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YOUR GUIDE TO LIVING ACTIVE, REWARDING LIVES www.siouxlandprime.com | December 2016

Smart cars Tech may help steer older drivers down safer road | Page 4

John Deere Historic Site tells story of plow inventor. | 10

November 2016 | 1


2 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com


Index

Where Comfort,

Publisher | Steve Griffith Editor | Bruce Miller

Quality & Value Meet.

Advertising Manager | Nancy Todd ©2016 The Sioux City Journal. Prime is published monthly by the Sioux City Journal. For advertising information, please call (712) 224-6285. For editorial information, please call (712) 293-4273.

YOUR GUIDE TO LIVING ACTIVE, REWARDING LIVES

PO Box 3616 Sioux City, Iowa 51102 712-293-4250

60 Years of Experience

Calendar ...................... 13 Local Services ............ 17 Puzzles.......................... 7 Senior Activities .......... 16 Terry’s Turn................... 9 Travel .......................... 10

On the cover This photo rendering shows Volvo Cars’ City Safety feature in one of their XC90 SUVs. City Safety features pedestrian and cyclist detection with full auto brake, day and night. Photo by Volvo Cars, via AP. Page 4

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December 2016 | 3


Technology

Tech may help steer older drivers down a safer road to become standard features in all cars on U.S. roads. SAN FRANCISCO — Better technology, of Older drivers may soon be traveling a safer road course, can help prevent drivers of all ages from thanks to smarter cars getting into accidents. that can detect oncoming traffic, steer clear of But those in their 70s trouble and even hit the and older are more likely to become confused at brakes when a collision heavily trafficked interappears imminent. sections and on-ramps. A few of these innoAging also frequently vations, such as blindlimits a body’s range spot warning systems, of motion, making it are already built in more difficult to scan all or offered as optional around for nearby vehifeatures in some vehicles and other hazards. cles, primarily in more And older drivers tend expensive models. to be more fragile than But more revolutiontheir younger counterary breakthroughs are expected in the next few parts, suffering more serious injuries in trafyears, when measures such as robotic braking fic accidents. “Anything that reducsystems are supposed BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE Associated Press‌

es the likelihood or severity of a collision is really a technology that is primed for helping tomorrow’s older adults,” says Bryan Reimer, research scientist for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s AgeLab and associate director of the New England University Transportation Center. “We are moving toward an ecosystem where older adults will increasingly be supported by the technology Volvo Cars, via AP that may help enhance This photo shows Volvo Cars’ Park Assist System in one of their XC90 SUVs. The system their mobility.” supports the driver during parking. The function expresses audible and visible output to help the driver to determine the distance to stationary and moving objects during parking. It uses four front and four rear ultrasonic sensors positioned symmetrically left to right on the front and rear bumper. Additional four sensors are positioned at the front and rear wheel housing PLEASE SEE CARS, PAGE 6 to scan the side of the vehicle.

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Cars

er The Hartford and MIT AgeLab. In an indication that priorities are shifting, only FROM PAGE 4 one-third of the surveyed 50-and-older drivers who Automakers are rolling bought a car during the past out more technology just as the first members of the cul- two years focused on safety ture-shifting Baby Boom gen- technology. The push to engineer eration turn 70 this year. By 2030, the U.S. Census Bureau self-driving cars has helped heighten awareness about the expects there will be nearly role technology can play in 54 million people who are 70 or older living in the country, eliminating the human error that causes most accidents. up from about 31 million in Google, now part of 2014. Alphabet Inc., ignited the About 80 percent of that self-driving car research group is expected to be seven years ago when it licensed to drive, based on current trends, and that ratio began working on autonomous vehicles in a secret could rise even higher if technology lets elderly people laboratory. Now, most autoremain behind the wheel and makers and other major techpreserve a sense of independ- nology companies, including Apple and Uber, are also ence longer. working on self-driving techThe presence of safety technology will be a key con- nology, though there is still wide disagreement over when sideration for three-fourths robotic chauffeurs will be of the drivers older than 50 ready — and legally cleared who plan to buy a car in the — to assume sole responsinext two years, according to a recent survey by auto insur- bility for navigating public

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roads. Google aims to have its fully autonomous vehicles cruising around by 2020. That objective is considered too ambitious by many auto industry executives and experts who believe self-driving cars are a decade or more away from becoming a reality. In the meantime, plenty of other technology should be widely available for older drivers. Earlier this year, the auto industry vowed to make automated emergency brakes a standard feature by September 2022, but it won’t be that long before the technology is widely available. Toyota plans to build it into most models, including its Lexus brand, by the end of next year. Cameras on a dashboard screen that show what’s behind the car have become commonplace in recent years and will be mandatory on all

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new cars by May 2018. The equipment is expected to be especially helpful for older drivers with a limited range of motion. Other technology expected to assist older drivers includes automated parking, and adaptive headlights that swivel in the same direction as the steering wheel and adjust the beams’ intensity depending on driving conditions and oncoming traffic. Robotic systems that temporarily assist with highway driving already are available, most notably in Tesla Motors’ high end Model S. The electric-car maker released its Autopilot feature last fall, prompting some Model S owners to entrust more of the driving to the robot than Tesla recommends while the system is still in testing mode. For instance, some drivers have posted pictures of themselves reading a newspaper or book with the Model S on

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Autopilot, or even sitting in the back seat. In May, an Ohio man was killed when a Model S in Autopilot mode crashed into the side of a tractor-trailer while traveling 9 mph above the speed limit on a highway near Gainesville, Florida. Federal investigators are looking into the cause. Highly publicized incidents like that may make it more difficult to persuade older drivers to trust the technology coming to their cars. Older drivers also will need help understanding its benefits and how to use it, says Dale Rife, senior adviser to AARP. To help, AARP is planning to put more focus on car technology in its 37-year-old driver safety programs. “This evolution is going to accelerate in the next few years,” Rife predicts, “but people fear what they don’t understand. And if they don’t understand it, they will just avoid it.”

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Hall Monument Hall Monument Company has been located in Sioux City, Iowa since 1926. Our office offers a large indoor showroom displaying more than seventy-five memorials. Hall Monument has a new manager, his name is Verne Climer. Verne and Shirley Peters are here to assist you and your family with a memorial solution to meet your needs. Hall Monument Company designs and

produces memorials, granite and bronze, for all cemeteries in the tri-state area. Through the ages the creation of a memorial has been one of the most important forms of remembrance. Personalize, “To personify, to make personal, to ascribe personal qualities to”, this is how Webster’s describes the term and its definition is never more apparent than when describing the “personalization” of a monument. Did the person being memorialized have a special love in their life, hobby, maybe a favorite poem? If the memorial is for yourself, is there a certain way you wish to be remembered? Modern technology allows the memorialist through shape, texture, image and inscription to create a personalized and unique monument. Modern technology also allows a monument to be designed in literally any

shape that you can envision. Whether it is freeform, entwined hearts, or a special object, your choice in shape and design is limitless. Remember, monument designs can be classic or contemporary. The choice is yours to make. Hall Monument uses techniques such as sandblasting, shape carving, laser and hand etching to achieve the design that best reflects your individual and personal preferences.

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Terry’s Turn

Christmas Past, with non-plastic ornaments It’s Christmas time once again and I’ve been digging out all the decorations getting ready for the big day. I went down in the basement and found all the stuff where they’ve been languishing for a year, pulled out the plastic tree from its cardboard box, dug out the plastic ornaments, the plastic Nativity set and the plastic star to go on top of the plastic tree. Then I unpacked my talking Christmas Terry Turner tree and dancing turnert185@outlook.com Santa, which of course are also plastic, and the whole collection was marked, “Made in China.” As I looked at that pitiful collection of synthetic decorations, I thought back to years ago when Christmas wasn’t nearly as artificial in so many ways as it is today. We didn’t buy a lot of decorations back then. We made them. Just before Christmas break every year we’d make decorations and Christmas cards in school. One of my favorites was the colorful chains made out of construction paper. I’d carefully cut strips of construction paper and glue the ends together with white glue to form a chain. I remember the kid next to me always ate some of that white glue. I never developed a taste for it myself. We also made ornaments to hang on the tree and one year we even made a star to go on top. But not all our decorations were made at school. We made some at home too. Sometimes I made more construc

tion paper chains but we always had other chains. These were made of popcorn. My mother would melt a couple of large spoonfuls of lard in her cast iron skillet, then carefully place one kernel of corn in the center of the pan and wait for it to pop. It would pop out of the skillet and I’d try to catch it. She’d cover the bottom of the pan with popcorn and then shake it to keep it from burning. I loved it when she put in too much corn and the lid would rise above the rim of the skillet. Once the popcorn was made, my brother and I would each get a bowl, a needle and thread, and we’d proceed to make strings of popcorn to hang on the tree. I think we probably ate more popcorn than we strung on the tree, but somehow we managed to get some popcorn strings hung on the tree. Once the tree was decorated there was one final item to add. Our mother would dig out the icicles that were saved from the previous Christmas. These were aluminum foil cut in very thin strips. My brother, sister and I draped the icicles on the tree, and then our dad topped the tree with a giant star. All was ready. Dad would then plug in the lights and we all stood back in awe of the beautiful sight. Those simpler days when we made our own decorations are long gone as is the simpler celebration of Christmas. But maybe we can bring back some of that true Christmas spirit by getting rid of all those plastic decorations and string some popcorn. At least it’s worth a try. Terry Turner is a Prime writer who can be reached at turnert185@outlook.com.

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Travel

Terry Turner photos

The entrance to the John Deere Historic Site in Grand Detour, Ill.

John Deere Historic Site tells story of plow inventor, businessman

BY TERRY TURNER‌

GRAND DETOUR, Ill. – The worldwide John Deere empire began in a simple blacksmith shop in the little town of Grand Detour. That historic site has been preserved and is now a museum telling the amazing story of one man and an idea for a

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better plow. John Deere was born in Rutland, Vermont, on Feb. 7, 1804. When John was just 4 years old, his father left the family and went to England hoping for a better life. He was never heard from again. John and his five siblings were raised by their mother. John developed an early

interest in working with his hands and at 17 he became a blacksmith’s apprentice. Just four years later he set up his first blacksmith shop and for the next 12 years plied his trade in various towns around Vermont. But Deere fell on hard times and closed his shop. He was deeply in debt and with four children and

another on the way, he didn’t know how he would support his growing family. So like his father he left his family in search of a better life. In 1836 his friend Leonard Andrus told him the town of Grand Detour, Illinois, was growing rapidly, and the nearest blacksmith was 40 miles away. Deere moved to

Grand Detour and was busy right from the start. Kathy, a tour guide at the John Deere Historic Site, said Deere saw a problem with the plows being used by local farmers and found a solution. “The plows they were using were made in the East. The plows were made of cast iron and the soil here would stick


to the plows,” said Kathy. She said Deere knew there had to be a better way and set out to find it. In the East, the soil is light and sandy. Because the thick, black prairie soil of Illinois stuck to the plow blade, farmers had to stop every few yards and scrape the blade clean, making for slow and frustrating work. “John Deere was visiting a friend at his sawmill and noticed an old saw blade,” said Kathy. “He wondered if that steel blade would make a good plow.” Deere took the blade, removed the teeth, polished it and shaped it into a plow. It worked and he gave his new design to a local farmer to try. The farmer loved it, and in 1840 Deere sold 40 plows. Farmers said the John Deere plow cut so smoothly through the soil it made a “singing sound.” They dubbed the new implement the “singing plow.” After this initial success, Deere teamed with friend Leonard Andrus and formed the company Andrus and Deere. By 1846 production soared to 1,000. In order to be closer to river power for his factory, Deere moved to Moline, Illinois, in 1848 and took on new partners to form John Deere and Company. The business continued to succeed and grow, but Deere wanted to own the company, and in the late 1850s he did. The John Deere Company then began to branch out into making other types of farm equipment. When most people today think of John Deere they think of tractors, but Kathy said Deere never saw one. “John Deere died before the company started making tractors.” In 1963 an archaeological team excavated the original site where John Deere forged his first self-cleaning plow. The site has been carefully documented and pre

Kathy, a tour guide at the John Deere Historic Site, explains the history of the site where John Deere began his career as a blacksmith.

A statue of John Deere working at his anvil is on the grounds of the John Deere Historic Site.

served so visitors can see where Deere had his first blacksmith shop. The archaeologists found the footings for the buildings and marked off the area. A building was constructed over the site to preserve it, and a museum in the building houses the many artifacts that were uncovered during the excavation. Also on the grounds of the site is an operating blacksmith shop where demonstrations of the art of blacksmithing are conducted daily. Eric, a blacksmith at the John Deere Historic Site, said that in days gone by the blacksmith was an important part of rural life. “The blacksmith not only fixed things like wagon wheels but he also made a lot of what fami-

The blacksmith shop at the John Deere Historic Site has a working blacksmith giving demonstrations.

If you go What: John Deere Historic Site Where: Grand Detour, Illinois, at 8393 S. Main St. Hours and Admission: Open Wednesday through Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from May 1 to October 31. Admission is $5 for those 12 and older. More Info: Call (815) 652-4551 or email JohnDeereHistoricSite@JohnDeere. com

lies used every day.” During a demonstration Eric made several decorative items used by people in the 1800s such as a portion of a fence gate.

Eric, a blacksmith at the John Deere Historic Site, points to some of the items made in his shop.

The original John Deere boarded apprentice blackhome built in 1836 is near smiths in the six-room home. the blacksmith shop. It was here John and his wife raised Not far from the home is their eight children and the gift shop, where items

forged in the blacksmith shop are for sale along with clothing, hats and other John Deere memorabilia. December 2016 | 11


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Calendar THROUGH DEC. 3 2016 NAIA Volleyball Championship, Tyson Events Center, 401 Gordon Drive. See the best in NAIA women’s volleyball as teams compete for the national championship title! Tickets on sale at the Tyson Events Center Box Office, online at www.etix. com or by calling 800-514-3849. For more information and to preregister, visit www.NAIANetwork. com. THROUGH DEC. 4 Sioux City Art Center Selects, Sioux City Art Center, 225 Nebraska St. Sioux City Art Center Selects is a regional juried exhibition, open to all artists in Iowa, as well artists living within 300 miles of Sioux City. Closed Mondays and holidays. 10 a.m.9 p.m. 712-279-6272. www. siouxcityartcenter.org/. THROUGH DEC. 22 Santa’s House, Santa’s House, 416 Jackson St. Weekly hours are 10-4 p.m. Saturday, Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday and 6 to 8 p.m.

Tuesday and Thursday. Dec. 6 is special needs day - hearing impaired in the morning and other-needs children 3:30-5 p.m. 6 p.m.-8 p.m. 712-279-3220. THROUGH JAN. 8 A Photo Album of Ireland, Sioux City Public Museum, 607 Fourth St. Images reveal details about how people lived, worked, and gathered that official historical records may have overlooked. This traveling exhibit is a program of ExhibitsUSA, a national division of Mid-America Arts Alliance and The National Endowment for the Arts. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 712-2796174. siouxcitymuseum.org/. THROUGH FEB. 5 The LeGrand Collection: A Regional Reflection, Sioux City Art Center, 225 Nebraska St. This exhibition will feature a significant portion of the nearly fifty artworks in the donation from Ritch LeGrand. Closed Mondays and Holidays 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 712-2796272. www.siouxcityartcenter. org/.

THROUGH MAY 28 ”Korea Remembered” photo exhibit, Betty Strong Encounter Center, 900 Larsen Park Road. A photo exhibit honoring Siouxland veterans of the Korean War culminating of The Journal’s 20-part series, “Korea: Forgotten war remembered,” produced by Journal newsroom staff. 712-2245242. www.siouxcitylcic.com . DEC. 1 Let’s Support Our Siouxland Troops, Support Siouxland Troops, 1551 Indian Hills Dr. Suite 102. Joins us by collecting these items to be sent to our deployed Siouxland Troops. Beef jerky, baby wipes, power bars, tuna pouches, protein snacks, Slim Jims, tooth brushes, toothpaste, sunflower seeds, pop-top soup, travel size games, drink mix, thumb drives, crossword puzzles, small water guns, new magazines. Call or e-mail the contacts to schedule a drop off. siouxlandtroops@gmail. com, 712-281-4217. Grief Share, Sunnybrook

Community Church, 5601 Sunnybrook Drive. Grief Share helps group members apply biblical principles to the healing process after the death of a loved one. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $15. 712-276-5814. www. sunnybrookchurch.org. Divorce Care, Sunnybrook Community Church, 5601 Sunnybrook Drive, Sioux City. Divorce Care helps group members apply biblical principles as they heal from the hurt of separation and divorce. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $15. 712-276-5814. www. sunnybrookchurch.org. DEC. 2 – DEC. 3 You Go Show & Funky Junk show, Sioux City Convention Center, 801 Fourth Street . Two days of shopping, fun and entertainment 1-7 p.m. DEC. 2 Go Mad Murder Mystery Dinner, Marina Inn, 385 E 4th St, South Sioux City. A Murder Mystery Dinner set during the 50’s will be hosted by the Sioux

City Growth Organization. Cocktail hour at 6 p.m. along with silent auction items to be bid on. Dinner and mystery begin at 7 p.m. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the The Food Bank of Siouxland. 6 p.m. $50 per person or $90 per couple. www.siouxcitygo.com. Christmas at Morningside, Eppley Auditorium, 3625 Garretson Ave. Morningside College presents its 21st annual Christmas at Morningside concert, featuring performances by several Morningside College choral and instrumental ensembles and the Siouxland Master Chorale. 7:30 p.m. 712-274-5320. https://www. morningside.edu/. DEC. 2 – DEC. 18 Calendar Girls, Sioux City Community Theatre, 1401 Riverside Blvd. Based on the true story of eleven WI members who posed nude for a calendar to raise money for the Leukemia Research Fund.. Shows 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. 7:30 p.m. $18 adults, $15

December 2016 | 13


students, $12 children ages 3-12, children under 3 are free. 712233-2719. www.SCCTheatre.org. DEC. 3 Winter Fun Day and Artist Open House, Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center, 4500 Sioux River Road. Join us for a fun day of winter activities including a craft to create for holiday gifts, snowshoeing or hiking and other fun indoor and outdoor activities. Dress appropriately and join us for some family fun! Free! Area artists will also have their artwork on display and available to purchase. 712-258-0838. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. www.woodburyparks.org. Koated Kernels Holiday Open House, Jolly Time Koated Kernels, 1717 Terminal Dr. Join us for FREE samples of our specialty popcorn, special deals and activities for the kids. 10 a.m.3 p.m. 712-560-6973. www. koatedkernels.com. Lutefisk and Meatballs Dinner, St. Paul Lutheran Church, 31903 475th Avenue, Elk Point, SD. Menu: Lutefisk with either melted butter or cream sauce, Meatballs, potatoes, green beans, Lefse, Flatbread, Swedish Rye Bread, Herring, Sweet Soup, Krum Kaka and Rosettes. A chartered bus is available for a “Dinner and Bus” combo at $20 each. Carry outs available; handicapped accessible. 4 p.m.7:30 p.m. $15 . 712-277-4043. Jill Miller Christmas, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St. Jill will be performing her 10th Christmas show for Sunrise Retirement Community’s annual fundraiser. She will bring the music of her latest CD, King of Kings among other fan favorites! 7 p.m. $20, kids 12 & under free.

Choral Celebration: “A Briar Cliff Christmas”, Bishop Heelan High School - Fine Arts Building, 1018 Grandview Blvd. Kick off the holiday season with “A Briar Cliff Christmas,” Siouxland’s premier choral-orchestral celebration of the season. 7:30 p.m. www. briarcliff.edu. DEC. 3 & DEC. 10 Santa’s Whistle Stop Tour, Sioux City Railroad Museum,

3400 Sioux River Road. Santa will arrive via caboose at 12:30 p.m. and leave at 3:45 p.m. Bring out the kids to see and talk to Santa and get your pictures taken and hear a reading of “The Polar Express.” Dress warm and take a nice winter time motor car ride, it’s our version of a Christmas time horse and sleigh ride. Noon-4 p.m. Freewill donation. 712-233-6996.

accompany the exhibit. 2 p.m. www.briarcliff.edu. Winter Festival, Sergeant Bluff Community Center, 903 Topaz Dr, Sergeant Bluff, Iowa. High school band members provide music for the event. Crafts available for you to buy one-of-a-kind gifts for Christmas. Food and fun for all. 3-6 p.m. DEC. 5 Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St. Enchant the whole family with larger than life magical props, a 60 foot growing Christmas tree and spectacular Russian-made costumes and sets. A must-see event, witness the world’s best dancers on stage in Sioux City! 7 p.m. DEC. 9 Newsboys, Tyson Events Center, 401 Gordon Drive. With special guests Hawk Nelson and Ryan Stevenson. 7 p.m. 800-5143849. tysoncenter.com. DEC. 10 Paracord Bracelet workshop, Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center, 4500 Sioux River Road. Make a Chain Sinnet paracord survival bracelet. This design is made for “quick deployment” if you need to use the cord in an siouxcityrailroadmuseum.org/. emergency situation. Cost is $5 DEC. 4 per bracelet. Pre-registration Senior Art Exhibition & is appreciated by calling 712Reception: Dominique Williams, 258-0838 or email tflammang@ Briar Cliff University - Clausen Art woodburycountyiowa.gov. 9:30 Gallery, 3303 Rebecca St. Enjoy a.m.-11 a.m. $5 each. www. a new exhibition and reception at woodburyparks.org. Clausen Art Gallery, as a senior Woodbury County Genealogy art major showcases work from Society, First Presbyterian the past four years. A reception Church, 608 Nebraska St. for the artist, held in the Stark Woodbury County Genealogy Student Center lobby, will

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TTY#800-735-2943. • Call (712) 279-6900 • Equal Housing Opportunity

Evergreen Terrace


Society February Meeting10 a.m. class: Census Forms; 11:15 Business Meeting; 11:30 Program: 1840 Census, How to show Family Connection. Bring your laptop or Tablet. We will help you find your ROOTS! 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 712-2511241. Kamryn’s Christmas Drive, Unity Point Health-St Luke’s, 2720 Stone Park Blvd. Items we will be collecting: individual boxes of 8 or 16 crayons, character coloring books, match box cars, blankets, stuffed animals and board books. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. https://www.facebook.com/ events/983235971823004/. 81st Annual Little Yellow Dog auction, Ho-Chunk Centre, 600 4th St. Fundraiser for the Sioux

City Journal’s Mr. Goodfellow Charities, which buys Christmas gifts for local children in need. The All-America Concert Band will begin a program of Christmas music at 11 a.m. and will play throughout the proceedings. Auction begins at noon. Sioux City Musketeers Hockey, Tyson Events Center, 401 Gordon Dr. vs. Lincoln. 7:05 p.m. $9.50$20. 712-224-7825. www. musketeershockey.com/. Sioux City Symphony, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St. The symphony will give a special Christmas performance with the award-winning Native American music group Brule. 8 p.m. Box Office, 712-277-2111. www. siouxcitysymphony.org/.

DEC. 11 All-America Concert Band, Bishop Heelan Fine Arts Center, 1018 Grandview Blvd. Benefits Heelan’s Music Department. Guest conductor Larry Williams. 2:30 p.m. $10. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St. The world’s most famous reindeer and a holly jolly cast of iconic characters including Hermey the Elf, Yukon Cornelius and the Abominable Snow Monster will help Santa save Christmas. 3 p.m. 800-514-ETIX. DEC. 13 Nature Tales, Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center, 4500 Sioux River Road. Pre-schoolers, join us with an adult for this

special story time about bears. We’ll hike too, weather permitting. Please pre-register by calling 712-258-0838 or email tkruid@woodburycountyiowa. gov. 10-11:30 a.m. www. woodburyparks.org. Holidays for our Heroes, Liberty Elementary, 1623 Rebecca St. Holiday meal, groceries and gifts. 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. DEC. 17 Sioux City Musketeers Hockey, Tyson Events Center, 401 Gordon Dr. vs. Sioux Falls. 7:05 p.m. $9.50-$20. 712-224-7825. DEC. 18 Tonic Sol-Fa, Orpheum Theater, 528 Pierce St. Tonic Sol-fa has established itself not only as the most in-demand vocal group in

the Midwest, but also one of the most successful independent acts in America. 7:30 p.m. $31-$37 adults, children 12 and under $11. www.orpheumlive.com. DEC. 28 Waffles for Warriors, Support Siouxland Soldiers, 1551 Indian Hills Dr. Our events are entirely free to attend for all who served and their immediate family members. Please provide proof of service, first come, first served. 9 a.m.-11 a.m. www. supportsiouxlandsoldiers.com. DEC. 31 Sioux City Musketeers Hockey, Tyson Events Center, 401 Gordon Dr. vs. Omaha. 7:05 p.m. $9.50$20. 712-224-7825. www. musketeershockey.com/.

Surgeries

from Head to Toe Don’t put off scheduling that elective surgery any longer. When it comes surgery, everything from head to toe, St. Luke’s is the place to go! Take the first step and schedule an appointment. Here are a few questions to ask yourself before calling: • Are you ready to start your journey to pain free? • Do you want to avoid having to be outside in the cold? Winter is a great time to cozy up at home and recover. • Do you want to have your procedure at Siouxland’s Top Choice for Surgery? With newly renovated surgical suites, a heavily experienced surgical team and the latest equipment – it’s easy to deliver the

best outcome for every patient, every time®.

Contact Us:

UnityPoint Health® – St. Luke’s

2720 Stone Park Blvd. | Sioux City, Iowa 51104 (712) 279-3500

001867a3-1 10/16 CS Copyright ® 2016 UnityPoint Health. All Rights Reserved. ® SM trademarks of UnityPoint Health.

December 2016 | 15


Senior Activities Nutrition program

Dancing; 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Canasta, Woodcarving; 1 p.m. Beginning Bridge Class, Men’s & Women’s Social Group, Inter. Line Dance, Cribbage; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 2: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness with YMCA Instr., Exercise Plus 50; 9:30 a.m. Wii Bowling, Mixed Media Art Class with Vivian Miller, Fitness with Dixie of Recover Health; 10 a.m. Blood Pressures/St. Luke’s; 10:30 a.m. Women’s Pool Shooting Class; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; Noon Basic Tap, Bridge Group; 12:30 p.m. Open Craft Time;1 p.m. Bridge, 500, Friday Dance “Country Brew” Dec. 5: 8 a.m. Scrapbooking; 8:30 a.m. Yoga with Amanda; 9:30 a.m. Poker, Beginning Dup. Bridge Class, Computer Siouxland Center for Active 1-on-1 (Pre-register); 9:45 a.m. Review Tai Generations Chi Class; 10 a.m. Knitting & Crocheting; Siouxland Center for Active Generations, 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge; 11:30 a.m. 313 Cook St., is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Mexican p.m. Monday through Friday. Train; 1 p.m. Christmas Party (Pre-register), WEEKLY CLASSES, PROGRAMS: Pinochle, American Mah Jong, Woodcarving Dec. 1: 8:30 a.m. Penny Bingo; 8:45 Dec. 6: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ a.m. Beg. 1 Line Dance; 9 a.m. Yoga, YMCA Instr., Penny Bingo; 9 a.m. Senior Beginning Bridge II; 9:30 a.m. Drum Circle, Yoga; 9:30 a.m. Painting Class; 10 a.m. Beginning Bridge I: 9:45 a.m. Beg. 2 Line Creative Writing, Walking off the Pounds; Dance; 10 a.m. Book Club, Walking off the 10:15 a.m. Belly Dancing; 10:45 a.m. Pounds, Men’s Club; 11 a.m. Advanced Line Beginning Tai Chi Class; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 Persons 60 years and older, and their spouses may participate in the elderly nutrition program in Siouxland. In Sioux City, meals are served Tuesday-Friday at Riverside Lutheran Church, 1817 Riverside Blvd.; on Monday at Riverside Gardens’ Community Room, 715 Bruner Ave., Fairmount Park, 210 S. Fairmount St., and Centennial Manor, 441 W. Third St. A suggested contribution is $3.75. Reservations are required a day in advance by calling the Sergeant Bluff site at 943-4669 or the Connections Area Agency on Aging nutrition office at 279-6900 ext. 25. For more information about other available meal sites, call 279-6900.

Glaucoma? If you have glaucoma and are considering cataract surgery, you may be eligible to participate in the COMPASS Clinical Study. The study is evaluating an investigational treatment designed to reduce pressure buildup inside the eye, which may help reduce or eliminate the need for glaucoma medications. If you participate, you will receive all study-related eye exams at no cost. In addition, you may be reimbursed for your time and travel.

For more information: Lisa, Study Coordinator, Jones Eye Clinic (712) 239-7045 16 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

p.m. Lunch; 11:45 a.m. Adaptive Aerobics; 12:30 p.m. Tap Class, Penny Bingo; 1 p.m. Scrabble, Balance Class w/YMCA Instr., Painting Class, Pitch; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 7: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr.; 9 a.m. Yoga w/ Dixie of Recover Health, Novice Dup. Bridge Game; 9:30 a.m. Computer 1-on-1 (Pre-register/ Pre-pay), Painting Class; 10 a.m. Chess Group, Sexy & Fit after 40; 10:30 a.m. Talk Show “Retirement and Investment Options;” 10:45 a.m. Guitar Practice; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:30 a.m. Jam Session; 12:30 p.m. Beginning Bridge; 1 p.m. Choreographed Ballroom, Coloring Corner, Painting Class, Scrabble, 500; 2:30 p.m. 1 Mile Walk Warm Up; 3 p.m. Fitness with Kelly Dec. 8: 8:30 a.m. Penny Bingo; 8:45 a.m. Beg. I Line Dance; 9 a.m. Yoga, Beginning Bridge II; 9:30 a.m. Drum Circle, Beginning Bridge I; 9:45 a.m. Beg. 2 Line Dance; 10 a.m. Walking off the Pounds, Men’s Club; 11 a.m. Advanced Line Dance; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Canasta, Penny Bingo, Woodcarving; 1 p.m. Beginning Bridge Class, Men’s & Women’s Social Group, Inter. Line Dance, Cribbage; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 9: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr., Exercise Plus 50; 9:30 a.m. Wii Bowling, Mixed Media Art Class with Vivian Miller, Fitness with Dixie of Recover Health; 10 a.m. Blood Pressures/Mercy; 10:30 a.m. Women’s Pool Shooting Class; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; Noon Basic Tap, Bridge Group; 12:30 p.m. Open Craft Time; 1 p.m. Bridge, 500, Friday Dance “Jerry O’Dell & His Country Flavor Band” Dec. 12: 8 a.m. Scrapbooking, 8:30 a.m. Yoga with Amanda, Exercise Plus 50; 9:30 a.m. Poker, Beginning Duplicate Bridge Game, Grief Support Program, Wii Bowling, Computer 1-on-1 (Pre-register), Tap Class; 9:45 a.m. Review Tai Chi Class; 10 a.m. Knitting & Crocheting; 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Mexican Train; 1 p.m. Birthday party, Pinochle, American Mah Jong, Woodcarving; 2:30 p.m. Fitness with Kelly Dec. 13: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr., Penny Bingo; 9 a.m. Senior Yoga; 9:30 a.m. Painting Class; 10 a.m. Creative Writing, Walking off the Pounds; 10:15 a.m. Belly Dancing; 10:30 a.m. Crafts with Betty; 10:45 a.m. Beginning Tai Chi Class; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:45 a.m. Adaptive Aerobics; 12:30 p.m. Tap Class, Penny Bingo; 1 p.m. Scrabble,

Balance Class w/ YMCA Instr., Painting Class, Pitch; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 14: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr.; 9 a.m. Yoga w/ Dixie of Recover Health, Novice Dup. Bridge Game; 9:30 a.m. Computer 1-on-1 (Pre-register/ Pre-pay), Painting Class; 10 a.m. Chess Group, Sexy & Fit after 40; 10:30 a.m. Talk Show; 10:45 a.m. Guitar Practice; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:30 a.m. Jam Session; 12:30 p.m. Beginning Bridge; 1 p.m. Choreographed Ballroom, Coloring Corner, Painting Class, Scrabble, 500; 2:30 p.m. 1 Mile Walk Warm Up; 3 p.m. Fitness with Kelly Dec. 15: 8:30 a.m. Penny Bingo; 8:45 a.m. Beg. I Line Dance; 9 a.m. Yoga, Beginning Bridge II; 9:30 a.m. Drum Circle, Beginning Bridge I; 9:45 a.m. Beg. 2 Line Dance; 10 a.m. Walking off the Pounds, Men’s Club; 11 a.m. Advanced Line Dance; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Canasta, Penny Bingo, Woodcarving; 1 p.m. Beginning Bridge Class, Men’s & Women’s Social Group, Inter. Line Dance, Cribbage; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 16: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr., Exercise Plus 50; 9:30 a.m. Wii Bowling, Mixed Media Art Class with Vivian Miller, Fitness w/ Dixie of Recover Health; 10 a.m. Blood Pressures/St. Luke’s; 10:30 a.m. Women’s Pool Shooting Class; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; Noon Basic Tap, Bridge Group; 12:30 p.m. Open Craft Time; 1 p.m. Bridge, 500, Friday Dance “Shirley’s Big Band” Dec. 19: 8 a.m. Scrapbooking; 8:30 a.m. Yoga with Amanda, Exercise Plus 50; 9:30 a.m. Poker, Beginning Duplicate Bridge Class, Wii Bowling, Computer 1-on-1 (Preregister), Tap Class; 9:45 a.m. Review Tai Chi Class; 10 a.m. Knitting & Crocheting; 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge; 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Movie, Mexican Train; 1 p.m. Pinochle, American Mah Jong, Woodcarving; 2 p.m. Walking off Pounds; 2:30 p.m. Fitness with Kelly Dec. 20: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr., Penny Bingo; 9 a.m. Senior Yoga; 9:30 a.m. Painting Class; 10 a.m. Creative Writing, Walking off Pounds; 10:15 a.m. Belly Dancing; 10:45 a.m. Beginning Tai Chi Class; 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:45 a.m. Adaptive Aerobics; 12:30 p.m. Tap Class, Penny Bingo;1 p.m. Scrabble, Balance Class w/ YMCA Instr., Painting Class, Pitch; 2 p.m. Dec. 21: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr.; 9 a.m. Yoga w/ Dixie of


Recover Health, Novice Dup. Bridge Hame; 9:30 a.m. Computer 1-on-1 (Pre-register/Pre-pay), Painting Class; 10 a.m. Chess Group, Sexy & Fit after 40; 10:45 a.m. Guitar Practice; 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:30 a.m. Jam Session; 12:30 p.m. Beginning Bridge; 1 p.m. Choreographed Ballroom, Coloring Corner, Painting Class, Scrabble, 500; 2:30 p.m. 1 Mile Walk Warm Up; 3 p.m. Fitness with Kelly Dec. 22: 8:30 a.m. Penny Bingo; 9 a.m. Yoga, Beginning Bridge II; 9:30 a.m. Drum Circle, Beginning Bridge I; 10 a.m. Walking off the Pounds, Men’s Club; 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Canasta, Penny Bingo, Woodcarving; 1 p.m. Beginning Brdige Class, Men’s & Women’s Social Group, Cribbage; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 23: Closed for Christmas Dec. 26: Closed for Christmas Dec. 27: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr., Penny Bingo; 9 a.m. Senior Yoga; 10 a.m. Creative Writing, Walking off the Pounds; 10:15 a.m. Belly Dancing; 10:30 a.m. Crafts with Betty; 10:45 a.m. Beginning Tai Chi Class; 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:45 a.m. Adaptive Aerobics; 12:30 p.m. Tap Class, Penny Bingo; 1 p.m. Scrabble, Balance Class w/ YMCA Instr., Painting Class, Pitch; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 28: 8:30 a.m. Enhance Fitness w/ YMCA Instr.; 9 a.m. Yoga w/ Dixie of Recover Health, Novice Dup. Bridge Game; 9:30 a.m. Computer 1-on-1 (Pre-register/Pre-pay), Painting Class; 10 a.m. Chess Group, Sexy & Fit after 40; 10:30 a.m. Talk Show; 10:45 a.m. Guitar Practice; 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 11:30 a.m. Jam Session; 12:30 p.m. movie “Frozen,” Beginning Bridge; 1 p.m. Choreographed Ballroom, Coloring Corner, Painting Class, Scrabble, 500; 2:30 p.m. 1 Mile Walk Warm Up; 3 p.m. Fitness w/ Kelly Dec. 29: 8:30 a.m. Penny Bingo; 9 a.m. Yoga, Beginning Bridge II; 9:30 a.m. Drum Circle, Beginning Bridge I; 10 a.m. Walking off the Pounds, Men’s Club; 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Lunch; 12:30 p.m. Canasta, Penny Bingo, Woodcarving; 1 p.m. Beginning Bridge Class, Men’s & Women’s Social Group, Cribbage; 2 p.m. Ping Pong Dec. 30: Closed for New Years

Local & Government Services Siouxland Directory of Elderly Services

Sioux City Better Business Bureau: 1-800-222-1600 City Hall: 405 Sixth St., 279-6109 Connections Area Agency on Aging: 2301 Pierce St., 279-6900 or 800-432-9209. Information and referral services, options counseling, case management, nutrition services, transportation options, and advocacy Department of Human Services: 822 Douglas St., 255-0833 Elder Abuse Awareness: 1-800-362-2178 Emergency: 911 Fire Department: 279-6314 Police Department: 279-6960 (general) Post Office (Main): 214 Jackson St., 2776411 Social Security Office: 3555 Southern Hills Drive, 255-5525 South Sioux City City Hall: 1615 First Ave., 494-7500 Department of Social Services: Dakota City, Neb., 987-3445 Emergency: 911 Fire Department: 494-7555 Police Department: 701 West 29th St., 4947555 Post Office: 801 West 29th St., 494-1312

Counseling

Catholic Charities: 1601 Military Road, 252-4547 Heartland Counseling Service: 917 West 21st, South Sioux City, 494-3337 Lutheran Social Service: 4240 Hickory Lane, 276-1073 Mercy Behavioral Care Center: 801 5th St., 279-5991 Siouxland Mental Health: 625 Court St., 252-3871 Vet Center: 1551 Indian Hills Drive, No. 204, 255-3808

Financial, Insurance and Tax Counseling

Center for Siouxland: 715 Douglas St., 2521861. Conservatorship service, provides money management and protective payee services Consumer Credit Counseling Service: 715 Douglas St., 252-1861 ext. 47 SHIIP (Senior Health Insurance Information Program): Information available from Connections Area Agency on Aging, Siouxland Center for Active Generations, Sunrise Retirement Community, and Mercy Medical Center Siouxland Center for Active Generations: 313 Cook St., 255-1729, tax and Medicare insurance (SHIIP) counseling Woodbury County Extension Service: 4301 Sergeant Road, 276-2157

Salvation Army: 510 Bluff St., 255-8836 Siouxland Center for Active Generations: 313 Cook St., 255-1729, open to the public, $5.25 meals South Sioux City Community Action Center: 2120 Dakota Ave., 494-3259 South Sioux City Senior Center: 1501 West 29th St., 494-1500, congregate meal site St. Luke’s Heat-n-Eat Meals: 2720 Stone Park Blvd., 279-3630, Karen Bergenske

Health Care Information

Alzheimer’s Association: 201 Pierce St., Suite 110, 279-5802. Information and education about Alzheimer’s disease, support groups and services. 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-2723900. Dakota County Health Nurse: 402-987-2164 Iowa Department of the Blind: 1-800-3622587 Food Lifeline: Personal emergency response Center for Siouxland: Food pantry, 715 system: St. Luke’s, 279-3279; Mercy Medical Douglas St., 252-1861 Center, 279-2036 Community Action Agency of Siouxland: Mercy Medical Center: Community 2700 Leech St., 274-1610 Food Bank of Siouxland: 1313 11th Education, 279-2989 Siouxland Community Health Center: 1021 St., 255-9741 Nebraska St., 252-2477 Iowa Department of Human Services: 822 Siouxland District Health: 1014 Nebraska Douglas St., 255-0833 Meals on Wheels: Connections Area Agency St., 279-6119 or 1-800-587-3005 St. Luke’s Health Professionals: 279-3333 on Aging, 2301 Pierce St., 279-6900, volunteerdelivered noon meals (M-F), suggested donation $3.75-$6.50

The Whistlestop would like to wish everyone a happy & joyous holiday season!

Employment and Volunteer Service

Foster Grandparent & Senior Companion Programs: Rotary Club of Rock Valley Foundation, 4200 War Eagle Drive, 224-2610 Senior Community Service Employment Program: 2700 Leech Ave., Cindy Thomas, 274-1610 Experienced Works: Siouxland Workforce Development Center, 2508 Fourth St., assistant; Faye Kinnaman, 233-9030 ext. 1020

Financial Assistance

Commission of Veterans Affairs: 702 Courthouse, 279-6606 Community Action Agency of Siouxland: 2700 Leech Ave., 274-1610, energy assistance Iowa Department of Human Services: 822 Douglas St., 255-0833 Salvation Army: 510 Bluff St., 255-8836 Social Security Administration: 3555 Southern Hills Drive, 255-5525 South Sioux City Community Center: 2120 Dakota Ave., 494-3259

W histle stop Casino

200 River Dr., N. Sioux City, SD | 605-232-4867 December 2016 | 17


Home Health Care

Boys and Girls Home and Family Services: 2101 Court St., 293-4700 Care Initiatives Hospice: 4301 Sergeant Road, Suite 110, (712) 239-1226 Geri-Care: Transit Plaza, 276-9860 Home Instead Senior Care: 220 S. Fairmount, 258-4267, non-medical home health Hospice of Siouxland: 4300 Hamilton Blvd., 233-4144, nursing care, home health aide/homemaker, social services Mercy Home Care: 801 Fifth St., Suite 320, 233-5100, 1-800-8973840, home health aides/homemaker services, therapy services REM Health of Iowa Inc.: 2212 Pierce St., Suite 200, 233-5494, skilled nursing care, home health aides, homemaker services, waivers Siouxland District Public Health Nursing: 1014 Nebraska St., 2796119, skilled nursing care in home, home health aide, homemaker services St. Luke’s Home Care: 2905 Hamilton Blvd., 279-3279. In-home nursing, therapy, home medical equipment and supplies, lifeline program Synergy Home Care: Kim Kreber, 600 Stevens Port Drive, Suite 102, Dakota Dunes, S.D., (605) 242-6056 Tri-State Nursing Services: 621 16th St., 277-4442, skilled nursing

care, Home Health aide services, services ordered by a doctor

Hospitals

Mercy Medical Center: 801 Fifth St., 279-2010 UnityPoint Health-St. Luke’s Medical Center: 2720 Stone Park, 279-3500 Siouxland Surgery Center: 600 Sioux Point Road, 605-232-3332

Housing

Sioux City Bickford Senior Living, Assisted Living & Memory Care: 4020/4022 Indian Hills Drive, 239-2065 or 2396851. Family owned and operated, individualized “level of care”, respite (short stay) welcomed. Community Action Agency of Siouxland: 2700 Leech Ave., 2741610. Carnegie Place Apartments, Sixth and Jackson sts. Connections Area Agency on Aging: 2301 Pierce St., 279-6900. This is subsidized housing, rent based on income. Evergreen Terrace, 2430 West St., 258-0508; Riverside Gardens, 715 Bruner Ave., 277-2083; Fairmount Park Apartments, 210 Fairmount St. Countryside Retirement Apartments: Lilac Lane, 276-3000 Floyd House: 403 C Street, Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, (712) 943-

7025, Affordable, multiple levels of care, studio, one-bedroom, respite Holy Spirit Retirement Apartments: 1701 West 25th St., 252-2726 Maple Heights: 5300 Stone Ave., 276-3821, contact Jennifer Turner. This is subsidized low-income housing with rent based on income NorthPark Senior Living

Community: 2562 Pierce St., 255-1200. 48 independent living apartments, 57 supervised living apartments and three respite apartments Northern Hills Retirement Community: 4000 Teton Trace, 239-9400. Studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments Northern Hills Assisted Living:

4002 Teton Trace, 239-9402. Studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments Oakleaf Property Management: 1309 Nebraska St., 255-3665, contact leasing department. Martin Towers, 410 Pierce St.; Shire Apartments, 4236 Hickory Lane; Centennial Manor, 441 W. Third St. This is subsidized housing, rent is based on income. Prime Assisted Living: 725 Pearl St., 226-6300. Affordable, spacious one-bedroom assisted living apartments for persons 65 and older. Income guidelines apply. Accept all sources of payment including Title 19 and private pay. River Heights: 2201 Gibson St., 202-2733. This is subsidized housing that is not handicapped accessible. Sunrise Retirement Community: 5501 Gordon Drive, 276-3821; 64 one- and two-bedroom ground level homes with attached garage, some with den and sunroom. War Eagle Village Apartments: 2800 W. Fourth St., 258-0801, subsidized housing based on income South Sioux City Autumn Park Apartments: 320 East 12th St., 402-494-5393 Dacotah House: 316 East 16th St., 712-274-9125. Subsidized housing, you must be over 62 or handicapped.

Sophisticated Comfort & Convenience • Independent Living • Residential Care Call 712-255-1200 today for more information or to schedule a free tour! Brookdale Sioux City | Formerly Emeritus® at Northpark Place Independent Living | Residential Care 2562 Pierce Street | Sioux City, IA 51104

18 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

brookdale.com


Get foot pain relief without surgery Multicare Health Clinic, with their chiropractors, medical doctors and physical therapists, treat pain, injuries & accidents of all types from head to toe.

Multicare has 3D laser diagnostic imaging

Multicare Health Clinic’s treatment software can create a 3 Dimensional image of your arch, depict any altered weight bearing, and demonstrate which joints may be contributing to your foot or back pain.

3930 Stadium Drive

(Between Wal-mart & Explorers Stadium)

276-HEAL www.multicareclinic.com

December 2016 | 19


See

Britain's Finest in concert! A Beatles tribute band. Yeah-yeah-yeah!

This December 17th, see the concert event that you never imagined you could see. It’s Britain's Finest, an incredible Beatles tribute band who faithfully recreates the style and music of the greatest band of all time, down to the smallest detail. General Admission tickets are $15. Voted AXS TV's #1 Beatles Tribute Band

Doors Open at 6pm Show Starts at 7pm

New Year’s Eve Party and a 2017 Chevy Silverado Giveaway! Celebrate with old friends, meet new friends, and possibly win a new truck. At midnight, the fun heats up as we toast the New Year with Champagne. Then at 12:05am, we’re giving away a 2017 Chevy Silverado! • Party Favors • Win your share of $1,000 at 9pm, 10pm, and 11pm *3 winners every hour. • Champagne Toast at Midnight • 12:05am Chevy Silverado Giveaway Earn 10 entries by stopping in Knoepfler. Test drive any car at Knoepfler and earn 20 entries into the drawing!

Every point you earn December 1st through December 31st gets you an entry for the cash drawings on New Year's Eve. *Players may only win twice.

I-29, Exit 127 Sloan, IA • 1-800-HOT-WINN www.WinnaVegas.com Promotions subject to change.

20 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

Siouxland Prime - December 2016  
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