division handle medical training for all its members, it has an active role in keeping citizens

safe and prepared to meet needs in the community. The public access defibrillator (PADs) program started in 2003 continues to be an important part of keeping Sioux Falls and other communities Heart Safe, with 797 PADs currently registered in our Sioux Falls area database. A vital component in survivability comes through awareness and training in CPR and AED use; in 2016 3,859 individuals were trained through SFFR’s communitybased education. In addition, 1,500 kids and adults were trained in hands-only CPR throughout 2016. The hands-only CPR is conducted at numerous events along with partnerships in many other great organizations committed to these lifesaving skills. 2016 was the fourth year as a PulsePoint covered community, the addition of the CPR alerting smart phone app has become a valuable component in engaging everyday citizens! At the end of 2016, there were 16,976 individual PulsePoint followers in the Sioux Falls area with 10,267 individuals having the CPR notification turned on and ready to respond.

“ With 6,821 EMS calls in 2016,

SFFR continues to play its part in providing the citizens and visitors of Sioux Falls with life-saving care.

22 | Professional Standards www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Community

SFFR strives to be a community partner in many beneficial ways. Community service is our business and all areas of the department have a community focus. The annual Heroes Behind the Badges blood drive provided a fun and friendly event between SFFR and the Sioux Falls Police Department to support the Community Blood Bank and their mission to ensure enough blood is available for those in need during the holiday season. Blood donations between both agencies totaled 1,081 units, with the real winners of the event being the 3,243 patients positively affected by those donations. This was the largest number of units donated for this event in its 21-year history. SFFR developed several community partners during the summer back pack program rollout. SFFR fire stations became pick-up locations for the Feeding South Dakota summer backpack program ensuring kids had enough to eat during the summer months away from school. Get Fit with SFFR and Sioux Falls Parks and Recreation was another success for the youth that participated from around the Sioux Falls community. The topics that were covered during the three weekend period were health, safety, nutrition, exercise, teamwork, and emergency procedures. The children had a wonderful 2016 Fire Annual Report

experience and were instructed on many aspects of being safe and practicing healthy lifestyles as they grow.

Fire Training

The mission of the Sioux Falls Fire Rescue Training Center is to practice and promote excellence in fire service instruction. The training center is committed to and responsible for providing relevant, challenging, evidence-based training. Our service supports the greater mission of Sioux Falls Fire Rescue and our core values while honoring the traditions of our past. The training center team is composed of all the members of the Professional Standards Division. The team had another outstanding year during 2016 which was packed full of robust training. The entire year of training was diverse in nature and extremely well received by the members of Sioux Falls Fire Rescue. The SFFR Training Team is comprised of three training officers; Captain Brian Christiaansen, Fire Apparatus Operator Brad Peterson and Firefighter Jason Marzolf. EMS Educators Amy Marsh and Jeremy Robertson are also part of this team. Throughout the past year they expanded on best practices and produced innovative 21st century training for the firefighters of Sioux Falls. Fire Protective Equipment Technician (FPET) Mike Ackerman also exceeded expectations and enhanced programs Professional Standards | 23


for personal protective equipment (PPE) cleaning, care, and maintenance. FPET Ackerman has spearheaded several enhancements for the health and safety of the SFFR personnel that align with NFPA 1851 and NFPA 1500. The training team is led by Battalion Chief Michael Clauson. In 2016, we had one Fire Cadet Academy that consisted of the 10-week education and training. There were a total of four cadets that successfully graduated from the Academy to join the ranks of the other members who serve the citizens and visitors of Sioux Falls. Two of the SFFR Training Officers traveled to Indianapolis, Indiana to participate in the 2016 Fire Department Instructor Conference (FDIC) where they brought back a myriad of training and education ideas, innovative thinking, modern firefighting tactics and strategies for the personnel of the Sioux Falls Fire Rescue organization. Captain Christiaansen and FAO Peterson utilized the training and education they received at FDIC to build several scaleddown wooden structures to depict flow-path and ventilation tactics for new and incumbent firefighters. Both CPT Christiaansen and FAO Peterson delivered this training at the 2016 SD State Fire School training that was delivered to several of the members of surrounding volunteer departments.

Once again several outside agencies utilized the SFFR Training Center campus to improve upon their skills for public safety. Some of these agencies include Sioux Falls Police Department, Sioux Falls SWAT, K-9, Narcotics Officers, Minnehaha County Sheriff’s Department, SD Department of Corrections, SD Parole Officers, SD Air National Guard Fire Department, and the United States Naval Recruitment Office. The interagency training has proven to be a significant benefit for all agencies to not only improve their own strategies and tactics, but to enhance the positive relationships that have developed among agencies. The local volunteer fire departments that utilize the SFFR Training Center campus are Harrisburg, Hartford, Crooks, Dell Rapids, and Tea. The training and education software continues to improve the delivery and tracking of curriculum that is required by the members of SFFR. The Target Solutions training team came for a one day workshop that showcased several new functions that has added value to the SFFR organization and its members. Several of our required training has been delivered via Target Solutions which has improved the workflow of drill preparation as well as continuity of our accreditation requirements.

Training Center Courses

Below is a list of some of the courses that were delivered at the SF training center in 2016. • National Fire Academy: Leadership & Executive Development; Shaping the Future • Incident Safety Officer • Fire Instructor I • USAR Big Rig Rescue Advanced • South Dakota State Fire School • USAR Search Specialist • Fire Cadet Academy • Fire Officer I • Fire Department Instructors Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana • Drill I: Modern Fire Behavior Review. SLICERS. Live Fire evolutions • Drill II: Nozzle Forward • Drill III: Firefighter Survivability; Downed Firefighter Captain Brian Christiaansen was the recipient of the 2016 Excellence in Safety Award. This is a very prestigious award where candidates from all City departments are nominated. Captain Christiaansen has been a cornerstone for the training and education for the Sioux Falls Fire Rescue organization. He, along with the other Training Officers, has developed and delivered curriculum that is second to none.

24 | Professional Standards www.siouxfalls.org/fire


FAO Brad Peterson and FAO Jason Marzolf completed their obligation to the SFFR Training Team and transitioned back to the Operations Division in late 2016. They have been instrumental in the successful Cadet Academies over the past few years.

“

The SFFR organization adheres to national fire service advancements that relate to health and safety and the 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives.

Health & Safety

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The health and safety of our personnel is the number one priority above all else. SFFR has a dedicated health and safety committee that meets monthly to address health and safety issues for the firefighters. Each member brings a new perspective to the committee with comprehensive research and information collection from all aspects. Battalion Chief Michael Clauson chairs the committee that is comprised of 14 members that are dedicated to ensuring everyone goes home. Areas of focus in 2016 were dedication to the 16 firefighter life safety initiatives. SFFR works to remain steadfast to all 16 initiatives where specific focus was placed on cultural change, technology, behavioral health, cancer prevention, hearing protective measures, resiliency, 2016 Fire Annual Report

Professional Standards | 25


fire station safety, and research agenda. FPET Ackerman continues to work diligently to enhance the cleaning, care, and maintenance of the members PPE. This past year he has cultivated his professional network with some of the nation’s leading PPE specialists. This strategic mindset has set SFFR in the vanguard of PPE cleaning, care and maintenance as a model organization for others to follow. Battalion Chief Clauson and Captain Christiaansen were invited to participate in the national research study that involved comprehensive research of 2016 Illinois Fire Service Institute (IFSI) research project; Cardiovascular and Carcinogenic Risks in the Fire Service studies. The research project is a monumental $1.3 million project funded by the Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG). A total of 34 firefighters from across the nation were invited to participate in this project. Several leading research and development agencies made up the research group such as Underwriters Laboratory Firefighters Safety Research Institute (UL), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Skidmore College, Harvard Medical School Research, Globe Manufacturing, and the IFSI (University of Illinois). This data will be studied and compiled for the next white paper that will reveal findings that without a doubt will have positive outcomes for fire service personnel regarding PPE (cleaning care and maintenance), live fire training tactics and strategies, and several other health & safety areas. Throughout the involvement with other fire teams during the week-long research project the two SFFR members built relationships with outside agencies that will add substantial value to our organization and others in the health and safety field. The Peer Wellness Coaches (PWC) had another great year of training and education to build this group to the next level. In 2016, this group brought in an outside expert to instruct the 14 member group on several topics, but specifically Tactical Professional Training that focused on the benefits of a comprehensive health and wellness program and how it can be a cost effective program based on worker compensation and injury reductions. The PWC group learned about nutrition, assessment and evaluation, basic principles of strength training, power lift introduction, patient and equipment handling, and developing an effective program based on your work or department schedule. Core concepts address the rotational ability needed for many tactical professionals. The PWC is a very loyal group that is committed to the longterm sustainability of health and wellness for the SFFR members. 2016 Fire Annual Report

Professional Standards | 27


Each year the members of SFFR participate in the Safety Stand-down which consists of reviewing various assigned topics such as firefighter nearmiss events, specific standard operating procedures, administrative policies, rehabilitation protocols, and overall wellness. The SFFR organization adheres to national fire service advancements that relate to health and safety and the 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives. SFFR also improved the Individual Physical Ability Test (IPAT) through the cooperative efforts of the Sioux Falls Firefighters Association, Human Resources, City legal team, Risk Administration Services (RAS), and South Dakota State University (SDSU). This physical test ensures our current and future members of SFFR are physically fit and capable of handling the extensive physical demands of the career.

Fire Chaplain Group

The Chaplain Group is led by Battalion Chief Michael Clauson. In 2016, two more Chaplains joined the group to boost the number of Chaplains to five. The SFFR Chaplain Group continues to build capital in membership to align with the growth of the organization. The Chaplain Group consist of five chaplains, Durwood Clauson, Terry Fraker, Frank Feltis, and two new chaplains Ken Sproles and Deacon James Boorman. This increase in Chaplains has proven successful for the

span of control during the non-emergency and emergency incidents. This is a very devoted group that inspires others and guides them spiritually through the rigorous environment of firefighting. Each of the chaplains serve in a capacity that is selfless and nothing short of outstanding. The five chaplains are members of the Federation of Fire Chaplains and are developing a larger group within South Dakota. Throughout the past year, these members have volunteered their time to extra education such as Peer Support training, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), the National Fallen Firefighter Foundation; Stress First Aid, and many more learning opportunities that support our SFFR body. In September, the 911 Remembrance ceremony took place at Fire Station 3. This marked the 15th year of the historical tragedy that left an indelible mark on America. The remembrance ceremony attendance was extremely good with approximately a hundred people that came to embrace those we have lost and to remember all that sacrificed that horrific day, September 11, 2001. The ceremony was supported by all the family members that lost loved ones, Chaplains, SFFR Honor Guard, SFPD Honor Guard, Sanford AirMed, Paramedics Plus, local leaders, and citizens of the community. The entire Chaplain Group has provided comfort and spiritual support to several of the SFFR members during difficult times

this past year. The value of this group is monumental to the mission and values and is the cornerstone to the continuation of service to one another and the community. SFFR Fire Chaplain Mission Statement: To give aid, comfort, and help to firefighters and their families, and the community; to work toward the betterment of all areas of the fire and emergency service. SFFR Fire Chaplain Vision Statement: To serve God, to aid humanity, our communities, our government, our religions, our country, and the quality of life. In 2016, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue was asked to be a part of building the South Dakota Local Assistance State Team (LAST). BC Clauson, FAO Patrick Duffy, FAO Kirk Rangel, FF Garrett Sharpe, and FF Jon Sanders went to Pierre, SD to participate with several other firefighters and key leaders in the state in a workshop for the LAST program. This program was created by the National Fallen Firefighter Foundation. The mission of the National Fallen Firefighter Foundation Local Assistance State Team Program is to provide assistance and comfort to the family and department and help with filing the appropriate documentation for state and local benefits. Dealing with a firefighter line-of-duty death is one of the toughest and most challenging experiences a fire department can face. This program is designed to support the

28 | Professional Standards www.siouxfalls.org/fire


family, fellow firefighters, and department through the ordeal of losing their loved one. SFFR has a team of members along with several other firefighters from across the state of South Dakota that are actively working to build the program for the state of South Dakota. The LAST team will be made up of a Chief Officer, an honor guard member, a chaplain, and a behavioral mental health specialist. Upon request from a department, these teams will be deployed to assist the department with all aspects of a line-ofduty death—from helping with arrangements for a fire department funeral with full honors to providing emotional support for the family and department members. Throughout the next several years the SD LAST team will continue to build this program.

Diversity and Inclusion Committee

The purpose of the group is to enhance awareness of the mission of SFFR for the community and build relationships that meet and exceed the SFFR core values. This group is devoted to learning more about diversity and building inclusion within the organization as well as outside of the organization. 2016 was another busy year for the Diversity and Inclusion group. This group is comprised of eight members that bring different perspectives and ideas that are the foundation for cultural competence for risk reduction. The number of ethnic groups and languages continue to increase in Sioux Falls that generates challenges both strategically and operationally in regard to effective communication. The SFFR Diversity and Inclusion committee supported several career day events and education venues throughout the city and state. One of the most memorable events was supporting the Indian School in Flandreau, SD. This was a historic event for SFFR to be a part of because the group was able to network with a large number of Native American youth. The overarching mission of these events is to educate and recruit potential members who will add value to the organization and to mirror those we serve in the great city of Sioux Falls. We look forward to the opportunities that the coming years will bring for this dynamic group. 2016 Fire Annual Report

Professional Standards | 29


PERSONNEL Name Rank Ackerman, Mike FPET Alberico, Stephen Alvey, Jon

Name Rank Christensen, Robert FAO

Name Rank Farsdale, Ryan FF

Christiaansen, Brian

Fedders, Tim

Captain

FAO

FI

Clark, Dennis

FF

Clarke, Jason

FF

Fessler, Steven

BC

Clauson, Michael

BC

Fischer, John

FF

Flannery, Robbie

FF

FPE

Feltis, Frank

Chaplain

Anderson, Scott

Captain

Ashley, Matthew

FF

Clauson, Woody

Chaplain

MFF

Cory, Johnathan

FAO

Fluit, Nathan

FF

Foster, Rocky

Captain

Backer, Kurt Baier, Andrew

Captain

Cox, Darin

FF

Balzer, Todd

MFF

Cox, Ryan

Captain

Fraker, Terry

Chaplain

Bartz, Eric

FAO

Davis, Ryan

Captain

Frick, Adam

FF

Bauers, Michael

FAO

DeBoer, Clint

Captain

Funke, Joseph

FF

Beckman, Cole

MM

Deck, Darryn

MFF

Bivens, Anthony Boden, Andrew Boe, Trent Boorman, James

FF FAO Captain Chaplain

Dieren, Eric Dirksen, Harlan Donelan, Patrick Dose, Shawn

Bosler, William

FF

Douglas, Matthew

Brannen, Payton

FF

Duffy, Patrick

Brunette, Steven

BC

Dulaney, Garett

Bukovich, Mark

BC

Dykstra, Robert

Burdick, Guy

FAO

Buys, Nathan

FF

Carlson, Heather Caven, Sara

Captain Clerk

Enalls, Harvey Engdahl, Eric Evertse, Mitchell Farland, Randy

FF

Gacke, Scott Galbreath, Shannon

Captain FI

FAO

Gilmour, Garret

MFF

Captain

Goodroad, Brad

DC

FI

Gortmaker, Joy

FA

FF

Gramlick, Michael

FAO

Captain

Greer, Shawn

FF

Captain

Groen, Josh

FF

Captain

Haiar, James

Captain

Hallstrom, Allen

Captain

FF Captain

Hanson, Anthony

FF

FF

Hartmann, Daniel

MM

Captain

Havlovic, Michael

MFAO

30 | Personnel www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Name Rank Helm, Jeff DC

Name Rank Lehr, Ryan FF

Name Rank Murphy, Kyle FF

Herrboldt, Kent

Limesand, Ryan

Murphy, Michael

FAO

FAO

Captain

Herther, Adam

FF

Lowe, Todd

Hill, Jeremy

FF

Luebke, Dustin

Hill, Matthew

FF

Luther, Nick

Captain

Hilsenroth, Jr., Donald

FF

Maag, Barry

FI

Neises, Jarud

Captain

Temp Clerk

Nelsen, Terry

Captain

Hoekman, Timothy Hofer, Chris Hultgren, Eric Irsfeld, Christopher Isaak, Michael Jacobsen, Jordan Jensen, David

FAO

MacArthur, Kathy

Captain FF

Murphy, Neal Mydland, Matthew Neeb, Linda

FF

March, Daniel

FAO

Nelson, Darres

FF

Marsh, Amy

EMS

Nugteren, Timothy

Martens, Jeff

FAO

Nusbaum, Adam

Marzolf, Jason

FAO

O’Hara, Todd

Matthews, Denny

MM

Olson, Anthony

Mattson, Steven

FAO

Olson, Bradley

Captain FAO FF Captain

FF FF Clerk

FF FAO FF FAO FF Captain

Johnson, Curtis

FI

Mayfield, Colt

FF

Olson, Mark

FF

Kaffar, Patrick

FF

McAreavey, Matthew

BC

Olson, Michael

FF

Kolda, Kyle

FF

McGuire, Kevin

FAO

McManigal, Jay

FF

Paszkiewicz, Phillip

McNamara, Andrew

FF

Petersen, David

Koolmo, Graham Koopman, Michael Kott, Robin Kringstad, Brian Kurvink, Nicholas Lacey, William Langenfeld, Luke Lanier, Dean 2016 Fire Annual Report

FAO Captain Temp Clerk

Medema, Doug

Orth, Conley

FAO FF Captain

Captain

Peterson, Bradley

FAO FAO

Captain

Meier, Michael

FAO

Peterson, Jackson

FF

Menage, Scott

FAO

Pontrelli, Mitchell

FF

FF

Powers, James

BC

FAO

Pugliese, Travis

FF

Rahm, James

FF

FAO

Milner, Cameron

FF

Mortensen, Bo

FM

Mulder, Wade

Captain

Personnel | 31


Name Rank Randby, Jon FF

Name Rank Skoglund, Christopher FAO

Name Rank Van Beek, Jason MFF

Rangel, Kirk

Skuza, Richard

FAO

Van Beek, Rachel

FAO

Small, Robert

FF

Van Gundy, Brook

FF

Smidt, Luke

FF

Van Riesen, Grant

Captain

Rauk, Ryan Reel, Thomas

FAO FF FAO

Rensch, Russ

FF

Ridge II, John

Captain

Rieland, Scott Robertson, Jeremy Ruml, Nathan Sanders, Jonathan Scandin, Troy Scherbring, Christopher Schillerstrom, Timothy

Smith, Charles

FI

Van Zee, Jeff

FF

Smith, Cody

FF

Vanden Top, Matthew

FF

FAO

Smith, Jeremy

FF

VanDonkersgoed, Albert

FF

EMS

Smith, Joshua

Captain

Captian FF Captain FF Captain

Smith, Regan

EM

Sona, Kevin

Captain

Sproles, Ken

Chaplain

Vosburg, Bradley Vosburg, Cody Vosburg, Robert Voth, Kristian

Stancer, Brendan

FF

Wagner, Daniel

FAO FF Captain FF FAO

Stark, Ian

FF

Wagner, John

FI

FI

Strasser, Nathan

FF

Wall, Andrew

FF

Schneider, Dan

Captain

Stratmeyer, Paul

FAO

Wallace, David

FF

Schnetter, Troy

FAO

Strom, Reed

FAO

Ward, Kendall

Schons, Timothy

MFF

Sunde, David

FAO

Weber, Shannon

Schmidt, Michael

Schroeder, Adam

FF

Talley, David

Captain

Weisenburger, Zachary

Schultz, Carla

AA

Thier, Michael

Captain

Welbig, Timothy

Seten, John

MFAO

Sharpe, Garrett

FF

Sideras, James

Chief

Siebenahler, Jordan Skiles, Daniel

FF FAO

Thom, Travis

BC

Wentz, Russell

Titus, Jay

DC

Willert, Travis

Tjeerdsma, Tyler Top, Michael Tracy, Benjamin

FI BC E/I FAO

Captain FF FF FAO FF FAO

Willis, Terry

FF

Wilson, Michael

FF

Wold, Randy

MFF

Young, Chad

FF

32 | Personnel www.siouxfalls.org/fire


Retirees | Doug Swartz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . February 16, 2016

Ryan Davis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 19, 2016 Fire Captain

Firefighter of the Year | Brian Christiaansen

Robert Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 14, 2016

Reassigned | Ryan Limesand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . February 1, 2016 FAO

Crew of the Year | Station 3B Captain Grant Van Riesen

Jon Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 16, 2016 Resignations | Jeffrey Christie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 5, 2016 Chaplain Bud VanBockern. . . . . . . .July 15, 2016 Joshua Reinfeld. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 18, 2018 Promotions | Tyler Tjeerdsma . . . . . . . . . . . . . February 1, 2016 Fire Inspector Daniel Wagner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Graham Koolmo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Rachel Van Beek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Timothy Hoekman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Jason Marzolf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Eric Bartz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Johnathan Cory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 20, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator Mike Thier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 20, 2016 Fire Captain Andrew Boden. . . . . . . . . . . . December 19, 2016 Fire Apparatus Operator 2016 Fire Annual Report

Designations | Jason Marzolf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 23, 2016 Master Firefighter Tim Schons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 23, 2016 Master Firefigther New Employees | Matthew Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 25, 2016 Firefighter Brendan Stancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 25, 2016 Firefighter Joshua Reinfeld. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 25, 2016 Firefighter Zachary Weisenburger. . . . . . . . . . . July 25, 2016 Firefighter Albert VanDonkersgoed. . . . . . . . . . July 25, 2016 Firefighter

FAO Tim Nugteren FF Dave Wallace FF John Fischer FF Jon Sanders FF Matt Ashley Sioux Falls Post 15 American Legion Firefighter of the Year | Captain Rocky Foster Sioux Falls Post 15 American Legion EMT of the Year | FAO Kirk Rangel VFW Firefighter of the Year | Captain Rocky Foster VFW EMT of the Year | FAO DJ Skiles

James Boorman . . . . . . . . . . December 12, 2016 Chaplain

Employee of the Year Safety Award Nominee/Winner | Brian Christiaansen

Ken Sproles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 12, 2016 Chaplain

V.L. Cruisinberry Award Nominee | Amy Marsh

Firefighters of the Quarter | Shannon Galbreath. . . . . . . . . . . . . First Quarter

Jeanne Fullenkamp Management Excellence Award Nominee | Matthew McAreavey

Brian Christiaansen. . . . . . . . . . Second Quarter Darin Cox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Third Quarter Bo Mortensen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fourth Quarter

Personnel | 33


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

<<Enter Your Chart Title Here>>

Fire Chief

Administrative Assistant

Fire Division Chief Professional Standards/EMS

Fire Battalion Chief Training

Fire Training Officers

Fire Division Chief Administration

Fire Protective Equipment Technician Emergency Vehicle Technicians

Fire Division Chief Operations

Battalion Chiefs (6)

Fire Captains

Fire Marshal

Battalion Chief Enforcement and Investigation

Inspectors

Technical Clerk Public CPR Educator

Minnehaha County Emergency Management Lincoln County Emergency Management State Emergency Management

Fire Analyst EMS Educator

Emergency Manager

Fire Apparatus Operators

Firefighters

Fire Protection Engineer

Technical Clerk

EMS Quality Assurance

PT Educator

34 | Organizational Chart www.siouxfalls.org/fire


CURRENT AND PROPOSED FIRE STATIONS

¦

City of Sioux Falls Current and Proposed Fire Stations

18

I9 0

¦ 15

I90

WESTPORT AVE

60TH ST N

I29

ST RI CE

SIX MILE RD

CLIFF AVE

I229

SYCAMORE AVE

MARION RD

CLEVELAND AVE

RICE ST

6TH ST

¦

11TH ST

12TH ST

14TH ST

5

MADISON ST

¦ 2

10TH ST

I29

18TH ST

SUNDOWNER AVE

TALLGRASS AVE

I29

4

I2 29

CLIFF AVE

12

SYCAMORE AVE

9

BAHNSON AVE

GRANGE AVE

WESTERN AVE

467TH AVE

ELLIS RD

41ST ST

AVE

468TH AVE

N ER

¦

¦

¦

ST

I2 29

A

E

13

33RD ST

H

49TH ST

57TH ST

69TH ST

¦ 17

¦ 14

85TH ST

Y

T

¦

2016 Fire Annual Report

41ST ST

49TH ST

57TH ST

¹

¦

33RD ST

SO U

6

KIWANIS AVE

E

¦

LOUISE AVE

VALLEY VIEW RD

AV

21

MA TO SER

¦

3

¦ 16

PK W

26TH ST

26TH ST

2 6TH ST

AR RO WH EA D

481ST AVE

18TH ST

VETE RANS PKW Y

¦

CENTRAL

10TH ST

BENSON RD

ST

MINNESO TA AVE

¦

HOLLY BLVD

MAPLE ST

UI N

RUSSELL ST

8

12TH ST

ON Q

WEST AVE

¦ 10

4TH AVE AL G

MADISON ST

20

¦ 7

¦

MAPLE ST

LOUISE AVE

LA MESA DR

11

¦

RICE ST

BENSON RD

¦

SPLITROCK BLVD

I90

¦ ¦¦ ¦

Current Fire Stations

22

Proposed Fire Stations

Fire Training Center

¦ 19

271ST ST

Current City Limits February 8, 2017

Current & Proposed Fire Stations | 35


2016 Fire Annual Report  
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