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YOUR GUIDE TO LIVING ACTIVE, REWARDING LIVES www.siouxlandprime.com | December 2011

Retirement: It’s not what it used to be

From taking care of grandkids to downsizing living conditions, seniors struggling

Ice Fishing Terry Turner’s brush with the elements

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Eastman House The George Eastman house in Rochester, N.Y.

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Office Aging Do presidents really age more rapidly?

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Terry’s Turn

Index Publisher | Steve Griffith Editor | Mitch Pugh Advertising Manager | Nancy Gevik ©2011 The Sioux City Journal. Prime is published monthly by the Sioux City Journal. For advertising information, please call (712) 224-6285. For editorial information, please call (712) 293-4201.

The Associated Press

On the cover Rosa Feddersen plays a computer game with her 15-month-old granddaughter Nora Thiel in Feddersen’s home near Middletown, Pa. Page 14

YOUR GUIDE TO LIVING ACTIVE, REWARDING LIVES Journal photo by Tim Hynds

A pair of fishermen try their luck at Bacon Creek Park in Sioux City in mid-December.

Ice fishing just isn’t for Terry Not long ago I read an article by retired Sioux City Journal editor Larry Myhre about getting ready for ice fishing. As I read the article I had a flashback to many years ago when I too went ice fishing. First of all let me say that I’m not a fisherman and never have been. But I do know ice fishing is not for the timid or faint of heart. It’s only for those who wish to endure hours of freezing Terry Turner boredom in order tturner174@longlines.com to catch a fish. To me the only difference between ice fishing and regular fishing is the freezing part. It was back in the early 1950s and I was living in Omaha. I was probably around 10 years old when I was introduced to ice fishing. One winter my family which consisted of my mother, my older brother Dick,

sister Betty and I went to Falls City, Nebraska to visit some friends and relatives. My brother and I were both born there and our sister was born in a nearby town. Our father had passed away in 1950 and since he was a railroad engineer our family had a free pass and could travel by train wherever and whenever we wanted. And because Falls City is only about 100 miles south of Omaha we made that trip quite often. On this occasion we went to visit my Aunt Vera and Uncle Mart. They lived just outside of Falls City on a small acreage. And not far from their home was a lake. When we got there Uncle Mart asked my brother and I if we’d like to go ice fishing with him. Fishing for ice? I thought to myself. Sounds a little strange. Uncle Mart must have noticed the confused look on my face. “You go out on the ice and cut a hole,” he explained, “and then you drop your line in and wait.” I was to find out later that “wait” was the most important part of that sentence. Dick and I agreed to go while our

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mother and sister stayed behind in the warmth of the house. It was one of those bitterly cold Nebraska days when the icy wind seems to cut through any outer clothing to chill your body through and through. The sky was gray and there was a feeling of impending snow in the air. Back then I didn’t mind the cold and that day I didn’t really mind at all because I was out with the big guys and I was going ice fishing whatever the heck that was. Today hardy ice fishermen like Larry Myhre have gas powered augurs to drill through the ice and comfy shacks to install over the hole. But I don’t remember any of that back then. As I recall Uncle Mart had a hand powered auger to make the hole and nothing in the way of a shelter. He cut a hole in the thick ice and my brother and I gathered around for instructions. “First you bait the hook,” he explained. I was to go fishing with Uncle Mart several times in the following years and he used a variety of bait. The one that sticks out in my memory is the apply named “stink bait” and that may have been what we used that day. We all baited our hooks and sat on makeshift chairs. I seem to recall Uncle Mart had a folding stool while Dick had a bucket and I had a small wooden box. I looked at my fishing companions who were intently starring at the hole in the ice. I starred too. After what seemed an eternity of looking at those three lines that

disappeared into the murky depths of that freezing water I began to feel a need. The cold air was beginning to act on my 10 year old bladder. “Uh...Uncle Mart?” I said. He looked at me. “I need to uh...well...go.” He pointed to the shoreline. “Pick a tree,” he said. I looked at my brother. He inclined his head toward the trees in apparent agreement. Being from the big city of Omaha I was used to indoor plumbing. This seemed to be rather crude. I reluctantly got up and headed for the nearest vegetation. Several years ago I saw an episode of “Seinfeld” and they talked about men and shrinkage when it’s cold. I learned that lesson behind a tree by the lake on that cold winter day. After several hours of sitting there we caught enough for supper that night and went home. After watching Uncle Mart clean our catch I decided fishing wasn’t for me. And I still feel that way. Today the coldest I get when I want fish for dinner is reaching in the freezer at the local grocery store. Although fishing is not for me I admire those hardy souls like Larry Myhre who brave the elements to get those slimy denizens of the deep especially when the temperature is colder than a motherin-law’s kiss. And they work hard to catch one of those finny creatures. As for me, the most energy I’ll expend to get a fish is when I point to it on the menu. Terry Turner is a Prime writer who can be reached at tturner174@longlines.com.

4 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

Terry’s Travel

Eastman house a snapshot of history By TERRy TURNER Prime staff writer

ROCHESTER, N.Y. - George Eastman has been called the “Father of popular photography” and for good reason. Through his development of easy to use cameras and film Eastman made photography available to everyone. The story of this amazing man and his contribution to photography can be seen today at the George Eastman House in Rochester. George Eastman was born July 12, 1854, in the village of Waterville, some 20 miles southwest of Utica, in upstate New York. George was the youngest of three children born to Maria Kilbourn and George Washington Eastman. The family moved to Rochester when George was five years old. It was there the elder Eastman founded Eastman Commercial College but died just a few years later leaving the family essentially penniless. At just 14 years old George decided to quit school in order to support his widowed mother and two sisters, one of whom was severely handicapped. He found a job as an office boy in an insurance company and later worked as a clerk in a local bank. While at the bank Eastman saved his money and decided to travel to Santa Domingo. While there he wanted to invest in some land. He needed to take some photos of the property and purchased all the equipment needed to take a wet-plate photograph. In addition to a large camera, Eastman needed a heavy tripod, darkroom tent, chemicals, glass plates and water containers. The glass plates had to be coated with light sensitive materials and processed on the spot. All this just to take a photograph. Although he grew to love photography he knew there had to be a better way. After hearing about gelatin emulsions being produced in

Terry Turner

The George Eastman House in Rochester, N.y. is now open to the public for tours and includes the International Museum of Photography and Film.

IF yoU Go

The Associated Press

In this late 1920s file photo, Eastman Kodak Co. founder George Eastman, left, and Thomas Edison pose with their inventions. Their contributions, Edison invented motion picture equipment and Kodak invented roll-film and the camera box, helped create the motion picture industry.

The George Eastman House and International Museum of Photography and Film is located at 900 East Ave. in Rochester, N.Y. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m.-8 p.m. on Thursday. The house and museum are open Sundays from 1-5 p.m. and closed on Mondays. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors 65 and older, students are $5 and children under 12 are free. For more information visit their web site at www.eastmanhouse.org or call (585) 271-3361.

made photography even simpler when he put light sensitive material on paper rolls. He formed a company and called it Kodak using his favorite letEngland that remained light sen- ter at the beginning and end sitive after drying Eastman per- of the name. The first cameras fected his own version of a dry came loaded with film and were plate process. In 1879 he patreturned to the company for ented a machine that could coat processing. Eastman used the large numbers of glass plates. phrase “You press the button, we The dry plates would allow pho- do the rest” in his advertising. tographers to take photos and Later cameras were designed so process the plates later. Eastman the customer could remove the


Hall Monument Company Hall Monument Company has been located in Sioux City Iowa since 1926. Our office offers a large indoor showroom displaying more than seventy-five memorials. Larry Tejral, Office Manager, has been assisting families with their memorial needs for over thirty-four years. Hall Monument Company designs and produces memorials, granite and

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bronze, for all cemeteries in the tri state area. Through the ages the creation of a memorial has been one the most important form of remembrance. Personalize, “To personify, to make personal, to ascribe personal qualities to”, this is how Webster’s describes the term and its definition is never more apparent that when describing the “personalization” of a monument. Did the person being memorialized have a special love in their life, hobby, maybe a favorite poem? If the memorial is for yourself, is there a certain way you wished to be remembered? Modern technology allows the memorialist through shape, texture, image and inscription to create a personalized and unique monument. Modern technology also allows a monument to be designed in literally any shape that you can envision. Whether it is freeform, entwined hearts, or a special object, your choice in shape and design is limitless. Remember, monument designs can be classic or contemporary. The choice is yours to make. Hall Monument

uses techniques such as sandblasting, shape carving, laser and hand etching to achieve the design that best reflects your individual and personal preferences. We would like to say “Thank You” to all the customers that we have been able to serve over the past eighty-six years and look forward to meeting your memorial needs in the future. The office staff at Hall Monument Company wishes you and your family all the best in 2012 and beyond. Hall Monument Company is located at 521 S. Lewis Blvd., Sioux City IA Office Hours Monday-Friday 8am to 5pm Saturday’s 9am-12 noon In home appointments are available by calling 712-2588275 or Outside the calling area toll free 1-888-455-4363

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film for processing. By the age of 44 George Eastman was a millionaire and in 1902 at the age of 48 he began building a house in Rochester. He bought an 8 ½ acre farm which would offer room for his planned 50-room mansion and huge gardens. The house and gardens took three years and $500,000 to build. Eastman hired the premier architectural firm in the United States at the time McKim, Mead and White of Manhattan to consult on the interior design. That same year the firm worked on the renovation of the White House for President Theodore Roosevelt. Eastman was a lifelong bachelor who lived in the home with his mother. Although he never married he did have a couple of serious relationships with women. It was rumored his mother never approved of those relationships. Eastman loved to entertain had held lavish parties in his home for friends. His philanthropic efforts benefited several schools and hospitals in the Rochester area. He also donated large sums of money to the Tuskegee University in Alabama and became close friends with its founder Booker T. Washington who would visit Eastman frequently. On one of those visits Eastman was having a formal party with a group of men all attired in tuxedos. When the butler told Eastman Booker T. Washington was walking up the driveway dressed in a business suit Eastman quickly went upstairs and changed into a suit

so his friend wouldn’t feel out of place. When in his 70s Eastman’s health began deteriorating to the point where he knew the time was not far off when he wouldn’t be able to walk. On March 14, 1932, at the age of 77 George Eastman took his own life in his upstairs bedroom in the home he loved. He left a simple note stating, “To my friends, my work is done. Why wait?” After his death the house and grounds were willed to the University of Rochester who used the residence to house their presidents until 1947. The University then donated the property to the newly-formed George Eastman House, Inc. a non-profit organization dedicated to creating a museum of photography as a memorial to George Eastman. In 1987 renovation work began to bring the home back to the way it was when Eastman lived there. Today visitors can tour the massive home and walk through the gardens George Eastman loved. Guided tours are available or visitors can pick up an audio device free of charge. Exhibits and galleries depict the history and ever changing future of photography. The lower level of the building houses the museum collection of equipment and photographs. The museum store offers unique books and gifts while the George Eastman House Café has a variety of soups, sandwiches and deserts for every taste.

6 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

Health

Do presidents really age faster? Despite gray hair and wrinkles, U.S. presidents tend to live longer than peers, study says By LINDSEy TANNER The Associated Press

CHICAGO — White House wannabes take note: Contrary to the idea that being president speeds up aging, a study shows that many U.S. commanders in chief have actually lived longer than their peers. Using life expectancy data for men the same age as presidents on their inauguration days, the study found that 23 of 34 presidents who died of natural causes lived several years longer than expected. The four former presidents still alive have already lived longer than predicted, or likely will because they’re in good health, the study said. “The graying of hair and wrinkling of the skin seen in presidents while they’re in office are normal elements of human aging,” said study author S. Jay Olshansky, a researcher on aging at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Stress can speed up those two outward signs of aging, and it’s possible that job stress has made some presidents appear to age quickly. But the study shows that doesn’t mean being doomed to an early grave. “We don’t actually know if they get more gray hair or more wrinkles” than other men their age. “But even if they did, we don’t die of gray hair and wrinkles,” Olshansky said. Given that most of the 43 men who have served as president have been college-educated, wealthy and had access to the best doctors, their long lives are actually not that surprising, he said. His study is published in Wednesday’s Journal of the

The Associated Press photos

President Barack Obama is shown in these photos, the left Aug. 28, 2008, in Denver, and the right Jan. 25, 2011, in Washington, D.C. A new study shows that contrary to the idea that being president speeds up the aging process, many U.S. commanders in chief have lived longer than their peers. American Medical Association. The idea that presidents age quickly comes from casual observation and more studious assessments. Promoters of that idea include Dr. Michael Roizen, chairman of Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute and co-founder of RealAge, Inc. The “real age” concept suggests that age depends partly on lifestyle factors including stress and diet that either keep people young or prematurely age them. Roizen theorizes that presidents age twice as fast while in office. Roizen said Olshansky’s study doesn’t disprove that idea and only shows “that in order to run for president you tend to be incredibly healthy.” Olshansky stands by his findings. The 34 presidents who died of natural causes were aged 73 on average at death, a few months less than Olshansky’s’ life expectancy estimate. But under the accelerated aging theory, their average age of death would have been 68, he said. The 23 presidents who lived longer than Olshansky’s projections died at an average age of 78, 11 years later than under the accelerated aging theory. The four presidents who were assassinated — Abraham Lincoln, James Garfield, William

McKinley and John F. Kennedy — were aged 52 on average at death. The first eight presidents were almost 80 years old on average when they died, at a time when the average life expectancy for men was less than age 35. “It’s absolutely extraordinary that they lived this long,” Olshansky said. That includes John Adams, who died at 90; James Madison, 85; and Thomas Jefferson, 83. Ditto the last eight presidents who died — seven lived longer than expected; Lyndon Johnson was the only one who didn’t. He died of a heart attack at age 64, 10 years less than his projected life expectancy and five years less than his life expectancy with accelerated aging, Olshansky said. Among the more recent presidents, Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford both died at 93. Jimmy Carter and George H. W. Bush are both 87. Olshansky has even done some projecting about 50-yearold President Barack Obama. Given his age when inaugurated, Obama’s life expectancy would be 79, but Olshansky estimates that Obama will live to at least 82 because of his education, wealth and access to top-notch health care.


Retirement

Some reject retirement, keep working even into 90s BY JAMIE STENGLE

Maxine Bennett, 91, laughs during an interview at her jewelry store in Dallas. Bennett is part of a growing number of people who continue working way past the usual retirement age.

The Associated Press

DALLAS — At 91, Maxine Bennett still works six days a week at her jewelry store: keeping the books, helping customers and occasionally going on buying trips. Retirement’s not for her. “At 65 I was just really getting started,” Bennett said. She is part of a growing number of people who continue working way past the usual retirement age. The reasons are as unique as the individuals themselves. There are those who can’t afford to retire, but there also are those who made midlife career switches and want to see their new vocation through, and others, like Bennett, who simply enjoy going into work each day. “Mother lives because she works. If she went home, didn’t do anything, there’s not enough crosswords for her to keep busy all day long,” said her daughter, Beverly Bennett.

The Associated Press

“Basically, this may be working, but this is really mother’s living.” The idea of a set retirement age at 65 is changing as companies drop pensions, and people are living lon-

ger and staying healthier, said Jean Setzfand, AARP’s vice president of financial security. “Our belief here is we want people to work as long as they desire to do so,” Setzfand

said. U.S. Department of Labor statistics show that the number of people 75 and older who work full or part-time has risen from about 487,000, or 4.2 percent, in 1990, to 1.2 million, or 6.9 percent, last year. Beverly Bennett, herself 70, also has no plans to retire from the family store, where she, too, works six days a week. “When you’re at work and you have your head down and you’re working very, very hard, you don’t know you’re 70 years old,” Beverly Bennett said. “If you don’t have great outside interests, if you’re not busy with other people, you need to be busy at work.” What’s important is staying involved, whether that means working or something else, said Jay Magaziner, a gerontologist who chairs the department of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of

Coming Up

Young Frankenstein comes to Sioux City The classic Mel Brooks movie is ... alive! And it’s headed to Sioux City. According to even promoters, you’ll have a monstrously good time at this “spectacular” new production. The production was the winner of the 2008 Outer Critics Circle Award and the Broadway. com Audience Award for best musical. The cast will deliver favorite moments from the classic film, plus new numbers for the stage, including “Transylvania Mania,” “He Vas My Boyfriend” and “Puttin’ on the Ritz.”

The classic Mel Brooks movie is ALIVE…and it’s headed to the Orpheum stage at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 17. Submitted photo

Histo r ry Under Construction... A Railroad Museum-in-the-making! For nearly a century, the Milwaukee Railroad Shops have been standing in a valley nestled between the Loess Hills Bluffs and the Big Sioux River along State Highway 12, Loess Hills National Scenic Byway. Located in the north Riverside area of Sioux City, the Milwaukee Railroad Shops are historically important as one of the nation’s largest surviving collections of buildings and structures associated with a steam locomotive servicing terminal and rail car repair facility. The Milwaukee Railroad Shops were built in 1917 on sixty acres of land. The complex originally consisted of a 30-stall roundhouse with turntable, eighteen backshop buildings, a power plant, two water towers, a wood coal tower, and two sand towers. Today, the Milwaukee Railroad Shops cover 30 acres with a six-stall roundhouse, turntable, four backshop buildings, one wood sand tower and several foundation remnants.

Milwaukee Railroad Shops Historic District

Sioux Cit y, IOWA 3400 Sioux River Road I-29 Exit 151 • IA Hwy 12 No rth Loess Hills National Scenic Byway

The Milwaukee Railroad Shops were originally built to function as workplaces for railroad workers to repair and maintain the Milwaukee Road’s fleet of steam locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars. During its peak years of operations in the 1920s and 1930s, over 500 craft and trades workers serviced and repaired approximately 850 steam locomotives a month and tens of thousands of rail cars a year. The workers were employed in craft professions such as boiler makers, machinists, carpenters, pipefitters, steam fitters, and many other trades. The railroad downsized the complex during the early 1950s when the railroad industry transitioned from steam locomotives to diesel engines. The railroad abandoned the shops in the 1980s and subsequently sold the complex to a local salvage operator. The Siouxland Historical Railroad Association bought the complex in 1996 and began its historic preservation work to transform the Milwaukee Railroad Shops into a railroad museum. In converting the Milwaukee Railroad Shops to a railroad museum, the volunteer developers are preserving the features of the roundhouse and other structures to give visitors an understanding of what work went on in the buildings and why this site has historic significance. The Milwaukee Railroad Shops are designated a historic district eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and are recognized as an official project of the Save America Treasures Program. The railroad shops are home to Sioux City’s iconic steam locomotive, Great Northern Railway No. 1355.

Open Fridays & Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for Walking Tours

Open Sundays

Noon to 4 p.m. for Walking Tours

Please visit the Milwaukee Railroad Shops... where history gets back on track for future generations!

Admission

Adults: $4.00 Senior Citizens: $3.00

Students (6-18): $2.00 Under Age 5: Free with Paid Adult

Join the 1355 Challenge IF YOU GO

WHAT: Production of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 17 WHERE: Orpheum Theater, Sioux City COST: Tickets range from $32-$54 CONTACT: 1-800-745-3000 or orpheumlive.com

Give a Gift of History, purchase a Vintage Engine 1355 T-shirt and help build the railroad he museum in Sioux City

Visit us online

Can Siouxland purchase 1,355 t-shirts in 101 days to help build the railroad museum? All proceeds go towards helping finance reconstruction of the historic buildings at the Milwaukee Railroad Shops Historic District. Purchase your vinatge engine 1355 t-shirts at

Milwaukee Railroad Shops Historic District GIFT SHOP Open Saturdays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

www.MilwaukeeRailroadShops.org

Partially funded by a grant from Vision Iowa.

December 2011 | 7


Medicine. “For some people, staying engaged and doing meaningful activities can be accomplished through leisure and retirement activities,” Magaziner said. For those who want to work, being selfemployed or having knowledge valued by an employer can help ensure that happens, said Sara Rix, senior strategic policy adviser in the AARP’s Public Policy Institute. Like the Bennetts, 82-year-old Darrell Reneker can’t imagine life without working. The distinguished professor of polymer science at The University of Akron still works full time teaching and conducting research. “I get paid, but my lifestyle isn’t so dependent on that. What else would I do that’s more interesting? And the answer is I can’t think of anything,” said Reneker, who starts every day with an early morning run. Raised in the small West Texas town of Rankin, Maxine Bennett left business college after getting hired as a bookkeeper. While her two children grew up, she worked a variety of jobs, from switchboard operator to bookkeeper to butcher. “I can’t remember not working and not enjoying it,” she said. During the 1960s, her husband’s job as a drilling superintendent for an oil company took them to Iraq, Kuwait, Mozambique, Tunisia, Libya and Singapore. At most stops, she found jobs as well. When he died of a heart attack in Saudi Arabia in 1973, at age 54, “life as I had known it ended,” she 8 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

said. Returning to Texas after 13 years overseas, she found a purpose when her son, Scotty, came up with an idea: buy Native American jewelry and sell it overseas. That didn’t exactly take off, but from that a business was born. By the mid-1970s, the Bennetts opened Castle Gap Jewelry in Dallas. Maxine Bennett says she knows many people who retire are “as happy as they can be.” But for her, “When you find something that you enjoy and you don’t have to do it — I guess that it makes it all the more interesting.” John Adams, 79, who took over his father’s Dallas paint store in 1977, said his work is fulfilling because he’s able to help people. “Somebody comes in with a problem, you help them with it,” said Adams, who sells paint and frames pictures at Adams Paint Center. “They’re not just my customers, they’re my friends,” he said. Adams’ previous jobs included supervisor at a baking company and running a restaurant. The Rev. John Naus, the 87-year-old chaplain of Marquette University’s Alumni Memorial Union, said he advises students to find a career that lets them make a difference in people’s lives. Ordained as a priest in 1955, Naus has a doctorate in philosophy, taught high school, and was a philosophy professor at St. Louis University before going to Marquette in the early 1960s, where he has held posts including director of spiritual welfare and assistant to the university president.


Retirement

Specialists in late-life downsizing on rise Help’s available for the late-life downsize: paring possessions and relocating By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press

Carol Gilbert remembers well the heartache and hassle of watching her aging parents struggle to remain in their house of 45 years; the desperate, last-minute calls for help and her dad’s isolation as her mom’s health declined. She also remembers the frustration of going through their things once they finally agreed to relocate to a senior care facility nearby in San Mateo, Calif. “I must have gone up to the house every Saturday for a year helping them sort through their stuff,” Gilbert said. “I couldn’t get my mother to make decisions or really do much each visit.” Once settled in the smaller space, surrounded by peers, her father’s burden lifted. He got his wish to remain with his wife and began enjoying life again at 86. Gilbert is now 72 herself and her folks are long dead, but their rocky transition in 1992 motivated her and her husband, David, to consider retirement housing at a much earlier stage. She was only 64 and he 67 when they moved into a full-amenity complex in Palo Alto, Calif., about 20 miles from the rural, ranch-style home where they had spent 35 years and raised their daughter. There’s a chef, a pool, a fitness center, a TV lounge with surround sound and a music room with a grand piano. There’s a housekeeping service, a balcony for a small garden and entertainment at least once a month. “I’ve never looked back,” Gilbert said. “At that time we were the kids here. We certainly weren’t candidates for God’s waiting room.” As Americans live longer, many people find themselves navigating

The Associated Press

Carol, right, and David Gilbert work in the office of their home at a senior community in Palo Alto, Calif. As the population ages, many people find themselves navigating a confusing web of interconnected services for themselves or their parents when it comes time to shed possessions and relocate. Some, like the Gilberts, use hard-won lessons from their parents’ experience to take control of their own late-life downsize while they still have time to enjoy it. a confusing web of interconnected services for themselves or their parents when it comes time to shed possessions and relocate. Some, like the Gilberts, use hard-won lessons from their parents’ experience to take control of their own late-life downsize while they still have time to enjoy it. Others have created a new industry, becoming “senior specialists” to help make those transitions less troublesome. Such specialists span business worlds, from real estate and financial planning to moving, home staging, personal organizing and “late-life coaching.” Roughly 25,000 have sought training and education to

focus on senior logistics, said Nan Hayes, a senior relocation specialist in suburban Chicago who is also a trainer. In addition to logistics, they provide emotional breathing room between grown children and aging parents, Hayes said. “If your parents feel comfortable with the process, if they feel they have some control over it, things will run much more smoothly,” she said. “If you have to argue to make your point or force your opinions and decisions on your parents, you will find yourself up against a roadblock. No one will feel good. Moving mom and dad doesn’t have to be a nightmare.”

Cincinnati, John Buckles went through a troubling transition with his parents. Determined to enjoy their retirement and hold on to their house, they were forced by ill health into a senior care facility instead, leaving him to sort through decades of their possessions. “I had no clue what they owned,” he said. “I remember being pissed off because there were thousands of books. I must have gotten rid of 2,000 before I realized there was stuff inside of them, like a little story my mother wrote about me, and money.” The experience prompted him to co-found Caring Transitions. With about 130 franchises around the December 2011 | 9


Carol, right, and David Gilbert look out at a courtyard from the balcony of their home at a senior community in Palo Alto, Calif. As the population ages, many people find themselves navigating a confusing web of interconnected services for themselves or their parents when it comes time to shed possessions and relocate. Some, like the Gilberts, use hard-won lessons from their parents’ experience to take control of their own latelife downsize while they still have time to enjoy it.

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The Associated Press

country, the company provides “general contractors” who do what faraway relatives often can’t: make sure that moving companies, real estate agents, liquidators, charities, disposal companies, appraisers, cleaners and home stagers are working together with the older person’s best interest in mind. Buckles and Hayes encourage a “sooner-rather-than-later” approach to sifting through possessions, whether the person is moving or looking to “age in place” through home modifications such as handrails and stair lifts. That approach to late-life housing doesn’t negate the value of a good home clean-out, they said. “If you want to remain independent longer, you must start making the decisions and acting now to preserve that independence,” said Hayes, who launched a network, MoveSeniors.com, that works with organizations around the country to provide reliable specialists and advice. “I’ve witnessed too many situations where adult children are forced to make tough decisions about mom’s home and possessions because she kept putting it off,” she said. The emotional toll on an older person can be heavy, bringing on anxiety, depression, sleeplessness and short-term mem-

ory loss, said Hayes and Tracy Greene Mintz, a social worker in Redondo Beach, Calif., who specializes in a body of symptoms known as “relocation stress syndrome.” “It’s a train, and everybody gets on the moving-mom-anddad train, and it’s easy to focus on the logistical details because they don’t require you to address the emotional aspects of the move,” Mintz said. “Then mom and dad get to their place and they just shut down.” There’s a lot that families can do to de-stress a late-life downsize: SLOW IT DOWN: Sometimes, Buckles said, resistance to shedding that grandfather clock or box of old aprons is driven by the owner’s desire to tell the stories behind them. “Once that’s done, once somebody took the time to listen, they can give it up,” he said. GIFTING POSSESSIONS: Planning to pass down something once you’re gone? Don’t wait. “I’ve comforted hundreds of clients who have had to watch their possessions being donated, sold or tossed in a Dumpster,” Hayes said. “Take the time to decide what you really need or love, and take steps to get rid of everything else NOW.” FALSE SPIN: Nobody wants to be the emotional downer, and that can lead to stiff, empty attempts

to stay positive when everybody’s hurting, Mintz said. “Ask mom or dad, ‘Does any of this make you feel anxious? Does any of this make you feel a little bit sad?’ That tiny nudge goes miles toward a better outcome in the new place,” she said. HOME STAGING: Mom has always stored the silverware in the top drawer to the right of the fridge. Make sure that happens in her new home. Bring along her favorite beat-up ottoman that you wanted to toss, and have her new place set up with pictures on the wall and slippers bedside when she moves in. SPOUSES: Jo Magnum in Raleigh, N.C., twice downsized her parents with the help of her three siblings. They made a pact: no spouses involved. “They weren’t allowed in on the conversations over who took what, where our parents went, who took care of the money. They weren’t even allowed in the room,” she said. “We just didn’t need them there.” DOWNSIZE THE DOWNSIZE: Organizer Vickie Dellaquila in Pittsburgh wrote a book, “Don’t Toss My Memories in the Trash: A Stepby-Step Guide to Helping Seniors Downsize, Organize and Move.” Her advice? Don’t give up everything in a set if it means that much. Save six rather than all 12 place settings of the good china or silverware. The same goes for treasured books.


Retirement

College towns draw those seeking active retirement “People think seniors today are looking for sun and sand and not much else,” said Jill College isn’t just for the Lillie, director of marketing young. at The Village at Penn State, With many people seeking a continuing care residence a retirement that is culturally active and intellectually in State College, Pa. “But boomers are focused on new stimulating, colleges and challenges. They want to universities are working to enrich their lives, write a bring retirees to their camnew chapter.” puses and towns, offering Campus life can provide them free or reduced-rate classes, artistic performanc- plenty of opportunities to do that. es or lectures. Some have “We were tired of looking partnered with retirement at old people, and we wanted residences in the area. to get to a place where there For some retirees, it’s a homecoming: They’re return- was a little more vibrancy, ing to their former campuses a little more to do,” said Al Green, a 1947 Penn State with warm memories of the time they spent there as stu- graduate who moved to The Village at Penn State after dents. Others are moving to first retiring to Florida. On a be closer to their children, who might be affiliated with recent fall weekend, he was juggling sporting events, a the university. For still others, it’s just a new adventure. bridge game and drinks with

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friends. Students cite benefits, too. Vicki Centurelli, an Ithaca College senior from Hingham, Mass., who has volunteered with retirees, says, “Hearing about different experiences allows you to reflect on your own life and see it a little bit differently, which I think is important for college students to do.” Sure, the same types of residential facilities and programming are available in communities around the country, but there’s a preponderance in college towns, said Scott Perry, president of Bankers Life and Casualty Company, which put out a study on the best U.S. cities for seniors. Among the criteria it considered were social opportunities, including the number of colleges and uni-

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versities in town. “We can’t underestimate the importance of keeping our minds active as we age,” he said, adding that college communities have the resources to “allow seniors to focus on what they want to pursue in the next stage of their life.” And it’s not just intellectual and social. Typically, he said, many large universities will have teaching hospitals and even dental schools which provide health services for seniors. “They raise the quality of care in the community,” he said. In Ithaca, N.Y., the Longview retirement community offers independent and assisted living, and has a partnership with Ithaca College to promote intergenerational learning. Two or

three residents are taking classes at the college, said Breelan Nash, Longview’s recreation and volunteer coordinator. Residents also attend plays and concerts on campus, with transportation provided. At the same time, some classes for students are held at Longview, and residents can sit in, said Rhoda Meador, director of the Gerontology Institute at Ithaca College. Talking with the seniors can provide context and reality to the students’ academic subjects, she said. Sarah Furie, 20, a junior from Windsor, Conn., who is majoring in television and radio, said student volunteers have taught Longview residents about computers, performed musical programs

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and done arts and crafts. Similarly, student interns teach fitness and art at the Village at Penn State and help with technology. Sports teams also visit, Lillie said. Residents can take one class a semester at Penn State. “There has to be space available and they can’t preempt a paying student,” Lillie said. But retirees don’t necessarily have to live in a facility partnered with a university to take advantage of programming at a school. Sam Wolsky, who retired to Tucson, Ariz., from Chicago to be near his children and grandchildren, said he and his late wife, Roberta, found the musical, dance and theater offerings at the University of Arizona an added benefit to their lives there. “There’s a smorgasbord of activities that you can be involved in,” said Wolsky. Colleges and universities also attract retirees who want to use their expertise and experience to pursue a second career — teaching. Ron Brown, a 64-year-old patent lawyer, decided to retire to Tucson from Minneapolis in part for an adjunct teaching position at the University of Arizona law school. He also hopes to take classes. “I have nightmares about forgetting how to do calculus,” said Brown, who studied chemistry and chemical engineering and got a PhD before going to law school. One school — the University of North Carolina at Asheville — has established an on-campus center dedicated to making retirement a fulfilling stage of life. The North Carolina Center for Creative Retirement, founded in 1988, lets retirees in the community “use their lifetime experience to solve some of the problems, make a contribution,” said Catherine Frank, the executive director. Among other programming, the center offers for a small fee some 280 classes each year, from arts and crafts to philosophy, religion and literature. About 30 percent of the members say the center was the primary reason behind their decision to retire to Asheville, Frank said. Other reasons cited include the area’s beauty and lively arts scene. The latest in the ongoing AP-APME joint project looking at the aging of the baby boomers and the impact this so-called silver tsunami will have on the communities in which they live.

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Retirement

Charitable groups grant seniors long-held wishes Always wanted to try that? Charitable groups grant seniors wishes of a lifetime By MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON The Associated Press

Margarette Kirsch always wondered what it would be like to roll across America in an 18-wheeler. With the help of the Twilight Wish Foundation, the 82-year-old found out. She spent more than two weeks this summer touring the country in the cab of a semi. “I enjoyed every minute of it,” she said from her home in Merritt Island, Fla. “Would I do it again? Come down and get me.” Twilight Wish is one of several organizations dedicated to granting wishes to seniors. The foundation started eight years ago in Doylestown, Pa., as a way to enrich the lives of senior citizens, said organization president Elinor Foltz. “They have so much wisdom to impart,” she said. Helping seniors achieve lifelong dreams is a way to thank them for their contributions to society, added Jeremy Bloom, a former NFL player who founded Jeremy Bloom’s Wish of a Lifetime in 2008. He created the Denver-based foundation as a way of honoring his grandmother, Donna Wheeler, who helped raise him. Now 86, she lives in Colorado and continues to inspire him, he said. Organizations like Bloom’s and Foltz’s grant a wide variety of wishes, from visits to World War II battlefields and hot-air balloon rides to family reunions. They also help seniors with household and health needs, providing

The Associated Press

Margarette Kirsch, 82, always wondered what it would be like to roll across America in an 18-wheeler. With the help of the Twilight Wish Foundation, she found out. appliances, wheelchair ramps, hearing aids and dentures. The organizations solicit donations from individuals and corporations. The seniors do not have to be sick or dying as is often the case with groups that grant wishes to children. Most of the organizations require the recipients to fill out applications and demonstrate financial need. Jim Young, 85, of Memphis,

Tenn., often talked about returning to Europe to visit the places where he was stationed during World War II, but was never able to get there. “I never had enough money to make a trip like that,” said Young, a retired auto body repairman. “I just didn’t imagine I would ever be able to do anything like that.” Then he met Diane Hight, founder and presi-


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Jim Young, right, stands beside tour guide Henri Mignon at the Battle of the Bulge Memorial in France. Young, 85, of Memphis, Tenn., often talked about returning to Europe to visit the places where he was stationed during World War II, but was never able to. Then he met Diane Hight, founder and president of Forever Young Senior Wish Organization in Collierville, Tenn. Hight routinely takes veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit the World War II Memorial. She also organizes trips to European battlefields. dent of Forever Young Senior Wish Organization, in Collierville, Tenn. Hight routinely takes veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit the World War II Memorial. She also organizes trips to European battlefields. “You and I are free today because of these men,” she said. “I really want to do something for them.” Young, who first arrived in Normandy, France, after D-Day, said going back in October was exciting and emotional. “It brought back a lot of memories - some pleasant and some other types,” he said. He met with officials and residents in small towns in France, Luxembourg and Belgium. “To try and describe my emotions — it is really beyond me to say how much it means to me,” he said. “It was just a trip of a lifetime.” The trips often give veterans a sense of closure, Hight said. “These are trips of healing for people,” she said. Although Hight focuses on veterans, she also grants other types of wishes, and is often surprised by what people request. “Some are just so simple. Some are very complex,” she said. “When you’re dealing with people and their hearts and something they’ve always wanted, you never

know what you’re going to get.” Libby Magness, 84, of Cherry Hill, N.J., always dreamed of riding on a float in a parade. “Anytime there’s a parade, she’s there,” said her daughter Ruth Weisberg, who has fond memories of attending the Miss America Pageant parade in Atlantic City, N.J., and the Philadelphia Mummers Parade with her mother. Weisberg contacted Twilight Wish to see if the group could put her mother in a parade. The foundation arranged for Magness to appear in the Thanksgiving Parade in Philadelphia. “I was thrilled,” said Magness. “It was one of the highlights of my life.” Weisberg, of Philadelphia, loved watching her mother fulfill one of her dreams. “My mom has a definite joie de vivre,” she said. “She has a long list of things she’d like to try. She’s always wanted to ride in a motorcycle side car. She’d like to go for a ride on fire truck.” Foltz hopes her organization can help younger people see their elders in a new light. “Just because you’re 83 doesn’t mean you don’t have dreams and life left to live,” she said. “Our vision is to change how the world views aging one wish at a time.”

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Cover Story

When Granny is the nanny: making shared childcare work Families work to learn how to split up childcare duties with less stress By ELLEN GIBSON

The Associated Press

Rosa Feddersen and her husband bought their dream retirement home on a lake in Oklahoma City five years ago. He, a pilot for U.S. Airways, was nearing the end of his career, and the area had everything the couple wanted. But when they learned their first grandchild was on the way in 2009, their agenda changed. After pleas from their daughter, they moved back to Pennsylvania to help with the baby. Their daughter and son-in-law are both surgeons, and Feddersen sometimes watches her granddaughter, Nora, 70 hours a week. While it’s a lot of work, she says the arrangement seems to be working for everyone. One reason: When it comes to taking care of baby, parents and grandparents try to stay out of each other’s way. “When I’m watching her, they pretty much understand that what I say goes,” Feddersen says. “But when they’re home, I totally back off.” That kind of mutual trust is essential to a successful childcare arrangement with grandparents, says Lawrence Balter, a child psychologist and parenting expert who is also a professor emeritus at New York University. Sharing childrearing duties is almost never simple. The Associated Press “Both generations are going to Rosa Feddersen watches as her 15-month-old granddaughter Nora Thiel plays dress up in her home near Middletown, Pa. have their ideal way of doing things,” he says. “You have to be able to navi- Feddersen and her husband bought their dream retirement home on a lake in Oklahoma City five years ago. But when they gate and find a happy medium.” learned their first grandchild was on the way in 2009, their agenda changed. 14 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com


More and more families are finding themselves in these murky waters. According to the most recent Census data, 30 percent of pre-school children with employed mothers are cared for by a grandparent, while 21 percent attend a daycare center. And the economic woes of the past few years have led parents to seek more help from relatives, says Donna Butts, executive director of Generations United, a non-profit based in Washington D.C. In addition to being a moneysaving option — the average cost of center-based daycare is approaching $12,000 a year — letting grandparents take care of the kids has other benefits, Butts says. Children learn about their family history and are cared for by adults who love them, while parents can have more flexible schedules. As for the grandparents, a 2007 study by Linda Waite, a professor of sociology at the University of Chicago, found that grandmothers who babysit 200 to 500 hours per year exercise more and get depressed less often. But these arrangements can also be tricky because there isn’t the same clearly defined code of conduct that would apply with a professional daycare provider. Balter shares these tips for ensuring that everyone remains healthy and happy. Set clear expectations. Determine how many hours each week the grandparent will care for the child, during what times and at whose house, and do your best to stick to the plan. Also, if there’s compensation involved, decide on the amount in advance. Is the grandparent expected to do any chores during the day? Make sure everyone agrees. Establish routines. Work together to create a rough schedule for the children’s day, including naptimes and meals. This is a good opportunity for mom or dad to fold in more detailed requests – for instance, if there are certain foods they do or do not want the child to eat. Don’t be critical. Remember you’re on the same team. Instead of a parent saying, “My daughter doesn’t go to bed because you’re

The Associated Press

Rosa Feddersen looks at a family calendar with her 15-month-old granddaughter Nora Thiel in Feddersen’s home near Middletown, Pa. Feddersen and her husband bought their dream retirement home on a lake in Oklahoma City five years ago. But when they learned their first grandchild was on the way in 2009, their agenda changed. getting her overexcited after dinner,” try phrasing it without accusation: “Let’s run through the schedule and see what we can do so she’ll be calmer at night.” This advice applies to grandparents, too. If you notice the parents doing something ineffective, instead of correcting them, try offering gentle suggestions, such as, “When you were a kid, we did it this way and it seemed to work.” Don’t obsess over consistency. While it’s important for an individual caregiver to be consistent, it’s fine if mom and grandma don’t have exactly the same rules. Kids learn that different things are expected of them in different contexts. (Even with mom and dad, they’ve already figured out what they can get away with when each parent is in charge.) Learning how

to behave in diverse environments will help them when they start school. Relinquish some control. This goes for both parents and grandparents. As a grandparent, it’s natural to feel defensive when your own offspring second-guess your childrearing skills. Just remember that scientific research is always evolving and today’s parents have access to knowledge you might not have had. That said, for many parents, it’s tempting to micromanage, but don’t expect grandparents to report everything that happens during the day. Trust that as long as kids are loved and kept safe, they will be OK. Schedule regular check-ins. Plan to sit down once every few months to discuss how things are going. In the chaos of drop-off and pick-

up, there won’t be much time to compare notes or share concerns. During these check-in sessions, be honest about what’s working for you and make any necessary adjustments. For Feddersen, when the hours spent babysitting got to be too much, the family decided to send the toddler to a daycare center a couple of days a week. Now grandma has some free time to sleep in and get her nails done, and granddaughter is learning valuable socialization skills. Feddersen has declared that her nanny stint will be up when her daughter’s fellowship ends. But she says she wouldn’t trade the time she’s spent with Nora. “We took a three-year detour to help out, but I really think it’s given her a good start in life,” she says. December 2011 | 15


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Living Arrangements New Health Center Construction On Schedule When the new health center of Sunrise Retirement Community opens in summer, it will feature all private rooms for seniors needing assisted living memory care, assisted living and skilled care. It will also offer Medicare outpatient therapy, a community life center and gardens, and connect to the existing Bernstein and Sunlight Centers. Construction is on schedule for the health center located directly across from The Pointe at Sunrise, the new independent senior community on the Sunrise campus. All resident rooms will have individual heating and cooling controls and private baths with showers for resident independence and privacy, according to Bev Zenor, executive director. Each neighborhood will have a spa room and be wired for the internet. “People want private rooms and more comfort today,” she says. “Our new health center will be a state-of-the-art facility with amenities we don't currently enjoy." 16 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

The Health Center will replace the 50-year-old, red brick building, known to many as the “manor.” The assisted living neighborhood in the new health center represents a new level of care at the 50-year-old senior community. The area will offer 12 apartments to meet a growing need in Siouxland. A pioneer in memory care, Sunrise cares for persons with higher levels of Alzheimer’s at the Bernstein and Sunlight Centers. The two centers feature an open concept of private rooms around a spacious common area, which is suited to the needs of residents with dementia. The residents benefit from memory therapy, music therapy and other special activities. For more information on the new health center at Sunrise or its other services, call 276-3821, ext 3144.

The Sunrise Retirement Community team looks forward to the summer completion of its new health center under construction on campus at 5501 Gordon Drive. From left are Andy Rodman, physical therapy; Aletha Jacobsma, cook; Patty LaVoie, nurse; Rachel Tolles, resident, Bev Zenor, executive director, and Larry Book, board president.

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Choosing housing that will work for you what ever your needs! You are 80 years old and live alone. Your eyes are failing and housekeeping is becoming a more difficult task. The home repairs are getting more expensive every year. You ask yourself how much longer can I manage on my own? Choosing housing or residential care for seniors can be a difficult task. No matter what the needs become we are seeing many forms of help for seniors when it comes to living arrangements. Seniors may need help with cooking, bathing, using the facilities, medical care, transportation or just companionship. Seniors and their caregivers work together to find that just right accommodation. You can find the alternatives are endless: Choosing from Continuing-Care Retirement Communities, Independent Living, Assisted Living Facilities, Nursing Facilities, Long Term Care and more. The Department of Housing and Urban Development as well as the AARP are both good resources

when you first get started considering living alternatives. When choosing what type of living arrangements are right for you or your loved one here are a few tips to consider: • Care for special needs • Custodial Care • Medical Care • Cost • Privacy • Independence • Needs Assessment • Location • Payment Options You will need to consider a needs assessment first for yourself or loved one before deciding on the type of care to consider. This assessment can be a short- term or a long-term process. It can also be re-evaluated as needed by a doctor or someone in the field that will guide you to the exact living arrangement that is ideal for you or your loved one. You can even set up a care planner, which like any other planner, is a tool for making appropriate decisions. December 2011 | 17


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What type of Senior Housing is available? • Apartment style living can consist of many things from changing light bulbs, to fixing things depending on what type of services your agreement consists of. Many of the apartments are now looking at adding small fees to the rent to include incidentals such as light bulb changing etc. Seniors only apartments are age-restricted apartments, usually reserved for 55 or 62 plus residents. The apartments follow HUD Regulations, which allow for such “Age Discrimination”. If restrictions are 55 plus at least one resident must be 55 and must have no more than 20% of all residents under the age of 55. If it is a 62 plus resident community the residents must be all 62 and over. Exceptions are made by HUD regulations for renters who are under the minimum age, if they are handicapped. Many seniors have rented all of their lives others have

sold a home and moved to an apartment. Sometimes financial considerations are what determines a rental community is the next step. Sometimes the maintenance of a home is the factor that the seniors are using to consider alternative living arrangements. It could also be a death or relocation to an area where a family member can lend emotional or physical support. You could also consider becoming a renter because of life changing circumstances. Here are some things to consider when looking for an apartment: Parking convenience, Lighting and security, storage, stairs, Transportation, safety within the apartment, location, services within and nearby, and quality of Management. Many will allow a tour ask to see several apartments to get a good feel for maintenance. You will also want to consider (if you are eligible for rental assistance) asking if they will accept the rent vouchers.

• Independent Living is designed for seniors who are able to live on their own yet prefer The security and convenience offered by community living. Most independent living communities offer daily social and recreational activities. You will find they provide Amenities like meals, housekeeping, laundry and scheduled transportation. Although a community such as this offers services that will allow seniors to remain independent they do not provide assistance with daily living requirements such as bathing or medications. Some independent communities can offer on-site home care services with an outside home health care agency. Some do require a “Buy-in” as a part of their agreement but Medicare or Medicaid does not cover Independent Living. • Assisted Living is a style of living arrangement in which personal care such as meals, housekeeping, transportation, and assistance with

activities of daily living are available as needed to people who still live on their own. In most cases, the “Assisted Living” residents pay a regular monthly payment. You can also expect additional on top of the rental fee for additional services you receive. Many will have free independent facilities close to or integrated housing complexes. Most residences consist of single or semi-private rooms or apartments with private bathrooms. They offer group dining areas and most facilities provide residents access to cooking areas. Rooms or suites usually will be furnished with the resident’s personal belongings. Many services can be provided for the residents of an Assisted Living Community. These styles of facilities usually cater to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other related memory disorders

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even frail residents while promoting their independence. • Nursing Care is a style of living that is best when the resident needs extensive care to continue quality of life. They will provide administering of Medications all house keeping, all meals, Activity Director, Laundry service, medically planned meals & a Skilled Care Nursing staff designed for seniors who need Licensed nursing staff. They also provide licensed practical nursing staff and nurses aids 24 hours. Some can be noted as providing on call physicians and physician services, physical, occupational and speech therapy, medications & personal care items for an additional service charge. Some can even go as far as to provide Acute Care which is generally more intensive that traditional nursing staff can provide, requiring frequent recurrent patient review. Nursing Homes are To learn more about our affordable regulated and licensed housing services, call (712) 548-4108. by State Department of For Telecommunications Relay Service, Public Health and are each certified by the Dial 711. State for Medicare and Medicaid. Most nursing homes charge on a monthly basis depending on the 620 14th Ave NE • LeMars, IA 51031 service provided and All faiths or beliefs are welcome. 11-G1924 each has many payment options including private

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With a little help from a friend, you can stay at home. Whether you are looking for someone to help you or a loved one a few hours a week, or need more comprehensive assistance, Home Instead can help. • Companionship • Light Housekeeping • Shopping and Errands • Incontinence Management • Meal Preparation • Medication Reminders • Bathing Assistance

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December 2011 | 19


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insurances carriers, Medicare, Medicaid, and private funds. Each nursing facility will work with the family or resident to help them determine which financing will be appropriate for the situation. There is also financing assistance available. • Continuing Care Retirement Communities are known as residential campuses that provide a continuum of care. Each of these facilities will provide you with private units to assisted living and to nursing home care which ever is needed. Continuing Care Facilities are a multi option facility if you were living in the independent unit and needed surgery you could go over to the nursing or assisted living side to gain your strength back then return to your independent lifestyle at the appropriate point. Continuing Care provides many different forms of agreements and fees to consider. You could possibly be required to purchase long term care insurance as a requirement for residing in a specific facility. Continuing Care Facilities are strictly regulated by some states and not in other states. Check with The Continuing Care Accreditation Commission, a non-profit organization for accredited Facilities in your area and the services they provide. Many facilities that provide Assistance Care such as Alzheimer’s or Dementia Care are growing as the trend toward facilities that give specialty care as well as housing fitted to each persons unique need also grows. These types of facilities keep their environment controlled so that it can help to diminish confusion and reduce agitation for these residents. The can assist with things like color coded halls, security, and visual clues to guide the residents and reduce their stress.

20 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

Now ask yourself what is important to me? • Location • Cost • Services provided • Can I change services as needed • Privacy • Independence security Now that you have thought it through thoroughly start touring the facilities in the area and have fun learning what they can do for you. Assisted living residences or assisted living facilities (ALFs) provide supervision or assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs); coordination of services by outside health care providers; and monitoring of resident activities to help to ensure their health, safety, and well-being. Assistance may include the administration or supervision of medication, or personal care services provided by a trained staff person. Assisted living as it exists today emerged in the 1990s as an eldercare alternative

on the continuum of care for people, normally seniors, for whom Independent living is no longer appropriate but who do not need the 24-hour medical care provided by a nursing home. Assisted living is a philosophy of care and services promoting independence and dignity. Independent living provides services such as meals, housekeeping, laundry, activities, transportation however does not include any care. A nursing home, convalescent home, Skilled Nursing Unit (SNU), care home or rest home provides a type of care of residents: it is a place of residence for people who require constant nursing care and have significant deficiencies with activities of daily living. Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Eligible adults 18 or older can stay in a skilled nursing facility to receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness.

A Great Place to Live

A Great Place to Work 1800 Indian Hills Dr. 712-239-4582 touchstonelivingcenter.com


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Safeguarding a Home for an Elderly Relative Since the economy began to slip, a notable and often newsworthy trend reported on across the country was the growing number of “boomerang” kids. After a brief period living on their own, boomerang kids return to live with their parents, mimicking an actual boomerang that returns to where it started after a brief period away. While boomerang kids might get the most publicity, another trend has also been steadily growing. According to the Pew Research Center, 20 percent of individuals age 65 and older lived in a multigenerational household in 2008. That marked a 3 percent increase from 1990. While there’s no single reason why more and more elderly residents are moving in with their adult children, the stillstruggling economy has likely played a significant role. Elderly men and women who lost retirement savings as the market tumbled can no longer afford the costly expense of an assisted living facility, causing many of those people to move back in with their children. For adult children welcoming a parent or an in-law into their home, a common priority is to ensure the home is safe for an elderly resident. Some safety measures might be easier to plan than others, but the following guidelines should help adults prepare their homes for the arrival of an elderly housemate. Reduce Risk of Injury in the Bathroom Perhaps no room can be more

difficult or seniors to navigate than the bathroom. Wet tiled floors can greatly increase the risk of falling, so men and women should make sure to have bathroom rugs that are slip-resistant. Slip-resistant rugs typically have a rubber bottom and won’t move even if the floor is wet. Another step to secure the bathroom is to install grab bars on the walls, including in the bathtub and next to the toilet. Also, make sure the towel bars are secure, as seniors might grab onto towel bars if they feel they are about to fall or need to regain their balance. As for the bathtub, be sure to place a non-skid mat or strips on the standing area. This can help secure arguably the riskiest part of a home not just for elderly residents but all inhabitants of a home. According to the National Safety Council, most falls in the home occur in the bathroom. Securing a slippery tub with non-skid mats or strips can greatly reduce the risk of a fall. Keep the Home Illuminated Understandably, many homeowners look to save money around the house, and turning off the lights at night is both common and financially savvy. However, when a home has an elderly resident, it’s best to ensure the home is at least partially illuminated. Nightlights should be used in hallways and along the staircase as well as in the bathroom and the kitchen. Elderly residents likely won’t be familiar with where the light switches are, at least not immediately. So keep the house at

least partially illuminated overnight in case a senior housemate must wake up to use the restroom or get a glass of water in the middle of the night. Clear Out the Clutter A cluttered home is a fire hazard regardless of whom is living inside. However, a cluttered home is also a considerable safety risk for seniors. When preparing a home for an elderly resident, be sure the bedroom is not overcrowded. Make certain there is a clear path in which elderly residents can walk around the bed. Clutter can also collect in the living room. Ideally, elderly residents should have a clear path on which to walk from room to room. Make sure cords from the entertainment system

are bundled and not lying open in the floor. In addition, magazine or newspaper baskets should be moved away from where residents will be walking. Clutter can also collect outside the home, particularly in homes with young children. Explain to kids that their toys need to be put away and kept off of walkways to help Grandma and Grandpa avoid injury. Homeowners who love to work around the house should also clean their work areas thoroughly and put everything away before calling it a day. The above are just a few of the many steps homeowners can take to make their homes safer for elderly guests.

Immediate 1 Bedroom Apartments For Rent

 Fairmount Park & Evergreen Terrace  ng ousi or Hxland! i n e S Siou in

Fairmount Park

• Must be 62 years of age or older • 1BR Apartment and meet income guidelines • Rent based on income • Handicap accessible • Utilities included in rent, laundry facilities, caring Call Today F on-site resident manager or A Showing and more!

Evergreen Terrace

Also Taking Applications For:

Riverside Gardens

TTY#800-735-2943. • Call (712) 279-6900 • Equal Housing Opportunity December 2011 | 21


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Learning to Live On a Fixed Income Difficult financial times have forced many people young and old to alter their lifestyles in order to stay afloat financially. Though unemployment has garnered most of the headlines as the economy has struggled the last several years, it’s not just men and women of working age who have felt the pinch. In a 2010 study from the University of Michigan Law School, researchers found that people age 65 and older are the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population seeking bankruptcy protection. While there’s no single culprit for the rise in bankruptcy filings among seniors, the state of Florida could offer valuable insight as to why the nation’s older citizens are increasingly filing for bankruptcy. Many retirees call Florida home, and in the past such retirees could tap into their home equity whenever they began to struggle financially. However, like most of the country,

Florida’s housing market is depressed, making it less viable for seniors to tap into their home equity to solve their financial problems. In fact, according to a study by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, bankruptcy filings increased by 118 percent in states where the home price index decreased. For many seniors fearful of financial struggles, living on a fixed income can be a helpful way of ensuring their future does not involve filing for bankruptcy. Though living on a fixed income is a definite challenge and certainly offers no guarantee that bankruptcy can be avoided, it does provide a framework seniors can rely on to keep their heads above water during difficult economic times. * Make an honest assessment. Living on a fixed income involves being honest with yourself and

Alearned. story to be told. Wisdom to be Everyone is someone. To learn more about our community in Le Mars, call (712) 546-2125 or visit www.good-sam.com. All faiths and beliefs welcome. 10-G2476

continued to page 23

Companionship makes life a joy! Come live in a community where your neighbors are your friends.

Our spacious live-in facilities include:

Our services include:

• Full kitchens • Spacious bathrooms with walk-in showers • Individually controlled heating & air conditioning • Utilities included

• A full staff of 24-hour medically trained attendants • Housekeeping & linen services • Daily social activities • On site beauty shop

Accepting Private Pay, Assisted Living Insurance, Medicaid/ Elderly Waiver and Section 8 Rental Vouchers

www . primeapartmentrental . com

Prime Assisted Living “Peace of mind for the entire Family”

108 1st Ave. NW, LeMars, IA • 712-548-5488 725 Pearl, Sioux City, IA • 712-226-6300 Call Jean Parrish at 712-541-1938 or email primelivingjp@frontiernet.net Maximum Income guidelines may apply.

22 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

Affordable...Quality...Apartments Throughout Iowa Country Site Homes – Correctionville Cushing Housing Development – Cushing Fair View Apartments – Moville Kirkendall Apartments • Valley Apartments – Sloan 1 & 2 Bedroom Units • Stove & Refrigerator Furnished On-site Laundry Facilities • Rent Is Based On Income In Most Towns

Rental Assistance Available

Murphy Management Service Bill Murphy

208 E. State St. • P.O. Box 476 • Algona, IA 50511 murphyenterprises@netamumail.com Office: 515-295-2927 Fax: 515-295-5946


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Income continued from page 22

admitting what your resources truly are. Write down any sources of income, including Social Security payments, pension payouts, investments, etc. Then write down how much money you have in savings or print out a statement of all savings accounts. Once you have an accurate figure of both income and savings, write down all your monthly expenses, including all expenses, no matter how minute they may seem. From here you can determine just how much you can spend each month. • Prioritize spending habits. Some expenses, including medications and monthly utility bills, will always remain a top priority. However, men and women who must begin living on a fixed income need to prioritize how they spend their discretionary funds. For instance, a membership at the local country club can cost several thousands of dollars per year, whereas the local public golf course only charges players each time they play. While the country club might have a better course, it could be more prudent to choose the public course and save the cost of a private membership instead. • Find it for free. Men and women pay for many services each month that they could very well find for free. For example, in addition to books, many local libraries now allow members to check out CDs and DVDs at no cost. The same also goes for magazines. Instead of paying a monthly subscription cost, visit the local library and read the magazines there for free. If the local library does not have your favorite periodical, the content could very well be available for free online. • Expect the unexpected. One of the worst things that can happen to a person on a fixed income is to encounter an unexpected cost. This can include an unforeseen hospital visit, a costly auto repair or even inflation that wasn’t factored into your initial fixed income budget. Men and women on fixed incomes should expect such emergencies and save accordingly each month. Saving money should never go out of style, and those on fixed incomes should still attempt to save money each month. Coming in under budget and making the most of it can make the difference between capably handling an emergency or being forced to consider unattractive alternatives such as filing for bankruptcy. For more information on living on a fixed income, visit the AARP at www.aarp.org.

December 2011 | 23


Puzzle Page

24 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

PRUOG ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LNAAV LALTEB CEETFD Answer : Yesterday’s

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

-

ACROSS 1 Infatuated 5 Priam’s son 10 Vaccines 14 Sister of Charles 15 U.S. rocket 16 Earnest 17 Play the lead 18 Clever 19 Aper 20 Modern-day emperor 22 Small eggs 24 Competent 25 Lulu 26 Asian attire 29 Ancient Jewish stronghold 32 Worship object 33 Most underhanded 35 Half of MCII 36 Eta follower 38 Nashville sch. 39 Loathes 42 Carry on 43 Rank 44 Fighting art, of Japan 47 Actress Lollobrigida 48 Barcelona bears 49 Flowering tree 52 WWII fighter 56 Sour 57 Meal for Moses 59 Spring flower 60 Pop flavor 61 Qum native 62 Custard ingredient 63 Remnants 64 Flower part 65 Took off DOWN 1 Knife mar 2 Con 3 Growl 4 Certain spray 5 “The Godfather” actor 6 Chalcedony specimens 7 Clinton cabinet member 8 Travel stop 9 Tokyo farewell 10 Japanese warrior 11 Wrongdoing 12 Encrust 13 Citrus products 21 “Star Wars” Solo 23 Suit piece 25 Skip 26 Famous pirate 27 Kills time 28 Dewy

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: BAKED POKED SESAME DECENT Answer: The fight at the laundromat would result in someone getting this — SOCKED

FIND ANSWeRS ON pAge 27

30 Coup ___ 31 Orgs. 33 Moines leader 34 Dance frock 36 Tidal waves 37 “For ___ jolly good . . .” 40 Eastern towers 41 Suffix meaning disease 42 Not as safe 44 Kerns, of “Growing Pains” 45 Shipping mode

46 Half a court game 49 Aromatic spice 50 Computer image 51 Temperate 52 Start for sack 53 Jason’s ship 54 Turns sharply 55 Latin I verb 58 “___ You Lonesome Tonight?”


Local & Government Services Siouxland Directory of Elderly Services

Sioux City Better Business Bureau: 1-800-222-1600 City Hall: 405 Sixth St., 279-6109 Department of Human Services: 822 Douglas St., 255-0833 Elder Abuse Awareness: 1-800-362-2178 Emergency: 911 Fire Department: 279-6314 Police Department: 2796960 (general) Post Office (Main): 214 Jackson St., 277-6411 Siouxland Aging Services: 2301 Pierce St., 279-6900. Information and referral services, case management. Senior Advocacy Program, Chris Kuchta, program director. Social Security Office: 3555 Southern Hills Drive, 255-5525 South Sioux City City Hall: 1615 First Ave., 494-7500 Department of Social Services: Dakota City, Neb., 987-3445 Emergency: 911 Fire Department: 494-7555 Police Department: 701 West 29th St., 494-7555 Post Office: 801 West 29th St., 494-1312

Adult Day Programs

Adult Day Program: Alzheimer’s Association, 420 Chambers St. 279-5802. A safe, nurturing group environment for functionally impaired adults who need supervision. Available Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

625 Court St., 252-3871 Vet Center: 1551 Indian Hills Drive, No. 204, 255-3808 Employment and Volunteer Service RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program): Center for Siouxland, Johnalyn Platt, 252-1861, ext. 21 Senior Community Service Employment Program: 2700 Leech Ave., Cindy Thomas, 274-1610 Experienced Works: Siouxland Workforce Development Center, 2508 Fourth St., assistant; Faye Kinnaman, 233-9030 ext. 1020 Senior Companion Program: 4200 War Eagle Drive, 712577-7848 or 712-577-7858

Financial Assistance

Commission of Veterans Affairs: 702 Courthouse, 2796606 Iowa Department of Human Services: 822 Douglas St., 255-0833 Salvation Army: 510 Bluff St., 255-8836 Social Security Administration: 3555 Southern Hills Drive, 255-5525 South Sioux City Community Center: 2120 Dakota Ave., 494-3259 Center for Siouxland: 715 Douglas St., 252-1861, Tax Counseling Community Action Agency of Siouxland: 2700 Leech Ave., 274-1610, energy assistance

Financial, Insurance and Tax Counseling

Consumer Credit Counseling Service: 705 Douglas St., 252-5666 Siouxland Senior Center: Counseling 217 Pierce St., 255-1729, tax Catholic Charities: 1601 counseling Military Road, 252-4547 SHIIP (Senior Health Heartland Counseling Service: 917 West 21st., South Insurance Information Program): Information Sioux City, 494-3337 available from either Mercy Lutheran Social Service: 4240 Hickory LaNeb.276-1073 Medical Center, St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center, or Mercy Behavioral Care The Center Center: 4301 Sergeant Road, Center for Siouxland: 274-4200 715 Douglas St., 252-1861. Prime Time Connections: Conservatorship service, Mercy Medical Center, 279provides money management 5700. Social support program and protective payee services using volunteers who provide Woodbury County Extension companionship for elderly Service: 4301 Sergeant Road, experiencing depression 276-2157 Siouxland Mental Health:

Food

Iowa Department of Human Services: 822 Douglas St., 255-0833 Meals on Wheels: Siouxland Aging Services, 2301 Pierce St., 279-6900, deliver noon meals, suggested donation $3.72 per meal Salvation Army: 510 Bluff St., 255-8836 Le Mars SHARE: Betty Dutcher, (712) 548-4229 (Distribution Site: Assembly of God, 410 First St. S.W.) Mid-City SHARE: Center for Siouxland, Johna Platt, 252-1861, ext. 21, (Distribution Site: Mary TreglIowa.900 Jennings St.) Sioux City SHARE: Center For Siouxland, Lisa Thomas, 259-7412 (Distribution Site: DAV, 5129 Military Road) South Sioux City SHARE: Sherry Stubbs, 494-6477 (Distribution Site: First Lutheran Church, 3601 Dakota Ave.) Siouxland Senior Center: 217 Pierce St., 255-4240, congregate meal site Siouxland Tri State Food Bank: 215 Douglas St., 2559741 South Sioux City Community Action Center: 2120 Dakota Ave., 494-3259 South Sioux City Senior Center: 1501 West 29th St., 494-1500, congregate meal site St. Luke’s Heat-n-Eat Meals: 2720 Stone Park Blvd., 279-3630, Cindy Hanson Center for Siouxland: Food pantry, 715 Douglas St., 2521861 Community Action Agency of Siouxland: 2700 Leech St., 274-1610

Health Care Information

Alzheimer’s Association: 420 Chambers St., 279-5802. Referral and information about Alzheimer’s disease, support groups and respite care Dakota County Health Nurse: 987-2164 Iowa Department of the Blind: 1-800-362-2587 Lifeline: Personal emergency response system: St. Luke’s, 279-3375, Jenny Herrick; Mercy Medical Center, 279-2036, Karen Johnson Marian Health Center:

women) and handicap persons. Northern Hills Assisted Services based upon need. Living: 4002 Teton Trace, 2399402. Studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments. Hospitals Oakleaf Property Mercy Medical Center: 801 Management: 1309 Nebraska Fifth St., 279-2010 St. Luke’s Regional Medical St., 255-3665, contact leasing department. Martin Center: 2720 Stone Park, Towers, 410 Pierce St.; Shire 279-3500 Apartments, 4236 Hickory Siouxland Surgery Center: LaNeb.Centennial Manor, 441 600 Sioux Point Road, 232W. Third St. This is subsidized 3332 Home Health Care housing, rent is based on Boys and Girls Home and income. Family Services: 2101 Court Housing Prime Assisted Living: 725 St., 293-4700 Sioux City Pearl St., 226-6300. Affordable, Geri-Care: Transit Plaza, Bickford Cottage Assisted 276-9860 Living: 4042 Indian Hills Drive, spacious 1 bedroom assisted living apartments for persons Home Instead Senior Care: 239-2065, Troy Anderson. 220 S. Fairmont, 258-4267, director. 36 apartments, family 65 and older. Income guidelines apply. Accept all non-medical home health owned and operated. We take sources of payment including Hospice of Siouxland: 4300 pets. Title 19 and private pay. Hamilton Blvd., 233-4144, Bickford Cottage Memory River Heights: 2201 nursing care, home health aide/ Care: 4022 Indian Hills Drive, Gibson St., 276-4930. This is homemaker, social services 239-6851, Joy Beaver, director. subsidized housing that is not Mercy Home Care: 801 36 apartments, three levels of handicapped accessible. Fifth St., Suite 320, 233-5100, care depending on need. Siouxland Aging Services 1-800-897-3840, home health Countryside Retirement Inc: 2301 Pierce St., 279-6900. aides/homemaker services, Apartments: Lilac This is subsidized housing, rent therapy services LaNeb.276-3000 based on income. Evergreen REM Health of Iowa Inc.: Floyd House, 403 C Terrace, 2430 West St., 2212 Pierce St., Suite 200, Street, Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, 258-0508; Riverside Gardens, 233-5494, skilled nursing care, 712-943-7025, Affordable, 715 Brunner Ave., 277-2083; home health aides, homemaker multiple levels of care, services, waivers studio, one-bedroom, respite Fairmount Park Apartments, 210 Fairmount St. Siouxland District Public Holy Spirit Retirement Sunrise Retirement Health Nursing: 1014 Apartments: 1701 West 25th Community: 5501 Gordon Nebraska St., 279-6119, St., 252-2726 Drive, 276-3821. 64 one and skilled nursing care in home, Lessenich Place two bedroom ground level home health aide, homemaker Apartments: 301 Fifth St. services Contact Connie Whitney or Pat homes with attached garage, some with den and sunroom. St. Luke’s Home Care: 2905 Trosin at (712) 262-5965 War Eagle Village Hamilton Blvd., 279-3279. Maple Heights: 5300 Stone Apartments: 2800 W. Fourth In-home nursing, therapy, Ave., 276-3821, contact St., 258-0801, subsidized home medical equipment and Jennifer Turner. This is supplies, lifeline program. subsidized low-income housing housing based on income Community Action Agency Tri-State Nursing Services: with rent based on income of Siouxland: 2700 Leech 621 16th St., 277-4442, skilled NorthPark Senior Living Ave., 274-1610. Carnegie Place nursing care, Home Health aide Community: 2562 Pierce St., Apartments, Sixth and Jackson services, services ordered by 255-1200. 48 independent sts. a doctor living apartments, 57 South Sioux City Synergy Home Care: Kim supervised living apartments Autumn Park Apartments: Kreber, 600 Stevens Port Drive, and three respite apartments 320 East 12th St., 494-5393 Suite 102, Dakota Dunes, S.D., Northern Hills Retirement Dacotah House: 316 East (605) 242-6056. Community: 4000 Teton 16th St., 274-9125. Subsidized Trace, 239-9400. Studio, onehousing, you must be over 62 bedroom and two-bedroom Home Maintenance or handicapped apartments. Siouxland Aging Services: 2301 Pierce St., 2796900, CHORE service, yard It’s the easy and maintenance, heavy cleaning effective way to find all (Riley Fields) kinds of local items and services SOS of Siouxland Inc.: - quickly and conveniently. Center for Siouxland, 715 Douglas St., 252-1861. NonIN THE CLASSIFIEDS profit organization which uses SIOUXCITYJOURNAL.COM volunteers to provide repair Place your ad online 24-7. services. Serves veterans, 293-4300 or 800-397-3530 senior citizens (especially

Community Education, 2792989 Siouxland Community Health Center: 1021 Nebraska St., 252-2477 Siouxland District Health: 1014 Nebraska St., 279-6119 or 1-800-587-3005 St. Luke’s Health Professionals: 279-3333

FIND IT.

December 2011 | 25


Calendar Nutrition program

Persons 60 years of age and older and their spouses may participate in the elderly nutrition program in Siouxland. In Sioux City, meals are served Tuesday-Friday at Riverside Lutheran Church, 1817 Riverside Blvd.; on Monday at Riverside Gardens’ Community Room, 715 Bruner Ave., Fairmount Park, 210 S. Fairmount St., and Centennial Manor, 441 W. Third St. A suggested contribution is $2.75 or what each person can afford without causing a financial hardship. Reservations are required a day in advance by calling the Sergeant Bluff site, 943-5356, or the Siouxland Aging Services nutrition office at 279-6900, ext. 15. For more information about other available meal sites, call Siouxland Aging Services at 2796900.

duplicate bridge, 11:30 a.m.; birthday party, Mah Jong, pinochle, woodcarving, 1 p.m.; Super Strong Senior with Kelly, 2:30 p.m. Jan. 10: Penny bingo, advanced Spanish, 8:30 a.m.; senior yoga, 9 a.m.; genealogy, painting class, beg./interm. Spanish, 9:30 a.m.; creative writing, walking off pounds, 10 a.m.; crafts, 10:30 a.m.; tap practice, 12:30 p.m.; painting class, pitch, tap practice, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 11: Senior yoga, 9 a.m.; painting class, 9:30 a.m.; beginner tap practice, 3 mile walk, 10 a.m.; talk show, “Memorial Park, The Right Way,” 10:30 a.m.; bridge,

Our program is specifically designed to help residents return home!

Siouxland Center, 313 Cook St., is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

26 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com

Rehab

After Surgery

Siouxland Center for Active Generations

JANUARY CALENDAR Jan. 2: Closed for the New Year’s holiday Jan. 3: Penny bingo, advanced Spanish, 8:30 a.m.; senior yoga, 9 a.m.; genealogy, painting class, beg./interm. Spanish, 9:30 a.m.; creative writing, walking off pounds, 10 a.m.; tap practice, 12:30 p.m.; painting class, pitch, tap practice, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 4: Senior yoga, 9 a.m.; painting class, beginner tap practice, 3 mile walk, 10 a.m.; talk show, “Slips and falls on the ice,” 10:30 a.m.; bridge, zumba gold, 12:30 p.m.; scrabble, 500, 1 p.m.; 1 mile walk warm up, 2:40 p.m.; fitness with Kelly, 3 p.m.; duplicate bridge club, 6 p.m. Jan. 5: Penny bingo, 8:30 a.m.; beg. 1 line dance, 8:45 a.m.; walking off pounds, 9 a.m.; beg 2 line dance, 9:45 a.m.; senior yoga, Men’s Club, beginning German, 10 a.m.; advanced line dance, advanced German, 11 a.m.; inter. line dance, woodcarving, bridge group, cribbage, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 6: Exercise Plus 50, 8:30 a.m.; fitness with Sandy, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; blood pressures, 10 a.m.; bridge group, noon; bridge & 500, scrabble, dance with Shirley’s Big Band, 1 p.m. Jan. 9: Exercise Plus 50, 8:15 a.m.; tap class, 9 a.m.; guitar practice, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; tap dance workshop, 10 a.m.;

fitness with Sandy, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; blood pressures, 10 a.m.; bridge group, noon; bridge & 500, scrabble, dance with Art & Gwen, 1 p.m. Jan. 16: Exercise Plus 50, 8:15 a.m.; tap class, 9 a.m.; guitar practice, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; tap dance workshop, 10 a.m.; duplicate bridge, 11:30 a.m.; movie “Monster-In-Law,” Mah Jong, pinochle, woodcarving, 1 p.m.; fitness with Kelly, 2 p.m. Jan 17: Penny bingo, advanced Spanish, 8:30 a.m.; senior yoga, 9 a.m.; genealogy, painting class, beg./interm. Spanish, 9:30

Come see how our facility can meet your need for a quality lifestyle.

3501 Dakota Ave. • South Sioux City, NE 402-494-4273 zumba gold, 12:30 p.m.; scrabble, 500, 1 p.m.; 1 mile walk warm up, 2:40 p.m.; fitness with Kelly, 3 p.m.; duplicate bridge club, 6 p.m. Jan. 12: Penny bingo, 8:30 a.m.; beg. 1 line dance, 8:45 a.m.; walking off pounds, 9 a.m.; beg. 2 line dance, 9:45 a.m.; senior yoga, Men’s Club, beginning German, 10 a.m.; advanced line dance, advanced German, 11 a.m.; inter. line dance, woodcarving, bridge group, cribbage, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 13: Exercise Plus 50, 8:30 a.m.;

a.m.; creative writing, walking off pounds, 10 a.m.; tap practice, 12:30 p.m.; painting class, pitch, tap practice, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 18: Senior yoga, 9 a.m.; painting class, 9:30 a.m.; beginner tap practice, 3 mile walk, 10 a.m.; talk show, “Regaining youth and vitality,” 10:30 a.m.; bridge, zumba gold, 12:30 p.m.; scrabble, 500, 1 p.m.; 1 mile walk warm up, 2:40 p.m.; fitness with Kelly, 3 p.m.; duplicate bridge club, 6 p.m. Jan. 19: Penny bingo, 8:30 a.m.; beg. 1

line dance, 8:45 a.m.; walking off pounds, 9 a.m.; beg. 2 line dance, 9:45 a.m.; senior yoga, Men’s Club, beginning German, 10 a.m.; advanced line dance, advanced German, 11 a.m.; inter. line dance, woodcarving, bridge group, cribbage, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 20: Exercise Plus 50, 8:30 a.m.; fitness with Sandy, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; blood pressures, 10 a.m.; bridge group, noon; bridge & 500, scrabble, card design class, dance with Burt Heithold Band, 1 p.m. Jan. 23: Exercise Plus 50, 8:15 a.m.; tap class, 9 a.m.; guitar practice, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; tap dance workshop, 10 a.m.; duplicate bridge, 11:30 a.m.; movie “March of the Penguins,” Mah Jong, pinochle, woodcarving, Parkinson’s support meeting, 1 p.m.; Super Strong Seniors, 2:30 p.m. Jan. 24: Penny bingo, advanced Spanish, 8:30 a.m.; senior yoga, 9 a.m.; genealogy, painting class, beg./interm. Spanish, 9:30 a.m.; creative writing, walking off pounds, 10 a.m.; crafts, 10:30 p.m.; tap practice, 12:30 p.m.; painting class, pitch, tap practice, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan. 25: Senior yoga, 9 a.m.; painting class, 9:30 a.m.; beginner tap practice, 3 mile walk, 10 a.m.; talk show “Popcorn presentation,” 10:30 a.m.; bridge, zumba gold, 12:30 p.m.; scrabble, 500, 1 p.m.; 1 mile walk warm up, 2:40 p.m.; fitness, 3 p.m.; duplicate bridge club, 6 p.m. Jan. 26: Penny bingo, 8:30 a.m.; beg. 1 line dance, 8:45 a.m.; walking off pounds, 9 a.m.; beg. 2 line dance, 9:45 a.m.; senior yoga, Men’s Club, beginning German, 10 a.m.; advanced line dance, advanced German, 11 a.m.; inter. line dance, woodcarving, bridge group, cribbage, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m. Jan 27: Exercise Plus 50, 8:30 a.m.; fitness with Sandy, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; blood pressures, 10 a.m.; bridge group, noon; bridge & 500, scrabble, dance with Terry and the Remnants, 1 p.m. Jan. 30: Exercise Plus 50, 8:15 a.m.; tap class, 9 a.m.; guitar practice, Wii practice, 9:30 a.m.; tap dance workshop, 10 a.m.; duplicate bridge, 11:30 a.m.; movie “Shall We Dance,” Mah Jong, pinochle, woodcarving, 1 p.m.; fitness with Kelly, 2 p.m. Jan. 31: Penny bingo, advanced Spanish, 8:30 a.m.; senior yoga, 9 a.m.; genealogy, painting class, beg./interm. Spanish, 9:30 a.m.; creative writing, walking off pounds, 10 a.m.; tap practice, 12:30 p.m.; painting class, pitch, tap practice, 1 p.m.; ping pong, 2 p.m.


PUZZLE ANSWERS

Arts & Theatre

JAN. 1 through JAN. 29 ‘Into the Light’ art installation, through Jan. 29, Sioux City Art Center, 225 Nebraska St. 712-279-6272. ‘The Fine Print: Works from the Collection of Morningside College’, through Feb. 12, Sioux City Art Center, 225 Nebraska St. 712-279-6272. ‘Prints by Amy Foltz’, through Feb. 12, Sioux City Art Center, 225 Nebraska St. 712-279-6272. The New Mel Brooks Musical: Young Frankenstein, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 17, Orpheum Theatre, 528 Pierce St. 712-279-4850. Artists Choose Artists exhibit, Jan. 21-April 22, Sioux City Art Center, 225 Nebraska St. 712-279-6272.

Community

Live Nativity and light show at Village Northwest, 5:30-9:15 p.m. through Jan. 1, Village Northwest Unlimited campus, 330 Village Circle, Sheldon, Iowa. 712-3245405.

GROUP NAVAL BALLET DEFECT

Music

TobyMac, Orpheum Theatre, 7 p.m. Jan. 21, 528 Pierce St. Christian recording artist and Grammy-award winner TobyMac. (712) 279-4850 or 800-745-3000 and ticketmaster.com.

The flag store looked a lot like this “POLE-LAND”

JAN. 28 Public Forum with Local Iowa State Legislators, 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Sioux City Public Museum, 607 Fourth St. A public forum with our local Siouxland Iowa State. 274-1948

‘100 Day Wellness Challenge,’ part of Iowa’s Healthiest State Initiative. 279-3481, www. stlukes.org Siouxland Artists, Inc. meeting, 5 p.m. Jan. 12, The Gallery, 4th and Jackson St. Held the second Thursday of every month. Open to all who enjoy art.

Sports & Rec

JAN. 13 - Jan. 14 Monster Truck Nationals, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 13-14, Tyson Events Center, Sioux Meetings City. (712) 279-4850 or 800-745-3000 and Live Healthy Siouxland ‘100 Day ticketmaster.com Wellness Challenge’ Kick Off Event, JAN. 27 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Jan. 12, St. Luke’s Family Spirit on Ice, 4:30-6:30 p.m., IBP Regional Medical Center, 2720 Stone Ice Center, 3806 Stadium Drive, Free, 279Park Blvd. Join a team and be part of the 3481, www.stlukes.org excitement as Live Healthy Iowa kicks off its

Book Review

Nesbo’s ‘Leopard’ gripping, full of twists Jo Nesbo’s ‘The Leopard’ a spot-on, chilling thriller – another homage to Scandinavian talent By NAHAL TOOSI

The Associated Press

After finishing Jo Nesbo’s latest crime novel, “The Leopard,” I rushed to look up whether one of the deadly devices described in it, the Leopold’s Apple, is real. First, I was relieved to learn that it isn’t real. Then, I was worried that someone might actually decide to create one. And finally, I wondered what type of guy Nesbo has to be to conjure up something so psychotic. Whatever Nesbo is (his bio describes him as a musician, songwriter, economist and author who lives in Oslo, Norway), he can spin a good tale. “The Leopard” is The Associated Press meaty, gripping, full of tantalizIn this book cover image released by ing twists — and another reminder Alfred A. Knopf, “The Leopard,” by Jo of why Scandinavian thrillers Besbo, is shown. deserve the long-overdue interna-

murders of two women who seem to have little in common other than how they were killed. Then, more victims pile up, killed in different ways, and it is up to Hole to discern a pattern, if there is one, and BOOK REVIEW find the culprit. “The Leopard” (Alfred A. Knopf), by Jo That’s the generic way of Nesbo describing it, but without giving too much away, I can say that the tional attention they are getting. (Here I shall make the obligatory book also involves the Congo, a reference to the late Stieg Larsson deeply troubled father-son relaand his “The Girl With the Dragon tionship, unrequited love, avaTattoo” series. The books’ heroine, lanches, sex and Norway police bureaucratic turf wars. Lisbeth Salander, seriously made I’d already read “The Snowman,” me want to increase the number of one of Nesbo’s previous novels piercings on my body.) featuring Hole, so I was prepared Nesbo also relies on a flawed for many of the references in hero in several of his books, including “The Leopard.” His name “The Leopard” that may puzzle newcomers to Nesbo’s work. But is Harry Hole, a drunken, often having read the previous books drugged-up Oslo detective with a is no requirement for picking up talent for sniffing out serial kill“The Leopard” — it can stand on ers. its own. In “The Leopard,” Hole is It also may make you never want dragged back to Norway from to eat an apple again. self-exile in Hong Kong after the December 2011 | 27


28 | Prime | www.siouxlandprime.com


Bass Adv/Mercy Medical/Prime 20648394 3.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_24 Bass Adv/WinnaVegas/Prime 20648395 4.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_08 Dial Senior Mgt. 20648392 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_28 Dr. Douglas A. Wheelock, D.D.S. 20648618 3.0 234.0pt 401.3316pt 525.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_13 Greenville Pharmacy 20648401 3.0 234.0pt 401.3316pt 40.50783pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_13 Iowa Nebraska State Bank 20648396 2.0 172.8pt 41.328pt 586.20239pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_12 JAM/ADVICE THEATRICALS 20647427 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_02 Jones Eye Clinic/local 20648399 3.0 354.60001pt 401.3316pt 404.40239pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_11 Regency Square Care Center 20648404 3.0 354.60001pt 161.32921pt 241.90611pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_26 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20648625 2.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_10 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20648670 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_05 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650362 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_17 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650364 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_18 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650365 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_19 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650368 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_20 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650369 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_21 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650370 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_22 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650371 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_23 SCJ House Account (Info Pub) 20650372 6.0 720.0pt 41.328pt 39.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_16 Senior Companion Program 20648397 3.0 234.0pt 401.3316pt 283.0024pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_13 Siouxland Hearing Healthcare P. 20648914 3.0 354.60001pt 41.328pt 404.40239pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_11 Siouxland Historical Railroad A 20650356 3.0 354.60001pt 401.3316pt 404.40239pt Dec 24 2011 12:00AM P_07 Allied Tours 20650952 3.0 354.96002pt 401.3316pt 404.04239pt P_03

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Siouxland Prime January 2011  

Your guide to living active, rewarding lives

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