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Children need preventive dental work

Home health care viable option for transition back home

Correct footwear may address most foot woes

A GUIDE FOR LIVING IN SIOUXLAND

A WIN-WIN SITUATION START RUNNING AND YOU’LL IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH AND HAVE FUN

FORM & FUNCTION MODERN KITCHEN FUSION

APRIL 2012

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APRIL 2012

SIOUXLAND LIFE


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CONTENTS

April 2012

4 FABULOUS FUSION

Form and function come together to provide a fabulous living space for family and friends.

18 ON THE COVER When the weather turns great, Siouxlanders, including Missouri River Runners members Patty Considine, left, and Chris Poeckes, turn to running and walking. This month, we look at the joys (and pitfalls) of taking it one step at a time. Photograph by Tim Hynds FEATURES 4 Feature home: Modern kitchen 8 Collections: Cat whiskers 10 Home theater 15 Home exercise equipment 18 Running: Missouri River Runners 20 Running: Running trails 21 Running: Eating for the run 22 Running: Children and running 24 Running: Family runs together 26 Running: Physical education changes

28 30 32 34 36 38 40 44 46 47

Running: Veteran runner Q&A: Olympic trials qualifier Running: Boston marathoner Running: Gear for runners Running: Running with pets Running: Foot woes Kids’ dental health Home health care Medical answers from the doctor Parting shot: Colonoscopy time

PUBLISHER Steve Griffith EDITOR Bruce Miller EDITORIAL Joanne Fox, Tim Gallagher, Earl Horlyk, Nick Hytrek, Laura Johnson, John Quinlan PHOTOGRAPHY Tim Hynds, Jim Lee, Laura Wehde PRESENTATION EDITOR Amy Hynds ADVERTISING SALES Nancy Gevik ADVERTISING DESIGN Stacy Pajl, Jill Bisenius

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ULTIMATE MAN CAVE Home theater designed for film buffs and gamers.

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©2012 The Sioux City Journal. Siouxland Life is published monthly by The Sioux City Journal. For advertising information, please call (712) 224-6275. For editorial information, please call (712) 293-4218.

SHAPE UP AT HOME Four ways to exercise and be healthier while working out at home.

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HOME Kitchen

Design

FORM, FUNCTION

FUSE

IN MODERN-DESIGN KITCHEN

w Kelly Kohout talks about the kitchen in her Dakota Dunes home. The kitchen is one of the stops in the Sioux City Art Center’s Artistry in the Kitchen fundraiser.

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Text by Joanne Fox | Photographs by Tim Hynds

WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE best part of their kitchen which will be featured on the Sioux City Art Center’s kitchen tour in May, Sam and Kelly Kohout of Dakota Dunes agree it is the way form and function come together to provide a fabulous living space for their family and friends. “I’ve lived in many houses and the kitchen, to me, as it is to many, is the heart of the home,” Kelly said. There is no way to talk about the Kohout kitchen without touching on the other light-filled common spaces that integrate together in this family home – the gallery space, kitchen, family room, dining room, wine cellar and wide-open halls. When beginning this project, the Kohouts put their trust in Kelly’s brother, Matthew Bindner, who in 2007 had just graduated from the Iowa State University architecture program and taken a job at HLKB Architecture in Des Moines. “What better way to bring it all together than to have your little brother designing for you?” Kelly queried. “In coming from a French Countrystyle home to designing the mid-century-modern home we now reside in, we

SIOUXLAND LIFE

had to have blind trust in our creative team of architects and our designer,” she said. Examples of modern design around this part of the Midwest were hard to come by, but through their team’s expertise and their own travels and experience with building, the Kohouts felt confident they could pull it off. “When brainstorming about home ideas, everything revolves around the kitchen and first and foremost family and friends,” Kelly said. With four kids and two dogs, the Kohouts are never without company. “The top priority when we designed this kitchen, this house, was that it was connected with the stunning nature all around us and that it was indestructible,” Kelly said. “Living inside and out is what we do, even in South Dakota. The kids and dogs are constantly leaving a wake of sand and backyard fun in our house. We wanted a modern home, but one that was warm and inviting and fit naturally into the landscape, one where we were not constantly on our children not to touch anything.” Curtain-wall glass drapes the home


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Above Kelly Kohout is shown in the kitchen of her Dakota Dunes home. The kitchen is one of the stops in the Sioux City Art Center’s Artistry in the Kitchen fundraiser. Far left A poured cement structural wall serves as the backsplash in the kitchen. Left Salvaged glass adds interest to the kitchen floor as well as providing more light to the basement.

DETAILS What: Artistry in the Kitchen Who: Sioux City Art Center When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 5 Tickets: $30 per person Reservations: Call 279-6272, ext. 200 or visit siouxcityartcenter.org

and allows the South Dakota landscape to become their art. A black slate floor with a contrasting white wall and opposing concrete wall frame the view of the prairie and river as you are invited into the 8-foot-high by 8-foot-wide by 40-foot-long gallery space. Warm walnut floors and soaring ceiling heights open to bring you to the living main living space. Dark-stained, quarter-sawn oak cabinetry has sleek,

understated aluminum hardware. The 20-foot-long PaperStone kitchen island countertop mimics what you might see in old-school science labs. Layers of naturally pigmented recycled paper are heat- and scratch-resistant on the matte black surface that extends the length of the kitchen and pantry. Professional appliances, the three working sinks placed just so, cabinets with airplane hangar hardware that

FEATURED KITCHENS Mark and Julie Adam Mark and Kris Brown Larry and Connie Chapman Jerry and Becky Holbrook Sam and Kelly Kohout Rick and Shannon Liddell Charles and Pam Mostek Joanie Rizk Andy and Sue Rodawig Eldon and Regina Roth Johnny and Shari Tureaud

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A six ring cooktop is shown in the kitchen in the home of Kelly and Sam Kohout.

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open up and out of the way, the larder that pulls out next to the stove to provide a two-sided peek into the array of spices and oils all create an atmosphere of works of art being created here. All those amenities combine to make a warm and inviting upscale space, but also a very family friendly home. “We wanted to use interesting materials and also use common materials in remarkable ways,” Kelly explained. The 120-foot-long, board-formed concrete wall running indoors and out from the front to back of the space accomplished this and also laid the foundation for the back wall in the kitchen, Kelly pointed out. “With such a clean, modern design, we loved the idea of this textural, imperfect, rough material running the span of our home and really creating a focal point in our gallery space and our kitchen,” she said. “The 100-year-old glass floor in the pantry which reflects the light from the massive skylight above does this as well.” The Kohouts’ friend and designer, Mary Dale Johnson, had access to the salvaged structural glass from the old Sioux City library. “In one of the many meetings with the fabulous team of people it took to bring this project to life, we all agreed we needed to find a special place for this glass,” Kelly insisted. Khalid Khan, the lead architect on the project suggested this design of the frameless skylight in the Kohouts’ open concept pantry. It mirrors the salvaged glass on the floor which was lit from underneath and set into a steel framework that complements the other steel in the house. “It has an amazing purpose of bringing more light into the home, into the basement even and adding tons of interest and is also a great design element,” Kelly added. In terms of the Kohouts’ home and especially their kitchen, the design revolves around family and friends and shared experiences. “We have all these creative friends who love to travel and love wine and art and these guys bring all of those experiences together in this kitchen,” she said. “They will fill this entire island with interesting ingredients and without any direction, concoct fabulous small bites all night long while we girls get to sit and taste food, drink wine, corral children and, of course, clean up after them!”


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COLLECTIONS Cat

whiskers

COLLECTION IS THE

CAT’S MEOW

l

Text by Joanne Fox | Photographs by Jim Lee

LINDA NITZSCHKE’S COLLECTION IS not on display for others to see. Well, in a way, they are if you count her two cats. See, Nitzschke of Sioux City collects kitty whiskers, all of which are housed in a Suisse Mocha container. “Most people don’t know that kitty whiskers fall out and are replaced,” she clarified. “Do you suppose people think I go through the shelters, pulling out all the kitty whiskers in order to amass a collection that big? Who knows? But as I always say, “If you can’t be first, be 8

APRIL 2012

different.” Q. When did you start collecting the cat whiskers? A. The same time I started “collecting” cats, in the early-to-mid 1980s in Glenwood Springs, Colo. Q. Why did you start this type of collection? A. For the exact same reason people climb mountains. Because they’re there. I guess I don’t really have any real answer for that. I never really started it with the intention of starting a collection. I just thought they were kind of interesting.

SIOUXLAND LIFE

Besides, as many times as I’ve moved, if I were to start any kind of a collection, what would be better than kitty whiskers? They all fit into one little Suisse Mocha container! Q. How does one go about collecting whiskers? A. Step 1. Start by getting a cat, or two or three, or four, or maybe even as many as five if you want the collection to grow faster. Then just watch for them while cleaning and doing laundry or so on. I had a tuxedo kitty, Buzzy, and I could sometimes tell when one of his whiskers


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Step 1. Start by getting a cat, or two, or three or four, or maybe even as many as five if you want the collection to grow faster. Then just watch for them while cleaning and doing laundry or so on. Q. What whiskers do you notice might be different than the others?

Linda Nitzschke, shown with her cat Pee Wee on her lap and above, estimates that she has more than 1,000 whiskers in her cat whisker collection.

was ready to come out, because it would bend or face in a different direction, so I’d give it a little tug, and it would come out. Pulling on them hard or cutting them off is cheating, plus not worth the battle. You’d have to stage to collect them that way, especially if your kitties still have four-wheel drive, as mine do. Q. How many whiskers do you have? A. Almost as many as my kitties do, these days. Oh, you meant kitty whiskers! I last counted them many years ago for an odd collection contest through the Des Moines Register, and I had more than 800 at that time. I would guess it’s over 1,000 now. I’m thinking another count is in order, as I may want to see about getting into the Guinness Book Of World Records. Q. What’s the appeal of continuing with the collection? A. Sure beats work! Besides, how many people can say they have a kitty whisker collection or would even admit

to such? No appeal, really, but why stop? It’s not a hard thing to do. It’s my kitties who do all the work. They have to produce them. Q. Tell me about the contest you entered. What prompted that? A. It was a contest for the oddest collection. I don’t remember ever winning any kind of contest before, but I thought for sure I’d have this one in the bag! Then, I lost out to, I believe, little bottles of dirt collected from vacation sites, which was first place and Spam memorabilia which was second place. Even my kitties hissed at that decision. Q. What do friends think of your collection? A. Knowing who was collecting the whiskers, I don’t think they were very surprised to learn of it. Some people with cats of their own actually would end up finding some whiskers at their homes, too, and save them for me, so I guess my friends are a bit “touched,” too.

A. The ones from my tiger kitties have a dark tip at the thick end where they are attached within the skin. My tuxedo kitty had all pure white whiskers. My black Persian had very long whiskers, especially for such a small cat, and they were as black as could be. And, my Himalayan has cream-colored whiskers that are a bit naturally curly. Q. Do you collect anything else? A. Well, I was going to collect the fangs from my tarantula when she shed her skin, but I kept making the mistake of giving them, plus the skins, away with the note, “Fangs for the memory.” I found out people are just as scared of the skins as they are of the actual spider, itself. I was going to make a barrette for my hair out of one of the skins – the skins stay in one piece when they shed them. I figured I’d never have to stand in line ever again with that thing in my hair. I guess I do have another collection. I have more than 3,000 45s but, again, that was never started as a true collection, either. I just wanted them because I like to play my flute along with them. Then, too, another sort-of-a collection would be that I have all the local papers from when President Kennedy was assassinated, a day when the world seemed to come to a screeching halt. Q. Any thought to ever stopping the whisker collection? A. Well, I’m down to just two kitties now, and they are going to be my last suppliers. I have loved all my kitties a lot, but dang, it’s hard going through the process of losing them over and over again. My life and, especially, my job have been so difficult for so long now that having to part with my kitties when they die is just not something I need to add to the mix anymore. My last two are 14, but they’re doing great and should have several more years of life left to go, as I feed them raw meat, and it makes a huge difference in their health.

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HOME Home

theater

HOME THEATER THE ULTIMATE MAN CAVE FOR FILM BUFFS, GAMERS

w

Text by John Quinlan | Photographs by Jim Lee

WHEN SCOTT PFLANZ OF Pflanz Electronics, Siouxland’s leader in home theater, tried to find a satisfied customer who would let Siouxland Life into their homes for an up-close look at home theater heaven, he found a lot of satisfied customers but few willing to come out of the closet and admit to ownership of such a seemingly extravagant luxury item, sort of the ultimate man cave for movie buffs or gamesters. We didn’t really know why this was so until one of his customers let us into his Morningside home for a photo peek and, as serious film geeks, the writer and photographer discovered just what we were missing with our suddenly small TVs. Our flat screens now seem as antiquated as a fuzzy 10-inch black-and-white Philco TV set from the 1950s. And now we know what envy really is. Eight big seats, way more comfortable than any you will find in a movie theater. An incredible sound system. A 105-inch screen with a fabulous picture. When he dimmed the lights and popped on a “Star Wars” movie, we were blown into another world. Much bigger screens are available today. But Mr. Homeowner is happy with 10

APRIL 2012

what he has. Of course, he is. FEELING THE SOUND “We have the look of the home theater and it has the sound system, surround sound, and a lot of sub-woofers. So it has a lot of bass. You can feel the sound,” Mr. Homeowner said. “And it’s capable of watching anything – satellite TV, Blu-ray movies or regular DVDs. We probably watch more movies than anything. At this stage of my life we watch kid movies more than anything else.” One of his sons kept trying to get in on the action and was repeatedly chased out of the room by Dad. The basement home theater room,

“Realistically, this is all an escape. After a long day and the kids go to bed, it’s an escape room. You turn on a movie and you escape to a different dimension.”

SIOUXLAND LIFE

located behind the large family room, is locked when Dad’s not home. A common practice, we’re told. The system is 7-8 years old. So bigger screens are now available. More bells and whistles, too. Last year, Mr. Homeowner added a Blu-ray player to his system that will hold 400 Blu-ray discs in addition to the other box with 300 regular DVD discs. He also has a touch-screen control pad located in the center of the back row of theater seats. Today, people are using iPads or iPhones to run their home theater systems, but it’s the same basic idea. “When you put a movie into the system, it’s all hooked to the Internet so it goes in and downloads the artwork and the name and all the information,” Mr. Homeowner said. “These are actually discs that are built into the system (sort of like a video jukebox). They have two players. It would hold 700 movies. I probably have 250. But I’m sure if you talk to Pflanz, the upcoming thing now is a box that uploads them from the Internet and stores them online. So that will be a future upgrade.” He decided to ring the room with movie posters. So once he figured out how much space was available, he found


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Above The projector for a home theater system in a Morningside home. Top Electronic components are stored beneath the screen. Right Movie posters line the walls in a Morningside home theater, which has reclining seats for up to eight people.

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10 posters of favorite movies, many of them autographed, hits like “The Wizard of Oz,” “The Outlaw Josey Wales,” (his favorite), “Jaws,” “Top Gun” and “Tommy Boy.” All are lit by low-voltage lighting that doesn’t distract from the darkened home theater experience. There is no ambient light. One tap of the touch-screen control pad activates everything, even a dropped screen over the room’s sole window. And because of the wiring work needed on the ceiling to connect the overhead projector and along the walls for the sound system, extra insulation was installed, making the theater room virtually soundproof. And the cabinet that holds the projector screen and most of the other electronic components was hand-crafted by a local cabinet maker, a job that took about three months. Well worth the wait, Mr. Homeowner said. SELLING AUTOMATION Pflanz provided the design and everything but the posters. That includes the seating, motorized shades, sound and lighting equipment. “What we sell also is automation,” Pflanz said. “The problem is the more things you put into a theater room, whether it’s lighting, control lighting, projector, surround sound, Play Station 3, you’re adding boxes; and the more boxes, the harder it is to control all those boxes.


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So what we do here is we put everything into automation.” The No. 1 item on the list of every home theater buyer is a big screen. And typically it is not going to be a flat panel TV hanging on the wall. It is going to be a projector screen with a projector on the ceiling, he noted. “Most people that I design theaters for, they want the whole front wall to be the screen,” he added. He pointed to the 4K projector on display in the store’s home theater room as an example of the next big thing. “The 4K is four times the resolution of high definition TV. This is cutting edge. You’re going to hear a lot about 4K in the next two to four years when 4K information becomes readily available.” This leaves us with four different levels of high definition: high def over cable TV (the lowest definition), one step up with Direct TV or Dish Network high def, Blu-ray, then 4K, Pflanz said. Projector costs range from $699 to $20,000, for the display model in the Pflanz home theater room, and even beyond to high-end projectors costing $80,000, not carried by Pflanz but made available if that is what a customer wants. So a good home theater system can coupon

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range from about $2,000 all the way up to $150,000, depending on the customer’s needs ... and bank account. One customer was a huge gamer who didn’t watch movies. He just wanted a cheap projector, which he got for $1,100, plus a surround sound system. So you don’t have to be a One Percenter to buy a home theater system. The problem many have is just finding the space for it, Pflanz said, which is why many home theater systems are set up in multi-purpose or living rooms. “We’re turning a lot of living rooms into theaters now,” he said. “It’s really not a theater, but

they still want a flat screen. The biggest one I’ve done is 192-inch.” A perforated screen with millions of holes allows for placement of three speakers behind the screen. And with the 7.1 surround system now in play, that means no more speakers along each side wall, two in the back and typically 1-4 sub-woofers in the roof. “That’s sound,” he said. “Realistically, this is all an escape. After a long day and the kids go to bed, it’s an escape room. You turn on a movie and you escape to a different dimension.”

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HEALTH Exercise

equipment

Elliptical machines, shown at Scheels, are easy on the knees and can be more fun than a standard treadmill.

FOUR WAYS TO

GET IN SHAPE AT HOME

o

OUTSIDE THE TEMPERATURE MAY be too arctic or hellacious to tempt one to head out for a jog. A gym membership can be expensive, and sweating and getting red-faced in front of others is not some people’s idea of a happy time. These are just some of the reasons people may want to work out in their own home. As any decent infomercial would have you believe, shedding pounds is easy if you just buy a certain in-home exercise equipment piece. But how is a person supposed to know which piece actually works and what to stay away from without paying an astronomical amount for

Text and photographs by Laura Johnson

it?

According to Brad Lepper, exercise manager at Scheels, there are many budget-friendly (and not-so-friendly) options for the person looking to work out at home. “If you are using your equipment daily it pays for itself before you know it,” Lepper said. “There’s no rule you have to go to a gym to get in shape.” Here are Lepper’s top four equipment picks: FLOORING There is no other feature more important in a home gym than protective

flooring. “Not only does it protect the carpet or hard wood, but it protects the equipment as well, making everything last longer,” Lepper explained. Made of materials like hard foam, rubber or even PVC, the mats can be bought in any size to cover a whole room or go directly beneath one piece of equipment. Cost: Starts at $30. CARDIO EQUIPMENT This encompasses a few machines. First there’s the standard treadmill. Some are meant simply for just walking or jogging and other high-end machines have life-time warranties. It’s up to the

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buyer to know what they actually need out of the item. Other popular cardio machines are the elliptical - “really great on your knees and is more fun than the treadmill” - and a stationary bike. “Doing cardio exercise is the best way to burn calories and lose weight,” Lepper said. “It’s actually better than working an abs machine.” Cost: $400 - $4,000. HEART RATE MONITOR Many major workout systems (Kosama, Insanity) are in favor of the heart rate monitor for a variety of reasons, but mostly it’s to keep participants healthy. “A monitor will make sure you are working out the right way,” Lepper said. “It will tell you if you’re working too hard or not hard enough.” In this regard, the device can keep you safe. It’s especially great for those with high blood-pressure, yet, Lepper recommends that everyone use one to achieve the best workout. Cost: Starts at $60. WEIGHTS At $1.50 a pound, weights are a relatively inexpensive way to begin a collection. You can buy a bar and any weight plate imaginable to clamp on the ends, or just purchase hand weights of varying heft. “It’s about what you feel most comfortable with and that you know you can use safely,” Lepper said. “With weights, the caloric burn effect lasts much longer than it does with just cardio. That’s why you want to do both.” Lepper suggested heavier weights for men, but fewer repetitions. Women would want the reverse because they’re more interested in toning and not bulking up. Cost: About $1.50 per pound No matter which you choose, Lepper said what’s most important is getting your money’s worth and getting into a routine. “Do whatever you enjoy and what you’re actually going to do,” Lepper stipulated. “If you’re not going to put in the time, than it’s not worth the investment.”

The Home Builders Association of Greater Siouxland promotes the professionalism of the building industry through educational programs and activities for the membership and the communities we serve. 3900 Stadium Dr., Sioux City, IA 712-255-3852 www.hbags.com email: hbasooland@siouxlan.net 16

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SIOUXLAND LIFE

Brad Lepper, exercise manager at Scheels, says free weights are an inexpensive starting point for building a home gym.

HOME BUILDER TELL US ABOUT IT

Do you have a collection you’d like to share? A question for the doctor? How about photos from an event to be featured in the “Out & About” section? Email your information to Bruce Miller at bmiller@siouxcityjournal. com for consideration.


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2/9/12 8:10 AM


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RUNNING Missouri

River Runners

MAKING IT TO THE FINISH LINE MISSOURI RIVER RUNNERS SHARE A COMMON GOAL

a

Text by Earl Horlyk | Photograph by Tim Hynds

AT LEAST THREE DAYS a week, Di Haldin laces up her shoes at South Sioux City’s Katch A Kup Coffee Shop and runs to Dakota City. Then she makes a bee-line back, concluding her run at South Sioux’s Crystal Cove Park. That’s quite a trip for the 50-year-old Haldin who began running less than seven years ago. “I’d jog occasionally when I was younger,” she admitted, “but it was hard staying motivated.” Haldin credits the Missouri River Runners, an area group of enthusiasts, for feeding her need to keep moving. “It’s OK running alone,” she said, “but it’s definitely more fun doing it with friends.” Started in 1996, the Missouri River Runners boasts a membership of more than 300 families. A nonprofit organization, it also sponsors 10 annual races, including the 5K and 10K Spring Thaw marathon, which will be taking place April 7 at Sioux City’s Bev’s On The River. Since becoming a MRR member, Haldin has competed in several marathons and is even currently training for a 18

APRIL 2012

triathlon. “It wasn’t too long ago that I’d be embarrassed signing up for a marathon because my time would be too pitiful,” she said, shaking her head. “But I came to realize it didn’t matter whether you came in first place or in last, all marathoners share a common goal: making it to the finish line. “I may not be the fastest runner,” Haldin said, “but I always make it past the finish line.” Patty Considine, one of the founding members of the MRR, said her group is

MISSOURI RIVER RUNNERS

Started in 1996, the Missouri River Runners is a nonprofit organization dedicated to Siouxland runners. More than 300 families currently belong to the club, which is affiliated with the Road Runners Club of America. The annual dues for club membership is $15 for the entire family. More information on the club and the races it manages and sponsors can by found at www.missouririverunners.com.

SIOUXLAND LIFE

supportive of everyone willing to make an effort. “People lead such busy lives that making a commitment to running is something that deserves some support,” she said. Especially since running can sometimes be a solitary endeavor. That is, unless you’re Mike Mahaney, a MRR member who took up running shortly before his 40th birthday. “I needed to set a goal before I turned 40 and running seemed pretty appealing,” he explained. Since then, Mahaney has participated in several area relays and marathons, where he’s befriended many of his fellow runners. “You learn a lot about people when you run a three-hour race with them,” he noted. A former college football player, MRR member Dane Doty took up competitive running as a way to lose weight. “Running in marathons and triathlons allows me to be as competitive as I want to be,” the “middle-of-the-pack” runner said with a smile. “After all, it’s one of the few sports where no one is gonna tackle you.”


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Missouri River Runners members Patty Considine, left, and Chris Poeckes run along the Missouri River during the summer.

“It’s OK running alone, but it’s definitely more fun doing it with friends.” DI HALDIN

Doty said his running has proven inspirational for his family. Likewise, MRR member Stacy Schrunk has proven to be a role model for husband, Ron Schrunk. “Every time I’d go out for a long run, Ron would get worried,” Stacy Schrunk

remembered. “As a way to not worry so much, he decided to join me.” Noting that her husband now runs faster and farther than she does, Stacy Schrunk concedes: “I think I may have created a monster.”

For Ron Schrunk, running has an unusual side benefit. “No matter what I eat, I know I’ll burn it off when I run,” he said. “I run so I can eat crap.” Crappy food notwithstanding, running has many other benefits, according to Considine. “Running is something that doesn’t require special talents or expensive equipment,” she said. “All it requires is moving away form the sidelines.” Considine looks at her club, which has members of all ages and walks of life. “Running is a great way to get in shape,” she said. “It’s even better when people are cheering you on.”

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APRIL 2012

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20

RUNNING Running

Trails

SIOUX CITY’S BEST

RUNNING TRAILS

m

ADAMS HOMESTEAD & NATURE PRESERVE TRAIL Take I-29 North into South Dakota until the McCook Lake exit. Turn west on North Shore Drive and follow the signs to the Nature Preserve. The lake loop is 4.6 miles and the river loop is 6 miles. The terrain is flat and the trail is made of crushed rock. 4th

Text by Earl Horlyk Photograph by Jim Lee

MIKE MAHANEY SEES PLENTY of flora, fauna and all kinds of wildlife. Is he a naturalist? No, Mahaney is an avid runner. “My favorite route to run is from my house to Stone State Park,” the Northside Sioux City resident said. “It’s a fun run that gives me plenty of stuff to look at.” Like Mahaney, Rex Rundquist is a Missouri River Runners member. But unlike his friend, Rundquist likes to run on a trail that’s located beside the Floyd River. “It’s paved and it’s flat,” Rundquist said of the Floyd River Trail. “That’s important when you run as often as I do.” According to MRR member Patty Considine, the Sioux City area has five major places to run, all easily accessible from Interstate 29. But Considine said runners can run pretty much anywhere their moods strike. “Whether it’s on a trail or by your home,” she said, “Sioux City has plenty of places for runners to run.”

AL BENGSTON/SOUTH SIOUX CITY TRAIL Take I-29 to the Wesley Way exit. Turn south and cross the bridge into South Sioux City before turning east on Sixth Street and into Scenic Park. Approximately 7 miles of marked paved trail with a flat terrain.

FLOYD RIVER TRAIL Take I-29 to the Floyd Boulevard exit, turning north on Floyd Boulevard to Fourth Street, east on Fourth Street to Hoeven Drive, north on Hoeven Drive to Sixth Street. The trail is paved and flat.

4th

Both of Sioux City’s two remaining running trails were affected during Missouri River flooding in summer 2011. They are: LEWIS & CLARK TRAIL Take I-29 to the Hamilton Boulevard exit or the Floyd Boulevard exit, turning south onto Larson Park Road. Length is approximately 5 miles one way. The trail has flat terrain and markers every quarter-mile.

PERRY CREEK TRAIL Take I-29 to the Downtown exit, west of Gordon Drive, turning north on Nebraska Street at the Tyson Events Center. The paved, flat trail heads north along Hamilton Boulevard. People walk and jog along the riverfront of the Missouri River in Chris Larsen Park .

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SIOUXLAND LIFE

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4th


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RUNNING Nutrition

ATHLETES LEARN

c

WHAT TO EAT, WHEN TO DRINK

COACH JILL MUHE HAS a standard response whenever one of her Briar Cliff University volleyball players balks at getting a drink during practice. “They’ll tell me they’re not thirsty,” she says. “I tell them, ‘No, go get a drink. By the time your body registers thirst, it’s too late.’” Muhe rarely has an athlete break from a practice drill to get a drink. The reason? The coach offers them so frequently. “You cannot function without it,” she says. Athletes at all levels make mistakes when it comes to what they put into their body before, during and after exercise. The situation is exaggerated when an athlete is performing at a high level of competition, like college. The exaggerated situation is compounded – or further exaggerated – when that athlete is away from home for the first time, fully in charge of their diet. “The analogy that seems to stick involves a Ferrari,” Muhe says of the highest-performing of high-performance sports cars. “A Ferrari won’t work without fuel. A Ferrari won’t work well with bad fuel. “We’re all trying to be Ferraris as college athletes.” With that in mind, Muhe and fellow Briar Cliff Coach Reggie Miller, an assistant in the Chargers’ track program, attempt to guide student-athletes on the pitfalls of poor nutritional choices. They focus on two key areas: hydration and breakfast. “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day,” Muhe says. “An athlete’s nutritional content (on the day of competition) goes back to a day or two days before. Making sure you eat breakfast each day is critical.” Miller used to run track at Simpson College. He’d often have a granola bar at breakfast when he competed. And that was it. “Knowing what I know now, I should have had a bigger breakfast,” he says. “Or, I should have had fruit. I could tell by the end of a meet in college that I was spent.”

Briar Cliff track athletes often receive a sack lunch as they board the bus for a meet outside Sioux City. The kitchen staff prepares these small meals, which consist of a turkey or ham-and-cheese sandwich, a bag of potato chips, a piece of fruit (usually an apple or banana) and a cookie. Potato chips? “Even though potato chips are not highly nutritional, they do give you a short energy supply,” Phillips says. Of course, this sack lunch isn’t – and isn’t meant to be – the main meal of the day. Phillips hopes his runners have eaten breakfast, lunch and had a couple of snacks before they board the bus. He will instruct them to drink water (or a sports drink) throughout the track meet. “The meal the night before a meet is important,” says Miller. “We ask our athletes to eat a complete meal, one without a ton of fat. One common mistake college students make involves fast food, which is high in fat. You don’t burn that as well.” Cramping can be seen more in cold weather during spring, according to Phillips. When the weather turns toward 80

Text and photograph by Tim Gallagher

degrees, runners become more aware of the need to hydrate. Sometimes, the last thing a runner wants is water when it’s 40 degrees outside. “Drink before you get thirsty,” he advises. Muhe asks her players to avoid food traps like soda and candy bars, the items stuffed with calories and possessing little benefits. “We call them empty calories,” she says. “They’re calories without nutritional benefit.” The trick becomes eating healthy foods and doing so regularly, making breakfast a part of your daily plan, supplemented with healthy snacks at least two to three times per day. Any fast food? Muhe sighs and says it’s a part of our nutritional fabric. Most students grow up with it. “The trick becomes eating intelligently.” Briar Cliff University volleyball players work out at the Newman Flanagan Center on the campus of Briar Cliff University. Players keep water and Gatorade available and take numerous breaks to hydrate, according to Coach Jill Muhe.

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22

RUNNING Children

and training

Lucas Hurlburt, an 8th grade student at Sacred Heart, works out with Tedi Andrews at the North High School weight room.

CHILDREN SHOULD AVOID SERIOUS TRAINING

UNTIL THEY’RE READY

w

Text by Dolly A. Butz | Photograph by Jim Lee

WHETHER RACING ON THE playground at recess time or participating in a youth track meet, kids should just focus on being kids and not take running too seriously, according to Tedi Andrews, Velocity Sports performance director at North High School. “If you start them too young there’s going to be a risk of injury,” said Andrews, who believes that kids are specializing too soon in a particular sport. Between the ages of 11 and 16, Andrews said children can start building up a speed and endurance base if they’re ready. “If kids don’t start until they’re 13 or 14, they’re going to pick it up pretty quick,” she said. “They might lag a little bit, but they’re really not going to have a problem catching up at all.” Andrews uses a training model created by Mike Boyle, a world-renowned 22

APRIL 2012

strength and conditioning coach, as a guide. When children are between ages 0 to 6, Andrews said parents should take an active and playful approach to exercise, according to the model. Depending on their development level, she said kids ages 6 to 8 can work on their motor skills (how to move their body), balance, coordination and agility skills. Recreational sports at this age, she said, are OK, as long as competition isn’t taken too seriously. At ages 8 to 12, children can begin to focus on the movements of a particular sport and speed training, according to Andrews. “I would first want to get them moving, getting them to understand their body in space and how they need to control their body before getting them out and start doing a hard training run.”

SIOUXLAND LIFE

VELOCITY SPORTS PERFORMANCE CNOS offers Velocity Sports Performance camps in the summer at all high schools and middle schools in the Sioux City Community School District as well as the Dakota Valley School District. Children ages 8 to 18 from a variety of sports and skill levels can participate in the program which is designed to improve speed, agility, mobility and flexibility, while reducing the risk of sportsrelated injuries. For more information contact CNOS at 605-217-2851. After they learn the mechanics of running, Andrews said, young athletes should run short distances at the pace CONTINUED ON PAGE 25


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APRIL 2012

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RUNNING Transformation Dane Doty with his wife Kristen and children Kelly, 12, and Drew, 8.

A FAMILY THAT

RUNS TOGETHER,

d

STAYS TOGETHER Text by Earl Horlyk | Photographs by Jim Lee and submitted

DANE DOTY IS HALF the man he used to be ... literally. Tipping the scales at 305 pounds six years ago, the Sioux City man is now a svelte 175 pounds, less than he weighed when he was a freshman linebacker on his high school football team. “At my heaviest, I was worried I wouldn’t be around to see my kids grow up,” Doty, a staffing manager for Wells Enterprises Inc., explained. “That’s when I made the desire to take control over my life.” Always athletic, Doty had been participating in a slow-pitch men’s softball team (“More of an excuse to drink beer and eat pizza than to stay active,” he 24

APRIL 2012

admitted). It was only after daughter Kelly began tae kwon do lessons that he became serious about weight loss. “I’d never ask my kids to do anything I wouldn’t do,” Doty said. “So when Kelly wanted tae kwon do lessons, I signed up as well.” Kelly Doty excelled at her new sport while her dad struggled. “When they asked me to touch my toes, I discovered I could barely touch my knees,” Doty said, shaking his head. In addition, the former high school and college athlete could no longer walk up the stairs of his basement workout room. “I had to literally crawl up those stairs

SIOUXLAND LIFE

following a workout because of my weight,” he said. But in time, Doty’s weight began melting away. “I’d set goals for myself,” he remembered. “First, it was to get down to 275 pounds, the same weight I was in college. Then, my goal was to weigh 230 pounds like I was in high school.” Eventually, Doty’s weight dropped to 175 pounds, comparable to the Mixed Martial Arts fighters he’d see on TV. Seeing such dramatic results, he added cardio (through P90X videos) and running (with the assistance of the Missouri River Runners) to his fitness regiment. Going from a 44-inch to a 28-inch


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“It’s incredible to see the change in Dane. It’s also pretty exciting to see the changes in our family.”

KRISTEN DOTY

waistline, Doty also began running marathons and participating in triathlons. In addition, he inspired his wife Kristen, 12-year-old daughter Kelly and 8-year-old son Drew. “I credit Kelly’s tae kwon do class for inspiring me to get healthy,” he said. “It’s cool knowing that I’m having a similar effect on my family.” During a recent 5K run with the Missouri River Runners, Doty was joined by son Drew, a Joy Elementary School third grader. “Oh, man,” Drew said, huffing and puffing his way up a hill. “I feel like my legs have been shot off my body.” Doty smiled because he knows about the aches and pains that come from exercise. “When I tell people I lost weight through sweat and hard work, they look disappointed,” he noted. “Everybody wants a quick fix but there aren’t any.” For Doty, staying fit has meant a change in lifestyle, which includes eating healthy. “Do I still want the cookies and the

cakes?” he asks with a shrug. “Heck, yeah. But my desire to stay healthy is greater than my desire to eat cake.” As her husband talks, Kristen Doty can’t help but smile. “It’s incredible to see the change in Dane,” she said in admiration. “It’s also pretty exciting to see the changes in our family.” Although she participates in marathons with her family, Kristen prefers walking to running. “And that’s perfectly OK,” Doty said. “Any physical activity is good. It doesn’t matter if you’re walking or running. You’re getting off your butt and doing something.” Describing his weekly schedule, which now includes running, twice-aweek tae kwon do classes, step and kick boxing classes at the Siouxland Y, even working out with a heavy bag in his basement, Doty kids that he may now be addicted to exercise. “Guess I’m just not wired to be sitting and taking it easy,” he said with a smile.

It took Dane Doty nearly five years to go from 305 pounds down to his current 175 pounds.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22 they are training for. “If you’re a sprinter or a long distance runner, I think it’s important to build up that endurance,” she said. NUTRITION, STRETCHING KEY Erik Nieuwenhuis, a physical therapist at St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center, said kids who start training too soon could suffer sprained or strained ankles and knees, patellar tendonitis or iliotibial band syndrome, a common injury to the thigh. “One of the best things for our running form is posture, so if our posture is out of balance, the more risks we have for lower back, for knee, for ankle, for hip problems when we’re running or doing any activity,” he said. Stretching the hip, calf, hamstring and spine are key to avoiding injury, according to Nieuwenhuis. He said kids should stretch before and after exercise. Shoes with good arch, mid-foot and heel support, Nieuwenhuis said, will help prevent plantar fasciitis, a foot injury common with high school and college students. Good nutrition and hydration are extremely important for children who are training and competing, according to Nieuwenhuis. He said medical professionals generally recommend that youth drink 16 to 24 ounces of water two hours before exercise. During exercise, he said they should consume 4 to 6 ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. “A lot of kids will tend not to drink anything until they’re thirsty,” he said. “About every 15 minutes during running or during competition you want to have your coaches take breaks and make sure the kids are staying hydrated.” For every pound lost during running, Nieuwenhuis said children should consume 24 ounces of water. Whole grain pasta, rice and bread with fiber, as well as fruits and vegetables are the best carbohydrates for the body, according to Nieuwenhuis. Cliff bars, he said, are an “outstanding” source of balanced nutrition for athletes. The energy company also makes the Cliff Kid Z Bar, a softer version of the original Cliff bar that contains fewer calories. “Your athletic performance and endurance is only going to go as far as your nutrition,” Nieuwenhuis said. “The most important factor, especially the day of running or training is your complex carbohydrates.” SIOUXLAND LIFE

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26

RUNNING Physical

Education

NOT YOUR FATHER’S OLD

P.E. CLASS

s

Iowa Army National Guard Sgt. 1st Class Grant Van Beek helps Jessica Kelly, center, stand up while wearing a sumo wrestling suit at an East High School physical education class. Morgan Erickson on the mat, was just “pinned” by Kelly.

Text by Tim Gallagher Photograph by Laura Wehde

STUDENTS REPORTING TO PHYSICAL education classes in the Sioux City Community School District get something if they forget “gym clothes” and cannot participate in class. “We give them a pedometer,” says Kelli Tuttle, a 26-year veteran of the district and head of the P.E. department. “We ask them to walk and we measure how far they go.” It may be a little thing, but it’s an important detail. Tuttle and her staff leave few stones unturned in making sure students exercise their hearts, their bodies, their minds. This isn’t your father’s old P.E. class where kids reported in uniforms, lined up and counted out jumping jacks, pushups and squat-thrusts for 25 minutes. Today’s instruction focuses on character education, life skills and all matters of health and nutrition. Students receive those concepts in activities that cover the map, ranging from ultimate Frisbee to hide-and-seek in the dark to ballet to the shuttle run. Students are part of Sioux City’s Blue Zones Project, a program sponsored by Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield and Healthways. The effort aims to recognize Iowa cities taking steps to promote healthy living. A local middle school/high school grant funded in large part by the National Football League and the National Dairy Council is called “Fuel Up to Play 60.” Students sported bands of eight beads apiece recently, a tool to reminding all to drink eight glasses of water per day. A triathlon effort coming from Hy-Vee Food Stores works with the schools to get students biking, swimming and running. The First Tee golf program in Sioux City takes aim at elementary students, 26

APRIL 2012

showing them a lifetime activity in golf while sharing ideals of fair play, honesty and integrity – key components that come into play every hole on the links. Students in the schools are also tastetesters working in a healthy food initiative that will see dairy products rated as well as entrées like fish tacos and baked fish sticks. That aim? Get healthier foods into the school lunch program. And, yes, there’s classroom instruction. The goal there is to get hearts pumping, young minds energized. “Each day we try to keep students active throughout the entire period, all 45 minutes,” says Tuttle. “We did a square dance unit and the kids danced for a full 40 minutes. The only time we took a break is when I had to teach something.” Tuttle doesn’t simply throw a square dance CD into a player and allow the students to have at it. She watches for skill development, enthusiasm and that students are on the move, getting the heart rate going while being exposed to an art form they might not otherwise experience. The dance ratio throughout the United States in physical education classes is 31 girls for every 1.7 boys. In Sioux City, the ratio is two girls for every boy. “Boys enjoy this class,” says Tuttle. Enjoyment. The word is a buzzword in gyms across the local school district. Tuttle and her teachers strive to make physical education fun. That way, students are more likely to pick up a ball, a Frisbee or a dance activity away from school. Students, after all, have physical education class five of every 10 school

SIOUXLAND LIFE

days. That leaves much time outside of class for activity. An ultimate Frisbee unit a couple of years ago led to an informal league setting up shop on weekends at East High. “Social media and technology have put a hit on outdoor activity,” Tuttle says. “When I started teaching here in 1987, there were students who could have pick-up games with each other away from school. I’ve seen a decrease in that. The unstructured activity has dropped off.” Think of your own experience. How many driveways feature children shooting baskets or jumping rope? How many yards and parks are full of children playing tag, football, kickball or Red Rover? That friendly Frisbee competition on the green space at East was more exception than norm, sadly. Sioux City physical education teachers approach the void by allowing students to select their own team activity every other Monday during class. Students must determine what game they’ll play; they must set the rules; they must pick teams and then keep score. Occasionally it has taken 10 to 12 minutes to get started. Why? Picking teams and setting rules can be a foreign concept for children who have participated on structured teams in structured leagues for years. “They need those life skills,” Tuttle argues. “Physical education teaches character ed more than other classes as you’ve got the responsibility of a uniform, you’re working on a team to solve problems. And, it’s a social activity.”


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RUNNING Veteran

runner

VETERAN RUNNER STILL WINNING RACES IN HER 50S

c

Text by John Quinlan | Photographs by Jim Lee

CONNIE PRINCE HOULIHAN STARTED running as soon as she learned what her feet could do, and she was a competitive runner even into her 50s (where she now resides), holding Sioux City East High’s 800 meter record (actually 880 back then) for 31 years and even outrunning her talented daughters, Shayla and Shelby Houlihan, for most of their still-young lives. She has been grounded the past two years, but she says she’s still happy. Watching her daughters compete helps a great deal. Just the fact that she and her husband, Bob, have seven children altogether is more than enough to lift away the blues, she said. Connie had to stop running when she got “bone on bone” on her right knee.

Connie Prince Houlihan stopped running two years ago because of knee problems, but hopes to run again.

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APRIL 2012

That’s when one bone rubs against another whenever the knee moves, and it can be quite painful. At first, she thought the pain was due to a small fracture in her tibular plateau. So she worked her elliptical and swam for about 10 weeks before trying to run again. That’s when she got the bone on bone diagnosis, and that was the last time she ran. “I get a cortisone shot once in a while. And I feel like I want to run, but I don’t dare. I mean it actually does grind and rub together,” she said. But she still hopes to run again. Some day. Connie is considering experimental (meaning non-FDA-approved) surgery that could put her back on her feet. Doctors told her they could move her knee over a notch, allowing her to run on the outside, but she nixed that proposal. “I think I’ve been very blessed with mechanics over the years, from the time I was a little kid, and I think I was meant to do this,” she said. “So I feel if they’re going to move my knee over a notch and I’m going to try to run on the outside, then I’m thinking, how long before that wears out? I guess I love running, but I want to be able to walk. So we’re looking into some new technology. We’ll see. “I mean, if the day came that I can run again, that would be awesome. I would really just like to be able to run again with my daughters, like we used to.” ALL IN THE FAMILY In the meantime, she is thrilled that Shelby and Shayla both seem to be headed to the Olympic Trials this year in Eugene, Ore. Stepdaughter Shayla will compete in the steeples, Shelby, who at 19 has already set school records as a freshman at Arizona State University will try to make it in the 1,500m or the 800m, she said. Connie’s passion for running has

SIOUXLAND LIFE

rubbed off on both. Connie had her own moment in the sun back in 1987 when she took part in the Olympic Marathon Trials in Minneapolis. Unfortunately, she was battling an ankle injury at the time, and then her dad died right before the Olympic Trials. Her father’s loss proved so devastating that a poor performance at the Trials was anticlimactic, even for a girl who was ranked fifth in the world and third in the United States at that time. “I still ran like a 2:41 and walked part of it and handed my water bottles to other girls to help them,” she said. “Had I not gone, would I have been sorry? Yeah. And my brothers wanted me to go. And my whole family was like, ‘Oh, you need to go, you need to go. Dad wanted this,’ I’m sure he did, but still it was extremely difficult. “I’ve told my daughters, too, that when you have trials and tribulations like this, as soon as you get through them, they make you stronger. And the fact that I’m still running into my 50s and competing, that’s why I could be able to do it.” IN THE BEGINNING Connie started running, everywhere, as a kid. She developed her speed running the short races, the only kind girls were allowed to run back then. While at Hayworth Junior High, she was brought to East High to compete on the varsity team, thrilled to get out of school early just to run. And she would run against anyone, including her brothers Bob and Bill, who also excelled at running. While at East, she broke a number of school records. And she found it shocking years later when she returned to Sioux City that she still held the 800/880 meter record. It made her think that, yeah, she was a pretty good runner, something she didn’t think about at that


29

Women’s marathon winner Connie Prince Houlihan crosses the finish line during the 2009 Siouxland Lewis and Clark Marathon.

time. That record was broken 31 years later by Ellen Dougherty. The current record holder, of course, is daughter Shelby. Connie recalls that she was actually embarrassed that her record time of 2:19 not only wasn’t broken a few years later but that it wasn’t even her best time in that event. She would run relays in 2:15 or 2:14, but they didn’t count. A big problem for high school harriers in those days was that the best runners competed in too many events and that kept them from excelling at any of them. “I was the best in the city and when I went to state, they would load me up with four or five races, and we’d have prelims in everything and I’d end up not running very well. I was just too tired,” she said, happy that her daughters didn’t have to compete under those conditions. Then she went to Kansas State University, where she started running 65 miles a week, helping to develop the distance skills that were accentuated when she started running with the school’s cross country girls. But again, she was running just too many miles, she said.

FINDING A WAY “I didn’t really have that good of a college career. So I think I had to prove something,” she said, of the successful running career she had after college. “That’s the way runners are. And my mom used to say, ‘Don’t tell Connie that she can’t do something. Don’t tell her that because she will and she’ll find a way.’ And that’s exactly what I did.” In her post-college career, she ran 10,000m and 5,000m races across the country. “I had really started to compete again once I was in my late 40s and I couldn’t really believe that I was able to beat 20-year-olds. It’s just that I had hung on to my speed. I think I have hung onto it for all these years because it was natural,” she said. “My daughter Shelby’s the same way. She has the natural gift of speed.” Competitive as she is, Connie admits that Shelby is the better runner these days, even before that bone on bone thing.

She fondly recalls one of the last races she and Shelby competed in was a 5K. Sometime before that, she and Shelby, then a high school junior, had run a road race in Storm Lake. Usually Connie likes to take an early lead, but this time she decided to run side by side with her daughter. Then when they neared the home stretch, Shelby with her younger legs sprinted to the end for an easy win. So at the 5K, Connie decided that wasn’t going to happen again, at least this one time. “I just shot out and got away from her. I just took off up the hill, and she never did catch me. I was probably like 49 or 50, and she couldn’t catch me,” she said, laughing. “It was fun, But it’s been fun over the years.” And whenever Shelby beats her in the future, she figures she can blame it on genetics. “Knowing that she has that kind of speed, it’s just that she got it from me, that part of it, and I think that’s a pretty cool thing.”

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PROFILE Q&A

20 QUESTIONS with Olympic Trials qualifier

Anne Shadle Text by Nick Hytrek | Photograph submitted

Anne Shadle, 2001 South Sioux City High School graduate, was a two-time national champion at the University of Nebraska, winning the 1,500 meters outdoors and the mile indoors, both in 2005. She competed in the 1,500 meters at the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials and is once again training to qualify for the trials in either the 1,500 or the 3,000-meter steeplechase. What’s it like to compete at that level? Nick Hytrek found out.

1. For those not familiar with track and field, what is the steeplechase? The steeplechase is 3,000 meters. There are barriers set up and one of those barriers is a water jump. 2. This isn’t a high school event around here. How did you get introduced to it? I got into it because in junior high I ran the 100-meter hurdles. I was a dancer. I took dance in Sioux City. I thought I was a dancer and should be able to do this. It’s kind of more fitting to my body type. I volunteered to run it in college and ran it my first three years. 3. What type of training is involved in preparing for the event? You have your basic schedule as a distance runner. 4. What do your workouts include besides running? Usually once a week there is an interval workout with barriers and then twice a week you just do hurdle drills. 5. Aside from endurance, what other physical skills do you need for the event? I would say just general athleticism. 6. Are you still competing? Yes. 7. What are you training for currently? 30

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The Olympic Trials, it’s the last week in June and the first week in July. I have to qualify. School is my main focus right now. Running is something I do for fun. 8. Do you have a training partner or others you work out with? Right now, I’m at the University of Missouri. I train here with the Missouri team. One of my training partners is former Missouri runner Shannon Leinert, and she’s a dual 400/800-meter runner. 9. Do you ever train alone? Yes. It’s more my schedule. For the majority of people in general and professional runners, sometimes your schedule doesn’t allow you to work out with others. You’ve got to do what works for you. 10. What positives have you found from working out alone and with others? I think it depends on how you’re feeling that day. Sometimes you feel like jumping in and working out with others. There are other times when you like being alone to think and reflect on your life. 11. What motivates you to train? I just love being able to push my body, push my limits. Running has always been my release from the world. 12. Do you ever take time off from training to give your body a break? Yes, all people do. We get sick, we get

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injured, we have setbacks, whether it’s anticipated or unanticipated. 13. Is that something anyone who works out regularly should do? I would definitely suggest that sometimes our body just needs a break. Emotionally and physically, we just need a break. 14. Do you have times when you don’t feel like working out? I think every person does. 15. What do you do to get yourself to do it? It’s thinking right. I can tell myself ‘I might not feel right, but I’m going to go out and have the best workout I can today.’ 16. You’re now working on a doctorate in sports psychology. What kind of work do you want to get into once you complete your degree? I want to be at a university doing sports psychology with teams, athletes and coaches and help them achieve success. I can talk about that and also get into teaching. 17. How much of staying fit and training is mind over body? I think a lot of times there are times when our bodies tell us to kind of back off. I think there are times when our mind gets in the way. It comes down to


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South Sioux City native Anne Shadle, second from left, competes in the 1,500-meter-run at the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials. A former national champion, Shadle is currently training with hopes of qualifying for the trials again this summer.

really knowing yourself, know if you’re slacking or if you’re not slacking. 18. What psychological tools can any of us use to get the most out of our workouts? Thinking right – we know wrong thoughts are going to hurt our workout for that day. Focus on what you need to do to get your workout in. Positive selftalk – those things we say to ourselves. Composure – being in control of yourself, not being too high or too low. Concentration in your workout. Are you focused on your running or your activity? Confidence – belief, trust, having that positive

“I just love being able to push my body, push my limits. Running has always been my release from the world.” mindset, knowing you’re going to succeed in what you do. 19. You’ve been at the U.S. Olympic Trials. What’s it like to be surrounded by some of the best athletes in the world?

It’s a really cool thing to be a part of. For me, it was a real cool experience. As an athlete, you have to focus on what you’re there to do. 20. From an athletic standpoint, what athlete you’ve seen at competitions has impressed you the most? I think I’ve always been impressed by (Canadian hurdler) Priscilla LopesSchliep (who won the bronze medal in the 100-meter hurdles at the 2008 Olympics). She was a college teammate of mine. She just has a great mindset. She has a great attitude.

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RUNNING Boston

Marathoner

BOSTON MARATHONER LOOKS

FORWARD TO 80

t

Text by Tim Gallagher | Photographs by Laura Wehde

THERE’S JUST A TOUCH of Forrest Gump in Sioux City marathoner Paul Miller. The difference? Gump ran for three years straight in the Oscar-nominated movie starring Tom Hanks. Miller, 72, began running 31 years ago. Really hasn’t stopped. “My wife (Helen) thinks I’m crazy,” Paul Miller said. “I just got back from the Lost Dutchmen Marathon at Apache Junction, Ariz.,” he continued. “There were five of us in the race (in his age division). I got fourth, finishing behind three kids.” The “kids” were all 70. “Only” 70. As spring sprang all around Miller, he sat in his home’s “Iowa Room” and pored over literature from the local Missouri River Runners club. The

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organization detailed 30 races, which gave Miller a chance to sketch out his 2012 season. He’s a veteran of 70 marathons. “I like to run the Dam to Dam in Des Moines,” he said. “We have a 10-miler coming up in a few weeks.” His 2011 season was highlighted with his second Boston Marathon. Miller’s first came in 1984, when he was but a novice in this healthy hobby. According to Miller’s watch, he toured the 26.2-mile Boston Marathon last spring in just over 5 hours. “Terrible time,” he scoffed. “My watch said 5 hours, 12 minutes. The official time said 5 hours, 17 minutes.” Running in Boston with 10,000 others – and many more there to watch – presents a new arena of challenges. Miller


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Far left Paul Miller, 72, holds the sign he wore above his runner’s bib in the Boston Marathon. He ran the race in just over 5 hours. Bottom left Paul Miller runs along 38th Street in Sioux City. Miller is an avid marathon competitor. Left Paul Miller displays medals from marathons he has participated in, including the Boston Marathon, which he’s run twice. He plans to run the Boston Marathon when he’s 80.

rose the morning of the world’s most famous race at 4 a.m., having overnighted 23 miles from the Massachusetts capital city. “My race began at 10:45 a.m., so you’re on your feet all the time. That gave me problems.” Miller plans to visit Boston again, but not until he’s 80. Yes, he plans to complete the grueling race at that time. “My goal is to run Boston when I’m 80,” he said. “There’s no reason I can’t. I feel super. I have no health problems, no knee problems.” Miller laughed and caught himself, adding a little self-deprecation to his optimism. “The reason I’m waiting is that there was only one man running last year in the over-80 division,” he said. “Once you get through your 70s, I guess, they start dropping like flies!” Miller likes his chances. The Sioux City native, one of nine children in his family, has six older brothers. All of them are living. One of his older brothers, Bill Miller, a resident of Los Angeles, became a runner like Paul after Paul’s first Boston Marathon. “Bill and I once ran as close to heaven as you can get,” said Paul. “It was a marathon that finished at the 50-yard-line in Notre Dame Stadium. Two miles into the race Bill pulled a calf muscle and I ran ahead.” Paul figured he’d beat Bill by a couple of hours. He didn’t. Bill finished 10 minutes or so behind his young brother. “After Bill pulled that muscle, he said it hurt so bad to walk,” Paul said. “So he kept running!”

Miller’s entry into the world of running can be traced to a 1981 back injury that forced him from his job at a food wholesaler. Out of work that entire summer, Miller relaxed on his porch as neighbors Bruce and Lorraine Whittier

jogged past on their daily workout. The Whittiers often asked Miller to join them. One steamy August day, Miller gave in. He’d join them the following afternoon as they ran around the track at North High. “I ran three miles and I was hooked,” he said. “In the first two weeks, I worked my way up to 10 miles.” The Whittiers soon gave up the hobby. Their protégé did not. For the next 31 years, Miller logged thousands of miles over thousands of hours. Unlike Forrest Gump, he hasn’t stopped. “I’ve run 70-some marathons and some eight-hour cancer runs,” he said. “I’ve done 26-mile workouts. Last June, they had a run for POWs/MIAs at (Memorial Field). It was a 23-hour workout. I only made 19 hours, but I think I logged 68 miles.”

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RUNNING Running

Gear

CUTTING EDGE GEAR FOR SERIOUS RUNNERS

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Text by Dolly A. Butz | Photographs by Jim Lee

FROM SHOES THAT MAKE your feet feel bare, to sports watches that put a virtual competitor on your wrist, there are numerous products on the market to help serious runners achieve their goals of running farther, faster. Siouxland Life scoped out the latest, high-tech offerings for runners in the areas of apparel, footwear, accessories and competitions. MINIMALISTIC/BAREFOOT SHOES Lightweight, flexible and low to the ground, minimalistic running shoes give wearers the feeling of running barefoot. Adventurous runners who want to try something new are giving Vibram Five Finger, Nike Free Run and Brooks Pure

Jim Ewoldt, co-owner of Peak Performance, is shown with a modern Asics Neo33 and a Nike Waffle from the 1970’s.

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Connect shoes a shot. The lightweight, flexible, low-to-theground shoes gained popularity last summer, according to Drew Graham, men’s sports shoe manager for Scheels. The shoes encourage mid-foot and front-foot striking, rather than the heel to toe striking associated with a normal running shoe. “I’ve seen high school runners get them, middle aged guys get them. Anybody that’s young at heart,” Graham said. It’s not the first time Peak Performance co-owner Jim Ewoldt has come across light-weight training shoes. The Asics Gel Neo33 - named for the 33 joints in the foot - made its debut in 2011, and like other recent minimalistic running shoes, bears a striking resemblance to the original Nike Waffle trainers of the 1970s. “The industry needs something new. If they can’t come up with something new, they bring back something old,” Ewoldt said. Because the shoes contain very little cushioning, much like a track spike, both Graham and Ewoldt urge runners to be cautious. Graham said runners must give themselves time to “acclimatize” their feet to barefoot shoes. Overpronators, with feet that roll inward, need a stabilizing shoe, Graham said, and could risk injury training with a barefoot running shoe. He recommends that anyone trying a minimalistic running shoe for the first time begin by running a half mile in the shoes and gradually build up distance from there.

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Ewoldt suggests wearing minimalistic running shoes on soft surfaces, such as grass, wood chips or an all-weather track. “They’re not for everyone,” he said. REFLECTIVE CLOTHING Blaze orange and lime-yellow aren’t just popular colors with construction workers and firefighters. Runners love donning shirts, jackets and tights in the vibrant colors to get noticed. Serious runners, Ewoldt explains, often run when it’s dark out. They take to the roads in the early morning hours to sneak in a run before work or find themselves running at night as the sun goes down. “It’s all about being visible and safe,” he said. Reflective striping and vibrant colors used to be limited to vests, but Ewoldt said Saucony, Nike and Asics brands are incorporating it into all kinds of running apparel. Shirts with UV protection that acts like a sunscreen to reflect UV rays and microfiber shorts with built in compression liners to prevent chaffing, are also favorites among runners, according to Ewoldt. WATCHES GPS-enabled watches by Garmin track distance, time, pace and heart rate. Travis Helt, Scheels specialty shop manager, said sports watches are perfect for the runner looking to elevate performance. If you run the same path everyday, Garmin Forerunner models 610 and 410


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might be the right watch for you. Helt said the “virtual runner” feature alerts wearers when they’re behind their goal pace and helps push them. The watches can also be paired with a strap to determine target heart-rate. Nike also offers a GPS sport watch powered by TomTom. The Nike+ SportWatch GPS by TomTom can be plugged directly into a computer’s UBS port to upload run data and recharge the battery. The watch tracks time, distance, pace, heart rate and calories burned. It also displays a mapped route with pace data and changes in elevation. TOUGH MUDDER Tough Mudder events, races that take competitors under barbed wire, over 12foot walls and through mud, fire and water, are filling up faster than marathons, according Ewoldt. “A lot of the reason why the Tough Mudders are doing so well is it’s fun to do,” he said. “It’s the event that’s giving runners something to train for.” The Wild Hog Run, Sioux City’s own version of a Tough Mudder, is planned for Aug. 18, according to Ewoldt. For more information visit www. u2canrun.org.

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RUNNING Dog

running partners

DOGS

MAKE GREAT RUNNING PARTNERS

Text by Dolly A. Butz | Photograph by Comstock

GETTING OUT OF BED, lacing up your shoes and pounding the pavement can sometimes feel like a chore. Inject a little joy back into your run with an exuberant canine. The wag of a tail and the spring in his or her trot may be all the motivation you need to get out the door or go that extra mile. Although dogs make great running partners, Brooke Gilbert, a veterinarian at South Sioux City Animal Hospital, said there are some things you should know before you take your beloved pooch on a run. KNOW YOUR DOG’S ABILITY Each breed has different abilities, Gilbert explained. Yorkshire Terriers and Chihuahuas are capable of accompanying you on power walks or short, slow jogs. Leave them at home if you’re planning a long run. Although Jack Russell Terriers are small dogs, Gilbert said their energy makes them good runners.

“They’re a little bit of a tripping hazard, so you have to be careful,” she said. Golden Retrievers and Labrador Retrievers are generally obedient, Gilbert said, which makes them an optimum choice for road running. “If you do trail running the Border Collies or the herding breeds (German Shepherd Dog, Collie, Belgian Malinois) are really good for that,” she said. “If you’re doing long, slow runs, Standard Poodles or Dalmatians are good.” Running could negatively affect the health of breeds that have certain traits or are predisposed to certain conditions. Extra large breeds like the Great Dane, Gilbert said, can develop hip dysplasia. She recommends that these dogs be evaluated by a veterinarian before beginning a running regimen. Dachshunds are prone to developing Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease; and breeds with broad and short brachycephalic skulls, like the pug and bulldog, have respiratory problems. “They have a hard time breathing as it is,” Gilbert said. “When they get really excited then they have an even harder time.” STARTING OUT Although you should wait until your puppy is at least 9 months old before you take him or her running with you, conditioning can start early on in life. Walking your puppy and training it to obey commands is essential for making your dog a good running partner, according to Gilbert. Once the dog is old enough and wellmannered, she said you can start running.

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Gilbert recommends outfitting your dog with a harness that goes around the body rather than a collar because it could strain your dog’s trachea if it pulls on the leash. A gentle leader head collar may also be a good choice for a dog that is just learning to run or is known to chase squirrels or rabbits, she said. To keep your dog hydrated, Gilbert said you should bring a dish with some water along on your run. If your dog is well conditioned and you are only going a short distance, she said you can leave the water at home. Sidewalks or trails are fine for dogs to run on, Gilbert said, but she urges owners to check their dog’s paws afterward for blisters or snowpack and watch for any signs of lameness. Running half a mile with your dog at a comfortable pace is a good place to start, according to Gilbert. From there you can build up your dog’s mileage, depending on its breed. Before taking off on your run, she said it’s a good idea to warm your dog up with a short walk. “They can pull muscles just like we do and stretching them out and conditioning them is great,” she said. Lagging behind and laying down, are also signs that you are going too far or too fast, according to Gilbert. Even if they’re laboring, she said some dogs will keep running. “They get endorphins like we do and it can mask their pain,” she said. If your dog’s tongue is hanging outside of its mouth, the corners of its mouth are pulled pack and it is panting deeply, Gilbert said it’s time to stop running.


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RUNNING Foot

woes

FEET DON’T FAIL ME

RUNNERS MAY EXPERIENCE A VARIETY OF FOOT WOES

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Text by Joanne Fox | Photographs by Tim Hynds

FOOT PROBLEMS ARE COMMON challenges affecting Siouxland runners and joggers. After all, the feet are what hits the ground first. “Running injuries are caused by trauma, training errors or biomechanical faults in the runner’s physical structure,” explained Sioux City podiatrist Dr. Paul Coffin, who treats running associated injuries, helps runners prevent future problems and returns them to full activity in as short a time as possible. Coffin pointed out that many foot woes are easily addressed with the correct shoe. “Runners, when they feel pain or discomfort in their feet, will sometimes alter their running style to alleviate the pain,” he noted. “They tend to

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Podiatrist Dr. Paul Coffin talks about running shoes during an interview in his Sioux City offices.

overlook the main culprit, which could be their running shoes.” Often runners purchase a trendy shoe or one a sales associate may recommend. Coffin stated those may not be the best running shoe choice. “Although cushiony shoes may feel the best in the store, multiple studies have shown that running in softer shoes causes more injuries,” he said. “When fitting shoes there are three things to take into consideration,” Coffin continued. “The shoes should not flex in the middle, but only at the ball of the foot. They should have long-lasting cushioning in the forefoot and have sturdy supportive heel counters with relatively firm material in the soles.” Coffin pointed out that the wrong shoe can wreak havoc on one’s feet. “What most people don’t realize is that soft heels on shoes require the muscles on the outside of the leg to work harder to hold the foot straight and prevent a sprain of the ankle and the joint,” he said “Runners may be all right initially, but ultimately could be putting themselves at risk with a soft shoe.” Another consideration runners may not grasp is the force put on one’s feet when running or jogging. If the material in the shoe’s heel is too soft, the foot will squish down the material at footstrike, causing the foot, ankle, knee and even hip to compensate. Coffin estimated the force when the foot hits the pavement could be as high as 500 pounds of pressure.

“That’s why it is important, when there is trouble with the feet, to analyze your running form, as well as bring in your shoes to see wear patterns,” he said. “By stabilizing the runner’s foot with sturdy shoes, and sometimes with the help of orthotic devices, runners can often avoid biomechanical injuries that manifest not only in the feet, but in the knee, hip and low back as well.” Certainly, when injured, runners can implement the Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation regimen but Coffin cautioned that just treating the injury and ignoring the cause of the injury can have disastrous results and repeated problems. One injury Coffin often sees in runners is plantar fasciitis, which involves pain and inflammation of a thick ligament that runs across the bottom of one’s foot and connects the heel bone to the toes. “This should not be taken lightly because it is a serious injury and difficult to heal,” he said. Coffin noted runners can also experience stress fractures, especially in the metatarsal bones or the tibia. “Only complete rest takes care of that,” he said. Coffin admitted that not every runner will suffer from foot woes. “Some runners are born with good feet and will not experience problems,” he said. “There is some genetic disposition to foot structure and resulting injuries.” It is common for Coffin to prescribe custom-made orthotics, inserts for the shoes, which realign the bones, muscles and tendons of the foot to a more optimum position. “Orthotics allow the individual to run in a more correct form, which definitely affects the body from the foot all the way up to the knee, hip and low back,” he said.

Runners may also be referred for physical therapy to train the muscles to function more efficiently. Coffin stressed that most people need to exercise more, and jogging may be a good choice. “Since most runners enjoy the experience of running, our plan is to get them back to that activity,” he said. Coffin’s recommendation is to start training slowly, stopping before you’re tired. “You can evaluate how you are feeling and add a bit of distance each time,” he said. However, even with the best preparation, aches and pains may surface, Coffin acknowledged. “Runners should consult a health care professional for persistent problems,” he said.

COMMON INJURIES

SHIN SPLINTS – appear at front and inside of leg, can be caused by running on hard surfaces or mistakes in training. RUNNER’S KNEE – a catch-all for jogging-related knee pain PLANTAR FASCIITIS – heel pain caused by inflammation or tears of the ligament on the bottom of the foot STRESS FRACTURE – an overuse fracture of one of the many bones in the foot or leg ACHILLES TENDONITIS – a strain or tear of the Achilles tendon MORTON’S NEUROMA – a condition caused by the chronic irritation of the interdigital nerve; runners often experience a “pins-and-needles” pain SUBUNGUAL HEMATOMA – bleeding underneath the toenail caused by chronically jamming the toe into the top of the shoe

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HEALTH Kids

dental health

KIDS NEED PREVENTIVE

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DENTAL WORK, WHEELOCK SAYS Text by John Quinlan | Photographs by Jim Lee

COSMETIC BONDING IS A trendy dental technique for putting smiles on the faces of children in, say, Beverly Hills or Manhattan. Not so much in Siouxland, said Dr. Douglas Wheelock of WheelockBursick Dentistry in Sioux City, who has been a practicing dentist for nearly 35 years. And the same holds for capping, even with teenagers, he said. “I think it’s quite rare to do it for children,” he said. “A cap or a crown is used to protect a tooth. Unless these teeth are severely destroyed, that isn’t warranted. To do bonding, composite bonding or two-colored filling bonding, we do that on occasion when a child chips a tooth or something like that. But that’s a much more conservative approach. “You see a lot of things in dentistry, and not all of them are good or necessary.” Dealing with children as patients is one of the good things about being a dentist, particularly if you can help get a child off to a good start on the path to proper tooth care. These days, dentists are stressing more than ever before the need for more preventive dental work, Wheelock said. A popular preventive tool today is fluoride varnishes. “Fluoride varnishes are a means of sticking the fluoride to the tooth a little better,” he said. “And fluoride application to the tooth is a good way of doing it.” Wheelock said our fluoridated water supply used to offer good teeth protection for everyone, but even though that water is still fluoridated, many children 40

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today simply don’t drink tap water. They prefer bottled water or filtered water, which has no fluoride. “Sometimes, we see children come in that look like (kids did) back in the days when there was no fluoridation,” he said. “We also work diligently with preventive techniques in teaching parents how to care for their child’s teeth before they’re able to care for them, such as how to position them for brushing and flossing, the importance of that. And the importance of diet. There are many things in our foods and drinks today that have lots of sugar, and sugar’s the enemy. Sugar is what the bacteria in the teeth want to convert to acid and cause tooth decay.” Another good preventive technique is sealing, he noted. Sealants are a means of sealing the pits and fissures in the chewing surfaces of the teeth. “A lot of times, these pits and fissures are really deep, so deep that the toothbrush won’t get down to clean the depth of it. So there is always plaque in there,” he said, “and those are usually the first areas that you will see develop tooth decay.” FIRST VISIT One big problem that confronts dentists who treat children is that when children come in for their first appointment, they are often terrified because other children, friends or relatives think it is funny to tell stories about their dental experiences, the kind that produce nightmares, Wheelock said.

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“It makes it more difficult on our end to reassure the child and show what we’re doing is comfortable and not threatening,” he said. “We typically ask that the kids start coming to see us at age 3, but we also see children earlier than that. We also like to give parents instructions earlier than that as far as child care because if the child care isn’t started when the teeth come in, there can be problems. If the diet’s not as good as it should be, if they’re not attempting to brush the child’s teeth or even sometimes flossing the child’s teeth, then by the time they come in at 3, they can have problems.” Ideally, a child’s first visit to the dentist is a positive experience, which can depend on the child’s upbringing. “If the parents don’t mind the dentist and they’ve had a good experience, their kids usually follow right in the same pattern. I look at our children bringing their children. It’s like ... no big deal,” he said, noting that some of his patients today are the grandchildren of the boys and girls who were his patients when he started his practice. Occasionally, a child is so distraught on that first visit that the dentist can’t do much but talk. “It’s usually a process of building confidence,” Wheelock said. His wife, Marilyn Wheelock, the office manager, said sometimes kids come to the office for what they call “a chair ride” on that first visit. They sit in the chair, go up and down, see how easy it is, then go home before returning for their first


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Dr. Douglas Wheelock examines Noah McWilliams, 11, at Wheelock-Bursick Dentistry.

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official sit-down. “They call them practice visits,” she said. “They show them the bib and the little squirter, the water, and they don’t do anything. Then they go home. They’re really shy little things sometimes. It’s very important that you start your dental care young. It’s crucial.” But Dr. Wheelock has yet to be bitten by a child, at least deliberately. “Sometimes, we ask them to open and they get confused and they close instead of open. But it’s not a deliberate thing. They’re not trying to get me,” he said. Children still get rewards, too, for being good patients. They get prizes like rings, removable tattoos and stickers, but no candy.

Dr. Douglas Wheelock examines Noah McWilliams, 11, at Wheelock-Bursick Dentistry.

PROBLEM AREAS “We don’t pull many teeth here at all,” Wheelock said. “One of the reasons is that we really strive to do everything we can do to save teeth. But sometimes we’re in enough of a situation when they come in and things are so bad that they can’t be saved. And in those cases, yes, sometimes they do need to be removed.” A common problem with younger patients or pre-patients is Milk Bottle Syndrome, which can involve some serious

tooth decay, especially in the front areas, he said. “It is not good to put a child to bed with a bottle, even with milk,” he said, “because the sugars in milk can be turned into acid and over a period of time they can develop what is called Milk Bottle Syndrome.” Sugar also remains the biggest problem for teenagers, Wheelock noted, “and the fact that many times they don’t see the value in spending the time to brush and floss their teeth. Cavities and gingivitis and all sorts of things result.” In recent years, a new tooth terror has emerged in the teen world: Pierced tongues and pierced lips. “One of the issues is the chance of getting infections in those piercings, and it can be quite a nasty deal once that does happen,” Wheelock said. “And if they’re using metal studs, especially in the tongue, they tend to tap those against their teeth. Over a period of time, they can actually loosen the teeth. “And then the other issue is sometimes they actually bite them and break or chip their teeth. There are a number of things that can go wrong when they have those piercings. I would discourage them from a dental standpoint.”

Spring Cleaning Safety As the weather begins to warm and thoughts turn to open windows and time spent outdoors, many families undertake the time-honored ritual of spring cleaning. It can involve anything from clearing winter’s debris from your lawn to major renovations, but it is important to remember to work safely during all of your spring cleaning activities. There are some simple steps you can take to ensure that you are protecting yourself, your family, and the environment. Ladders can be hazardous when not used properly. In many cases, accidents and injuries occur while using ladders because they are improperly placed, not secured, not the right size for the job, or the user overreaches. When working with ladders always remember to: • Read and follow all warning labels that are on the ladder • Use ladders only on solid, stable and level surfaces • Keep your body centered on the ladder; never let your belly button pass either side rail • Never stand on the top two rungs of a 42

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step ladder • Only use a step ladder in a fully opened and locked position; never use it while it is closed, partially opened or leaning on a structure • Protect yourself from electrical hazards and do not work within 10 feet of overhead power lines Spring cleaning often involves moving heavy objects such as couches, tables, entertainment consoles and bookcases—a situation where a serious injury can occur. In order to eliminate the risk of objects falling and to lift items safely, always have another person help you. More tips for lifting heavy objects include: • Get close to the load • Maintain an upright posture from the waist up • Lift with your legs, not your arms or back • Pivot on your feet, don’t twist from your waist Using chemicals during cleaning can post a hazard to not only yourself, but also the environment. Read the labels of all chemicals you are using and follow all

SIOUXLAND LIFE

the recommended safety practices. These may include: wearing protective gear such as gloves and goggles, not mixing the substance with other cleaners, opening windows for ventilation, and following proper disposal guidelines. Finally, before you use any tools or equipment while cleaning up your yard, make sure you have maintained them in proper working condition and in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations. Have your lawnmower serviced yearly, never remove guards or safety devices, and wear appropriate eye, body and hearing protection. For more information on home maintenance, visit www.nahb.org.

Bob Wilcke President Bob Wilcke Construction

712-255-3852 www.hbags.com


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ask a professional Q: Doctor, what’s the best way to prevent any injuries from running?

A: First of all, congratulations on taking care of your

health! Besides losing weight, running can also improve your concentration, memory, and cardiovascular health, as well as shape and tone your body. Additionally, studies have shown that bodies “in motion” tend to stay “in motion”. Keeping your body moving, tuned up, and in shape will help you retain your ability to stay active as you age. There are 4 things to remember to help prevent injuries from running. The first is to have a solid foundation, your feet. While running, that foundation supports forces up to Dr. Joel 3-5x of your body weight. That means if you weigh 150 Pistello, DC pounds, your feet each need to support, sustain, and move 450-750 pounds of pressure each step. Now, the body has a unique system of arches in your feet to support your body’s movements, and each of those arches is comprised of 26 bones, 33 joints, and over 100 ligaments. If you don’t support those arches with a proper shoe, you can cause injuries in your feet such as plantar fasciitis, sesamoiditis, heel spurs, shin splints, and stress fractures, as well as low back, hip, and knee pain. Be sure and get to a shoe store and have one of their staff suggest a supportive running shoe, and have them work with you to ensure a proper fit. The second is to gradually work up to running longer, further, and faster. Start gradually and work up to your goal. A good start is 20 minutes a day of running, at average speed. Don’t focus on the distance, focus first on time, and pay attention to your form. As you get tired, you lose proper form, which can set you up for an injury much quicker that when you are using proper running form. Increase your speed as you feel able, and increase time & distance 10% per week. The third is stretching: develop stretching protocols you can do consistently and be sure to include your low back, hamstrings, quads, and calves. Fourth and foremost: do not work through pain. Pain is a warning sign and is not normal. Some discomfort is to be expected, especially if you have just started a workout routine. However if in doubt, get it checked out! You know your body better than anyone else; don’t ignore anything it’s telling you. If while you are running you experience any pain in your lower extremities, back, or even neck, be sure and schedule an appointment with us to take a look at your feet. A simple non-invasive foot scan can demonstrate imbalances in your feet that are transferred up your body as you run. Take care and can’t wait to see you out on the trails!

Call 276-4325 today for an appointment

3930 Stadium Drive. (Between Wal-Mart & Explorer Stadium)

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HEALTH Home

health care

Home health care aide JoAnn Andersen does light housekeeping for Claudine Dirks, 90, at Dirks’ Sioux City apartment.

HOME HEALTH CARE

s

CAN BE A VIABLE OPTION Text by Joanne Fox | Photograph by Tim Hynds

SWALLOWING YOUR PRIDE AND admitting you need help is no easy task for many senior citizens. Claudine Dirks is not one of those folks. “I was having trouble in my back muscles with vacuuming about three years ago,” the 90-year-old confessed. “That’s when I decided I needed home health care.” Dirks opted to use a home health agency for some of her needs, not all of which are health-related, such as vacuuming. “Some things I still can do,” she insisted. “Things like the dishes and keeping 44

APRIL 2012

the apartment clean. But other things, I realized I needed help with.” Home is where we feel most comfortable and independent. However, many times “home” is the only thing on one’s mind when being released from a hospital. Sometimes patients mistakenly believe they can handle everything by themselves, explained Karen Vlach, director of Mercy Medical Center’s Home Care. “When patients balk at the idea of having some help when they return home, we explore their questions and concerns about having home care,” she said. “We explain what home care is and

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how it can help them succeed in being independent at home.” Vlach noted that patients can become very creative when they wish to sidestep the idea of assistance. “They say, ‘I am doing fine.’ ‘I have family and friends around.’ ‘I have always done it myself and will continue to do so.’ ‘There are people worse off than me.’ ‘I don’t want strangers in my house.’ ‘My house is a mess.’,” she said. There are even times when “help” is heard as “hospice,” the term used with care for terminally ill patients. “We have not heard ‘help’ specifically confused with ‘hospice,’” Vlach clarified.


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“People are unaware of what skilled home care is and how it benefits them. Home health care is more cost-effective than hospital, skilled and nursing facility care.” KAREN VLACH Home Care director, Mercy Medical Center

bland is a choice

Doctor’s Appreciation Day 2012 Doctor’s Appreciation Day 2012

Robert E. Anderson, M.D.

Paul E. Johnson, M.D.

Craig R. Nemechek, M.D.

William A. Rizk, M.D.

Keith A. Vollstedt, M.D.

Lawrence T. Volz, M.D.

Michael L. Wolpert, M.D.

Tareq S. Khairalla, M.D.

Michelle L. Daffer M.D.

Life-saving. Expert. Reassuring.

Life-saving. Expert. Reassuring.

Patients and families at Midlands Clinic use these words to describe the doctors who make life better for them. On Doctor’s Appreciation Day, we honor our physicians along side our patients for the quality, patient-centered healthcare they provide each day.

Check out our new gourmet food and spice shop!

Patients and families at Midlands Clinic use these words to describe the doctors who make life better for them. On Doctor’s General • Endocrinology • Dermatology AppreciationSurgery Day, we honor our physicians along side our patients 605.217.5500 • www.midlandsclinic.com Sioux Pointthey Rd • Suite 100 • Dakota Dunes for the quality, patient-centered• 705 healthcare provide each day.

Premium ingredients for high quality taste.

705 Sioux Point Rd. • Suite 100 Dakota Dunes • 605.217.5500 www.midlandsclinic.com 405 Wesley Parkway 712.258.7790 405 Wesley Parkway • Sioux City, IA www.palmercandy.com 712.258.7790 • www.palmercandy.com

General Surgery • Endocrinology • Dermatology SIOUXLAND LIFE

APRIL 2012

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“But frequently people coincide ‘help’ with ‘failing health’ and then may refuse assistance.” “It makes sense,” Kathie Petrie, branch manager for Recover Health, a Medicarecertified home health agency that provides a full range of in-home services, said. “Patients are so thrilled to be going home after hospitalization that when home health care is suggested, they may think it means end-of-life care, which usually is nowhere near their situation.” Home health services may include nursing care, physical, occupational, speech and respiratory therapies, but may also include assistance with personal care and daily activities by home health aides. “We make living easier and more comfortable for people recovering from hospitalization or surgery, those with special medical physical or behavioral needs and those with chronic illnesses,” explained Petrie. “Our mission is to create relationships that make a meaningful difference in other people’s lives.” Dirks is a client of Recover Health and an exuberant cheerleader for home health care. “I tell others about how great it is,” she said. “It’s certainly a better alternative than a nursing home.” A year ago, Dirks decided to have a nurse visit her on a regular basis, taking her blood pressure, checking her weight, listening to her heart and lungs and setting up her medications. Recover Health’s JoAnn Andersen, Dirks’ home health aide, helps with her personal needs. “This is not a job,” Andersen insisted. “I’m here to build a relationship with Claudine. I enjoy helping her, but I also consider her a friend.” “I miss her when she’s not here,” Dirks interjected. “She’s just a lot of fun to be around.” The goal of home care is to keep the patient as independent as possible in their own home with appropriate services, Vlach pointed out. “People are unaware of what skilled home care is and how it benefits them,” she said. “Home health care is more costeffective than hospital, skilled and nursing facility care.” The repercussions of refusing home health care will vary from case to case, but there are several worse-case scenarios. “A patient may fall, suffering an injury that would complicate their care ending up in a nursing facility,” Vlach said. “They may take their medications incorrectly or 46

APRIL 2012

“This is not a job. I’m here to build a

relationship with Claudine. I enjoy helping her, but I also consider her a friend.” JOANN ANDERSEN Home Health Care nurse

not at all. They may not get the nutrition they need. They may not follow up with their physicians. They may not understand their disease process and end up with all of the above.” Research indicates patients are most at risk when transitioning between different levels of care. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, up to 35 percent of patients who go home without home care will be readmitted to the hospital. Some patients and family are not aware that home care services are

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covered by Medicare, Medicaid and the majority of private insurance carriers. “Recover Health also participates in waiver services that may involve the elderly, ill and/or handicapped,” Petrie said. “A growing area of care for us is those with diabetes. We anticipate those numbers will continue to rise.” “Many people think that home care is only for the elderly,” Vlach added. “But patients of all ages are served depending on their skilled need such as IV antibiotics for infections, physical therapy for post-surgical care and other situations.”


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PARTING SHOT By

Bruce Miller

COLONOSCOPY TIME IF I EVER GET the bug to invent something, it’s going to be a What you don’t realize is the drink makes you “go” at the tasty liquid that you can drink before a colonoscopy. most unlikely times. You could be on the phone and, suddenly, The stuff they’ve got now is vile and should be labeled as you just run. By the time I got to the hospital, I was sure there such. Trust me. I’ve had three colonoscopies and, each time, I was no “go” left but, sure enough, there was. dread the drink more than the flood that follows. And considering I usually sanitize a restroom before I use it, Now if you’ve never had a colonoscopy, it goes something it took a lot of willpower to ignore my OCD tendencies and just like this: 1. You starve for a day. 2. You drink the vile liquid (that run. you can’t choke down). 3. You spend the night in the bathroom. By the time I was ready for the check-up, I wondered if oth4. You go to the hospital where they put you to sleep. 5. You ers were as conscientious. (What I learned: No. Big accidents wake up and eat The Best can happen and others Toast Ever. have to clean up...which, I Simple, right? There’s no assume, does not go down Katie Couric chit-chatting in well.) between (or, if there is, you Everything went as have no clue what you said planned. After the toast, and I don’t think it would I went home, took a long hold up in a court of law). nap and, when I awoke, You just drink, go to the ate everything I could find. bathroom (a lot) and sleep. Surprisingly, the magneThe hard work is done by sium citrate doesn’t flush someone else. calories out of your system. Now that I’m a three-time I weighed before and after veteran (there should be a and there wasn’t any signifiprize for that and, no, I’m cant change. not that old … I just have a I was also told that I family history of colon cancouldn’t drive for a day. cer), I know the drill. I can see why. Because I can’t get past the taste of the sedation, you’re kind of the magnesium citrate (as of balmy. You know what it’s officially called) so, this you’re doing – you just aren’t time, I decided to lace it with sure why. So, naturally, I Jell-O. Sort of a Jell-O shots, emceed a fundraiser that kind of thing. I polished off night and made it home OK. six containers of Jell-O while When I got home, I realized drinking two bottles of the I had lost something in my stuff and, still, I can’t get house. Instead of going to the drink’s taste out of my bed, I decided to “find” it. mouth. The bottle says it’s For four hours, I turned the “lime-flavored” but, really, place upside down. I went to if limes tasted this awful bed and, at 2:30, decided to tequila would have found a look some more. By the time better partner years ago. I actually found it – at 9:30 People always say “put it a.m. – the house looked like on ice,” too, like that’s going a scene from “Hoarders.” to cut the taste. It’s cooler, I was so exhausted, I not better. And when you get spent most of the afternoon Journal photo by Bruce Miller down to the last inch of the in bed. When I finally got up, Magnesium citrate and Jell-O, a perfect combination. stuff, you convince yourself I stumbled to the kitchen most of the ice melted, so and there – on the counter – you can just throw the rest was my old friend, the bottle away. of magnesium citrate. But beware. If you’re not “clear” by the time they’re ready to It was a reminder of my wild weekend of Jell-O shots, blackdo the probe, you’ll get more. Never, in my life, have I gone to outs and manic activity. the bathroom and had someone say beforehand, “don’t flush.” Producers of “Hangover, Part III”: I’ve got the perfect plot for That’s to check if you were lying about the two bottles. you.

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Connoisseur

Reflect your own personal style. 715 East Ninth Street South Sioux City, NE 68776

402-494-5411

Siouxland Life Magazine - April 2012  

A guide for living in Siouxland

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